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Winter 2016 | CHOREF 5777

WHOSE LIFE WILL YOU CHANGE? OVERSEAS UPDATE HARRY KAY LEADERSHIP INSTITUTE LEGACY GIVING AT ANY AGE


WHAT'S JEWCY?

HARRY KAY LEADERSHIP INSTITUTE

Quick news and to-dos

The dynamic leadership program returns

THE 2017 COMMUNITY CAMPAIGN

LEGACY GIVING

Whose life will you change?

No matter your age or stage

WHERE WILL A FEDERATION MISSION TAKE YOU?

FORMER SOVIET UNION: STAY OR GO? Overseas update

There's a trip for everyone MOISHE HOUSE

COMMUNITY CALENDAR

A Jewish space in Uptown

Places to go; people to see!

THANK YOU TO OUR CORPORATE PARTNERS PLATINUM CORPORATE PARTNER

GOLD CORPORATE PARTNERS LURIE US BANK WELLS FARGO

SILVER CORPORATE PARTNER BREMER BANK

BRONZE CORPORATE PARTNERS AFFIANCE FINANCIAL BMO HARRIS BANK J.P. MORGAN

OUR GLOBAL NETWORK OF PARTNERS American Jewish Joint Distribution Committee

National Federation/Agency Alliance

Amos and Celia Heilicher Minneapolis Jewish Day School

Minnesota Hillel

Bais Yaakov High School Bet Shalom Congregational School Israel Center of the Minneapolis Jewish Federation The Jewish Agency for Israel Jewish Community Relations Council of Minnesota and the Dakotas Jewish Family and Children’s Service of Minneapolis Jewish Historical Society of the Upper Midwest

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Nechama: Jewish Response to Disaster* Rimon: The Minnesota Jewish Arts Council Sabes Jewish Community Center Sha’arim Shir Tikvah Congregation School Sholom Talmud Torah of Minneapolis Temple Israel Congregational School Torah Academy of Minneapolis

Twin Cities Jewish Community Government Affairs Program *Non-funded provisional partner agency OUR MISSION We build community, care for the welfare of Jews everywhere, and maximize participation in Jewish life. Minneapolis Jewish Life is a publication of the Minneapolis Jewish Federation 13100 Wayzata Blvd., Suite 200 Minnetonka, MN 55305 952.593.2600 | jewishminneapolis.org


Passionate Leadership

David Orbuch on inspiration, modern day miracles, and leadership at Federation, which he sees as both a philanthropic beacon and a community table.

B

oth influence and inspiration led David Orbuch to his role as Minneapolis Jewish Federation Board president.

and the Dakotas. David also became involved in his synagogue, eventually becoming president of Adath Jeshurun Congregation.

His parents instilled in him the value of giving back to the community. His wife Jill—who he met while volunteering at a homeless shelter on Christmas—and his three daughters inspire him to continue working for a better Jewish future.

“I realized through my volunteer experiences the importance of a dynamic Federation for our community,” David says. “Federation not only serves as a philanthropic beacon, but as a community table to support other agencies and drive an overall strategic view of our community. I can’t tell you how many times I have seen Federation help other agencies with issues. A strong Federation lifts all boats.”

And a young camper he met while on a Federation mission makes the time and effort he spends on Federation worthwhile. David met Tanya at a Minneapolis Federation-supported Jewish summer camp in St. Petersburg, Russia, where they made a book together about the influential people in their lives. “We had a beautiful conversation,” says David. “I learned there is no reason in the world why Tanya should be at Jewish summer camp—her parents and grandparents didn’t practice Judaism and nobody gave her the richness and beauty of our traditions.” But somehow she found the camp, and instead of the many other opportunities available to teenage girls, she chose to attend. “We talk about modern day miracles, the fact that Tanya is Jewish is a miracle. She chose to find the beauty that Judaism has to offer. We need to bottle that, understand it, and then pour that drink for lots of other people.” A STRONG FEDERATION LIFTS ALL BOATS David’s volunteer journey in the Minneapolis Jewish community began with the Jewish Community Relations Council of Minnesota

Meet David

A strong Federation starts with a cohesive community, and David has made it a priority to bring the Jewish community closer together during his term. That’s no empty promise—in his first four months, David has taken steps to change the way Federation works with its partner agencies, and made great strides in how the St. Paul and Minneapolis Jewish communities work together.

DAY JOB Executive Vice President, Optum FAMILY Wife Jill, daughters Sarah, Elana, and Rachel

David knows he can’t please everyone in his role. “Be angry with me if you must,” he says. “Be unhappy with the board. But don’t show your irritation through your gift. Don't be angry with the Jews locally and internationally that need our support and rely on us.” Bearing the brunt of constructive criticism comes with the role of leading any organization—and David is up for the challenge. “I’m passionate about supporting and strengthening the community I live in,” he says, “and I intend to do that.”

MINNEAPOLIS JEWISH LIFE

COMMUNITY INVOLVEMENT Board of Directors of Hennepin County Medical Center, Hennepin Theatre Trust, and of course, Minneapolis Jewish Federation I am passionate about building a community for my children and future generations that is as strong and vibrant as the one we have today. I am a product of this amazing community!"

WINTER 2016 / CHOREF 5777


Chanukah at American Swedish Institute This holiday season, American Swedish Institute (ASI) in Minneapolis has transformed its historic Turnblad Mansion into a light-filled winter wonderland for Nordic Holidays: Celebrations of Light—complete with a room dedicated to Chanukah. The room features work from Kris Prince, a local Swedish and Jewish artist. Kris created several pieces for the room, including wooden dreidels with Swedish designs and a wooden dala (Swedish horse) menorah. ASI reached out to the Jewish Community Relations Council of Minnesota and the Dakotas (JCRC) to decorate the room, the latest in a tradition of collaboration between the two organizations. Laura Zelle, Director of JCRC's Tolerance Minnesota and Holocaust Education, says she hopes the Chanukah room at ASI inspires an appreciation for a different religious celebration—even among the youngest visitors. An entire house in the children's play area is devoted to Chanukah, filled with menorahs, dreidels, gelt, latkes, and Chanukah books. ASI and JCRC have collaborated on events for many years, including teacher workshops about the Holocaust. “We have a long standing and respectful relationship dating back many years,” says Laura Zelle, “ASI is a community leader in promoting tolerance to its neighbors.” Safe Spaces for LGBTQ Community Members Our Jewish community often discusses inclusion as it relates to community members with special needs, but a

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different type of inclusion is factored in less frequently: LGBTQ inclusion. Thankfully, our partner Jewish Family and Children's Service has resources to help community organizations be more inclusive to people of all gender identities and sexual orientations. This summer, Federation welcomed Emily Saltzman, JFCS Community Services Director, to train staff on best practices. A few of our top takeaways: •

Pronouns matter. Starting meetings and gatherings with a pronoun check might seem unnecessary, but for those for whom it matters, it will make all the difference.

You may think you have a safe space, but look closer. Providing a unisex bathroom can make transgender community members feel much more at home.

Are you showing LGBTQ community members they are welcome in your community? Check your stock photos; make sure they see themselves represented in your materials.

Are you interested in a training for your organization? Contact Emily Saltzman at Jewish Family and Children's Services | 952-542-4809| esaltzman@jfcsmpls.org Honoring Shimon Peres with Governor Dayton Following the death of former Israeli president Shimon Peres, several members of the Jewish community including Federation's Myra Giesener met with Governor Mark Dayton at his residence as the American and Minnesota flags were lowered to half-staff at the Governor's order. After honoring Peres, the group discussed Israel and the Weizmann Institute in Rehovot (Minneapolis's sister city through Partnership2Gether).


"It was a unique moment in history to commemorate," Steve Hunegs of JCRC told Governor Dayton, "The passing of the last of Israel's founding fathers/mothers during your governorship while you have been such a wonderful friend of the Jewish community and Israel." Working together for community security Jewish community security is always on our minds. For several years the Minneapolis and St. Paul Jewish Federations have been collaborating with the JCRC to facilitate a bi-city, community-wide security assessment at a discounted rate to ensure no community partner who wanted an assessment was left out. Now, in phase II, Federation and JCRC are looking to fund critical identified improvements, and have found a champion in the Women's Endowment Fund (WEF)—a fund of Federation's Jewish Community Foundation. In November, WEF committed to a multi-year gift—$40,000 per year for three years— to help fund this effort which will be facilitated by JCRC. CEO Search Committee Update The Federation CEO Search Committee continues to source local and national candidates to find the right person to challenge, enlighten, and vision with Federation. The committee is using a multi-tiered approach to vet potential candidates and o ensure they possess the qualities needed to be successful in our community. At the same time, a group of ten community members from St. Paul and Minneapolis is working with a consultant to determine the viability of one CEO for the two Federations. For more in depth information, please visit jewishminneapolis.org/ceo-search.

MINNEAPOLIS JEWISH LIFE

"Today I learned that I don't have to be afraid to wear my hijab." —Overheard at the November 19th gathering of Muslim and Jewish Women of Minnesota, a new program of National Council of Jewish Women Minnesota and Rabata After discussion, bonding, connection, and a meal at Breaking Bread Cafe, participants shared what they learned—and then snapped a "groupie." Learn more about this program on Facebook: NCJW Minnesota

WINTER 2016 / CHOREF 5777


2017

WHOSE WHOSE WHOSE WHOSE

HAND WILL YOU HOLD? JOURNEY WILL YOU INSPIRE? VOICE WILL YOU EMPOWER? FAMILY WILL YOU SAVE?

COMMUNITY C A M PA I G N WHOSE LIFE WILL YOU CHANGE?

RHONDA STEIN & STUART GOLDENBERG What is your goal for the 2017 Campaign? Our goal is to have each donor feel good about their gift to the community and to increase our community's giving by 15%.

COMMUNITY C A M PA I G N

CHAIRS

What inspires you to do this work? We were both inspired by our parents who were active in volunteering for the Jewish community. Growing up we had a caring community, a vibrant JCC, USY, and Jewish education. I had grandparents at Roitenberg senior living and we both had life changing experiences at Jewish camps or in Israel. Perhaps most importantly we felt safe being Jewish. We feel as though the community has taken care of us and now it is our turn to take care of the community. What does Jewish community mean to you?​ Belonging, safety, and security. We all take care of each other.

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We believe no child should go to bed hungry. That every senior has the right to live with dignity. And that all Jews should be able to live— anywhere in the world—without fear of persecution. No one should be forgotten and no one left behind. We believe in singing Hebrew songs at the top of our lungs at Jewish summer camp and dressing up like Queen Esther for Purim. In knowing the words for Friday night services…and in adding our own. In eating too many matzah balls on Passover and covering ourselves with mud before jumping in the Dead Sea. We believe in building bridges between people and ideas. That there is more to life than hashtags and headlines. That together our impact is greater than what any of us can do alone. We believe in creating the kind of community our grandparents would be proud of and our grandchildren will thank us for. And we believe we can’t rest because there’s more work to be done.

TOTAL FINANCIAL RESOURCE DEVELOPMENT

Todd Leonard | Chair

COMMUNITY CAMPAIGN

COMMUNITY C A M PA I G N VO L U N T E E R S

Rhonda Stein & Stuart Goldenberg | Chairs Mark Ratner| Vice Chair, Major Gifts Lisa Ratner | Vice Chair, Women's Philanthropy President Jason Grais | Vice Chair, Cornerstone, Business & Professional Steve Lear | Vice Chair, Jewish Community Foundation Bobby Swiller | Vice Chair, Philanthropic Leadership Howard Zack | Vice Chair, Supplemental Opportunities OTHER CAMPAIGNS

Debbie Goldenberg | Chair, Women's Philanthropy Campaign Jed Stillman, Yoni Binus | Chairs, Agency/Synagogue Campaign Scott Teplinsky | Chair, Cardozo Society Campaign Joel Greenwald | Chair, Maimonides Society Campaign

MINNEAPOLIS JEWISH LIFE

WINTER 2016 / CHOREF 5777


Volunteer. LGBTQ. No matter how you identify, there’s a Federation mission for you. On a mission, you’ll see firsthand how your gift impacts the global Jewish community—and come back with great stories and lifelong friendships.

The Campaigners’ mission gave me a better understanding of how Federation dollars touch the lives of Jews outside of our community. It’s fairly easy to see how Federation assists our community, but going on a mission clarified why it’s so important for a portion of our funds to be allocated elsewhere, specifically to Israel." Andrew Wieberdink

Where will a Federation mission take you?

Jewish Federations of North America's Campaigners Mission

Learn more at jewishminneapolis.org/missions

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The LGBTQ mission was incredible. We met with government officials, Israeli business leaders, and civic organizers, who shared what they're working toward with regards to LGBTQ rights.

We also visited a school for Ethiopian youth in Afula, where my father was born. My father left Afula, moved to the United States, and upon retiring from business has pretty much devoted his life to Jewish communal service. I definitely thought, while sitting in that room, maybe there’s another child from Afula who will go on to help build the Jewish community." Joshua Mann Jewish Federations of North America's LGBTQ Mission to Israel


Mom. Young adult. Artist.

I had the realization on my trip that I wanted to get more involved. It seemed pretty simple: it's about having gratitude for what you have, recognizing there's more work to be done, and deciding to take responsibility for it. Sarah Key Jewish Women’s Renaissance Project with AISH

One day we visited a local program called HaGal Sheli (my wave). It's a leadership program that engages troubled teens through surfing. These are teens who are not initially admitted into the Israeli Defense Forces, but the program helps with life skills (confidence, perseverance) and school work—and many end up being admitted into IDF. I met an instructor who said the program saved his life— without this program, he felt his life could have gone in a very different direction."

I have lived in and traveled the length and breadth of Israel. But the Minneapolis Jewish Artist Lab tour was my first time experiencing Israel through the lens of the arts. What an amazing experience! At the close of our trip, we traveled to Minneapolis' partner city, Rehovot. After spending the night with our host families, we sat together creating art and talking with each other. Our shared interests and warm feelings helped overcome any language barriers." Rabbi Alexander Davis Minneapolis Jewish Artists’ Lab Trip

Max Orenstein National Young Leadership Mission at a visit to local partner HaGal Sheli MINNEAPOLIS JEWISH LIFE

WINTER 2016 / CHOREF 5777


MOISHE HOUSE: A JEWISH SPACE IN UPTOWN Uptown Minneapolis: known for great restaurants, its proximity to lakes, independent coffee shops, late night shenanigans. And—since Moishe House moved in—legendary Shabbat dinners.

The Moishe House concept is simple: three twentysomethings rooming together, hosting Jewish events.

for Shabbat dinners, volunteer opportunities, holiday celebrations, and educational programming.

“It’s important to have avenues for people to connect to Judaism in their own way,” said Samantha Hamlin, one of three women living at Moishe House Twin Cities. “Some people may connect in services. Others, like me, might connect through volunteering. We have four pillars of programming for our events: social, volunteering, Jewish Learning, and Shabbat and holidays.”

Samantha, Jacqueline, and Lauren plan all the programming themselves based on their personal interests and feedback from the community they’ve created. At one of their first events, Help Us Plant Our Roots, guests helped plant Moishe House’s backyard garden followed by snacks and a discussion about how Judaism relates to farming and food.

Moishe House’s model is resonating with young adults in a big way—and not just in Minneapolis. Founded in 2006, Moishe House launched when four Jewish 20-somethings began hosting Shabbat dinners in Oakland, California for their friends. Fueled by enormous demand for Jewish programming by and for young adults, Moishe House has become the global leader of Jewish life among that crowd. Today, there are 94 Moishe Houses in 21 countries, from Minneapolis to Moscow to Melbourne. When the opportunity arose to bring Moishe House to the Twin Cities, the Minneapolis Jewish Federation evaluated the need and found that young adults craved this type of programming—and the community was ready to embrace it. With funds set aside for community initiatives, including young adult programming, Federation helped make the Twin Cities Moishe House a reality. In August 2016, Samantha, Jacqueline Soria, and Lauren Dahar moved in, and in just three months have welcomed 475 young adults (204 unique participants)

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“This is a topic I care about a lot,” said Jacqueline, “I was excited to share it, but nervous people would be turned off by the idea of Jewish learning. But the response was just the opposite.” Jacqueline was blown away by how guests embraced the event.. “It was so special to bond with people over a passion of mine and find they cared about it, too.” Since that August evening of gardening and discussion, Moishe House has hosted happy hours, packed food for Second Harvest Heartland, volunteered at PRISM food shelf, served up a delicious break fast after Yom Kippur, carved pumpkins in the sukkah, and of course, hosted Shabbat dinners much like the ones that propelled Moishe House to success back in 2006. Moishe House Twin Cities also introduced the Tour de Rabbi series, an opportunity to schmooze, eat, and learn from rabbis across the Twin Cities about everything from the Jewish perspective on Halloween to unpacking the results of the 2016 election.


My favorite MoHo moment “I’ve loved getting to know so many different rabbis,” said Lauren. “Each one has a different flavor, and it’s so fun experiencing all of their styles.” “The rabbis are leading some really cool innovative initiatives,” agreed Samantha. If they haven’t met a rabbi yet, say the women, they are eager to do so! What’s next for Moishe House? The ladies have some ideas up their sleeve, including outside-the-box Passover programming and opportunities for community members to take on leadership roles. But above all, the women hope to continue creating a space to connect Jewish young adults. “There’s a gap between graduating college and starting a family where Jewish life can be missing and young adults struggle to find community,” says Lauren. “This is why Moishe House is so important.”

At a friend’s for Shabbat, we went around and shared how we knew the host. 80% of the table knew him through Moishe House. This was my favorite moment, knowing that we helped build a true community.” —Samantha “Squeezing 65 people in our house for Global Shabbat—after just one month of being open!” —Lauren We spend most of our time gathering around our kitchen island whether we are planning, cooking, hosting, or just hanging out. We love our kitchen and it’s the heart of our house. —Jacqueline

HARRY KAY LEADERSHIP INSTITUTE The dynamic leadership program returns

T

he flagship program for developing and training Jewish leaders in the Twin Cities is back. Last month, Cohort 9 of the Harry Kay Leadership Institute (HKLI) met for the first time, marking the beginning of a two-year leadership journey. Along the way, these forty emerging leaders will become experts in our community, philanthropy, and Jewish values. “Cohort 9 is a very impressive group,” said Lauren Kaplan, Director of the Harry Kay Center for Leadership Excellence. “They represent St. Paul, Minneapolis, eleven different synagogues, and many, many different nonprofits—Jewish and non-Jewish.” Having graduated just under 300 leaders in its more than 25 year history, HKLI has truly changed the face of leadership in the Twin Cities Jewish community by inspiring and assisting emerging leaders in addressing the issues and challenges facing us as a Jewish community and as individual Jews. In November 2017, between the first and second year of the program, Cohort 9 will travel on a mission to Budapest and Israel. The Harry Kay Leadership Institute is a joint program of the Minneapolis Jewish Federation and the Jewish Federation of Greater St. Paul, in partnership with the Harry Kay Foundation.

MINNEAPOLIS JEWISH LIFE

Kol hakavod to Cohort 9 of the Harry Kay Leadership Institute: Erin Baldinger  Cassie Benowitz  Adrienne Berman  Efrem Berman Lauren Brand  Jason Divine  Adam Fink  Alan Garelick  Kim Gelperin  Aaron Gelperin  Joey Greenberg  Shep Harris  Lindsay Holden  Hope Kalin  Jeremy Kalin  Grant Kamin  Jennifer Kaplan  Arielle Kaufman  David Krco  Ryan Lohr  Bruce Manning  David Milavetz  Nicki Murphy  Joel Paper  Alina Portnoy  Joel Ribnick  Tamar Ribnick  Uri Rosenwald  Robyn Schein  Ben Schein  Abby Schneider  Shira Shapiro  Rhona Shwaid  Sandy Sondell  Jason Sondell  Zoe Stern  John Vegas  Melissa Wolchansky  Debbie Wolfe  Leo Zabezhinsky    

WINTER 2016 / CHOREF 5777


LEGACY GIVING (No matter your age or life stage)

What if it was simple for community members to leave a legacy gift to the community? What if every organization had the tools to ask for these gifts? We believe it would lead to a better future for our Jewish community— for our children, grandchildren, and beyond—and we’re making it happen through It’s Your Legacy. In partnership with the Jewish Federation of Greater St. Paul and the Harold Grinspoon Foundation’s Life & Legacy Program, It’s Your Legacy is a community-wide, collaborative effort to infuse legacy into the language and culture of our community and secure resources for generations to come. Twenty-five organizations across Minneapolis and St. Paul have signed on with It’s Your Legacy, attending trainings and receiving one-on-one support from national legacy resources. The collective goal of the program in its first year was to receive 270 letters of intent to leave a legacy. At four months in, 25% of that goal has been reached, and here’s what we’ve learned: legacy giving is for everyone—regardless of age and stage of life. Take a look at three examples of legacy giving in our community on the facing page.

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EVAN STERN // AGE: 30s Why is it important to you to leave a legacy gift? I cannot overstate the importance of endowment funding to the financial health of our Jewish community. After I’m gone, my gift will be put into my chosen organizations’ endowments. Annually, it will provide a small sum of money – but they will be able to rely on that small sum every single year like a Ner Tamid. That’s pretty powerful. What do the organizations you chose represent? Temple Israel is my family. Minnesota Hillel was my home in college, and it propelled me into a career in the Jewish community. As the new Development Director at Adath, I have been welcomed in the most warm and heartfelt ways. It’s my “Conservative home away from home.” Going to work every day is a joy and blessing, so I want to support Adath long after I’m gone. The Minneapolis Jewish Federation is the piece that ties it all together. A gift to Federation benefits the entire Jewish community.

HOLLY & JON BROD FARBER // AGE: 40s Why is it important to you to leave a legacy gift? Leaving legacy gifts to the agencies we love is one way of expressing our gratitude and optimism for the future of our Jewish community and the Jewish people (or Kol Yisrael). When our estate passes to the next generation we want that moment to be an expression of who we are and what we love and believe in. Did you find the It's Your Legacy process simple? It's Your Legacy is brilliantly designed to be inclusive of multiple agencies. It is very easy to sign a letter of intent and then file that with our will. The program provides us a chance to express our love, support, and gratitude for the many agencies that play a critical role in our lives. We may not have personally used each agency, but we know that each agency plays a critical role in our larger circle, and that our support is important to these agencies.

HOWARD AND MARLEE KAMINSKY // AGE: 50s Why is it important to you to leave a legacy gift? ✡✡ I care about the community. ✡✡ I want to direct my legacy gift to a program I am passionate about. ✡✡ I want to set an example for my kids. ✡✡ It makes me feel good. Why It’s Your Legacy? It is simple to complete, it makes one feel good, and it is so important for the vitality of our community. If not me, then who will take care of the next generation?

MINNEAPOLIS JEWISH LIFE

WINTER 2016 / CHOREF 5777


FORMER SOVIET UNION: SHOULD I STAY OR SHOULD I GO? 8,000 young Jews across the former Soviet Union attend Federation-supported Jewish Agency for Israel Jewish summer camps, where they discover their Jewish heritage, make lifelong friendships, and develop leadership skills. As campers grow up and embrace their Judaism, they face a choice: stay in the former Soviet Union, or make aliyah? If you ask Jewish Agency for Israel's Roman Polonsky, Director of RussianSpeaking Jewry, there’s no wrong answer. When former campers stay in the communities in which they were raised, says Roman, they often give back as communal leaders, teaching a new generation what it means to be Jewish.

53%

UNDER AGE 35

13-16 YEARS OF EDUCATION

69%

OLIM FROM THE FORMER SOVIET UNION

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And when former campers make aliyah, they contribute greatly to Israeli society. 53% of people making aliyah from the former Soviet Union are under age 35 and 69% have 13-16 years of education. "They are young and highly educated," says Roman, "I think these olim are a blessing to the people and economy of Israel." Aliyah across Russia has been high in recent years, and with no end in sight to the conflict in Ukraine, Ukrainian aliyah remains especially high. In 2016, 6000 Ukrainian Jews made aliyah—an increase of 300%.

BECAUSE OF YOUR SUPPORT, THOUSANDS OF PEOPLE WHO NEVER KNEW THEY WERE JEWISH ARE SUDDENLY ENJOYING THE MANY PATHS A JEWISH LIFE CAN TAKE. NO MATTER WHICH PATH THEY CHOOSE, FEDERATION IS THERE—YOU ARE THERE—TO SUPPORT THEM.


AT IT AGAIN: THE NEED TO PERFORM PHILIP ROTH | RIMON ARTIST SALON*

JFCS NEXTGEN WINTER PARTY

7 PM | $12 / $6 30 & under

Punch Bowl Social West End, St. Louis Park

Playwrights' Center 2301 Franklin Ave, MPLS Featuring Stuart Pimsler, choreographer/ performer; Hayley Finn, moderator

CAN YOU HEAR ME NOW? CRAFTING A VOICE IN SOCIAL MEDIA | RIMON ARTIST SALON* 4 PM | $12 / $6 30 & under Huge Improv Theater 3037 Lyndale Ave. S., Minneapolis Featuring Jason Shapiro, Twitter superstar; Andrea Siegel, moderator.

6 PM | $10

Join NextGen for our annual Winter Party—a night of fun and games in support of a great cause! The $10 fee is a direct donation to a JFCS program or project to be announced. Contact Erica Solomon for more info: esolomon@jfcsmpls. org or (952) 417-2124.

*

The Rimon Artist Salon Series is funded in part by a gift from Bruce Goodman; an anonymous gift in memory of David Tychman; and is made possible by the voters of MN through a grant from the Metropolitan Regional Arts Council, thanks to a legislative appropriation from the arts & cultural heritage fund. For more information contact David Jordan Harris, Rimon Executive Director at 952-381-3449 or rimon@sabesjcc.org.

Co-sponsored by NextGen/JFCS

1 PM | FREE

COMMUNITY-WIDE NIGHT TO HONOR ISRAEL | BENEFITING THE ISRAEL PROGRAMS OF FEDERATION

Location TBD

6:30 PM | FREE

Connect with our LGBTQ and allied teens (ages 12-18) in the Jewish community, meet other parents of queer and trans youth, discuss LGBTQ issues that matter to you, and learn, explore, and ask questions about being a resource to your friends and family.

Living Word Christian Center 9201 75th Avenue N, Brooklyn Park

J-PRIDE TEEN AND FAMILY SUMMIT

Thousands of Minnesotans will unite for a night of solidarity to show support for Israel, hosted by Pastors Mac and Lynne Hammond.

MINNEAPOLIS JEWISH LIFE

WINTER 2016 / CHOREF 5777


Non-Profit Org. U.S. Postage

PAID

13100 Wayzata Boulevard, Suite 200 Minnetonka, Minnesota 55305

Permit No. 3474 Twin Cities, MN

Let there be light Chanukah tells a great story­...oil, miracles, victory…you know the one. But it isn’t done.

Judah fought to protect the future of the Jewish people and so can you. Help ensure future generations are able to keep the flame alive.

NO GIFT TOUCHES MORE JEWISH LIVES.

Minneapolis Jewish Life // Winter 2016  
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