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GIVE JEWISHLY GIFT CARDS

Snapshots of Impact

An Investment in Hope

Locally, in Israel and overseas

DAFs leverage the power of community

PHILANTHROPY THROUGH A

RREPAIRING EPPAIRRING THE WO WORLD ORLDD HHAS AS NNEVER EVER BBEEN EEN EEASIER ASIERR

A meaningful Chanukah gift for your friends & family. Give Jewishly gift cards are like other gift cards, but instead of buying stuff they allow you to make a donation to organizations you're passionate about. Available in December on our website. For or more information contact Gilad Salmon, Director, Give Jewishly, gilad@givejewishly.org, 415.512.6282

Helping Our Youth Find Real Joy in Giving Jewish Teen Foundations Celebrating a landmark achievement: 9 years, 500 teens, over $1Million granted to nonprofit organizations and causes

www.GiveJewishly.org Jewish Community Federation of San Francisco, the Peninsula, Marin and Sonoma Counties 121 Steuart Street, San Francisco, CA 94105 | 415.777.0411 | jewishfed.org

Jewish Community Federation of San Francisco, the Peninsula, Marin and Sonoma Counties 121 Steuart Street, San Francisco, CA 94105 | 415.777.0411 | jewishfed.org

Legacies Helping to ensure Jewish continuity

November 2012 • Volume 1


Dear Friend, We are so pleased that you joined us at the Day of Philanthropy, where our community comes together to learn, connect, and celebrate the profound impact we have when we work together. The Jewish Community Federation and Endowment Fund does annual, multi-year, and endowed fundraising to strategically invest in the most effective Jewish organizations here and around the world, fulfilling our collective responsibility and creating vibrant Jewish life. We also work with individuals and families through DAFs and foundations to achieve their personal philanthropic goals. Over one hundred years ago, the Federation was built by visionary leaders whose lives were deeply connected to Jewish values. The belief that we take care of those who need help, give with just intention, and build community was second nature to these men and women. At the turn of the century, they created the organizations that became the foundation of Jewish life then, and remain so today. They established the Federation to care for the entire Jewish ecosystem, and to bring the community together to solve our greatest challenges. This long tradition of innovation and collective action continues today. And although the challenges we face have changed, our commitment to working together to address them has not. In this past year, the Federation has been evolving to meet the demands of a changing philanthropic landscape, and to better serve our community. We have refocused our work around three key roles that represent our unique strengths, and provide the community with the support it needs to thrive: investing strategically, building capacity, developing leaders and philanthropists. In addition, for the first time in our 102 year history, we are offering donors the option of investing directly in issues that matter most to them through a family of four funds. We are also bringing the community together as a convener to address our challenges and embrace our opportunities. It is an exceptionally exciting time to be leading this venerable organization as CEO and President of the Board of Trustees, and we are deeply grateful for your enthusiasm and support.

102 years ago, at the turn of the century, our community came together to create charitable organizations that took care of Jews in need, and they established the Federation to solve the community’s greatest challenges.

Jennifer Gorovitz CEO Jewish Community Federation and Endowment Fund

Today, Nancy Grand President

Our community is fortunate to have fresh ideas, strong organizations, a pipeline of capable leaders and passionate philanthropists − resulting in vibrant Jewish living that will thrive for the next 100 years and beyond, as long as we and the next generation remain engaged and committed to a common goal.

Jewish Community Federation and Endowment Fund

we remain part of the Bay Area’s culture of innovation and impact. Guided by those same timeless Jewish values of kehilla (community), tzedakah (giving with just intention), and tikkun olam (repairing the world), the Jewish Community Federation and Endowment Fund is a philanthropic catalyst, connecting people of all ages, backgrounds, and perspectives to the power we have as a Jewish community to improve the world.

We can make a difference individually, but when we work together, there is no limit to what we can achieve. That's the Power of Community.

BRINGING THE COMMUNITY TOGETHER FOR GREATER IMPACT.

With sincere gratitude,

The Federation helps build and sustain a healthy, thriving Jewish community by playing three important and unique roles:

Jennifer Gorovitz

Nancy Grand

CEO, Jewish Community Federation and Endowment Fund

President, Jewish Community Federation and Endowment Fund

We Can Make A Difference Individually, But Together There Is No Limit to What We Can Achieve… Sending free books and music through the PJ Library to 4,000 Bay Area children every month, introducing Judaism into many interfaith homes while educating entire families on Jewish holidays, traditions and values. Supporting Israel by providing academic tutoring for 600 Israeli teens from disadvantaged backgrounds, and helping ensure a strong and just democracy. Caring for seniors, by giving 20,000 free or highly subsidized nutritious meals to 1,000 local low-income elderly through our community’s Kosher Lunch Program. Providing more than $1 million in scholarships for Jewish schools and camps, creating a lifetime of Jewish connection for hundreds of children. Creating a truly inclusive community by helping our synagogues, day schools, and camps to welcome and accommodate 450 children with special needs and their families. 2

STRATEGIC INVESTING: We raise funds and make grants to support the community’s core organizations, fund vital capital projects, foster innovation, and solve big challenges that impact our local, Israeli, and worldwide Jewish community. BUILDING CAPACITY: We cultivate high-performing organizations through our pro bono consulting, specialized coaching and trainings, and communities of practice.

Federation Earns Top Spot Among US Charities Two Years In A Row Charity Navigator, America’s largest independent evaluator of charities, has once again given our Federation its highest 4 star rating. This indicates that the Federation executes its mission in a fiscally responsible way and outperforms most other charities in America. In fact, only 17% of charities receive a 4 star rating in consecutive years. In this competitive philanthropic marketplace, this “exceptional” designation confirms what our donors already know – that we are an effective organization they can support with confidence.

ENGAGING LEADERS AND PHILANTHROPISTS: We develop and engage Jewish leaders and philanthropists to ensure our community’s future.

PHILANTHROPY THROUGH A JEWISH LENS The Jewish Community Federation's Annual Campaign focuses your donations on the services that are most critical to local and global Jewish vitality and continuity. Our expert staff provides a range of philanthropic services to align your charitable goals with your values and increase the impact of the change you seek to create in the world. Each year, millions of Jews locally and around the world are helped by our donors, ranging from aid to Jews in need, to connecting our people and resources on the ground in Israel, to ensuring that our diverse community and its children build a welcoming and meaningful relationship with their heritage.

We can make a difference individually, but when we work together, there is no limit to what we can achieve. That's the Power of Community.


LEVERAGE THE POWER OF COMMUNITY WITH A DONOR ADVISED FUND

DONOR ADVISED FUND FAQ’S What is a Donor Advised Fund(DAF)?

An Investment in Hope In 1976, at the height of the Cold War, Sophia Pesotchinsky and her family fled the Soviet Union. They arrived in the U.S. as refugees with a toddler, significant language barriers, no place to live, nor jobs awaiting them, and about $300 to start their lives over. And yet, with one obstacle larger than the next, they overcame them all. Sophia went on to co-create three life science companies and her husband Leon became a professor of mathematics at UCSB and San Jose State University. Indeed, theirs is an inspiring American success story, but when you ask Sophia about life’s challenges she immediately shifts the conversation to the most courageous person she knows, her daughter, Vera. Vera was diagnosed with Late Onset Tay-Sachs disease eleven years ago. Since that time, despite the unrelenting toll of her illness, she has received undergraduate and graduate degrees from Wellesley College and Santa Clara University, worked in marketing for her family business, and has embraced life with dignity, great humor, and not a trace of self-pity. “She is an inspiration to everyone – and I mean everyone she meets,” said Sophia. But mercilessly, her condition rages on. So Sophia decided to do whatever she could to help in her daughter’s fight. Thus, she established a Donor Advised Fund, dedicated to the eradication of Tay-Sachs and other degenerative neurological diseases. “If there is one thing I want people to know about our DAF it is that I believe it is helping us get closer to combating this disease. I’m an engineer, I analyze things. I don’t work in dreams. And the scientific breakthroughs we’ve had in the last six years, particularly with gene therapy, have given us real hope – not just for a cure for my daughter, but for people who struggle with any genetic neurological diseases. The first clinical studies are scheduled for the beginning of 2013.” Of course, running a business, being involved with the Tay Sachs Gene Therapy consortium, and tending to the needs of her family doesn’t give Sophia a lot of time to take on the responsibilities of operating her own philanthropic foundation. “I’m a very busy person,” said Sophia. “So that’s why I set up my DAF with JCF. It was incredibly easy and it has allowed me to focus on what I need to focus on to stop this disease.”

To learn more or contribute to Sophia’s Fund #797 call 650.248.9630 or email sophia@lsvpusa.com. As Sophia has done, supporting causes that are personally meaningful through DAFs has become increasingly popular. Today more and more donors are using DAFs to honor loved ones and celebrate lifecycle events such as weddings, b’nai mitzvahs, memorials and graduations.

For information on DAFs contact Ruth Bender at 415.512.6205 or email RuthB@sfjcf.org.

10

Emma, Liz, Ron and Rachel Mester

A DAF is a charitable fund in your name, any name of your choosing or anonymously, that accepts contributions and allows you to recommend grants to public charities throughout the U.S. Why create a DAF with the Jewish Community Federation and Endowment Fund? JCF has been putting Jewish values into action for the past 100 years with a robust philanthropic program emphasizing our shared values and commitment to tikkun olam (repair of the world). A DAF with JCF aligns your philanthropy with your Jewish values and our mission to ensure the collective well-being of the Jewish people; contributions from your JCF DAF are made in the name of your fund as well as the Jewish Community Federation and Endowment Fund; and JCF provides personalized, responsive service with access to a dedicated staff with philanthropic expertise in: • Multi-generational philanthropic education • The needs of our community • Evaluating the effectiveness and impact of programs and organizations Why DAFs are the preferred way to give v Simple: organize all of your philanthropic giving in one online portal. v 24 hour online access: w Recommend a grant any time you like w View your fund balance w Review past grants – individual contributions and cumulative contributions to organizations v Flexible: w Add to the fund whenever you want. No annual minimum distribution requirements. w JCF can accept contributions of many kinds of assets, including stock and real property. v Informed: w JCF philanthropic advisors with expertise in strategic grantmaking, Jewish community issues, and multigenerational family philanthropy are available to assist you. v Family-friendly: w Your family can engage in supporting worthy causes together through a single fund or multiple funds.

INVESTING STRATEGICALLY Snapshots of Local Impact Synagogue-Federation Partnership

A Community of Service

Capacity Building

“We have never received support like this and are thrilled to have resources brought to our congregation,” said Bonnie Lindauer, whose synagogue, Congregation B’nai Emunah, is one of eight participating in the Membership Initiative, which connects local synagogues and nonprofits to experts in the field of fundraising and membership development. “It gives us renewed energy and a burst of ideas.”

With more than half of California children in the 4th grade reading below grade level, the Jewish Coalition for Literacy provides much-needed support to children during a crucial period in their development. Jerilyn, a volunteer, agreed “It’s invaluable, providing more than reading resources and support to underserved communities – it enriches the lives of all its participants.”

The Federation convened a team of real estate and finance experts to help the Jewish Home build a 21st century facility to house and care for seniors at its Silver Avenue site in San Francisco. “Both the capital and business planning aspects of this project are so complex,” explains Daniel Ruth, President and Chief Executive Officer of the Jewish Home. “Having some of the best real estate and finance minds in the Bay Area in our court will go a long way toward making our new home provide the best care possible.”

Bay Area Initiatives The JCF Pro Bono Practice leverages the expertise of professionals in the community on behalf of Jewish nonprofits. Professionals serve as consultants on short-term, results-oriented projects while nonprofits gain access to free, high-quality consulting that strengthens their operations and increases their impact. “Executive Directors often do not have the time and resources to get training and coaching. I felt I was in a unique position to really help make a difference,” said Tracy Akresh, a volunteer.

Reducing Barriers to Jewish Life

Bay Area

Research confirms that high quality Jewish preschool doesn’t just contribute to a child’s future success, it also lays the foundation for a life-long Jewish identity. The Early Childhood Education Initiative is working to increase the quality of 41 Jewish preschool programs, developing 400 exceptional educators, engaging thousands of families in Jewish life and ultimately, helping to ensure our Jewish future.

Next Generation Engagment Special Needs Initiative With an estimated 9,000 children in our service area with autism, ADHD, and other learning challenges, many are excluded from Jewish life because schools, camps and other programs often lack the resources they need to serve them. INCLUDE is a partnership of Jewish LearningWorks and the JCF that builds the capacity of the community to fully welcome and include children with special needs and their families.

Moishe House is an international organization that provides meaningful Jewish experiences to young adults in their 20s. By subsidizing the rent for three to six young people per house in exchange for their commitment to organize events that build community, Moishe House has developed a creative model for cultivating young leaders. Started in the Bay Area six years ago, today they have 50 houses in 14 countries, and have connected over 44,000 young adult Jews to the community.

Caring for the Vulnerable From Jewish Single Parent Support programs to providing direct financial assistance to families, Jewish Family and Children's Services (JFCS) has been a lifeline to hundreds of local residents. Supported in part by Federation grants, our contribution goes beyond dollars, with YAD volunteering to assemble and deliver Hashanah bags to help frail seniors, new émigrés, and people with disabilities so they too can experience the joy of the High Holiday season. 3


INVESTING STRATEGICALLY Our Impact in Israel and Overseas SUPPORTING CIVIL SOCIETY AND EQUAL OPPORTUNITY

Helping Ethiopian Jews Integrate, Participate, and Prosper For the past two decades, our Federation has been a driving force in helping Ethiopians Jews in Israel break the cycle of poverty. One such program, Tech-Career, provides opportunities to better integrate Ethiopians into higher levels of Israeli society through technology and software training, ultimately placing participants in high tech industry careers. And the results are impressive. In 2004 there was a total of 4 Ethiopian-Israelis working in Israel’s thriving high tech industry. Today there are over 200. Graduates of this program not only find jobs, they also give back to the community by serving as role models for Ethiopian-Israeli teens.

PROMOTING VOLUNTEERISM AND LEADERSHIP D E V E L O P M E N T A M O N G D I S A D VA N T A G E D P O P U L AT I O N S

Improving Lives for Young Druze There are approximately 100,000 Druze in Israel today. As Arabic-speaking citizens of Israel who serve in the Israel Defense Forces, they are committed to the State and its institutions. Today this distinct ethnic community faces persecution, social inequality, and limited educational opportunities. The Neurim program aims to change this by closing academic gaps, and promoting self-empowerment through volunteer and leadership programs. Neurim serves over 700 youth in five Druze settlements in the North.

JEWISH IDENTITY AND PLURALISM

Providing ‘Wisdom in the Neighborhood’ Over ten years ago, BINA founded a community-wide social action program in South Tel Aviv with the dual goal of engaging young adults in Jewish social action and assisting the underserved local community. Today, more than 250 pre-army, mid-service and post-army young adults from all over the country participate in the program annually, touching the lives of thousands of children, youth, adults and the elderly. They provide educational support in the local schools, serve as tutors in after-school programs, hold programs for youth-at-risk, assist the elderly in the community, and organize pluralistic community holiday celebrations.

Taking Care of the Vulnerable, Building Leaders and Community in Central and Eastern Europe and the Former Soviet Union Through our support of JDC the Federation provides lifesaving assistance to impoverished Jewish elderly—primarily Holocaust survivors—and needy Jewish children throughout the regions. We are also revitalizing Jewish communal life in countries that lived under communist rule by funding programs that educate Jews about pluralistic Jewish traditions, and by running Jewish camping programs, family retreats, and grassroots and virtual learning experiences that build a connection to Jewish life and culture for future generations of European Jewry. And we are developing tomorrow’s Jewish leaders by training Jewish professionals, lay leaders and volunteers through learning seminars, conferences, and cross border initiatives. Together with JDC, we are investing in a cadre of up-and-coming leaders to ensure communal life continues to grow and communities can respond to the pressing needs of their most vulnerable members. 4

ANNETTE DOBBS July 26, 1922 – March 19, 2012 “I believe that my involvement locally and in Israel has made something special of my life. As I think back on the road I have traveled, I know one thing with certainty: I have received far more than I have given.” ~ Annette Dobbs, Book of Life Annette Dobbs, a beloved community leader and generous benefactor, was a first generation American-born Jew with a gift for influencing and inspiring people. Annette devoted more than 50 years of her life to volunteering and leading the Jewish Community Federation and Jewish organizations around the Bay Area and Israel. “Being able to help people who really needed help,” Annette once said. “How do you turn that down?” Indeed, she never did. Annette held numerous leadership roles, from Women’s Division President to serving as President of the Federation from 1988-1990. Her deep sense of responsibility and commitment for the Jewish community were also evident in the work she did for the United Jewish Appeal, serving as a campaign consultant, board member, and national vice chair. Annette had a great love for Israel, traveling there more than 70 times.

DONALD H. SEILER December 16, 1928 – August 3, 2012 “It is important to us to attempt to leave this world a somewhat better place for our being here.” ~ Ruth F. and Donald H. Seiler, Book of Life San Francisco native Don Seiler, was both a past President of the Federation and Endowment Committee Chair, and a distinguished and dedicated volunteer leader and philanthropist in the Jewish and general communities. A Robert Sinton Distinguished Leadership Award winner and Professional of the Year recipient, Don set an inspiring standard of leadership. Warmth, wisdom, integrity, advice, and thoughtfulness were his hallmarks. Don’s generous legacy will help ensure that future generations have the opportunity to engage in the richness of Jewish life as he did.

IRVING RABIN

May 11, 1930 - August 15, 2012

Irv Rabin, a much beloved community leader and philanthropist, was one of the founders of the Federation’s Young Adult Division, and served as YAD President in 1968. Less than a decade later he helped create the Jewish Vocational Service and served as Chair of its board. For the rest of his life Irv continued to serve the Jewish community locally, nationally, and in Israel with great passion and distinction.

ELINOR FRIEND September 16, 1919 – January 17, 2012 Elinor Friend was a humanitarian and patron of the arts who touched the lives of countless people through her compassion and philanthropy. Elly was committed to helping future generations appreciate their Jewish heritage and remember the importance of helping others.

MARION OSHER SANDLER October 17, 1930 - June 1, 2012 Marion Osher Sandler was a trailblazing business leader and philanthropist. The only daughter of an Eastern European immigrant family raised in Biddeford, Maine, Marion’s life was a quintessential Jewish American success story of breaking through barriers and living up to the highest standards. “A woman of valor, who can find? Far beyond pearls is her value.” 9


LIVING LEGACY SOCIETY

LIVING LEGACY

Create a Legacy that Builds the Vibrancy of the Jewish Community from Generation to Generation Gifts in perpetuity will help ensure that no matter what happens in the world, our community will have the resources it needs to sustain and enrich the lives of future generations, enabling us to meet the challenges of today and embrace the opportunities of tomorrow. Grants from these sources seed innovation, respond to emergencies, and provide key support for new building projects in our community.

The Book of Life The Book of Life recognizes the foresight and generosity of the members of the Living Legacy Society, individuals who have established a permanent fund within the Federation’s Endowment Fund, either during their lifetime or through their will, to help ensure Jewish continuity. Prominently displayed in the lobby of our building at 121 Steuart Street in San Francisco, it is an ever-growing record of names and family stories, now more than 500 strong – a collective portrait of our community and testament to chai, the unbroken chain of life for our People. Book of Life members give form and substance to their dreams, each in his or her own way, by sharing the thoughts and feelings that motivate

If I am not for myself, who will be for me? And if only for myself, what am I? And if not now, when?

their personal commitment to the future – sending messages to all children yet to come.

- Hillel

South Peninsula IGI

The Evolving Landscape of Philanthropy By Adin Miller

IN MEMORIAM The Jewish Community Federation and Endowment Fund mourns the loss of these generous leaders and philanthropists. May their memory be a blessing for all time – Zichrono L’vracha.

F. Warren Hellman July 25, 1935 – December 18, 2011 Warren Hellman was one of our community’s greatest leaders. An exceptional man in every way, Warren exemplified the qualities to which we all aspire. He was a great teacher, a wonderful mentor, an intuitively talented philanthropist, and an inspiration to us all. His life was a case study on how to change the world for the better. Warren was Chair of the Jewish Community Federation’s Endowment Fund and a member of the Executive Committee of the Board. His contributions to our organization were vast. He enriched our lives and our community beyond measure, working tirelessly by our side, never shying away from a good challenge, and helping the Federation evolve to succeed in the 21st century. The JCF is but one of many organizations and causes Warren touched so significantly. As a dedicated student of the Torah, he was always finding inspiration and discovering life lessons, particularly in regards to how we treat others and how we use philanthropy to express our values. For Warren, the imperfections inherent in the human condition were important to appreciate and to contrast with our tremendous potential for decency. “What does move me is the philanthropic stuff. Giving really does move me. Part of it is selfish. It's fun to be appreciated. But the other part is that good things really are growing.” ~ Warren Hellman, Fortune magazine

8

Today’s philanthropy continues to evolve. The field has undergone tremendous disruptions in both how funders think and practice their work and in how individual donors express their own philanthropy. It’s both an exciting and challenging time. We operate now in an era in which funders and philanthropists place a greater reliance on good data to inform grantmaking and donor decisions, and a much higher value on measurable outcomes and impact. We continue to see the growth of decentralized giving as more methods and opportunities arise for individual philanthropists to make their own decisions on where to give. Both these trends have fed the philanthropic sector’s need to provide accountability and transparency. At the same time, the growing need to more effectively align limited resources with an ever growing demand for social services has been balanced by more collaboration among funders, nonprofits, and government sectors. These changes in the field of philanthropy have shaped how the Jewish Community Federation and Endowment Fund (Federation) operates, funds projects, and engages donors in its work. Over the past two years, our work at the Federation has shifted to providing our donors with more opportunity to learn about the

challenges facing our community and how to use strategic philanthropy and grantmaking to solve those challenges. Our pilot round of the Impact Grants Initiative (IGI), which provides this type of hands-on experience, led to the formation of five additional approaches this year. Two of those approaches engaged young adults in both learning about philanthropy and funding compelling projects that further expand opportunities to engage in Jewish life. Two more approaches have been running in the South and North Peninsula regions and will conclude their work over the next few months. And the last one, which we’re putting the final touches on before announcing it, will expand the hands-on approach to our work in Israel. These efforts have reshaped and informed not only our local philanthropic efforts but have also influenced and informed the federated system across North America. San Francisco will continue to be a national leader as we work to redefine and reshape today’s philanthropy. Adin Miller is the Senior Director of Community Impact and Innovation at the Jewish Community Federation and Endowment Fund in San Francisco. In this role, Adin develops and implements new strategies, initiatives, programs, research, collaboration and processes to bring about change and impact in accordance with the organization's mission, goals and priorities.

5


DEVELOPING LEADERS AND PHILANTHROPISTS

Teens Courageous Enough to Change the World are the Ones Who Do. In some ways, Andrew Gerson is like most other 16-year olds living on the Peninsula. When he’s not at school or studying, he spends time with his friends – or chatting with them on Facebook. In other ways, Andrew is an atypical teenager. For the last year, he’s been working to raise money to fund a project to increase access to water in Africa and Israel. The project has raised $10,575 to make sure families have access to clean drinking water and farmers can irrigate their crops. Not many 16-year olds are having thoughtful debates on issues like global water sustainability – let alone raising dollars to fund projects abroad.

The Jewish Teen Foundations teach Bay Area Jewish teenagers about philanthropy. But its real power is rooted in the idea of connecting young people who want to make the world a better place to each other, and to their Jewish values. “I was intrigued by the idea of connecting with other Jews my age who want to make a difference, so I decided to give it a chance.” Andrew admits. “I also love the idea that a bunch of teenagers in the Bay Area are making a difference in the lives of people halfway around the world.”

ABOUT THE JEWISH TEEN FOUNDATIONS JTF offers select groups of Bay Area Jewish teens the opportunity to explore Jewish values and ideas, develop leadership skills, and practice informed and directed philanthropy. Teens who serve on one of the four Jewish Teen Foundations learn how to run their own nonprofit foundations and to become strategic grantmakers. The JTF is a program of the Jewish Community Federation and Endowment Fund, in cooperation with the Jewish Community Foundation of the Greater East Bay. Learn more at jewishteenfoundations.org

2006: The Marin support from th generous funde was raised by th Foundations. Th Outstanding You award by the As Professionals.

2004: The South Peninsula pilot board and the East Bay Teen Foundation were established. They raised a total of $23,200, which was granted to six organizations dedicated to improving quality of life through education and eradicating hunger.

2004

2006

2005

2005: Building on the momentum of the first year’s program, the 2005 JTF participants raised more than $36,250, which was distributed to 19 different nonprofit organizations. John and Marcia Goldman created an endowment for the South Peninsula JTF.


What makes this program unique?

A year after attending his first meeting, a lot has changed in Andrew’s life. While he’s still playing the drums and posting on Facebook, he’s now on the Board of Directors of the Jewish Teen Foundations. And last year, he took his first trip to Israel through Birthright. “After getting a chance to meet other Jewish teenagers from around the world, I feel a lot more connected to my Judaism,” Andrew volunteered. “And now I’m looking for other ways to stay involved.” Andrew said he might start a Donor Advised Fund through the Federation, which will help him effectively support causes most meaningful to him.

The Jewish Teen Foundations is a key part of our work to build young leaders and philanthropists. It offers a tangible way for teens to practice tikkun olam in order to make a significant impact in the world.

...teenagers in the Bay Area are making a difference in the lives of people halfway around the world... – Andrew Gerson erson

• The Jewish Teen Foundations are based on a youth empowerment model. Teens work with local and global nonprofit leaders and innovative philanthropists. • Board members make all decisions by consensus through a collaborative and thought-provoking group process that ensures every voice is heard.

“For now, I’m focused on bringing water to people who need it. Who knows what I might do in my twenties and thirties.” Research shows his early engagement could very well result in his becoming a leader in the Jewish community

• Program alumni design curricula and educate the broader community about the principles and practice of youth-led philanthropy.

Andrew’s story is not unique. It symbolizes the role that the Jewish Community Federation and Endowment Fund has played in the Bay Area for more than 100 years.

in JTF was launched with he Federation and other ers. A total of $91,500 he three Teen The JTF won the outh in Philanthropy Association of Fundraising

• Each year, our teens raise more money than any other Jewish youth philanthropy program in the world to support the causes they care about.

2010

2008

2007

2007: The Federation and other funders helped launch two additional Teen Foundations in the North Peninsula region and in San Francisco, doubling program participation in a single year. A total of $95,501 was raised by the five Teen Foundations.

In its 9th year, our landmark program raised $220,000; reaching over a million dollars granted by over 500 teens to more than 100 nonprofit organizations practicing tikkun olam.

A philanthropist invests in the Marin/SF Jewish Teen Foundation, ensuring that it will exist in perpetuity. That year $177,856 was raised.

The Marin and SF JTF merged in the fall of 2008. More than 150 organizations submit grant proposals for teen board review and selection. That year a total of $204,011 was raised.

2009 The JTF were named ‘Program of the Year’ by the Jewish Community Federation. San Francisco Magazine ran a cover story called In Good We Trust, Ideas Changing the World. A total of $168,206 was raised by the Teen Foundations.

2012

2011 Marin/SF region launches first-ever Alumni Council in which program graduates further their philanthropic knowledge in the community by teaching in schools, synagogues and a national network of teen philanthropists. A total of $194,129 was raised.


LIVING LEGACY SOCIETY

LIVING LEGACY

Create a Legacy that Builds the Vibrancy of the Jewish Community from Generation to Generation Gifts in perpetuity will help ensure that no matter what happens in the world, our community will have the resources it needs to sustain and enrich the lives of future generations, enabling us to meet the challenges of today and embrace the opportunities of tomorrow. Grants from these sources seed innovation, respond to emergencies, and provide key support for new building projects in our community.

The Book of Life The Book of Life recognizes the foresight and generosity of the members of the Living Legacy Society, individuals who have established a permanent fund within the Federation’s Endowment Fund, either during their lifetime or through their will, to help ensure Jewish continuity. Prominently displayed in the lobby of our building at 121 Steuart Street in San Francisco, it is an ever-growing record of names and family stories, now more than 500 strong – a collective portrait of our community and testament to chai, the unbroken chain of life for our People. Book of Life members give form and substance to their dreams, each in his or her own way, by sharing the thoughts and feelings that motivate

If I am not for myself, who will be for me? And if only for myself, what am I? And if not now, when?

their personal commitment to the future – sending messages to all children yet to come.

- Hillel

South Peninsula IGI

The Evolving Landscape of Philanthropy By Adin Miller

IN MEMORIAM The Jewish Community Federation and Endowment Fund mourns the loss of these generous leaders and philanthropists. May their memory be a blessing for all time – Zichrono L’vracha.

F. Warren Hellman July 25, 1935 – December 18, 2011 Warren Hellman was one of our community’s greatest leaders. An exceptional man in every way, Warren exemplified the qualities to which we all aspire. He was a great teacher, a wonderful mentor, an intuitively talented philanthropist, and an inspiration to us all. His life was a case study on how to change the world for the better. Warren was Chair of the Jewish Community Federation’s Endowment Fund and a member of the Executive Committee of the Board. His contributions to our organization were vast. He enriched our lives and our community beyond measure, working tirelessly by our side, never shying away from a good challenge, and helping the Federation evolve to succeed in the 21st century. The JCF is but one of many organizations and causes Warren touched so significantly. As a dedicated student of the Torah, he was always finding inspiration and discovering life lessons, particularly in regards to how we treat others and how we use philanthropy to express our values. For Warren, the imperfections inherent in the human condition were important to appreciate and to contrast with our tremendous potential for decency. “What does move me is the philanthropic stuff. Giving really does move me. Part of it is selfish. It's fun to be appreciated. But the other part is that good things really are growing.” ~ Warren Hellman, Fortune magazine

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Today’s philanthropy continues to evolve. The field has undergone tremendous disruptions in both how funders think and practice their work and in how individual donors express their own philanthropy. It’s both an exciting and challenging time. We operate now in an era in which funders and philanthropists place a greater reliance on good data to inform grantmaking and donor decisions, and a much higher value on measurable outcomes and impact. We continue to see the growth of decentralized giving as more methods and opportunities arise for individual philanthropists to make their own decisions on where to give. Both these trends have fed the philanthropic sector’s need to provide accountability and transparency. At the same time, the growing need to more effectively align limited resources with an ever growing demand for social services has been balanced by more collaboration among funders, nonprofits, and government sectors. These changes in the field of philanthropy have shaped how the Jewish Community Federation and Endowment Fund (Federation) operates, funds projects, and engages donors in its work. Over the past two years, our work at the Federation has shifted to providing our donors with more opportunity to learn about the

challenges facing our community and how to use strategic philanthropy and grantmaking to solve those challenges. Our pilot round of the Impact Grants Initiative (IGI), which provides this type of hands-on experience, led to the formation of five additional approaches this year. Two of those approaches engaged young adults in both learning about philanthropy and funding compelling projects that further expand opportunities to engage in Jewish life. Two more approaches have been running in the South and North Peninsula regions and will conclude their work over the next few months. And the last one, which we’re putting the final touches on before announcing it, will expand the hands-on approach to our work in Israel. These efforts have reshaped and informed not only our local philanthropic efforts but have also influenced and informed the federated system across North America. San Francisco will continue to be a national leader as we work to redefine and reshape today’s philanthropy. Adin Miller is the Senior Director of Community Impact and Innovation at the Jewish Community Federation and Endowment Fund in San Francisco. In this role, Adin develops and implements new strategies, initiatives, programs, research, collaboration and processes to bring about change and impact in accordance with the organization's mission, goals and priorities.

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INVESTING STRATEGICALLY Our Impact in Israel and Overseas SUPPORTING CIVIL SOCIETY AND EQUAL OPPORTUNITY

Helping Ethiopian Jews Integrate, Participate, and Prosper For the past two decades, our Federation has been a driving force in helping Ethiopians Jews in Israel break the cycle of poverty. One such program, Tech-Career, provides opportunities to better integrate Ethiopians into higher levels of Israeli society through technology and software training, ultimately placing participants in high tech industry careers. And the results are impressive. In 2004 there was a total of 4 Ethiopian-Israelis working in Israel’s thriving high tech industry. Today there are over 200. Graduates of this program not only find jobs, they also give back to the community by serving as role models for Ethiopian-Israeli teens.

PROMOTING VOLUNTEERISM AND LEADERSHIP D E V E L O P M E N T A M O N G D I S A D VA N T A G E D P O P U L AT I O N S

Improving Lives for Young Druze There are approximately 100,000 Druze in Israel today. As Arabic-speaking citizens of Israel who serve in the Israel Defense Forces, they are committed to the State and its institutions. Today this distinct ethnic community faces persecution, social inequality, and limited educational opportunities. The Neurim program aims to change this by closing academic gaps, and promoting self-empowerment through volunteer and leadership programs. Neurim serves over 700 youth in five Druze settlements in the North.

JEWISH IDENTITY AND PLURALISM

Providing ‘Wisdom in the Neighborhood’ Over ten years ago, BINA founded a community-wide social action program in South Tel Aviv with the dual goal of engaging young adults in Jewish social action and assisting the underserved local community. Today, more than 250 pre-army, mid-service and post-army young adults from all over the country participate in the program annually, touching the lives of thousands of children, youth, adults and the elderly. They provide educational support in the local schools, serve as tutors in after-school programs, hold programs for youth-at-risk, assist the elderly in the community, and organize pluralistic community holiday celebrations.

Taking Care of the Vulnerable, Building Leaders and Community in Central and Eastern Europe and the Former Soviet Union Through our support of JDC the Federation provides lifesaving assistance to impoverished Jewish elderly—primarily Holocaust survivors—and needy Jewish children throughout the regions. We are also revitalizing Jewish communal life in countries that lived under communist rule by funding programs that educate Jews about pluralistic Jewish traditions, and by running Jewish camping programs, family retreats, and grassroots and virtual learning experiences that build a connection to Jewish life and culture for future generations of European Jewry. And we are developing tomorrow’s Jewish leaders by training Jewish professionals, lay leaders and volunteers through learning seminars, conferences, and cross border initiatives. Together with JDC, we are investing in a cadre of up-and-coming leaders to ensure communal life continues to grow and communities can respond to the pressing needs of their most vulnerable members. 4

ANNETTE DOBBS July 26, 1922 – March 19, 2012 “I believe that my involvement locally and in Israel has made something special of my life. As I think back on the road I have traveled, I know one thing with certainty: I have received far more than I have given.” ~ Annette Dobbs, Book of Life Annette Dobbs, a beloved community leader and generous benefactor, was a first generation American-born Jew with a gift for influencing and inspiring people. Annette devoted more than 50 years of her life to volunteering and leading the Jewish Community Federation and Jewish organizations around the Bay Area and Israel. “Being able to help people who really needed help,” Annette once said. “How do you turn that down?” Indeed, she never did. Annette held numerous leadership roles, from Women’s Division President to serving as President of the Federation from 1988-1990. Her deep sense of responsibility and commitment for the Jewish community were also evident in the work she did for the United Jewish Appeal, serving as a campaign consultant, board member, and national vice chair. Annette had a great love for Israel, traveling there more than 70 times.

DONALD H. SEILER December 16, 1928 – August 3, 2012 “It is important to us to attempt to leave this world a somewhat better place for our being here.” ~ Ruth F. and Donald H. Seiler, Book of Life San Francisco native Don Seiler, was both a past President of the Federation and Endowment Committee Chair, and a distinguished and dedicated volunteer leader and philanthropist in the Jewish and general communities. A Robert Sinton Distinguished Leadership Award winner and Professional of the Year recipient, Don set an inspiring standard of leadership. Warmth, wisdom, integrity, advice, and thoughtfulness were his hallmarks. Don’s generous legacy will help ensure that future generations have the opportunity to engage in the richness of Jewish life as he did.

IRVING RABIN

May 11, 1930 - August 15, 2012

Irv Rabin, a much beloved community leader and philanthropist, was one of the founders of the Federation’s Young Adult Division, and served as YAD President in 1968. Less than a decade later he helped create the Jewish Vocational Service and served as Chair of its board. For the rest of his life Irv continued to serve the Jewish community locally, nationally, and in Israel with great passion and distinction.

ELINOR FRIEND September 16, 1919 – January 17, 2012 Elinor Friend was a humanitarian and patron of the arts who touched the lives of countless people through her compassion and philanthropy. Elly was committed to helping future generations appreciate their Jewish heritage and remember the importance of helping others.

MARION OSHER SANDLER October 17, 1930 - June 1, 2012 Marion Osher Sandler was a trailblazing business leader and philanthropist. The only daughter of an Eastern European immigrant family raised in Biddeford, Maine, Marion’s life was a quintessential Jewish American success story of breaking through barriers and living up to the highest standards. “A woman of valor, who can find? Far beyond pearls is her value.” 9


LEVERAGE THE POWER OF COMMUNITY WITH A DONOR ADVISED FUND

DONOR ADVISED FUND FAQ’S What is a Donor Advised Fund(DAF)?

An Investment in Hope In 1976, at the height of the Cold War, Sophia Pesotchinsky and her family fled the Soviet Union. They arrived in the U.S. as refugees with a toddler, significant language barriers, no place to live, nor jobs awaiting them, and about $300 to start their lives over. And yet, with one obstacle larger than the next, they overcame them all. Sophia went on to co-create three life science companies and her husband Leon became a professor of mathematics at UCSB and San Jose State University. Indeed, theirs is an inspiring American success story, but when you ask Sophia about life’s challenges she immediately shifts the conversation to the most courageous person she knows, her daughter, Vera. Vera was diagnosed with Late Onset Tay-Sachs disease eleven years ago. Since that time, despite the unrelenting toll of her illness, she has received undergraduate and graduate degrees from Wellesley College and Santa Clara University, worked in marketing for her family business, and has embraced life with dignity, great humor, and not a trace of self-pity. “She is an inspiration to everyone – and I mean everyone she meets,” said Sophia. But mercilessly, her condition rages on. So Sophia decided to do whatever she could to help in her daughter’s fight. Thus, she established a Donor Advised Fund, dedicated to the eradication of Tay-Sachs and other degenerative neurological diseases. “If there is one thing I want people to know about our DAF it is that I believe it is helping us get closer to combating this disease. I’m an engineer, I analyze things. I don’t work in dreams. And the scientific breakthroughs we’ve had in the last six years, particularly with gene therapy, have given us real hope – not just for a cure for my daughter, but for people who struggle with any genetic neurological diseases. The first clinical studies are scheduled for the beginning of 2013.” Of course, running a business, being involved with the Tay Sachs Gene Therapy consortium, and tending to the needs of her family doesn’t give Sophia a lot of time to take on the responsibilities of operating her own philanthropic foundation. “I’m a very busy person,” said Sophia. “So that’s why I set up my DAF with JCF. It was incredibly easy and it has allowed me to focus on what I need to focus on to stop this disease.”

To learn more or contribute to Sophia’s Fund #797 call 650.248.9630 or email sophia@lsvpusa.com. As Sophia has done, supporting causes that are personally meaningful through DAFs has become increasingly popular. Today more and more donors are using DAFs to honor loved ones and celebrate lifecycle events such as weddings, b’nai mitzvahs, memorials and graduations.

For information on DAFs contact Ruth Bender at 415.512.6205 or email RuthB@sfjcf.org.

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Emma, Liz, Ron and Rachel Mester

A DAF is a charitable fund in your name, any name of your choosing or anonymously, that accepts contributions and allows you to recommend grants to public charities throughout the U.S. Why create a DAF with the Jewish Community Federation and Endowment Fund? JCF has been putting Jewish values into action for the past 100 years with a robust philanthropic program emphasizing our shared values and commitment to tikkun olam (repair of the world). A DAF with JCF aligns your philanthropy with your Jewish values and our mission to ensure the collective well-being of the Jewish people; contributions from your JCF DAF are made in the name of your fund as well as the Jewish Community Federation and Endowment Fund; and JCF provides personalized, responsive service with access to a dedicated staff with philanthropic expertise in: • Multi-generational philanthropic education • The needs of our community • Evaluating the effectiveness and impact of programs and organizations Why DAFs are the preferred way to give v Simple: organize all of your philanthropic giving in one online portal. v 24 hour online access: w Recommend a grant any time you like w View your fund balance w Review past grants – individual contributions and cumulative contributions to organizations v Flexible: w Add to the fund whenever you want. No annual minimum distribution requirements. w JCF can accept contributions of many kinds of assets, including stock and real property. v Informed: w JCF philanthropic advisors with expertise in strategic grantmaking, Jewish community issues, and multigenerational family philanthropy are available to assist you. v Family-friendly: w Your family can engage in supporting worthy causes together through a single fund or multiple funds.

INVESTING STRATEGICALLY Snapshots of Local Impact Synagogue-Federation Partnership

A Community of Service

Capacity Building

“We have never received support like this and are thrilled to have resources brought to our congregation,” said Bonnie Lindauer, whose synagogue, Congregation B’nai Emunah, is one of eight participating in the Membership Initiative, which connects local synagogues and nonprofits to experts in the field of fundraising and membership development. “It gives us renewed energy and a burst of ideas.”

With more than half of California children in the 4th grade reading below grade level, the Jewish Coalition for Literacy provides much-needed support to children during a crucial period in their development. Jerilyn, a volunteer, agreed “It’s invaluable, providing more than reading resources and support to underserved communities – it enriches the lives of all its participants.”

The Federation convened a team of real estate and finance experts to help the Jewish Home build a 21st century facility to house and care for seniors at its Silver Avenue site in San Francisco. “Both the capital and business planning aspects of this project are so complex,” explains Daniel Ruth, President and Chief Executive Officer of the Jewish Home. “Having some of the best real estate and finance minds in the Bay Area in our court will go a long way toward making our new home provide the best care possible.”

Bay Area Initiatives The JCF Pro Bono Practice leverages the expertise of professionals in the community on behalf of Jewish nonprofits. Professionals serve as consultants on short-term, results-oriented projects while nonprofits gain access to free, high-quality consulting that strengthens their operations and increases their impact. “Executive Directors often do not have the time and resources to get training and coaching. I felt I was in a unique position to really help make a difference,” said Tracy Akresh, a volunteer.

Reducing Barriers to Jewish Life

Bay Area

Research confirms that high quality Jewish preschool doesn’t just contribute to a child’s future success, it also lays the foundation for a life-long Jewish identity. The Early Childhood Education Initiative is working to increase the quality of 41 Jewish preschool programs, developing 400 exceptional educators, engaging thousands of families in Jewish life and ultimately, helping to ensure our Jewish future.

Next Generation Engagment Special Needs Initiative With an estimated 9,000 children in our service area with autism, ADHD, and other learning challenges, many are excluded from Jewish life because schools, camps and other programs often lack the resources they need to serve them. INCLUDE is a partnership of Jewish LearningWorks and the JCF that builds the capacity of the community to fully welcome and include children with special needs and their families.

Moishe House is an international organization that provides meaningful Jewish experiences to young adults in their 20s. By subsidizing the rent for three to six young people per house in exchange for their commitment to organize events that build community, Moishe House has developed a creative model for cultivating young leaders. Started in the Bay Area six years ago, today they have 50 houses in 14 countries, and have connected over 44,000 young adult Jews to the community.

Caring for the Vulnerable From Jewish Single Parent Support programs to providing direct financial assistance to families, Jewish Family and Children's Services (JFCS) has been a lifeline to hundreds of local residents. Supported in part by Federation grants, our contribution goes beyond dollars, with YAD volunteering to assemble and deliver Hashanah bags to help frail seniors, new émigrés, and people with disabilities so they too can experience the joy of the High Holiday season. 3


Dear Friend, We are so pleased that you joined us at the Day of Philanthropy, where our community comes together to learn, connect, and celebrate the profound impact we have when we work together. The Jewish Community Federation and Endowment Fund does annual, multi-year, and endowed fundraising to strategically invest in the most effective Jewish organizations here and around the world, fulfilling our collective responsibility and creating vibrant Jewish life. We also work with individuals and families through DAFs and foundations to achieve their personal philanthropic goals. Over one hundred years ago, the Federation was built by visionary leaders whose lives were deeply connected to Jewish values. The belief that we take care of those who need help, give with just intention, and build community was second nature to these men and women. At the turn of the century, they created the organizations that became the foundation of Jewish life then, and remain so today. They established the Federation to care for the entire Jewish ecosystem, and to bring the community together to solve our greatest challenges. This long tradition of innovation and collective action continues today. And although the challenges we face have changed, our commitment to working together to address them has not. In this past year, the Federation has been evolving to meet the demands of a changing philanthropic landscape, and to better serve our community. We have refocused our work around three key roles that represent our unique strengths, and provide the community with the support it needs to thrive: investing strategically, building capacity, developing leaders and philanthropists. In addition, for the first time in our 102 year history, we are offering donors the option of investing directly in issues that matter most to them through a family of four funds. We are also bringing the community together as a convener to address our challenges and embrace our opportunities. It is an exceptionally exciting time to be leading this venerable organization as CEO and President of the Board of Trustees, and we are deeply grateful for your enthusiasm and support.

102 years ago, at the turn of the century, our community came together to create charitable organizations that took care of Jews in need, and they established the Federation to solve the community’s greatest challenges.

Jennifer Gorovitz CEO Jewish Community Federation and Endowment Fund

Today, Nancy Grand President

Our community is fortunate to have fresh ideas, strong organizations, a pipeline of capable leaders and passionate philanthropists − resulting in vibrant Jewish living that will thrive for the next 100 years and beyond, as long as we and the next generation remain engaged and committed to a common goal.

Jewish Community Federation and Endowment Fund

we remain part of the Bay Area’s culture of innovation and impact. Guided by those same timeless Jewish values of kehilla (community), tzedakah (giving with just intention), and tikkun olam (repairing the world), the Jewish Community Federation and Endowment Fund is a philanthropic catalyst, connecting people of all ages, backgrounds, and perspectives to the power we have as a Jewish community to improve the world.

We can make a difference individually, but when we work together, there is no limit to what we can achieve. That's the Power of Community.

BRINGING THE COMMUNITY TOGETHER FOR GREATER IMPACT.

With sincere gratitude,

The Federation helps build and sustain a healthy, thriving Jewish community by playing three important and unique roles:

Jennifer Gorovitz

Nancy Grand

CEO, Jewish Community Federation and Endowment Fund

President, Jewish Community Federation and Endowment Fund

We Can Make A Difference Individually, But Together There Is No Limit to What We Can Achieve… Sending free books and music through the PJ Library to 4,000 Bay Area children every month, introducing Judaism into many interfaith homes while educating entire families on Jewish holidays, traditions and values. Supporting Israel by providing academic tutoring for 600 Israeli teens from disadvantaged backgrounds, and helping ensure a strong and just democracy. Caring for seniors, by giving 20,000 free or highly subsidized nutritious meals to 1,000 local low-income elderly through our community’s Kosher Lunch Program. Providing more than $1 million in scholarships for Jewish schools and camps, creating a lifetime of Jewish connection for hundreds of children. Creating a truly inclusive community by helping our synagogues, day schools, and camps to welcome and accommodate 450 children with special needs and their families. 2

STRATEGIC INVESTING: We raise funds and make grants to support the community’s core organizations, fund vital capital projects, foster innovation, and solve big challenges that impact our local, Israeli, and worldwide Jewish community. BUILDING CAPACITY: We cultivate high-performing organizations through our pro bono consulting, specialized coaching and trainings, and communities of practice.

Federation Earns Top Spot Among US Charities Two Years In A Row Charity Navigator, America’s largest independent evaluator of charities, has once again given our Federation its highest 4 star rating. This indicates that the Federation executes its mission in a fiscally responsible way and outperforms most other charities in America. In fact, only 17% of charities receive a 4 star rating in consecutive years. In this competitive philanthropic marketplace, this “exceptional” designation confirms what our donors already know – that we are an effective organization they can support with confidence.

ENGAGING LEADERS AND PHILANTHROPISTS: We develop and engage Jewish leaders and philanthropists to ensure our community’s future.

PHILANTHROPY THROUGH A JEWISH LENS The Jewish Community Federation's Annual Campaign focuses your donations on the services that are most critical to local and global Jewish vitality and continuity. Our expert staff provides a range of philanthropic services to align your charitable goals with your values and increase the impact of the change you seek to create in the world. Each year, millions of Jews locally and around the world are helped by our donors, ranging from aid to Jews in need, to connecting our people and resources on the ground in Israel, to ensuring that our diverse community and its children build a welcoming and meaningful relationship with their heritage.

We can make a difference individually, but when we work together, there is no limit to what we can achieve. That's the Power of Community.


GIVE JEWISHLY GIFT CARDS

Snapshots of Impact

An Investment in Hope

Locally, in Israel and overseas

DAFs leverage the power of community

PHILANTHROPY THROUGH A

RREPAIRING EPPAIRRING THE WO WORLD ORLDD HHAS AS NNEVER EVER BBEEN EEN EEASIER ASIERR

A meaningful Chanukah gift for your friends & family. Give Jewishly gift cards are like other gift cards, but instead of buying stuff they allow you to make a donation to organizations you're passionate about. Available in December on our website. For or more information contact Gilad Salmon, Director, Give Jewishly, gilad@givejewishly.org, 415.512.6282

Helping Our Youth Find Real Joy in Giving Jewish Teen Foundations Celebrating a landmark achievement: 9 years, 500 teens, over $1Million granted to nonprofit organizations and causes

www.GiveJewishly.org Jewish Community Federation of San Francisco, the Peninsula, Marin and Sonoma Counties 121 Steuart Street, San Francisco, CA 94105 | 415.777.0411 | jewishfed.org

Jewish Community Federation of San Francisco, the Peninsula, Marin and Sonoma Counties 121 Steuart Street, San Francisco, CA 94105 | 415.777.0411 | jewishfed.org

Legacies Helping to ensure Jewish continuity

November 2012 • Volume 1

Profile for Jewish Community Federation of San Francisco

Jewish Lens  

Jewish Community Federation of San Francisco, the Peninsula, Marin and Sonoma Counties news magazine

Jewish Lens  

Jewish Community Federation of San Francisco, the Peninsula, Marin and Sonoma Counties news magazine

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