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The Week In News

JULY 28, 2016 | The Jewish Home


JULY 28, 2016 | The Jewish Home

The Week In News

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CONTENTS

JULY 28, 2016 | The Jewish Home

COMMUNITY

Community Happenings. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6

JEWISH THOUGHT

Pinchos Focused. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 Is that a Lamborghini!?! . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16

FEATURE

Turmoil in Turkey. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21

ENTERTAINMENT Quotes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32

LIFESTYLES

Book Review. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 Ask Dr. T . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 Travel Guide: Haifa. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 Ask the Attorney. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28

NEWS Israel News . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 That's Odd. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30

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Dear Readers,

The Week In News

“The word of Bilam son of Be’or… Your tents are so good, O Yaakov! Your dwellings O Israel! He will crouch and lie down (in his land) like a lion, an awesome lion… Those who bless you will be blessed... A star will shoot forth from Yaakov, and a staff will arise from Israel...” With these words the prophet Bilam prophesied many of the events which have happened and will happen to our nation, including the end of days. Looking at current events it seems that part of the process is the erosion of the status quo. The Arab spring brought revolution and chaos to country after country in the Middle East. The people have had enough of the corruption of their Governments. In Europe the social fabric is beginning to tear at the seams as attacks continue to be made in the name of radical Islam and movements such as Brexit are used to show the dissatisfaction of the people in the ruling class. Here in America, one of major parties has nominated a shoot-from-thehip opportunist who will say anything to get what he wants, and the other chose a corrupt politician par excellence who though claiming to take the high road is as greedy and selfish as they come. Nobody saw this coming. It’s not so farfetched to envision Israel becoming one of the most stable and successful countries to which much of the world looks for responsible leadership. Granted redemption is much greater than the physical success, but we mustn’t be blind to what’s taking place right in front of our eyes; the return of the Jewish people to their land as a light among the nations. Events are quickly unfolding; let us keep pace by increasing in acts of goodness and kindness. Wishing you a wonderful and reflective first Shabbos of the three weeks,

Shalom

T H E P R E M I E R J E W I S H N E W S PA P E R H I G H L I G H T I N G L A’ S O R T H O D OX C O M M U N I T Y The Jewish Home is an independent bi-weekly newspaper. Opinions expressed by writers are not neces­sarily the opinions of the publisher or editor. The Jewish Home is not responsible for typographical errors, or for the kashrus of any product or business advertised within. The Jewish Home contains words of Torah. Please treat accordingly. FOR HOME DELIVERY, OR TO HAVE THE LATEST ISSUE EMAILED TO YOU FREE OF CHARGE, SEND A MESSAGE TO EDITOR@JEWISHHOMELA.COM

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TheHappenings Week In News

JULY 28, 2016 | The Jewish Home

Los Angeles Welcomes the Boyaner Rebbe Rabbi Arye D. Gordon Last week, the Los Angeles community had the distinct honor and privilege to welcome the Boyaner Rebbe, Harav Nachum Dov Brayer shlita, on his first official visit to L.A. The impetus for the Rebbe’s visit was the opportunity to participate in a family simchah, the birth of a girl, a first child for his brother. Arriving on Sunday, July 17, 2016, the Rebbe was escorted to the home of his hosts, the Lebovics family. The Rebbe stayed in Los Angeles until Wednesday, with visits to the Los Angeles Cheder, various supporters of his torah institutions in Israel, and other prominent rabbanim. The Rebbe had the opportunity to participate in fulfilling the mitzvah of kevias mezuzah at the new home of Yaakov and Avigail Rosenblatt and attend a gathering in his honor at the home of his hosts, Dr. and Mrs. Irving Lebovics. Later on Sunday evening, a special, welcoming kabbolas panim took place at the Chassidishe Kollel. Before long, guests packed the Kollel’s bais medrash,

with all seats at the tables filled and standing throngs of young and old, five people deep, filling in the remaining space. As the Rebbe entered the bais medrash, those near him greeted him. While he headed to the front, the invigorating singing of the crowd accompanied him. A head table of prominent local rabbanim sat with the Rebbe. The program began with words of greeting from Rabbi Matisyahu Dinkels. The Rebbe then made a brachah mezonos, handed out lekach to the worthy assembled, followed with a borei pre hagafen on wine. The Rebbe then waved his hand in the air, extending “L’chaiyim” to the crowd gathered at each side of his table. At that point, the Los Angeles Cheder Choir, led by Rabbi Doron Jacobius, with soloist, Yossi Katz, broke out in song.   Rabbi Menachum Krybus, Rosh Kollel, Kollel Yechiel Yehuda (the Chassidshe Kollel), took his turn at the lectern, expounding on the significance and influence of “Tzadik bah La’Ir,” with the Rebbe’s

Photos: Arye D. Gordon

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visit in mind. The Rebbe then spoke, expressing his feelings on being in Los Angeles for the first time and his impression of our community. The Rebbe extolled the Los Angeles religious community on developing torah institutions, kollelim of various stripes and colors, community members that make time to learn and baale batim who are active supporters of worthy causes. He thanked the Chassidishe Kollel for all its endeavors in harbatzas torah and for hosting this kabolas panim. The assembled then lined up to greet the Rebbe, who took the time to offer his hand, his brochos, and smiles for the kinderlach, all the time revealing patience to listen to one and all as they passed by. Boyan is one of the branches of the Ruzhiner dynasty, together with Bohush, Chortkov, Husiatyn, Sadigura, and Shtefanesht. The first Boyaner Rebbe was Rav Yitzchok Friedman (1850–1917), known as the Pachad Yitzchok. He was the eldest son of Rav Avrohom Yaakov Friedman (1820–1883), the first Sadigura Rebbe,

and the grandson of Rabbi Yisroel Friedman of Ruzhyn (1797–1851), founder of the Ruzhiner dynasty. While the various branches of the Ruzhin Dynasty continued to grow, the children of the first Boyaner Rebbe established their courts in different towns, only to have them and their families decimated by the Germans, yimach shemum. It was the Rebbe’s youngest son, Rav Mordechai Shlomo Friedman, who managed to find his way to the Lower East Side of New York and reestablish the Ruzhin-Boyan survivors of the Holocaust. For over four decades he led the chassidus until his sudden passing in 1971. At that particular time, there were no direct members of the family desiring or able to take over leadership. After a series of attempts to find a proper replacement, it fell to a young 11 year old boy, a grandson of the previous Rebbe, Rav Mordechai Shlomo, to take up the mantle. In 1984, at the age of 25, Harav Nachum Dov Brayer shlita, the Rebbe visiting in Los Angeles, was declared Boyaner Rebbe.


TheNofei WeekIsrael In News

JULY 28, 2016 | The Jewish Home

Making Aliyah is not just about the house! A luxury neighborhood in the Jerusalem hills, considered Jerusalem’s Caesarea, has intrigued many families from Los Angeles – Ramat Givat Zeev. It was established by a vision to provide everything necessary to families of olim. Ramat Givat Zeev’s developers, the Nofei Israel Company, have marketed and filled more than 2000 housing units. A few years ago, Nofei Israel decided to build the ultimate neighborhood for USA residents who are interested in making aliyah but fear the difficulties along the way. Ramat Givat Zeev, which is part of Givat Zeev, is a closed, exclusive neighborhood located approximately 15 minutes from the center of Jerusalem,

without the population density found elsewhere in the city. Greenery abounds throughout, and the neighborhood features lucid mountain air. Approximately 400 housing units make up Ramat Givat Zeev, including about 140 private and semi-private homes, with an additional 250 apartments in luxury buildings. Important details were taken into consideration by the entrepreneurs from the start of the project, in order to provide solutions for a large public eager to make aliyah to Israel, a public which has yet to find a suitable location in which they can live by the same lifestyle they were accustomed to in the USA. For that reason, the entrepreneurs have presiden-

tially decided to create what is called by real estate experts “a dream neighborhood for new olim.” In addition to the upscale housing units in rapid construction these days, an emphasis was placed on creating a green environment. To this point, more than 1000 trees have been planted, and approximately 6000 additional trees will be planted by the time the neighborhood is populated. Ramat Givat Zeev is rich with parks, advanced playgrounds for children, tennis, and basketball courts. A magnificent country club will be built as well, including an upscale pool, gym, and more amenities. A commercial center will be established, too, including stores suited to

the American public. The educational institutions will be adjusted to the high level of education that olim expect, and will be funded by the Ministry of Education, all in well-appointed school facilities. Three synagogues will be established in the neighborhood, as well as kindergartens and a mikvah. Although the neighborhood presents unique solutions for all the residents’ needs, the company CEO, Chanoch Kass, says that the vision just begins here: “When a family decides to implement such a meaningful step to make aliyah to Eretz Yisroel, they are not aware of the adaptation difficulties that exist, with children’s adjustment, finding work, and integration in community life. The main part we see in the neighborhood’s success is to build a unique model of a unique community in which everyone will feel at home. The company will establish a committee to help the families find work and get accustomed to life in Israel. It is clear to us that this neighborhood will be role model for other entrepreneurs who will understand the great need of establishing additional neighborhoods such as Ramat Givat Zeev. As long as there are no similar neighborhoods, the apartment prices in Ramat Givat Zeev will rise quickly since there is no price label for such a unique project.” Aliyah is not just about the house, it’s about the community! Search for “Ramat Givat Zeev” on YouTube for a beautiful video highlighting the project .

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TheHappenings Week In News

Second Annual Tomchei Golf Classic at the Mountaingate Country Club

JULY 28, 2016 | The Jewish Home


The Week In News

JULY 28, 2016 | The Jewish Home

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The Week In News

JULY 28, 2016 | The Jewish Home


JULY 28, 2016 | The Jewish Home

The Week In News

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The Week In News

JULY 28, 2016 | The Jewish Home


JULY 28, 2016 | The Jewish Home

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Living with In theNews Times The Week

By Rabbi Pinchos Lipschutz

JULY 28, 2016 | The Jewish Home

Pinchos Focused

Publisher of the Yated Ne’eman

Parshas Pinchos weaves together themes and ideas that seem unconnected. The parshah opens with the enduring act of zealotry by Pinchos, born from an inability to stand by while evil was being perpetrated. The same act that so traumatized other onlookers that they didn’t know what to do caused Pinchos to be bold and courageous. Pinchos grabbed a spear and literally eradicated evil. His act lives on for all time as one of passion and commitment, epitomizing the instincts and reactions of a servant of Hashem. The parshah continues with a count taken of each individual Jew in Klal Yisroel. It then discusses the bnos Tzelafchad and their petition for a portion in Eretz Yisroel, and concludes with halachos of the yomim tovim. These topics, though seemingly unrelated, combine to teach a lesson. Mekubolim explain that the entirety of creation is divided into three dimensions: olam, shanah, and nefesh, space, time and man. Each realm has its climax. Yom Kippur is such a time, for all three meet at the height of their abilities when the kohein gadol, the highest level of man, enters the Kodesh Hakodoshim, the holiest place on earth, on the most sacred day. Kedushah means investing each of the three dimensions with meaning. Each person has a mission, every place has its use, and every day has its avodah. Pinchos created a new reality, rising to new heights, transforming himself through his selfless, altruistic act. He took a stand when others did not, and in doing so, he formed a covenant with Hashem. The parshah reinforces this message with the counting of the Bnei Yisroel. Every Jew counts. Everyone can do what Pinchos did, acting as a lone soldier, demonstrating the strength of character and devotion to bring glory to Heaven. Each individual has intrinsic value. The counting reminds every person that he has the ability to make a difference. You matter. Every person matters. You can affect more people than you ever thought possible. You can be living

at a time when people are confused and confounded, not knowing which way to move. They are frozen by fear and insecurity. Stay focused on your goal. Don’t be deterred. Don’t be distracted. It may be difficult and it might earn you temporary ridicule, but when all are lost, leaders rise from among the crowd and show the way. That is the power of each nefesh. Eretz Yisroel, the apex in the realm of olam, has unique spiritual properties, power, and potency. The daughters of Tzelafchad, appreciating the significance of the land, pined for a share. Yomim tovim are the greatest days of the year. People who appreciate their abilities, seize the moment, and seek a role and portion in holiness, appreciate yomim tovim as a time for sublime joy. The avodah zarah of Baal Peor diminished man and caused him to believe that humankind is a small being with limited abilities that he is unable to face or overcome (see Chasam Sofer in this week’s parshah). Thus, the yetzer hora reduces people to the level where they think they are inconsequential, their actions are inconsequential, and whatever they think or do has no meaning or importance. The Soton couples that with his ability to create diversions and cause people to lose focus of the important matters in life. He confuses people and causes them to be stressed and defeatist, unable to contend with the vagaries of life. They become lost and dizzy, unable to remain grounded and stable enough to deal with situations, and remember that all that befalls them is ordained by Hashem. Those who have faith remain calm, composed, and properly balanced. Their confidence gives them the strength to do what must be done in order to perform the actions necessary to right the situation. Pinchos maximized his abilities and withstood the entreaties of the yetzer hora to stand by the side and let someone else do what had to be done. Because he perceived the value and opportunity inherent in life, he did not become flummoxed when he witnessed tragedy unfolding.

It is because of Pinchos, and people like him in every generation, that our nation has endured to this day and is able to appreciate and celebrate yomim tovim. Others have cowered, compromised, and capitulated, diluting the abilities of olam, shanah, and nefesh. When people arrived on the shores of America, many said that it was too hard to build Torah here. They claimed that it was unrealistic to expect American children to be Torah Jews and they gave up. They compromised on Shabbos, kashrus, and everything else. They lost their children and didn’t really have much themselves. But in communities where there was a Pinchos, who said, “We can do it. We can lead Torah lives here. We don’t have what to fear,” Torah Judaism took hold, yeshivos were built, kosher standards were adhered to, and Shabbos became a day of halachic rest and an opportunity for kedushah of olam, shanah, and nefesh. There is a common misconception that taking a stand means being negative. Kannaus is often misunderstood as pessimism. In fact, it’s just the opposite. Those who are fired up with Torah and seek to live lives of kedushah are optimistic about their abilities. They are optimistic about Am Yisroel and the future. They refuse to be reined in by the pessimists who say it can’t be done; not here, not now. They serve as a beacon of light and strength for all to look up to and emulate. Pinchos took a stand, which created a bris of sholom that continues and endures. Parshas Pinchos is the parshah of yomim tovim, because taking a stand guarantees better and happier times. People who rise up to the occasion are those who make a difference. My uncle, Rav Berel Wein, born and raised in Chicago, sadly witnessed Orthodox Jewry in decline, as the older generation of European immigrants looked on hopelessly while their children chose a different path. He wrote about a speech that changed his life and impacted his life’s ambitions and thoughts. It was at a banquet for Beis

Medrash LeTorah in Chicago in the early 1950s. The guest speaker was Rav Pinchos Teitz of Elizabeth, New Jersey. Rabbi Wein recounts, “Most European rabbis used speaking engagements to bemoan the state of American Jewry, especially in comparison to the glory days of Eastern European Jewish life. Not Rabbi Teitz. He spoke of a coming revolution in American Jewish life; of a growing and vital Orthodoxy; of the triumph of the day school and yeshiva movements; and he predicted that Orthodoxy would diminish the influence of Conservative and Reform movements, not vice versa. His optimism made him a heroic figure in my eyes, and he remained such over many decades.” That, too, is a story of Pinchos, of taking a stand. Rav Pinchos Teitz spoke of hope, optimism and opportunity. He cried out that yom tov was coming, and to merit those days the people had to remain loyal to Torah. He set up a school in Elizabeth, educated the next generation in the Torah path, and many were saved. There were others, like Rav Shmuel Kaufman zt”l, who was niftar last week. Not seeking fame, glory, or financial reward, they spread across this country, opening schools and staffing them, showing the correct way to educate fine people to live lives of Torah and Judaism. Their efforts spawned a rebirth here, and because of heroes like him, cities like Detroit, Chicago, Cleveland, and so many others are flourishing islands of Torah, beacons of kedushah, goodness and happiness for the rest of the country. Rabbi Wein once visited a philanthropist in what New Yorkers call a mid-sized out-of-town city on behalf of the yeshiva he headed almost twenty years ago. The wealthy man complained that while he used to support his shul and the local school, now there was a new thing coming to town called a “kollel,” whose leaders also came knocking on his door for a donation. “Who needs them?” the man questioned. “We have such nice shuls here. What do we need this kollel thing for?” Rabbi Wein answered with the wisdom of someone who had seen what happened to dozens of shuls in his native Chicago. “My dear friend,” he said as he put his arm on the man’s shoulder. “Kollel is the way of the future. It is that kollel that will maintain the neighborhood and bring young families here. It is the kollel where people will visit to study Torah. It is the kollel that will be a magnet for everything good in this town and many others. You’d do yourself well if you would support it.” It seemed so far-fetched that he couldn’t bring himself to support it. He


Living with the Times The Week In News

JULY 28, 2016 | The Jewish Home

lacked the vision and optimism to believe that Torah would bring them back and hold them. He was pessimistic and didn’t get it. But today, that man’s children and grandchildren enter the kollel to study Torah and increase their levels of kedushah. Pinchos didn’t talk about not tolerating injustice. He acted upon the problem. He didn’t conduct a poll or focus group before deciding. He didn’t run around asking his friends how it would look. He just did it. And because of that, the plague stopped and we are here today.

Pinchos was not a leader of his nation, but his actions obligate all of us. There are moments, places, and times for us to stand up and make a difference. Perhaps there is no time of year for this avodah like the Three Weeks. Kol hamisabel al Yerushalayim, anyone who mourns the destruction of the holy city and Bais Hamikdosh, zocheh veroeh b’simchasah, will merit seeing its joy. We have to use these days to contemplate what we are lacking and make these weeks significant and meaningful. Too often, people are con-

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tent to let the season pass so that they can get back to regular life. Chazal, however, admonish us to make these days important by being misabel, so that we will enjoy yomim tovim to the fullest when Tisha B’Av joins the chagim. A person who is involved in an accident, or suffers serious illness and temporarily loses mobility, must remain optimistic about their latent strength and abilities in order to be able endure therapy and recuperate. They cannot allow themselves to be deterred or to give up hope because of

the difficulties of maintaining a difficult discipline. Life is tough and full of challenges. Those who remain optimistic and see the Hand of Hashem in all that befalls them are able to muster the courage to persevere and succeed. Those who mourn Yerushalayim and use these days to help rebuild it through the arrival of Moshiach will merit to witness and partake in that joyous day when the redemption arrives. Let us all remain focused on the goal.

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Torah Musings The Week In News

JULY 28, 2016 | The Jewish Home

Is that a Lamborghini!?! Sarah Pachter

My father-in-law flew to Sao Paulo, Brazil, in order to deliver a medical lecture. He drove with a friend through the city streets, and was shocked by what he saw: People sat on the side of the street, covered in dirt, with tattered clothing and no shoes. Their poverty was so extreme that they were not begging for money, but rather for food.  Oddly enough, on the very same street, several Lamborghinis drove by.  There seemed to be extreme levels of poverty and wealth in the same neighborhood. My father-in-law curiously asked, “What’s going on here? How can there be Lamborghinis and starvation within such close proximity?”

His friend replied, “Oh that! Yeah, those are not really Lamborghinis. See, here in Sao Paulo, people take the shell of a Lamborghini car and jack it up with a run-down Beetle engine.” I listened to this story in shock. Is this what our world has come to? And then I started to wonder: Why does our society give so much credence to externals? Truthfully, to some extent we all do the “Lamborghini trick.” We carry a mask around with us at all times. Sometimes who we are and what we want to portray do not match one hundred percent of the time. However, this image we project matters greatly to us.

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Suppose you are driving and approach an intersection. A policeman stands in the middle trying to help direct traffic by moving his arms while shouting out orders. Now imagine seeing the same man in that intersection with arm movements and calling out directions, yet he is wearing a pirate costume. As a driver, we would certainly relate differently to those two people. Our clothing – and our image – make a statement. It is clear that we judge others based on their exteriors. In the previous example, we related to the policeman differently based on his garb. However, there seems to be evidence that this policeman himself would view himself differently depending on his outfit. Yes, new research indicates that we also judge ourselves based on our own exterior. This concept, termed enclothed cognition, states that our exteriors can affect our behavior and feelings.   A student of mine once noted, “I feel better when I get dressed up, wear heels, and have my hair blown out. I even act friendlier towards others because I feel more confident about myself.” We all can relate to this idea that taking care of ourselves, and putting effort into our exterior, brings positive inner feelings. Does this mean we will also feel better about ourselves when driving a nicer car – a Lamborghini? What if we are fooling others to get that type of status update? The car upgrade affects how people view us, but if we are fooling others in the process, it will not cause us to feel positive inside. Even if we feel an initial boost, at some point, that dissonance will no longer sit well within us.   A fascinating study done at Northwestern University asked two groups of people to participate in a brain teaser. Half the participants were wearing a lab coat, and were told it was the coat of a doctor. The other group wore their regular clothing with no white coat at all. The participants who wore the lab coat preformed twice as well than the control group. Our external garb can affect how we behave, feel, and even perform. There are numerous studies that back up the results of this study, including the fact that the success rate of students who “dress up” for SATs is higher. Here is the kicker: A subsequent study

was done at Northwestern: Again there were two groups participating in brain teasers, and this time both wore lab coats. One group thought they were wearing a doctor’s coat, while the other group was told they were wearing a painting smock. In this study only the “Dr. Coats” did better. In essence, this study proves that while our external clothing matters, it is the internal feeling about what we are wearing that matters just as much, if not more. There are two aspects to what controls how we feel about our image: The outside and the inside. The exterior is important, but only when the inside matches. If we walk around sporting a run-down Beetle engine inside a Lamborghini shell, that dissonance can create an internal anxiety. We are forced to carry a heavy burden when our inner and outer selves are not congruent, for keeping up a façade is exhausting, and we are haunted by our fear of discovery.  A student of mine, Amy, told me a story from when she was in high school. She had been using drugs and alcohol recreationally while her parents remained none the wiser. Amy’s therapist at the time told her that although Amy on one level was terrified of her parents finding out, she subconsciously wanted her parents to know what she was up to. The constant need for lies and alibis weighed down her down heavily. In fact, after time, her parents did realize, and even though Amy had to deal with the consequences of her actions, she felt relieved. She was finally able to be the authentic person she wanted to be. When a person is dating and feels they cannot be themselves, it hinders the process of developing a deep and meaningful relationship. Sometimes people feel that they must live beyond their means in order to impress others, or keep up with the “Joneses.” This constant sporting of a mask is not sustainable, and makes it challenging to feel authentic overall.   External improvements definitely raise our confidence levels, and should be encouraged. However, the only way to achieve lasting results is when we work on our inside, as well. It is when we toil to make sure our insides are congruent with our outside that we will feel like the shining individuals that we truly are.


TheBook WeekReview In News

JULY 28, 2016 | The Jewish Home

Book Review: A Taste of Torah, Recipes, Divrei Torah and Stories to Enrich Every Shabbat by Aviv Harkov

Reviewed by Devorah Talia Gordon In her first cookbook, Aviv Harkov showcases dozens of delicious recipes specifically for the Jewish family. But this is more than a cookbook; Harkov has created a user-friendly guidebook for preparing for Shabbos with one’s children. Each recipe is connected to the parshah, includes a dvar Torah for that week’s parshah, and a story to read with one’s children. Harkov, an avid cook, food writer, and contributor to several Jewish food websites, maintains her own blog and even ran a catering business. These are impressive accomplishments for a 23 year old. Harkov is a New Jersey native, but made aliyah, served as a naval officer in the IDF, and is currently studying at Hebrew University. Her release is quite a feat, both substantial and appealing, and could become a well-worn go-to for Shabbos preparation. The book is organized according to the parshiyos, including one recipe per parshah, as well as one dvar Torah and one story. While it’s handy to go through the book parshah by parshah as you prep for Shabbos, the writer included a separate table of contents organized by course,

including appetizers, salads, side dishes, main courses, and desserts. Therefore, if one just wants a fresh salad idea or a new side, she can easily find what she’s looking for. The benefit, however, of the book’s organization by parshah is that one can spend quality time with his or her children in the kitchen while simultaneously teaching about the parshah. Harkov has also included specific tips for tasks your little “sous chefs” can take on. For example, in the recipe for Unleavened Coconut and Chocolate Macaroons, Harkov writes, “Your sous chefs will enjoy scooping out the macaroon mixture onto the baking sheets. You can also put them in charge of dipping the baked macaroons into the melted chocolate and then decorating them.” Each recipe connects to a quote from the parshah, for example for this week’s parshah, Pinchas, the quote is “On the day of the first-fruits, when you offer a new meal-offering to Hashem (God) on your Festival of Weeks, it shall be a holy convocation to you; you shall not do any laborious work (Bamidbar 28:26). The fruitthemed recipe for the week is Watermelon

and Lime Granita, with a dvar Torah about Zelophehad’s daughters, and a story about making an unbiased decision. This is another nice touch; the stories Harkov has included address important educational topics like self-respect, taking initiative, setting an example, fearing G-d and loving your fellow Jew. Some readers might be sensitive to the fact that not every story is derived from a Jewish source. For example, some are sourced in other cultures fables and folk tales; but the vast majority are Jewish, and all include valuable lessons. A potential drawback to an otherwise outstanding book is that while the recipes look and sound delicious, many are quite gourmet. While a lot of cooks do like to potchke, especially in honor of Shabbos, those with less time or resources on their hands might find a multi-step gourmet recipe such as Coq au Vin with Sun-dried Tomato and Mushroom Stuffing quite daunting. However, there are many cooks, myself included, who would gladly take on the challenge! Another benefit of this book is its appeal to Jews across the spectrum of observance. While the stories are replete

with ideas sourced in traditional Judaism, Harkov presents them in a warm, inviting way, rather than sounding didactic. I can easily see this book as a good gift choice for many families, particularly ones that are open to exploring Torah and mitzvah observance. With beautiful pictures, clear instructions and more than fifty tantalizing recipes, A Taste of Torah is worthy to find a permanent place on your kitchen counter. Beteyavon!

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The Week In News

JULY 28, 2016 | The Jewish Home

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Talks too much Doesn’t talk enough Not “outgoing” Too “outgoing” Too many siblings Not enough siblings Has a 3 carrot Kallah ring Only eats 3 carrots a day (see “too thin”) REASONS YOU DIDN’T ALLOW YOUR DAUGHTER TO GO OUT WITH HIM : Wears wrong type Davens too quickly Davens too slowly Went to the wrong Yeshiva Not yeshivish enough Too yeshivish Didn Didn’t learn in Israel Learned too long in Doesn’t have friends Wears colored socks Wears white socks Wears no socks Too litvish Not “heimish” enough Too chasiddish Wears a gart Doesn know what FLOP is Too tall Too short Not good looking enough Too good looking Listens to English music Doesn Doesn’t listen to English music Is to color war general Was losing color war general Familyuseschinaduringtheweek Family uses china during the week Family uses paper goods on shabbos (GASP!) Parents don’t have winte Doesn’t want to learn in kollel Parents have no money Parents have too much money Parents think they have money Wears the wrong type of watch glasses Doesn’t wear glasses Glasses frames are too stylish Squints when he learns Has a beard Has no beard Has a trimmed beard Cant grow WITH HER: Too tall Too short Not pretty enough Too pretty Too thin Went to wrong school Family not yeshivish enough Family too yes Went to college Didn’t go to college You wanna marry a speech therapist? 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Talks too much Doesn’t talk enough Not “outgoing” Too “outgoing” Too many sib jewelry Wears no jewelry Wants a 3 carrot Kallah ring Only eats 3 carrots a day (see “too thin”) REASONS YOU DIDN’T ALLOW YOUR DAUGHTER TO GO Doesn’t daven in the right shul Davens too quickly Davens too slowly Went to the wrong Yeshiva Not yeshivish enough Too yeshivish Didn Doesn Didn’t le “yichus” Wrong type of friends Doesn Doesn’t have friends Wears colored socks Wears white socks Wears no socks Too litvish Not “heimish” enough Will only do FLOP Doesn Doesn’tt know what FLOP is Too tall Too short Not good looking enough Too good looking Listens to English music Does Went to the wrong camp Wasn Wasn’t color war general Was losing color war general Family Familyuseschinaduringtheweek uses china during the week Family uses paper goods on shabbos work Wants to learn in kollel Doesn Doesn’t want to learn in kollel Parents have no money Parents have too much money Parents think they have money blue strings on tzitzis Wears thick glasses Doesn’t wear glasses Glasses frames are too stylish Squints when he learns Has a beard Has no beard H YOUR SON TO GO OUT WITH HER: Too tall Too short Not pretty enough Too pretty Too thin Went to wrong school Family not y seminary Didn’t go to seminary Went to college Didn’t go to college You wanna marry a speech therapist? 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JULY 28, 2016 | The Jewish Home

The Week In News

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mulke too small Car is not leased Drives his parents car Doesn’t daven in the right shul Davens too quickly Davens too slowly Went to the wrong wrong type of college No family “yichus” Too much family “yichus” Wrong type of friends Doesn’t have friends Wears colored socks Wears white “schmaltzy” Parents not “schmaltzy” enough Wont do FLOP Will only do FLOP Doesn Doesn’t know what FLOP is Too tall Too short Not good looking a with a fork & knife Doesn Doesn’t know how to use a fork & knife Went to the wrong camp Wasn Wasn’t color war general Was losing color war general Family mer home in Monsey Mother works full time Mother doesn’t work Wants to learn in kollel Doesn Doesn’t want to learn in kollel Parents have no money ant tell time Wears his tzitzis out Wears his tzitzis in Wears blue strings on tzitzis Wears thick glasses Doesn’t wear glasses Glasses frames are too Has older unmarried sibling R E A S O N S Y O U D I D N ’ T A L L O W Y O U R S O N T O G O O U T W I T H H E R : Too tall Too short Not pretty gs wear wrong type of yarmulke Didn’ Didn’t go to Israel Went to the wrong seminary Didn’t go to seminary Went to college Didn’t go to college You Not heimish Too heimish Not chasiddish Too chasiddish Parents too schmaltzy Parents not schmaltzy enough Parents have no money Parents tep foot into a pizza shop Wont eat pizza Didn’t go to camp Went to the wrong camp Wants a kollel boy Wants a learning boy Wants a working/ tson Not Tzniusdik enough Too Tzniusdik Wears colorful clothes Clothes are too drabby Skirts too long Skirts too short Wears no makeup s. Talks too much Doesn’t talk enough Not “outgoing” Too “outgoing” Too many siblings Not enough siblings Has unmarried siblings Parents nly eats 3 carrots a day (see “too thin”) REASONS YOU DIDN’T ALLOW YOUR DAUGHTER TO GO OUT WITH HIM : Wears wrong type of hat Wrong type of vens too slowly Went to the wrong Yeshiva Not yeshivish enough Too yeshivish Didn Didn’t learn in Israel Learned too long in Israel Went to college Wears colored socks Wears white socks Wears no socks Too litvish Not “heimish” enough Too chasiddish Wears a gartel Doesn Doesn’t wear a gartel Too short Not good looking enough Too good looking Listens to English music Doesn Doesn’t listen to English music Is tone deaf Eats pizza with a s losing color war general Family uses china during the week Family uses paper goods on shabbos (GASP!) Parents don’t have winterized summer home in kollel Parents have no money Parents have too much money Parents think they have money Wears the wrong type of watch Doesn Doesn’t wear a watch r glasses Glasses frames are too stylish Squints when he learns Has a beard Has no beard Has a trimmed beard Cant grow a beard Parents are o tall Too short Not pretty enough Too pretty Too thin Went to wrong school Family not yeshivish enough Family too yeshivish Father wears Didn’t go to college You wanna marry a speech therapist? No family Yichus Too much family Yichus Wrong type of friends Not enough friends nts have no money Parents have too much money Parents not willing to support Listens to English music Doesn’t listen to English music Eats pizza ning boy Wants a working/learning/kollel boy Wants a hat wearer Doesn’t want a hat wearer Wants a straw hat wearer Doesn’t know the difference hort Wears no makeup Wears too much makeup Wants to wear a fall Wont wear a fall Will only wear a fall in the fall Goes to shul on shabbos unmarried siblings Parents are divorced Parents should be divorced Wears expensive jewelry Wears inexpensive jewelry Wears no jewelry Wants e of hat Wrong type of yarmulke Yarmulke too big Yarmulke too small Car is not leased Drives his parents car Doesn Doesn’t daven in the right shul Israel Went to college Didn Didn’t go to college Went to the wrong type of college No family “yichus” “yichus” yichus Too much family “yichus” “yichus” Wrong type of friends tel Doesn Doesn’t wear a gartel Gartel is too thick Parents too “schmaltzy” Parents not “schmaltzy” “schmaltzy schmaltzy” enough Wont do FLOP Will only do FLOP Doesn Doesn’t one deaf Eats pizza with a fork and knife Doesn Doesn’t eat pizza with a fork & knife Doesn Doesn’t know how to use a fork & knife Went to the wrong camp Wasn Wasn’t erized summer home in Catskills Parents don’t have summer home in Monsey Mother works full time Mother doesn’t work Wants to learn in kollel Doesn’t wear a watch Wears a watch on shabbos Cant tell time Wears his tzitzis out Wears his tzitzis in Wears blue strings on tzitzis Wears thick Doesn w a beard Parents are divorced Sibling is divorced Has older unmarried sibling R E A S O N S Y O U D I D N ’ T A L L O W Y O U R S O N T O G O O U T shivish Father wears wrong type of hat h Siblings wear wrong type of yarmulke Didn’ Didn’tt go to Israel Went to the wrong seminary Didn’t go to seminary enough friends Not litvish Too litvish Not heimish Too heimish Not chasiddish Too chasiddish Parents too schmaltzy Parents not schmaltzy usic Eats pizza in a pizza shop Wouldn’t step foot into a pizza shop Wont eat pizza Didn’t go to camp Went to the wrong camp Wants a kollel boy w the difference between Borsalino and Stetson Not Tzniusdik enough Too Tzniusdik Wears colorful clothes Clothes are too drabby Skirts too long n shabbos Doesn’t go to shul on shabbos. Talks too much Doesn’t talk enough Not “outgoing” Too “outgoing” Too many siblings Not enough jewelry Wants a 3 carrot Kallah ring Only eats 3 carrots a day (see “too thin”) REASONS YOU DIDN’T ALLOW YOUR DAUGHTER TO GO OUT WITH HIM : in the right shul Davens too quickly Davens too slowly Went to the wrong Yeshiva Not yeshivish enough Too yeshivish Didn Didn’t learn in Israel ng type of friends Doesn Doesn’t have friends Wears colored socks Wears white socks Wears no socks Too litvish Not “heimish” enough Too chasiddish OP Doesn Doesn’t know what FLOP is Too tall Too short Not good looking enough Too good looking Listens to English music Doesn Doesn’t listen to English camp Wasn Wasn’t color war general Was losing color war general Family uses china during the week Family uses paper goods on shabbos (GASP!) (GASP GASP!) Parents earn in kollel Doesn Doesn’t want to learn in kollel Parents have no money Parents have too much money Parents think they have money Wears the wrong Wears thick glasses Doesn’t wear glasses Glasses frames are too stylish Squints when he learns Has a beard Has no beard Has a trimmed beard O GO OUT WITH HER: Too tall Too short Not pretty enough Too pretty Too thin Went to wrong school Family not yeshivish enough go to seminary Went to college Didn’t go to college You wanna marry a speech therapist? No family Yichus Too much family Yichus Wrong type ents not schmaltzy enough Parents have no money Parents have too much money Parents not willing to support Listens to English music Doesn’t Wants a kollel boy Wants a learning boy Wants a working/learning/kollel boy Wants a hat wearer Doesn’t want a hat wearer Wants a straw hat bby Skirts too long Skirts too short Wears no makeup Wears too much makeup Wants to wear a fall Wont wear a fall Will only wear a fall in the blings Not enough siblings Has unmarried siblings Parents are divorced Parents should be divorced Wears expensive jewelry Wears inexpensive OUT WITH HIM : Wears wrong type of hat Wrong type of yarmulke Yarmulke too big Yarmulke too small Car is not leased Drives his parents car earn in Israel Learned too long in Israel Went to college Didn Didn’t go to college Went to the wrong type of college No family “yichus” “yichus” Too much family Too chasiddish Wears a gartel Doesn Doesn’t wear a gartel Gartel is too thick Parents too “schmaltzy “schmaltzy” schmaltzy” Parents not “schmaltzy” enough Wont do FLOP sn’t listen to English music Is tone deaf Eats pizza with a fork and knife Doesn sn Doesn’t eat pizza with a fork & knife Doesn Doesn’t know how to use a fork & knife (GASP!) Parents don’t have winterized summer home in Catskills Parents don’t have summer home in Monsey Mother works full time Mother doesn’t Wears the wrong type of watch Doesn Doesn’t wear a watch Wears a watch on shabbos Cant tell time Wears his tzitzis out Wears his tzitzis in Wears Has a trimmed beard Cant grow a beard Parents are divorced Sibling is divorced Has older unmarried sibling R E A S O N S Y O U D I D N ’ T A L L O W yeshivish enough Family too yeshivish Father wears wrong type of hat Siblings wear wrong type of yarmulke Didn’t go to Israel Went to the wrong hus Wrong type of friends Not enough friends Not litvish Too litvish Not heimish Too heimish Not chasiddish Too chasiddish Parents too h music Doesn’t listen to English music Eats pizza in a pizza shop Wouldn’t step foot into a pizza shop Wont eat pizza Didn’t go to camp Went to

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The Parenting Week In News

JULY 28, 2016 | The Jewish Home

Proactive Parenting: Gimme Sara Teichman, Psy.D.

Dear Dr. T., “I need…” “Mom please…” “I want…” “Get me…” That’s about all that I hear from my eleven year old daughter. I wasn’t born yesterday, and I do understand peer pressure. I know that kids have more “stuff” today than we did, but what bothers me is that she never seems happy: she is always looking forward to the next thing, treat, trip, etc. It scares me that she is so demanding, and yet so dissatisfied with what she has. Yet, I hesitate to deny her something that I could technically afford. So, here is a good example. For afikomen she got a trip to Disney. But, now she insists we must take a family trip when day camp is over. All her friends are, and it’s weird to just stay home, she says. Is that a reason for me to go along with what she wants? Sophia

Dear Sophia, In today’s times, the line between giving to the child and spoiling him is often blurred. Unlike in previous generations, many of us today are actually able to indulge our children (and ourselves), and the question is not what is possible, but what is appropriate. Because our children are such wonderful advocates for themselves, and we understand that times are different, we often hesitate to take a stand, even against our better judgment. The problem you describe is both a societal concern and a personal issue. Much has been written about our culture of conspicuous consumption and its deleterious effect on us all. Certainly our Orthodox culture is not immune to this malaise; excessive materialism has been called the nisayon, the trial, of our time. Yet, this problem is a personal one as well; and while most of us have little ability to change society, we can have an impact in our family. As parents, we want to differentiate between our wants and needs – and to help our children do so, as well. Needs – and that includes social needs like having the “right” lunchbox – must be addressed for the psychological well-being of the child, in order to preserve his self-esteem and his status with his peers. You are certainly astute in recognizing that kids today need a lot, and that life can only be lived in the present. You want to help your child adjust to his society, rather than attempt to turn back the clock. So, if you have determined through discussions with others or your children that a need exists, fill it gladly if you can, without comparisons to the “olden days” and all the guilt-inducing that the comparison creates. But, to the distraught child everything may seem like a need, and it is the wise parent who can help his child distinguish between his needs and wants. This ability to separate between the two is a skill that will serve your child well both now and in days to come. So, through talk and discussion, you and your child may come to agree that a specific request is indeed a want. In that case, an issue to review with your child is that of values; how we spend our money is reflective of what is important to us. As Torah Jews, we want to help our children see that while pleasure and relaxation are necessary, there is more to life than “getting” and fun. We can help our children see that many of the pleasures of life – such as our relationships, our interests, and nature – are free. We also want to teach our children to make good choices; obviously, we all cannot have everything we want all of the time. Having to pick and choose allows the child to practice the process we all engage in – figuring out what we really do want

and letting go of the rest. Lastly, teaching the child to delay gratification (i.e. take a dollar later rather than fifty cents now) is a critical life skill for developing relationships and dealing with life’s disappointments – big and small. By considering some of these guidelines, together with your child, you can hopefully diminish some of the over-the-top requests. Above all, what is most crucial in the process of inculcating good character (in this case, modesty and gratitude) is the modeling and example of the parent. Our exercising restraint and good judgment, our showing appreciation for what we have – as opposed to anticipation for what we will get – is the best insurance policy that our children will do the same. As parents, we want to give our children what they really want and need: our time and attention, our listening ear, our love, and our care. When children feel “full,” they do not crave more and more to fill them up. All too often, people – children and adults alike – attempt to selfsoothe – fill their emptiness or soothe their

loneliness – by acquiring material objects, much as the addict needs his “fix.” By being proactive and providing a warm, loving environment where the child feels cared for and understood, you go a long way in obviating the need for excessive giving. And, always remember, that while the good will created by the material things that you give may last a day or a year, the good feelings generated by giving of yourself will last a lifetime. The Book Nook: The Book Nook: The “Me, Me, Me” Epidemic is described by author Amy McCready as a step-bystep guide to raising capable, grateful kids in an over-entitled world. This book is practical and very comprehensive. Sara Teichman, Psy.D. is a psychotherapist in private practice in Los Angeles and Clinical Director of ETTA, L.A.’s largest Jewish agency for adults with special needs. To submit a question or comment, email DrT@jewishhomela.com.


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Feature The Week In News

JULY 28, 2016 | The Jewish Home JULY 21, 2016 The |Jewish HomeHome OCTOBER 29, |2015 The Jewish

Turmoil in Turkey Erdogan on a Tear after Failed Coup By Susan Schwamm

W

hen it comes to global events, the words Pennsylvania and Turkey have probably never been in the same sentence before last weekend. What does the northeast state of Pennsylvania – a blue collar state with a penchant for smashmouth football – have in common with the Middle-Eastern country of Turkey – a place where smashmouth Islam and secularism are in an ever-present tug-of-war for control? Until last weekend, not much. But after the attempted coup last Friday in Turkey, its president, Recep Tayyip Erdogan, is pointing his finger at one resident of Pennsylvania as the driving force behind the coup. Although the standoff in Turkey was quickly quashed, the next standoff may be with a much more powerful foe: The United States of America.

An Imam in Pennsylvania Fethullah Gulen, 75, lives a secluded lifestyle on a 26-acre gated property in the Pocono Mountains of Saylorsburg, PA. Gulen is the reclusive leader of the Gulen movement, a sect of Islam known as “Hizmet,” which means service. Until he went into self-imposed exile in 1999, Gulen was a prominent imam in Turkey. He practices what is considered to be a moderate brand of Sunni Islam, which embraces modernity. His philosophy not only gained him ardent followers, but blossomed into a powerful movement in Turkey which operates despite him being 6,000 miles away. The Gulen movement claims to support democracy, globalization, and progressiveness and prides itself in integrating tradition with modernity. It has millions of followers in Turkey and addresses

many of Turkey’s social problems through its schools, hospitals, banks and media outlets. It operates secular schools not only in Turkey but throughout the world. In fact, in the United States, the Gulen Movement is the biggest operator of chartered schools. For years, members of the Gulen Movement have been active in Turkish bureaucracies and have played a role in the police and judiciary. However, not everyone believes that Gulen and his followers are really moderates. Many suspect that they only practice a moderate form of Islam in order to fly beneath the radar of the secularist Turkish laws. Since the Ottoman Empire collapsed after World War I, Turkey’s official ideology has been secularism. Its judiciary and military worked hand-in-hand to eradicate religious Islam from Turkish society. Even so,

it’s not surprising that in a country where 98% of the population is Muslim, a large segment of the population continued to support Islamism, a belief that all aspects of social and government life shall be guided by Sharia and the laws of Islam. Over the past eighty years, numerous Islamist parties arose, but they were repeatedly banned by the courts or overrun by military coups. One of those was the Welfare Party, founded in 1983. Recep Tayyip Erdoğan was a young member of that party; it was banned by law in 1998. Despite the radical secularism which clamped down on any form of Islamism, the Gulen Movement was allowed to operate and grow. Its members were even able to secure key government positions. Their way of avoiding the secularists, many believe, was by flying beneath the radar and coming across as human-

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A hanging effigy of Gulen

ists, rather than Islamists. Gulen once instructed his followers: “You must move within the arteries of the system, without anyone noticing your existence, until you reach all the power centers … You must wait until such time as you have got all the state power, until you have brought to your side all the power of the constitutional institution in Turkey.” Gulen may have just been a smarter Islamist than his predecessors.

An Islamist Disguised as a Reformer In 2001, another dynamic leader came along. He, though, was clearly associated with Islamists, although he denied it. Recep Tayyip Erdogan started the Justice and Development Party at the time. The AKP, as the party is commonly called, quickly gained wide popularity through its moderate and pragmatic approach. Although many accused Erdogan of reincarnating an Islamist party disguised as being pro-democratic, Erdogan shrewdly adapted a platform that garnered wide support, even among secularists. He advocated democracy and promised to comply with European Union guidelines in order for Turkey to become a member of that group. This endeared him to secularists who always wanted to be embraced by the West. His promises of reform also earned him the support of the business community as well as the underprivileged. One of Erdogan’s most ardent early supporters, the one who gathered the power of his massive

JULY 28, The Jewish Home The Jewish Home | |JULY 21, 2015 2016 The Jewish Home | 2016 OCTOBER 29,

Erdogan and Gulen when they were friends

movement, was Fethullah Gulen. Although the two supposedly had different Islamic ideologies – Erdogan arose from a more hardline view of Islamism – the two had the common interest of defeating the secularists’ stronghold on Turkey. The Gulen Movement also had much to gain by supporting the AKP party’s rise to power because its members would be able to access respectable positions within the bureaucracy. In 2002, Erdogan’s party won the most seats in the parliament and he became the prime minister. Erdogan adopted many of the promised economic policies and reforms necessary to be in compliance with European Union guidelines and actually ushered in an era of economic success. But on the religious front, the AKP began what many believed to be a push toward Islamism. The government lifted bans on females wearing headscarves in schools and reversed numerous other laws which were in place to ensure the secular culture of Turkey. Over time, the largely secular military became weary of the AKP, but they were unable to prevent the shift towards Islamism because on the economic front things were going well and Turkey was actually moving closer towards acceptance into the EU. Then Erdogan began taking steps against the Gulen Movement. In 2013, he shut down many of their schools and closed their newspaper. The Gulenists did not go down without a fight. Gulenist prosecutors sought to expose corruption scandal within the AKP party, which resulted in several AKP ministers being

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Gulen in the rolling hills of Pennsylvania

forced to resign and tarnishing Erdogan’s reputation as a reformer. An angry Erdogan then raised the ante and designated the Gulen Movement to be a terrorist organization. Hundreds were then prosecuted over alleged Gulenist links. In December 2014, Erdogan’s government issued an arrest warrant for Fethullah Gulen. But by then Gulen was safely nestled in the rolling hills of Pennsylvania’s Pocono Mountains.

Attempted Coup Late last Thursday night, as President Erdogen was vacationing in Bodum, word of a military coup spread. Soldiers had taken control of the two main bridges into Istanbul, and fighter jets flew over government buildings in the capital, Ankara. Tanks were deployed near the parliament buildings, and military helicopters circled overhead. The military took control of the state-run TV channel. They broadcast a statement that the military had taken over control of the country because Erdogan had been eroding democracy. They announced a curfew and declared martial law. The reporter who read the statement later said that she was forced to do so at gunpoint. Within a half of an hour of the announcement, Erdogan appeared on TV in a cellphone video from an undisclosed location. He urged the public to take to the streets and said that he was on the way back to Istanbul. He arrived in Istanbul before dawn and addressed thousands of flag-waving supporters outside Istanbul’s Ataturk Airport, telling

them that he is in charge and that the coup won’t succeed. “They have pointed the people’s guns against the people,” he said. “They won’t succeed as long as we stand against them by risking everything.” According to military officials, the plotters had tried to attack Erdogan and had bombed places he had been at shortly after he left. Two F16s piloted by coup supporters supposedly even had Erdogan’s planes in sight, but did not fire at it. Officials claim that Erdogan “evaded death by minutes.” By daybreak images appeared on Turkish TV of troops surrendering. Turkish military officials announce that they had taken control of the country. In all, at least 290 died and more than 1,400 were wounded, according to Turkey’s Foreign Ministry.

Roundups Begin In the immediate aftermath of the failed coup, the soldiers involved were rounded up and stripped, a sign of humiliation. Many soldiers were beaten on the streets by civilians and one was beheaded by a crowd on one of the bridges where the coup started. The Erdogan-controlled police rounded up more than 6,000 people, including many judges and high-ranking generals. Thousands of soldiers and officials from the justice ministry were discharged and 24,000 teachers were fired. Predictably, many of those arrested and fired are associated with the Gulen movement. This purge and the tepidness of the attempted coup leads


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Feature The Week In News

People take to the streets in support of Erdogan

many to believe that the upheaval was staged as a pretext to rid the government of Erdogan’s enemies. Erdogan is promising the harshest punishment for those involved in the attempted coup. While at a funeral for his chief advisor’s brother, who was killed in a gun battle while resisting the coup, the crowd greeted Erdogan with chants that they wanted the death penalty – which is banned in Turkey – for the coup perpetrators. Erdogan announced, “We can’t ignore the people’s request in a democracy, this is your right.” At a rally in front of his home he responded to similar chants by saying, “We hear your request. In a democracy, whatever the people want they will get.” He said that he will determine if there is a legal way to dole out the death penalty to the perpetrators and added, “We will not delay this decision for long because those who attempt a coup in this country must pay.” It doesn’t take a Turkish constitutional scholar to conclude that Erdogan will likely find his legal loophole.

Erdogan Guns for Gulen But Erdogan has made it clear that the real “prize” is Fethullah Gulen himself. As soon as the cloud of the coup lifted, by Saturday morning, and it was clear to all that Erdogan had full control of the government, he began pointing his finger across the Atlantic Ocean at his former-ally-turned-rival, Fethullah Gulen. He accused Gulen of being behind the failed coup. “I have a message for Pennsylvania,” Erdogan said in a televised speech. “You have engaged in enough treason against this nation. If you dare, come back to your country.”

Rounding up those associated with the coup

He added, “Turkey will not be run from a house in Pennsylvania.” If anyone thought that Erdogan was just blowing off steam, he seemed to salivate for Gulen’s return. In another address on Saturday, he addressed the United States directly. “Dear Mr. President, I told you this before: Either arrest Fethullah Gulen or return him to Turkey,” he charged. “You didn’t listen. I call on you again,

staged. “You can think about many motivations of people who staged this coup,” he said. “Some leaders’ stage … false suicide attacks to strengthen their hand.”

America Responds As the U.S. attempts to take on ISIS, it cannot afford a falling out with Turkey, which borders Syria. Turkey, which since 1952 has been a

“I have a message for Pennsylvania. You have engaged in enough treason against this nation. If you dare, come back to your country.”

after there was a coup attempt. Extradite this man in Pennsylvania to Turkey. If we are strategic partners or model partners, do what is necessary.” He added that “any country that protects Fethhullah Gulen will be an enemy of Turkey,” a statement reminiscent of America’s post-911 position on those harboring Osama bin Laden. Turkey’s Prime Minister Binali Yıldırım echoed Erdogan’s sentiment. “I do not see any country that would stand behind this man, this leader of the terrorist gang, especially after last night,” he said. “The country that would stand behind this man is no friend to Turkey. It would even be a hostile act against Turkey.” Gulen has vehemently denied any involvement in the coup and subscribes to the theory that it was

member of NATO – a military alliance between western nations – plays a key role in the fight against ISIS. U.S. jets take off from an air base in southern Turkey to bomb ISIS targets. In the aftermath of the ISIS terrorist attack on the Istanbul Airport last month in which 41 people were killed, many believed that Turkey would strengthen its role in the fight against ISIS. But if Turkey has a rift with the U.S. they may diminish their involvement. Although ISIS poses a terrorist threat to Turkey, Erdogan sees the Kurds – who are the ones fighting ISIS on the ground in Syria – as a more existential threat to his government’s power, since approximately 20% of the Turkey population are Kurdish. If the Kurds gain control of land in Syria, the Kurds in Turkey may

seek independence as well. Therefore, when it comes to its campaign against ISIS, the U.S. has a flimsy ally in Turkey. That can all change if they give Erdogan the red meat that he wants: Fethullah Gulen. Secretary of State John Kerry reiterated on ABC’s This Week that “Turkey is a friend. Turkey is an ally. Turkey is an important coalition partner in the fight against ISIL.” He promised to consider an extradition request from Turkey and said, “If you have evidence of X, Y, or Z, please present it to us.” But he added, “We have very strict standards in order to protect people’s rights. We will go through our legal process.” Kerry told reporters in Brussels that the U.S. will honor its extradition treaty with Turkey. “There’s no interest we have in standing in the way of appropriately honoring the treaty that we have with Turkey,” he said. Within two days of Kerry’s statements, the Turkish government announced that they sent the formal extradition request to the U.S. “We have sent four dossiers to the United States for the extradition of the terrorist chief,” announced Prime Minister Binali Yildirim. He boasted, “We will present them with more evidence than they want.” Although President Obama may have a reputation of backing away from “red lines,” Recep Tayyip Erdogan has never been accused of such flimsiness. All bets are that a post-coup-empowered Erdogan will be a harder guy to play geo-political poker with. This leads to the likelihood that there will soon be a vacancy at a rolling 26-acre property in Pennsylvania.

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JULY 28, 2016 | The Jewish Home

Travel Guide: Haifa fortress itself was completely destroyed when Saladin pushed the Crusaders out of the city in 1187 and then returned to the Christians a decade later during the Third Crusade. From the end of the Crusades to Ottoman rule in 1516, Haifa is described as ruined, poor, and mostly uninhabited. Beginning in the 17th century, though, Haifa was revitalized as an important trade link between Eretz Yisrael and Europe. Haifa’s population grew steadily and comprised a diverse mix of Jews, Muslims, and Christians. The Jewish population at this time was small, mostly North African in origin, and impoverished. With the first and second aliyos in the late 1800s, Haifa’s Jewish population grew dramatically, incorporating many more Jews from Eastern Europe. Zionist pioneer Theodor Herzl understood the potential Haifa had as a major port center and wrote extensively about his vision for the city in his 1902 novel Altneuland. 1912 marked a significant milestone to achieving that vision: the building of Technion, now Israel’s equivalent of MIT, and a key factor in

over two million square feet of land. At the summit is the Shrine of the Bab. The shrine serves as the tomb of the Bab, who is considered to be the predecessor to Baha’u’llah (founder of the Baha’i religion). The Bab’s movement started in Iran and branched off from Shi’a Islam after being rejected by Shi’a clergy. He was eventually executed by the authorities but served as inspiration to Mirza Husayn Ali Nuri who became known as Baha’u’llah. Baha’u’llah was exiled to the Ottoman Empire in 1868 for his beliefs and sent to a prison in Akko, where he’s buried. Baha’u’llah’s son Abdul-Baha continued his father’s work and built the Shrine. Today, the Baha’i religion numbers at least seven million adherents and all of them are commanded to make at least one pilgrimage to the gardens and the Shrine of Baha’u’llah in Akko. The Baha’i World Center is also located in the gardens, and it is where the Baha’i ruling council makes decisions. However, the Center is off-limits to the public. Free tours run every day except Wednesday. Cave of Elijah: One of the most important Jewish sites in the Haifa region, the Cave of Elijah is where the prophet prepared to challenge King Achav’s priests (as mentioned in 1 Kings 18). The cave is located on Mount Carmel and is accessible via a stairway off Allenby Street. Madatech: Located inside the original

Atlit Detention Camp

Beit She'arim

Concentration Camp made from memory at the Ghettos Fighters' Museum

Knights' Hall

Aaron Feigenbaum Haifa, Israel’s third-largest city, is one of the most picturesque places in the Middle East. Located on Israel’s northern coast, Haifa is situated between the Mediterranean Sea and breathtaking Mount Carmel. Haifa is well-known for its tolerance: It’s one of the few places in Israel where Jews, Arabs, and Christians live in relative peace and harmony. However, it’s another religion that put Haifa on the international map: the Baha’is. Haifa is home to the gorgeous Baha’i gardens, the most revered site in the Baha’i religion. Sitting on a hill overlooking the city and the sea, the gardens are one of Israel’s most popular attractions. After you’ve explored the city, head up to the top of Mount Carmel for a dramatic view of the surroundings. Following that, there are plenty of unforgettable adventures to be had outside of Haifa, including exploring underwater shipwrecks, touring the Roman ruins of Caesarea, walking through the very ancient city of Akko and visiting the magnificent limestone grottoes of Rosh Hanikra. In short, the Haifa region is one of Israel’s most rewarding and fasci-

Caesarea

Rosh HaNikra grottoes

nating regions to discover. History The Haifa region has a rich Jewish history dating back to Biblical times. Mount Carmel is mentioned in Tanach as the place where Hashem accepted Eliyahu HaNavi’s sacrifice while rejecting that of the priests of Baal. The city of Haifa itself is mentioned numerous times in the Talmud, where it is described as a small fishing village and the home of Rabbi Avdimos. The Talmud also recounts that the coloring for tekheiles (the colored fringes of tzitzit and tallis) was derived from murex shellfish caught off the coast of Haifa. During the Crusades, the invaders initially bypassed Haifa. Although the town was described as well-fortified, the Crusaders came back and were able to capture it and slaughter its Jewish defenders. The

the success of the Israeli tech sector. Haifa’s development accelerated greatly during the British Mandate period as it became one of Israel’s largest cities and one of the Middle East’s most bustling ports. Haifa was also one of the main entry points for Jewish refugees from Europe and North Africa. During the 1948 war, Haifa was captured by the Haganah just two days after the British left the city. In the following decades, Haifa has become a major center for commerce and technology while retaining its historical charm and tranquil scenery. Attractions Baha’i Gardens: By far Haifa’s most popular attraction, the gardens are divided into 19 terraces that extend out from the summit of Mount Carmel and cover

building for the Technion (Israel Institute of Technology), Madatech is one of Israel’s best science and technology museums and has a huge variety of worthwhile exhibits. One of the most poignant of these is “Imagine,” which tells the story of the late Ilan Ramon, Israel’s first astronaut, through artifacts recovered from the Space Shuttle Columbia crash site. Kids and adults alike will enjoy having a go at the puzzles in the “Puzzle Games” section. And there are lots more interesting exhibits to explore such as an optical illusion room, the science behind magic tricks and cool chemistry lab experiments. Be sure to visit the nearby Cinematrix, a state-ofthe-art 4D theater that adds the sensations of scent, wind, water and even tickling to the usual movie experience. The films currently playing explore fascinating subjects

such as the human body and the cosmos. Clandestine Immigration and Naval Museum: This museum tells the struggle of Jewish refugees trying to immigrate to Eretz Yisrael from 1934-1948 when the Holy Land was under the British Mandate. Through historic documents, photos, interviews and films, the museum explores the variety of ingenious ways that Jews during this period managed to immigrate. One such method was the ship Af al Pi Chen (“in spite of all that”). This ship was originally a WWII tank landing craft and then converted into a clandestine immigration ship. The ship has been completely preserved and is on display. Another part of the museum deals with the history of the Israeli Navy, whose history is tied up with that of the clandestine immigration movement. One of the most intriguing stories told here is the Shoded operation in which an Egyptian flagship was sunk by Israeli commando boats and INS Eilat in what was Israel’s first naval battle. The rest of the museum continues the Navy’s story from the 1950s to the present day including the establishment of a submarine fleet, the incredible victories during the Yom Kippur War, and the capture of a terrorist boat carrying 80 tanks in 2002. Outside the museum are a variety of naval guns, terrorist boats, enemy ships, and the INS Mivtach – the first Israeli missile boat. National Maritime Museum: This museum steps back further in time and looks at the history of seafaring around the world, with special emphasis placed on Israel’s close connection to the Mediterranean Sea. There is an exhibit about the phenomenon of naval piracy, a phenomenon which originated millennia ago in the Mediterranean and has plagued the high seas around the world ever since. Original pirate artifacts are on display. Another exhibit focuses on ancient seafaring in the Mediterranean and modern underwater archaeology. Yet another exhibit takes a look at antique navigational instruments including the medieval astrolabe, of which many were made by Jewish craftsmen. Haifa Educational Zoo: Built on a nature reserve on Mount Carmel, the zoo has over 100 species of wildlife and fantastic views of the Mediterranean. Many of the animals housed here are native to Israel. The natives include the Israeli wolf, ibex, Griffon vultures, camels, and the rare Persian fallow deer. There are also more wellknown animals such as pythons, leopards, tigers, and monkeys. Kids can pet friendly animals and have their picture taken with them. Also located on the zoo grounds is the Prehistory Museum, which takes a look at excavations of prehistoric settlements, some of which have been submerged for thousands of years. Day trips: The ancient site of Caesarea is located on the coast halfway between Haifa and Tel Aviv. The history of the site goes all the way back to the fourth century BCE when it was used by the Phoenicians as a port. King Herod built the city into one of the most impressive cities in Eretz Yisrael, with the iconic amphitheater that still stands today. Herod renamed the city in honor of the Roman emperor. Caesarea


Travel The Week In News

JULY 28, 2016 | The Jewish Home

View from Mount Carmel

played host to many key events in ancient Jewish history, including the Jewish revolt of the first century CE and the execution of Rabbi Akiva in 135. Caesarea was an important Christian center for several centuries before falling to the invading Muslim armies in 637. Visitors today can see the remains of the Crusader city and see concerts at the amphitheater. The old city of Akko is an absolute must-see for history buffs. The underground Knights’ Hall is an ancient Crusader fortress that served as the invading army’s headquarters after the city’s capture in 1104. It was in these halls that the Crusaders (officially known as the Knights of the Hospital of Saint John) would eat, sleep, and coordinate before journeying to Jerusalem. As the Crusaders were slowly pushed out of the Holy Land by Saladin’s army, the Hall became their last stronghold until the Mamluk invasion in 1291. Much later, the above-ground citadel became a British prison to hold Zionist activists. The Hall is in remarkable condition considering its age and is one of the city’s most popular attractions. Elsewhere in Akko, you can visit the Ramchal’s shul. The highly influential author of the ethical guide Mesillas Yesharim came to Akko from his native Italy in 1743. In keeping with Italian-Jewish tradition, the bimah is located on the wall opposite the ark containing the Torah scrolls. The Tunisian Or Torah shul in Akko is a stunning masterpiece of mosaic art. A local Tunisian-Jewish resident modeled the shul’s design after one on the Tunisian island of Djerba, which is still home to a fairly large Jewish community. The Atlit fortress is one of the most impressive examples of Crusader architecture in the Middle East. It’s located right on the coast and was capable of supporting as many as 4000 troops. While the site is currently off-limits due to being located within the Atlit naval base, it is still worth going here to snap photos from afar of this amazing structure. However, what isn’t off-limits in Atlit is the famous detainee camp. Many Jewish Holocaust refugees who traveled to Israel after WWII to seek a new home were cruelly imprisoned in this

squalid camp by the British. Following a break-in by in October 1945 by the Haganah, the British relocated their detainee camp to Cyprus. During the War of Independence and the 1967 war, the authorities used Atlit to hold Arab POWs. Today the detainee camp is a museum that tells the story of the history of the site and the experiences of the refugees kept there. Beit Shearim is considered by UNESCO as the most extensive ancient Jewish burial site in the world. The catacombs, which were dug into the local hillside, contain hundreds of ancient coffins. Talmud Yerushalmi notes it as being the burial place of Yehuda HaNasi, who lived in the town. After he was buried there, many prominent Jews from around the world requested to be buried in Beit Shearim as well. The outside stone benches were used for prayers and discourses. The Lohamei HaGeta’ot kibbutz on Israel’s far northern coast is home to the Ghetto Fighters’ House, a museum dedicated to honoring the Jewish men and women who fought the Nazis in the Warsaw Ghetto. The museum contains a comprehensive collection of materials related to the Jewish resistance including testimony, journals, underground newspaper, images, and films. A relatively recent addition to the house is the Yad LeYeled Children’s Memorial Museum, the first museum in the world to commemorate Jewish children who perished in the Holocaust. Every Yom HaZikaron (28 Nisan), a public commemoration ceremony attended by around 15,000 people is held in the museum’s amphitheater. Last but certainly not least, a visit from Haifa to the Rosh HaNikra grottoes is highly recommended. The stunning turquoise waters and dramatic rock formations make for an amazing sight as you ascend the world’s steepest cable car, which runs very close to the Lebanese border. Walkways provide a safe place to view the incredible grottoes. Visitors to the site are also treated to a captivating film about the grottoes. Visitors can also swim in the grottoes although the local wildlife (bats, birds, and loggerhead turtles) might not take too kindly to that.

Daven and Eat One of the most famous shuls in Haifa is the Ohel Ya’akov Synagogue, constructed by Baron Edmond James de Rothschild in memory of his father Jacob. There is also a Chabad at Technion University. A third choice is Yeshivas Or Vishua in the Neve Sha’anan neighborhood of Haifa. Haifa has a huge variety of kosher restaurants covering a wide range of cuisine types. For example, there’s Falafel Yerushalmi, the perfect place for traditional Israeli food. If you’re in the mood for

Chinese, try Ha’sinit shel Nof at the highend Nof Hotel. And if you’re wondering what kosher South American food tastes like, head over to El Gaucho. Getting There and Around The best option to get to Haifa is to travel by car, bus, train, taxi, or shuttle from Tel Aviv. Travel time is less than two hours. Getting around Haifa is easy thanks to its efficient Egged bus system and the Carmelit funicular (the only subway system in Israel).

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The Week In News

Revel.

JULY 28, 2016 | The Jewish Home

Safety Reminders for Children Riding Scooters & Bikes Michael Rubinstein Esq.

Wood Grilled Rib Eye mustard demi | fried yukon gold potatoes sous vide abalone mushrooms | roasted pearl onions

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We are well into the summer! With warmer weather upon us, it’s common to see children and teenagers in our community out and about enjoying the outdoors on two wheels. As a concerned parent and Los Angeles accident attorney, I’d like to share a few safety reminders for children and teenagers riding their scooters and bikes. If You’re Under 18, You MUST Wear a Helmet! California requires everyone under the age of 18 to wear a helmet while riding a bicycle or scooter. Let me repeat that: Children riding scooters are required to wear helmets, too! Statistics show that the head is the most likely area of the body to sustain an impact in an accident, ch”v. Parents: If you’re sending one of your children on an errand to the store, please make sure he or she does not ride without a helmet! Children might not know about California’s helmet laws, and it’s incumbent on adults to help make sure our children are educated on this important, potentially life-saving issue. Make sure your child’s helmet fits properly and is certified by the Snell Foundation, the ASTM (American Society for Testing and Materials), or CPSC (United States Consumer Product Safety Commission). Maximize Visibility Many collisions between bikes and cars occur because of visibility issues. Bicycle riders should make every effort to increase their visibility. One way to do this is to wear bright or neon-colored clothing, as well as reflector vests for nighttime riding. The key is to make yourself stand out and catch an otherwise distracted driver’s attention. Wearing bright clothing is not required, but it’s a good idea. Riders must also use their bicycle lights whenever riding at night, even if it’s for a short ride. Too often, I see yeshiva students riding their bicycles at night without using their lights. This is a terribly dangerous habit that can have tragic consequences. Do not assume a car will see you! Turn on your lights, and make sure they are in good working order. The lights must be visible from 300 feet ahead, and 500 feet behind. Do not be afraid to use your bicycle’s bell to alert nearby drivers and pedestrians of your presence. Riding Against Traffic Riding against traffic – that is, riding in the direction against which cars are traveling – is a controversial issue. The

California Vehicle Code flat-out forbids bicyclists from riding against traffic if they are riding on the actual street. A bicycle is treated the same as a vehicle under the Code – just like it’s illegal for a car to drive the wrong way against traffic, it’s also illegal for a bike to do so. What about riding against traffic on the sidewalk? The legality of sidewalk riding changes from city to city. As it stands now, sidewalk riding is permitted in Los Angeles as long as the rider is not riding in wanton disregard for the safety of him/ herself or others. Even where it’s legal, riding on the sidewalk against traffic has led to many collisions between cyclists and cars. Often, while a driver exits a parking lot to turn right, he or she will not anticipate a cyclist approaching quickly from right to left, against traffic. Riders should keep this in mind if they are riding against traffic, and exercise special caution near parking lot entrances and exits. Stop at the Stop Sign! My office receives numerous questions each month about this issue. Does a bicyclist have to stop at the stop sign? The answer is yes – and that surprises many people. Unfortunately, I’ve lost track of how many times I’ve seen yeshiva students and adults blow right through stop signs. Whether you’re riding your bike or a scooter, you are required to stop at the stop sign. If a police officer sees you violate this rule, he will probably give you a ticket. It might disrupt your rhythm to stop at every stop sign, but your life is more important. When it’s car versus bike, car always wins. Please educate your children so that they comply with the important laws discussed above. While we are all enjoying the warmer summer months, let’s keep in mind the mitzvah of Venishmartem Me’od L’Nafshosaychem. Michael Rubinstein is a Los Angeles based personal injury and accident attorney. He may be reached by visiting www. rabbilawyer.com, or by calling 213-2936075. For a free bicycle safety handout, send an email to Michael@rabbilawyer. com.


The Week In News

JULY 28, 2016 | The Jewish Home

PA to Sue UK

Gaza Tunnels: Fun for Kids? Well, it seems that they have found someone else to blame. Recently it was reported that the Palestinian Authority is preparing a lawsuit against the British gov-

Summer time brings all sorts of exciting and pleasant feelings, especially for children who get to enjoy their time off from school and have some extra fun. However, itineraries for Gaza’s day camps are vastly different than your child’s calendar of trips to the local zoo or amusement park. Gaza’s latest summer attraction for its youth is an informative and educational tour of the underground tunnels that were constructed to carry out violent cross-border attacks on Israelis. In a video posted to Facebook by Afaq, a pro-Hamas media outlet, there is footage of throngs of children hiking through the tunnels. The post is accompanied by a caption that reads, “Afaq media enters a tunnel created by the Qassam Brigades during a weapons exhibition in Shejaiya on the anniversary [of the war].” The passageway serves as a memorial to the operatives killed by Israel, their portraits adorning the tunnel walls. Hamas is packaging this exhibition as a depiction of weapons and methods used in the “resistance” against Israel. The attraction that is “open to any citizen or media for videos and publishing” is located in the Shejaiya neighborhood of Gaza City. The tunnels were discovered by the IDF during Operation Protective Edge that began on July 8, 2014 and lasted for 50 days. Many of the tunnels were effectively used to ambush Israeli soldiers during the war. Throughout the weeks of violent fighting, 66 Israeli soldiers perished along with six innocent civilians. Hamas claims that 2,000 Gazan citizens died during the conflict. According to their records, 50 percent of them were civilians. Israel has denied these figures, calling them grossly exaggerated. In the months following the conflict, Israel invested close to NIS 1 billion, about $250 million, into technology that could detect these tunnels. In the last several months, Israel has discovered two such tunnels. The Shin Bet has said that captured Gazans were the source of extensive information regarding the tunnel system. I wonder if these camps offer bussing and hot lunch…

ernment over the issuing of the 1917 Balfour Declaration that paved the way for the creation of the State of Israel. The PA’s Foreign Minister Riyad al-Malki told Arab League leaders gathered in Mauritania on Monday that London is responsible for all “Israeli crimes” committed since the end of the British mandate in 1948. Signed by British Foreign Secretary Lord Arthur James Balfour in 1917, the declaration was seen as giving the Zionist movement official recognition and backing on the part of a major power, on the eve of the British conquest of the then-Ottoman territory of Palestine. This decision,

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al-Malki charged, “gave people who don’t belong there something that wasn’t theirs.” There was no immediate reaction from Britain, although it’s possible that they’re used to hearing a bunch of hot air from this group. Interestingly, this is not the first time the UK was sued in this respect. Last year, a group calling itself the Popular Palestinian Campaign to Sue the United Kingdom sued the UK in an Egyptian court. In 2008, a Palestinian youth group said it would attempt to sue the UK over the Balfour Declaration in Britain or in the ICC. It is unclear if either effort was successful.

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The Week In News

IDF Feeds the Needy

Soldiers generally need to eat large meals, but there are still some leftovers after dessert is served. This week, the Kirya (IDF headquarters in Tel Aviv) cafeteria announced that it has joined up with an initiative that takes leftover foods uneaten by soldiers from army bases to soup kitchens that feeds hundreds of needy people, including senior citizens and Holocaust survivors. This collaboration with the army, which is run by Leket Israel, is not new. The deal started two years ago and now the army provides the bulk of the cooked food for the needy.

JULY 28, 2016 | The Jewish Home

Agency Relations Manager Pini Fefer related, “We are working with nearly 50 bases across the country and collecting leftovers every day. All in all, we receive some 45,000 meals from the army per month. “A week ago, we started with the Kirya, and it’s working great. Yesterday, for example, we collected 400 meals from there. It’s a very large base, and it naturally has a lot of leftovers.” Many of those who are recipients of this program would go hungry without the food they consume at soup kitchens throughout the land.

Gaza Workers Receive Financial Aid from Qatar It’s payday for many in the Gaza Strip. Back in 2007, Hamas military forces seized control of the Gaza Strip from President Mahmoud Abbas, sparking mutual distrust. A major effect of the conflict was the budget cut that left thousands of public sector workers without pay, which was further exacerbated by the blockade imposed on

Gaza by both Israel and Egypt. At the time, Hamas employees protested, but to no avail.

By 2014 both sides had agreed to a reconciliation and many assumed that the Palestinian Authority would resume the payroll of 50,000 public sector employees. However, that money never showed, and thousands of public servants remained in heavy financial distress. While some suffering economies receive bailouts from government agencies, others get bailed out by their oil-rich relatives. Recently, Qatar, an oil-rich Gulf state, has generously pledged to donate $30 million in order to pay the workers who have not been getting paid since 2013. The Palestinian Authority and the State of Israel did not provide immediate comment but Hamas gladly accepted the generous donation, increasing suspicions that Qatar’s frequent donations are reaching the hands of Hamas and other Islamist terrorist groups across the region. The emir of Qatar, Sheikh Tamim bin Hamad al-Thani, said the payment of 113 million riyals is intended to ease the suffering and financial distress of the region. “The July payment will be made in full immediately once the Qatari financial fund is received,” Hamas’ deputy finance minister, Youssef al-Kayyali, promised. Don’t go spending your entire paycheck at once; you never know when the next one will come.

Saudis Look to Israel in Solving Iran Issue Peace between Israel and the Palestinians is the solution to the Iran support of terrorism, according to the retired Saudi Arabian general that visited Israel this week. Dr. Anwar Eshki is pushing for a two-state solution and is pulling out all the stops to convince both parties to participate. In a very rare visit from a Saudi official, a delegation of businessmen and academics led by Eshki visited Jerusalem and met with many Israeli officials and members of Knesset. “To my knowledge,

there is no cooperation between Israel and Saudi Arabia in counter-terrorism efforts, and though they share the same approach in seeking a solution, we want Israel to put an end to what has caused this terrorism,” Eshki told Israeli radio. When he was forced to answer as to whether he thought Israel is responsible for terror in the region, Eshki admitted that “the Israeli-Palestinian conflict is not the source of terrorism, but it does create fertile ground for acts of terrorism in the region. If the conflict is resolved, the countries that exploit the Palestinian issue, namely Iran, will no longer be able to capitalize on it.” Although the visit was a rare occurrence, Saudi Arabia has a history of believing that peace in Israel leads to peace in the rest of the Middle-East. In 2002, the Saudi kingdom put forth a peace initiative that guarantees full diplomatic ties with 57 Arab and Muslim countries if a peace deal can be made with the Palestinians. Multiple media outlets have reported on secret meetings between Arab powers and Israel to determine if the Jewish state could be a possible ally in the fight against Iranian-sponsored terror.

What’s an Italian without Meatballs?

It’s almost the Nine Days. That means lots of meals sans chicken or meat. But, hey, it’s only nine days long, so we can survive without our steaks and burgers. Residents of Turin, a small town in Italy, may not be so lucky. The new mayor of the village is seeking to turn the area into Italy’s first “vegetarian and vegan” city with the promotion of a meatless-diet. Mama mia! Seems like Mayor Chiara Appendino has a bone to pick with nona’s meatballs and chicken cacciatore. And does she abhor pizza as well? The 32-year-old is advocating a plant-based diet for residents and has pledged with this be a priority for her administration. She was just sworn into office last month; her term lasts five years.


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Holy cannoli! I’m sure residents will soon be chanting “Basta – enough!” to just eating pasta.

The Bottle Deposit They say that truth is stranger than fiction and I’m sure they’re right. This story is straight out of an episode from Seinfeld, but this time Kramer and Newman aren’t the stars.

Love to drink water in the summer? Well, you do know that you pay an extra five cents per bottle you’re drinking. Want to get your bottle deposit back? No problem. Just stand in line outside of Costco and start heaving them in.

Want to earn more? Perhaps you should head to Michigan. In that state residents receive ten cents back for every bottle deposited. (That’s because they spent ten cents on the bottle when they purchased it, but that’s just semantics.) The problem with heading to the Wolverine State with your bags of bottles is that it’s illegal, contrary to what Kramer and Newman think, to deposit your bottles there without purchasing them in the same state. Brian Everidge is learning this lesson the hard way. He was pulled over by a Michigan state trooper for speeding. The trooper noticed that the truck he was driving was a little overloaded: “I don’t think you could have put another five or 10 cans in here,” Clifford Lyden said. “It was packed.” Everidge indicated the 10,000 cans were from Kentucky and he was just “returning” them. To whom? To where? Therein lies the question. Now Everidge is heading to the can because of all his cans and faces up to five years in prison for his money-making scheme. Sort of seems like his business ideas were scraping the bottom of the bottle – I mean, barrel.

Ice Cream Forever

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Let’s Build a Wall If he wants a wall so much, we’ll give him a wall. That’s what a Los Angeles-based street artist must have said when he created a wall around Donald Trump’s star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame. The wall was built on Tuesday evening but it was short-lived. The 6-inch wall made of wood and barbed wire was taken down early Wednesday morning. Could it be the Donald said, “Mr. President, tear down this wall”?

It’s so hot outside now that the second you start screaming for your ice cream, it’s already melted. Enter Gastronaut Ice Cream. This gastronomic delight isn’t actually frozen and comes in a bar but, according to its creators, the product transforms into the “exact same sweet and creamy ice cream you’ve known all your life” once you start licking. The recipe for this all-weather confection takes real ice cream, adds a pinch of salt, and freezedries it into a bar. Sounds delicious? (Or not?) The ice cream comes in three square flavors: Mexican Chocolate Chip, Cookies and Cream, and Mint Chocolate Chip. Rob Collignon, owner of Gastronaut Foods, boasts, “This is the only premium organic freeze-dried ice cream on the planet. I’ve always liked freeze-dried ice cream – they sell it in space museums and camping stores.” The Brooklyn resident says that his product tastes way better than those eating it in space since he starts with the best ingredients. “Ice cream is delicious and deserves to be eaten everywhere, no matter how far from a freezer.” Sounds like it’s out of this world.

“I built and paid for the wall myself. No Mexican money,” tweeted the British-born artist, as curious onlookers took pictures of his work before it was removed. This is not the first time this artist has trumpeted his disdain for Trump. He has also created “No Trump Anytime” signs that have been posted in Los Angeles, New York and other cities. Now we know who will be one of the first immigrants who will be deported once Trump hits the Oval Office.

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Quotes The Week In News

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OCTOBER 29, 2015 | The Jewish Home

Notable Quotes “Say What?!”

The Russians are releasing these emails for the purpose of helping Donald Trump. I don’t think it’s coincidental that these emails were released on the eve of our convention here, and I think that’s disturbing - Hillary Clinton’s campaign manager, Robby Mook, discussing emails which were released by WikiLeaks showing that the Democrat National Committee worked to get Hillary the nomination over Bernie Sanders

It just goes to show you their exact moral compass. I mean they’ll say anything to be able to win this. This is time and time again, lie after lie. It’s disgusting. It’s so phony. I watched him bumble through the interview. - Donald Trump Jr. responding to the allegation that the Russians are working for his father, on CNN

Hate cops? The next time you need help call a crackhead

Syrian Migrant Dies in German Blast

–An electronic billboard in eastern Indiana last week. The posting was subsequently taken down

- BBC headline after a Syrian migrant blew up a suicide bomb in Germany, killing himself and injuring many others

Meanwhile, Donald Trump’s running mate Mike Pence gave a speech at the convention last night and even poked fun at the fact most people don’t know who he is. I guess even Donald Trump calls him “Vice President Hey Buddy.” – Jimmy Fallon

In Cleveland tonight, Donald Trump officially accepted the Republican nomination. Throwing “Make America Great” t-shirts into the crowd — not really, but it’s kind of believable, right? – Jimmy Kimmel

I often feel like there’s the Hillary standard and then there’s the standard for everybody else. - Hillary Clinton on CBS’ “60 Minutes”

As we were working together on the challenge of [ISIS] and terrorism, it’s hard for some people to grasp it, but what we – you – are doing here right now is of equal importance because it has the ability to literally save life on the planet itself.

When he finished his speech, they dropped 125,000 balloons. Poor Chris Christie spent all day blowing them up. – Ibid.

– Sec. of State John Kerry in Vienna at a conference for a cleaner environment

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The big story of last night was that Texas Sen. Ted Cruz, despite being invited by Donald Trump, refused to endorse him in his speech and this prompted the audience to boo him. I will say Ted Cruz was completely unfazed by the booing. I think it was because he thought they were going “Cruuuz.” He’s like, “Thanks guys, thank you, thank you.” – James Corden

Donald Trump’s campaign manager Paul Manafort said … that Melania’s speech was similar to Michelle Obama’s because they must feel the same way about their families. Then Melania said, “Yes, especially my daughters, Sasha and Malia.” – Jimmy Fallon

Following the outrage that Cruz did not endorse Trump last night, Cruz’s wife, Heidi, was escorted from the convention by security as people yelled, “Goldman Sachs!” Careful, Republicans — if you say it three times, Hillary will appear. – Seth Myers

I really like Trump and Pence’s chemistry. You can tell these guys have been friends since all the way back on July 18th of 2016. – James Corden

We demand a termination to APD’s involvement in the Georgia International Law Enforcement Exchange (GILEE) program, that trains our officers in Apartheid Israel. - Part of a list of demands presented to Atlanta’s Mayor Kasim Reed by a local “Black Lives Matter” organization

There was a demand that I stop allowing the Atlanta Police Department to train with the Israeli police department. I’m not going to do that; I happen to believe that the Israeli police department has some of the best counterterrorism techniques in the world, and it benefits our police department from that longstanding relationship. – Mayor Reed’s responding at a press conference

I ask you as a personal courtesy to me to not engage in any kind of protest on the floor. It’s of utmost importance you explain this to your delegations. Bernie. – Text message sent out by Bernie Sanders hours before the Democrat National Convention began

I didn’t leave my bed, because I was like, “Man, if I walk outside somebody might just try to hit me with their car.” – Kevin Durant talking about the aftermath of his decision to leave the Oklahoma City Thunder to join the Golden State Warriors

Americans viewing the recent failed coup attempt in Turkey as some exotic foreign news story – the latest, violent yet hardly unusual political development to occur in a region constantly beset by turmoil – should pause to consider that the prospect of similar instability would not be unfathomable in this country if Donald Trump were to win the presidency. – The Los Angeles Times suggesting a possible coup if Trump gets elected

Right now the New York Times says that Hillary has a 76 percent chance of winning the election. Hillary says she’s excited by the news and can’t wait to find a new way to blow it. – Jimmy Fallon

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