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SECRETARIAT - 150 route de Ferney, P.O. Box 2100, 1211 Geneva 2, Switzerland - TEL: +41 22 791 6033 - FAX: +41 22 791 6506 www.actalliance.org

Appeal Syria (incl. neighbouring countries Jordan, Lebanon, Turkey)

ACT Alliance Syria Regional Humanitarian Response - SYR131 Appeal Target: US$ 19'954'916 Contr. received: US$ 839'890 Balance Requested: US$ 19'115'026 Geneva, 2 September 2013 Dear Colleagues, The civil war in Syria now extends to its third year. The number of civilian causalities, internally displaced people and refugees continues to grow to astounding levels. Over 4 million people are displaced within Syria according to UN OCHA and almost 2 million refugees are hosted by Jordan, Lebanon, Iraq, Turkey and countries in North Africa. Recent developments, such as the purported use of chemical weapons around Damascus towards the end of August, are but one indicator of the increasing severity of the crisis. ACT Alliance members have been providing humanitarian support from the onset of the crisis. With 6.5 million USD raised through the appeal SYR121, members were able to assist conflict-affected families inside Syria, as well as refugees and host communities in Lebanon and Jordan. Since he beginning of 2011, ACT members have scaled up their relief programmes and their decades of experience working in the region has enabled them to reach out to communities and adequately address the most urgent needs, in line with humanitarian principles. The magnitude and complexity of the crisis, as well as the scale of the ACT humanitarian response, has called for an external evaluation of appeal SYR121 which will be carried out in September/October this year. Recommendations on how to improve programming might lead to a revision of this appeal, SYR131. The secretariat reserves the right to decide whether or not to commission another external evaluation towards the end of the implementation period of the appeal on hand. ACT members in the region coordinate the humanitarian response as the ACT Jordan/Syria/Lebanon Forum (JSL). The five ACT requesting members in this appeal (IOCC, LWF, FCA, DSPR, DKH) are working in various sectors including health, food and NFI, shelter, education and others. Almost 500,000 people in Syria and neighbouring countries will benefit from the support to be provided by ACT Alliance members through this 12months appeal.


ACT Appeal SYR131: Syria Regional Humanitarian Response

ACT FORUM

Jordan/Syria/Lebanon (JSL) Forum

ACT REQUESTING MEMBERS

International Orthodox Christian Charities (IOCC) The Lutheran World Federation/Dept. for World Service (LWF/DWS) Finn Church Aid (FCA) Dept. of Service to Palestinian Refugees/Middle East Council of Churches (DSPR/MECC) Diakonie Katstrophenhilfe (DKH)

KEY PARAMETERS: Project Start/ Compl. Dates Geogr. areas of response Sectors of response and projected target population per sector

IOCC

LWF

FCA

DSPR

DKH

01 Sept 2013 – 01 Sept 2013 – 01 Sept 2013 – 01 Sept 2013 31 Aug 2014 31 Aug 2014 31 Aug 2014 31 Aug 2014 Jordan, Lebanon, Jordan Jordan Jordan, Syria Lebanon FOOD: 56,000 NFI: 72,000 WASH: 5,500 FOOD: 51,600 NFI: 40,200 PSS: 1,200 EDU: 5,424 WASH: 51,600 EDU: 6,500 WASH: 54,000 PSS: 300 PSS: 1,550 WASH: 36,749 EDU: 15,000 ENVIR: 7,580 NFI: 10,475 PROTECTION: 5,160 INCM/LIVLHDS: 400 HEALTH: 16,875 PSS: 250 SHELTER: 1,200 SHELTER: 600 PUB. HEALTH: 3,096 EDU: 100 INCM/LIVLHDS: 750 SHELTER: 3,660 Please note: The above numbers are disaggregated by age and gender later in the appeal.

01 Sept 2013 31 Jan 2014 Turkey NFI: 9,000 INCM: 200

TABLE 1: SUMMARY OF APPEAL REQUIREMENTS BY ACT MEMBER: Appeal Requirements Total requirements US$ Less: pledges/contributions US$ Balance of requirements US$

IOCC

LWF

FCA

DSPR

DKH

8'591'104 150'000

5'408'171 2'820'098 689'890

2'412'324 -

723'219

8'441'104

5'408'171 2'130'208

2'412'324

723'219

Total Requirements 19'954'916 839'890

19'115'026

TABLE 2: REPORTING SCHEDULE Type of Report Situation reports Interim narrative and financial report Final narrative and financial report Audit report and management letter

IOCC/LWF/FCA/DSPR DKH weekly in case of drastic changes otherwise monthly 31 March 2014 NA 31 October 2014 28 February 2014 30 November 2014* 31 March 2014

*Note: The LWF component will be included in their annual audit which will be submitted to the ACT Secretariat on 31 March 2015.

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ACT Appeal SYR131: Syria Regional Humanitarian Response

Please kindly send your contributions to either of the following ACT bank accounts: US dollar Account Number - 240-432629.60A IBAN No: CH46 0024 0240 4326 2960A

Euro Euro Bank Account Number - 240-432629.50Z IBAN No: CH84 0024 0240 4326 2950Z Account Name: ACT Alliance UBS AG 8, rue du Rh么ne P.O. Box 2600 1211 Geneva 4, SWITZERLAND Swift address: UBSWCHZH80A

Please also inform the Director of Finance Jean-Daniel Birmele (jbi@actalliance.org) and the Senior Programme Officer, Josef Pfattner of all pledges/contributions and transfers, including funds sent direct to the implementers. We would appreciate being informed of any intent to submit applications for EU, USAID and/or other back donor funding and the subsequent results. We thank you in advance for your kind cooperation. For further information please contact: ACT Senior Programme Officer, Josef Pfattner (phone +41 22 791 6710, mobile +41 76 245 0667) or ACT Deputy General Secretary, Rebecca Larson (phone +41 22 791 6069, mobile +41 79 376 1711) ACT Web Site: www.actalliance.org

Rebecca Larson Deputy General Secretary ACT Alliance Secretariat

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ACT Appeal SYR131: Syria Regional Humanitarian Response

Table of Content I.

OPERATIONAL CONTEXT ................................................................................................................................ 5 1.

The crisis: details of the emergency ........................................................................................................... 5

2.

Actions to date ............................................................................................................................................ 6

II.

2.1.

Needs and resources assessment ....................................................................................................... 6

2.2.

Situation analysis ................................................................................................................................ 8

2.3.

Capacity to respond .......................................................................................................................... 12

2.4.

Activities of forum and external coordination.................................................................................. 14

PROPOSED EMERGENCY RESPONSE ............................................................................................................ 14 1.

Target populations, and areas and sectors of response ........................................................................... 14

2.

Overall goal of the emergency response .................................................................................................. 16

3.

2.1

Overall goal ....................................................................................................................................... 16

2.2

Outcomes .......................................................................................................................................... 17

Proposed implementation plan ................................................................................................................ 17 3.1

Narrative summary of planned intervention .................................................................................... 17 Jordan LWF ....................................................................................................................................... 17 Jordan DSPR ..................................................................................................................................... 19 Jordan FCA ........................................................................................................................................ 20 Jordan IOCC ...................................................................................................................................... 21 Lebanon DSPR .................................................................................................................................. 22 Lebanon IOCC ................................................................................................................................... 22 Syria IOCC ......................................................................................................................................... 24 Turkey DKH ....................................................................................................................................... 26

3.2

Log frame .......................................................................................................................................... 27

3.3

Implementation methodology .......................................................................................................... 38

3.4

Planned implementation period ....................................................................................................... 44

3.5

Monitoring, reporting and evaluation .............................................................................................. 44

III.

THE TOTAL ACT RESPONSE TO THE EMERGENCY .................................................................................... 45

IV.

APPENDICES TO THE APPEAL DOCUMENT .............................................................................................. 46

Appendix 1: Map of Region .............................................................................................................................. 46 Appendix 2: Budgets - Alphabetically by organisation ..................................................................................... 47 DKH Turkey Budget ...................................................................................................................................... 47 DSPR Jordan Budget ..................................................................................................................................... 49 DSPR Lebanon Budget .................................................................................................................................. 50 FCA Budget ................................................................................................................................................... 52 IOCC Jordan Budget ..................................................................................................................................... 55 IOCC Lebanon Budget .................................................................................................................................. 58 IOCC Syria Budget ........................................................................................................................................ 61 LWF Jordan Budget ...................................................................................................................................... 64 4


ACT Appeal SYR131: Syria Regional Humanitarian Response

I.

OPERATIONAL CONTEXT

1. The crisis: details of the emergency The civil war inside Syria is now extending into its third year, and the number of civilian causalities, internally displaced people, and refugees continue to grow to astounding numbers. According to ACT emergency response mechanism guidelines, the crisis qualifies as both a "mega" and a "protracted" emergency. 1 Millions of Syrians have been forced to leave their homes, over a million of whom have crossed international borders into neighbouring countries, and who are often unable to meet even the most basic of needs. As of 29 August 2013, the United Nations Commission for Refugees (UNHCR) has registered close to 1,800,000 refugees in Lebanon, Jordan, Iraq, Turkey and Egypt and North Africa, with a further 200,000 persons awaiting registration.2 However, backlogs in the registration process, and disincentives to register such as protection concerns means the total number of refugees is likely far higher. Intense fighting continues to devastate inside the country. An estimated 6.8 million people inside Syria, almost 33% of the population, are in need of relief support3. Humanitarian response efforts are hampered by constantly shifting battle lines and the constant movement of armed groups, and dire economic conditions are exacerbating the crisis. By the end of 2012, the total loss to the economy due to the crisis was estimated at $48.4 billion and each year the conflict continues, costs the country 18% of the Syrian GDP4. Rapid inflation has made the purchase of daily items progressively more difficult, putting the extremely poor in a highly precarious position, unable to afford basic foodstuffs, healthcare or personal items necessary for human survival. According to the Syrian Ministry of Local Administration (MoLA) there are approximately 4,250,000 internally displaced persons (IDPs) inside the country – mainly women, children and the elderly, most of whom have been displaced multiple times to escape the ever-spreading violence.5 While some IDPs lodge with family members and/or friends, most now live in either: improvised/makeshift shelters constructed of salvaged materials, derelict or abandoned buildings, with host families, or in collective accommodation such as a repurposed school or mosque. Most of those attempting to escape hostilities have been forced to abandon all belongings. Those who cannot find safety inside the country flee to neighbouring nations. Unregistered and newly arrived refugees have been identified by the UN agencies and host governments as among the most vulnerable. Many are female-headed households with several children, many of whom are under five years of age. Shelter is a primary concern to new arrivals. If they can afford it, refugees rent space, though overcrowding and exorbitantly high rents force many families to overcrowd in accommodation. Despite initially warm and hospitable receptions at the onset of the crisis, growing intolerance and resentment towards the refugee community in the context of already resource-poor host environments presents a serious challenge. While host communities in both Jordan and Lebanon initially accommodated refugees with sympathy and hospitality, struggles over depleting resources are building tensions. Rampant inflation of accommodation prices and overcrowding of hospitals and schools are reducing the already low quality of living for poor host community families. Recent developments such as the purported use of chemical weapons around Damascus towards the end of August, 2013 are but one indicator of the increasing severity of the crisis. News of the attack spurred protests in refugee communities, adding to an already palpable sense of unrest. In the same month, incidents such as 1 http://www.actalliance.org/resources/policies-and-guidelines/act-responsemechanisms/2012_FINAL_ACT_Response_to_Emergencies_and_Annexes_APPROVED_ENGLISH.pdf 2 http://data.unhcr.org/syrianrefugees/regional.php, August 2013 3 Ibid 4 Ibid 5 Syria Crisis, ECHO Factsheet, Humanitarian Aid and Civil Protection, European Commission, 11 May 2013

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ACT Appeal SYR131: Syria Regional Humanitarian Response

the attacks on government buildings in Mafraq (a refugee-heavy city in Northern Jordan) resulted in the evacuation of some NGO workers. Will more refugees flooding host countries daily, tensions in both camps and host communities can be expected to worsen. Refugees are facing trauma, depression, stress over providing for their families, as well as battling isolation and loneliness. This is particularly true of those spread throughout host communities, who feel increasing hostility directed at them from local residents. As well as psychosocial interventions, ACT Forum members have identified WASH, shelter, food, non-food item distribution and education as high-impact, priority areas for intervention.

2. Actions to date 2.1.

Needs and resources assessment

Since the beginning of the crisis, numerous assessments mapping the needs of refugees and IDPs from Syria have been conducted ranging in location and scope. The most comprehensive resource currently available is the fifth edition of the Regional Response Plan (RRP5). This is the planned or proposed responses of various UN agencies and other local and international actors, including ACT members, and their requirements and priorities for relief projects, region-wide. The findings are derived from project proposals based on a compilation of various assessments, most of which are available on the UNHCR Syrian Regional Response Inter-Agency Informational Sharing Portal. The Jordan/Syria/Lebanon (JSL) Forum has been closely monitoring existing and planned assessments by all agencies to avoid unnecessary replication, and to closely tailor response strategies to commonly identified needs for maximum impact. JSL Forum members as well as ACT Alliance partners in all countries are actively participating in UN-led Working Groups in the interest of coordinating the humanitarian response, as well as maintaining close ties with partner organisations. Examples of Working Group (WG) participation includes but is not limited to; Cash WG, NFI WG, Food WG and Protection WG.

Jordan Several ACT Alliance members have carried out needs assessments in the country. The Lutheran World Federation (LWF) has conducted a rapid needs assessment in Mafraq city, comprising focus groups of men and women, Syrian and Jordanians. The findings from both groups identify rising commodity prices, scarcity of employment and accommodation, and increasing tension and discomfort between the refugee and host communities. The Department of Service to Palestinian Refugees of the Middle East Council of Churches (DSPR/MECC) has also done needs assessments, particularly in the under-served areas south of Amman. International Orthodox Christian Charities (IOCC) has conducted a shelter assessment in Mafraq which has identified shelter-related needs and requirements of refugee families. Finn Church Aid (FCA) participated in a collaborative interagency effort which took place in Zaatari camp between 31st Jan and 3rd Feb with 6 focus groups sessions held for children and youth aged from 12 years old 24 years old. The outcome of the focus groups showed that the youth are interested in seeing improvements in the curricula and more extra-curricular activities. Furthermore, FCA is a founding member of the Youth Task Force in Zaatari Camp. FCA participated in a collaborative interagency effort which took place in Za´atri with 6 Focus groups sessions held for children and youth aged from 12 years old - 24 years old by the Youth Task Force in Za’atri Camp. The most commonly-voiced observation among males ages 12-24 in the focus groups was the amount of free time during the day, with no activities, creative outlets, or ways to occupy themselves. All males expressed a strong desire for work opportunities and vocational training, mainly in masonry, tailoring, metal work, electricity, mobile phone repair, agriculture, and cars. All of those above 15 years old had been working in Syria, even if

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ACT Appeal SYR131: Syria Regional Humanitarian Response

part time or during school vacation time. Most male did not feel comfortable with their reading skills and they had varying levels of school completion from Syria. Girls’ daily routine is full of free time, similarly to the males, though females have the compounded problem of limited mobility. While some girls are allowed to attend extracurricular activities, a significant majority have very restricted movement, with most unaccompanied time confined to the tent or caravan and its immediate surroundings. When the girls are allowed to leave, they must be accompanied. School attendance is much higher among the females. In terms of the psychological state (of both male and female), there were widespread reports of sleeping disorders particularly upon arrival to Za’atri. From the youngest to the oldest ages, most claim to have directly witnessed violence in Syria. Almost all echoed that they still spend significant time worrying about what has been going on with their family and friends in Syria. It was noted that youth were willing to assist new arrivals and use their capacity to promote activities that empower youth to improve their own and others’ experience of the camp. (YOUTH FOCUS GROUP DISCUSSIONS: FINDINGS AND RECOMMENDATIONS, Youth Task Force. Za’atri Camp.27 February 2013.) In April 2013 UNICEF published its JOINT EDUCATION NEEDS ASSESSMENT ZA’ATARI REFUGEE CAMP – JORDAN. The survey data show that 78% of the children between 6 and 17 in Za’atari do not go to school. The recommendations of the assessment are e.g. that especially those children who have been out of school for a long time should be engaged in non-formal education, particularly out of school boys, and more needs assessment information is needed in order to create activities targeting boys. Assessments from the host communities state that the influx of over 30,000 Syrian students in Jordan has forced many host community schools to switch to "double-shift" systems, rotating students in half-day sessions to ease stress on overcrowded and understaffed classrooms (Mercy Corps: “Mapping of Host Community-Refugee Tensions in Mafraq and Ramtha, JORDAN” in May 2013). According to CARE Jordan Rapid Participatory Community Assessment (April 2013) 60% of school-age children are not in school, with some differences between survey sites: Irbid, Madaba, and Mufraq have more school-age Syrians out of school than in school (73%, 58%, and 69%, respectively). Zarqa is the only city with more school enrolment than not (63% vs. 37%). The greatest discrepancy in enrolment is in Irbid, with 27% enrolled and 73% not enrolled. It is also important to note that 10% of these school-age Syrians are currently working in the labour market. Already in December 2012, the UNHCR published a detailed participatory assessment. Key findings for Jordan overall have been that an urgent need exists for greater focus on host communities, both in the form of direct assistance to Jordanians and as tension mitigating endeavours. The provision of shelter, employment, and NFI items are also ranked as high priorities for emergency relief.

Lebanon International Orthodox Christian Charities (IOCC) has been operating in Lebanon for 12 years pre-dating the Syrian crisis, and is consequently well-formed regarding the national context. Due to IOCC's embedded nature within the community, refugees from Syria have directly approached IOCC or its community-based partners for assistance, and this way, IOCC interventions continue to identify and address gaps that have been neglected by other international and local humanitarian assistance efforts. The Department of Service to Palestinian Refugees of the Middle East Council of Churches (DSPR/MECC) has also been active in Lebanon since 1950, and base projects on decades of experience embedded in refugee communities. As a particular area of concern across the country, IOCC has highlighted the vulnerability of refugees in terms of lack of access to health services, particularly for pregnant women. Protection and gender-based violence have also been assessed as particularly under-supplied areas, and the predominance of female-headed households results in greater risks of exploitation in these areas. As in all refugee communities, shelter and livelihoods are also paramount concerns. 7


ACT Appeal SYR131: Syria Regional Humanitarian Response

Syria IOCC has been closely collaborating with its partner inside Syria, the Department of Ecumenical Relations and Development (DERD) of the Greek Orthodox Patriarchate of Antioch and All the East (GOPA). Together they have been implementing various programs inside country since 2002, as well as responding to the Syria crisis through funding from various donors since March 2012. Through this on-the-ground experience, IOCC/GOPA has collected data to put together emergency relief assistance plans. Methods include observations during fieldwork, coordination meetings, and focus groups and discussions with community members, as well as home visits and community outreach during monitoring and evaluation purpose exercises. Obviously, due to constantly shifting battle lines difficulties in conducting assessments exist. IOCC/GOPA also operates via an extensive network of grassroots volunteers and community-based organizations (CBOs), and through such has fostered close relationships with community leaders and influencers, and with the beneficiaries themselves. It is through personal relationships and person to person contact that most information is exchange, often on a relatively informal basis. Balamand University based in Beirut, Lebanon has provided input on assessments, carried out in the spring of 2013 in seven Syrian governorates: Damascus City, Rif Damascus, Swaida, Daraa, Homs, Tartous, and Latakia. The initial findings of the assessment indicate that the most pressing needs according to the respondents include livelihood opportunities, WASH and sanitation, shelter and accommodation needs, and food. Assessment methodology relied heavily on first person narrative and results were challenging to triangulate. However, the needs of the population, in particular IDPs, were so severe to be relatively obvious.

Turkey Diakonie Katastrophenhilfe (DKH) streamlines its activities and interventions in for refugees from Syria in Turkey based on the experience of its local partner, Support to Life (STL). STL has been carrying out assessments with Syrian refugees in Southern Turkey since the beginning of its relief operation in October 2012. STL has combined qualitative and quantitative tools for the collection of data, including a detailed questionnaire, rapid assessment checklist, semi-structured interviews, focus group discussions, and observation. The majority of assessments have been conducted in Hatay, Kilis and Sanliurfa provinces where the density of refugees from Syria is the highest.

2.2.

Situation analysis

Jordan Syrian refugees in Jordan are unevenly dispersed between camps and host communities, with an estimated 70% spread throughout host communities across the country.6 Based on arrival trends from January to March 2013, it is estimated that the number of Syrians in need of assistance in Jordan by the end of 2013 could reach one million individuals, with as many as 300,000 hosted in camps and 700,000 in urban and rural communities.7 Presently, the majority of urban refugees are located in the northern cities of Jordan, such as Mafraq, Ramtha and Irbid, which already suffer from higher than average levels of poverty, unemployment, and generally poor living conditions. The Government of Jordan continues to be hospitable to refugees from Syria, allowing entry without visas and access to government services such as primary healthcare and education. Even so, refugees face difficulties accessing basic services and meet basic needs, and in an already resource-scarce environment such as Jordan, as refugee numbers grow so does their socio-economic impact.

6 UNHCR. 2013. "Regional Response Plan" Version 5 7 ibid

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ACT Appeal SYR131: Syria Regional Humanitarian Response

Conditions inside the main refugee camp of Zaatari are crowded, dusty, and highly vulnerable to changing weather. 190,000 individuals have been registered at the camp, though returns to Syria and movement into host communities brings the current estimated number of residents to approximately 110,000.8 Overcrowding of Zaatari camp and the continuing influx of refugees has necessitated the planning of a second camp, Al Azraq, due to open in the summer of 2013. Conditions are expected to be similarly difficult to Zaatari, and Al Azraq camp will have an expected capacity of 130,000. Several other, smaller camps exist,9 hosting additional thousands of refugees, including a small number of Palestinian refugees from Syria. Predating the Syrian refugee crisis, Jordan's water system was already strained to support the local population, and water shortages are a problem for both camp and non-camp refugees. High quality infrastructure and water conservation campaigns are essential to reduce strain on WASH systems, and as urban and camp settings become increasingly densely populated, hygiene promotion for health reasons becomes especially crucial. In host communities, families are overcrowded in inadequate shelter structures, presenting serious hygiene risks. Multiple families share single bathrooms with insufficient drainage, and water delivery in many areas is unpredictable and irregular. In camps the situation is worse. Severe overcrowding coupled with facilities that have been damaged past the point of usability often result in filthy conditions at best. Families have taken to constructing private washroom facilities outside their tents or caravans, resulting in pits of open grey and black water. Besides the obvious health risks, unsafe and inaccessible WASH facilities in camps have implications for protection and the prevention of gender-based violence. There is a crucial need for interventions that specifically address building tensions and the growing potential for conflict. Syrian men and boys report being targeted for physical harassment and violence in host communities, and women report increasing verbal abuse and discrimination. Refugees from Syria are openly blamed for wildly inflated housing prices and at the same time driving day-labour rates down. An April survey conducted by a Jordanian national newspaper revealed that nearly three in four Jordanians want the country to close its borders to further arrivals, confirming growing tensions that have given rise to public protests in some northern cities. 10 Refugees are currently being provided with ration cards, but often lack income for supplementary fresh fruit and vegetables, and fresh food is becoming increasingly unaffordable due to reduced supplies from Syria coupled with increased demand from the rising population. Inside Zaatari camp, families struggle to use underequipped community kitchens that have been looted or vandalised. A nutrition assessment among children below the age of five shows that the nutritional status of Syrian children both inside and outside of camps is poor, and access to health care remains an issue, particularly for those outside of camps.11 New arrivals and longer term refugees often require assistance to secure even the lowest level of nutrition for their families, as food often falls behind rent as a priority. Syrians in both host community and camp settings are extremely vulnerable to the seasonally varying temperatures, that range from the high 40s (Celsius) to a humid near-freezing in the winter, often while residing in sub-par accommodation. NGOs and UN agencies have responded with seasonal NFIs to camp and host communities, but are currently unable to keep up with the demands of both new arrivals and longerterm refugees. Children continue to comprise the majority of refugees arriving from Syria, and represent 54% of the registered refugee population. 12 Educational opportunities for children and youth are being undermined, as the education system in Jordan, like other areas of the public sector, is being vastly overstretched. The 8 ibid 9 Other refugee camps in Jordan include King Hussein park, Cyber City, plus the Emirati-Jordanian Camp (ERC). 10 UNHCR. 2013. "Regional Response Plan" Version 5. 11 ibid 12 2013. "UN Inter-agency Sit Rep, 30 June - 08 July".

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ACT Appeal SYR131: Syria Regional Humanitarian Response

Government of Jordan continues to provide access to education for Syrian refugees in host communities, though public schools are vastly under-resourced and in dire need of a wide range of support, from infrastructure expansion to day to day supplies and books. The number of Syrian children enrolled in public schools in host communities has drastically increased, from some 7,400 children in May 2012 to over 30,000 children in March 2013.13 However, this number still represents only 23 percent of the total of estimated number of school-aged registered refugees from Syria. 14

Lebanon Since the beginning of the conflict, over 500,000 refugees have been registered in Lebanon with approximately 85,000 still awaiting registration.15 However, these statistics fail to account for the high numbers of displaced Syrians who have no intention of registering, such as; former immigrants/migrants to Syria now returning to their home countries; and those who have become refugees twice, such as Iraqis and Palestinians who had sought asylum in Syria and are again displaced. The Lebanese government estimates that there up to one million Syrian refugees in the country. While the majority are Sunni Muslim, there is a substantial Christian minority (approximately 10–15%). Like in Jordan, a significant number of refugees are sheltering in areas of Lebanon that do not have adequate social services, are already economically disadvantaged and where the capacity to absorb them is minimal at best. Tensions are rising as host and refugee populations compete for the same resources, paying jobs, housing, and public services. This huge influx of refugees also presents particular financial and political challenges for Lebanon, as the country already hosts a large number of refugees from Iraq and Palestine. While the government has done its best with regard to the influx of refugees from Syria, there are simply too few resources to provide relief assistance while maintaining high quality services and economic strength for Lebanese citizens. Political and social tensions spilling over from the Syrian crisis continue to directly affect the security and political stability of immediately bordering countries and the region as a whole.

Syria Over eight million Syrians are now in desperate need of urgent humanitarian assistance. The U.N. Economic and Social Commission for Western Asia (ESCWA) reports that the conflict in Syria has damaged or destroyed 1.2 million houses—about one-third of the total number of houses in the country.16 Approximately 400,000 houses have been completely destroyed, 300,000 have been partially destroyed, and 500,000 have sustained damage.17 As a result, the United Nations (UN) estimates that nearly 1.2 million people are now homeless.18 The decline in social service provision has left people without rudimentary public services. There are acute medical needs and people cannot regularly, or safely, access health care facilities and services. With an estimated 80,000 deaths and over 400,000 people injured due to the war, the World Health Organization (WHO) projects that these figures will double during the next 12 months.19 Moreover, the health system in the country has been severely disrupted: 57% of public hospitals have been damaged, 20% are partially damaged and 37% are completely out of service.20 Remaining, functional health facilities are overwhelmed and operating at drastically reduced capacity due to shortages in fuel, electrical power, medical supply/commodities, and personnel. Prior to the conflict, 95% of Syrian women gave birth with a skilled birth attendant, though this option is currently often impossible for

13 “UNHCR. 2013. "Regional Response Plan" Version 5 14 ibid 15 http://data.unhcr.org/syrianrefugees/country.php?id=122, July 2013 16 Syria – Complex Emergency, Fact Sheet #13, Fiscal Year (FY) 2013, April 12, 2013, USAID 17 Ibid 18 http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-middle-east-22163884, 16 April 2013 19 Donor Update – The Syrian Arab Republic, World Health Organization, 09 April 2013 20 Ibid

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ACT Appeal SYR131: Syria Regional Humanitarian Response

pregnant women with little or no financial resources.21 Due to stress generated by the conflict, doctors are seeing high numbers of miscarriages and premature births.22 Lack of clean water and reliable sanitation services continue to threaten much of the population with waterborn and other communicable diseases. The per capita availability of the water supply in the country has decreased to one third of the pre-crisis levels, i.e. from 75 to 25 litres per person.23 Currently, only 35% of sewage is being treated, as compared to 70% prior to the crisis, posing serious public and environmental health risks.24 Of particular concern are the extremely WASH conditions in the IDP collective shelters, where the lack of sufficient latrines (with a range of 50:1 to 70:1 persons per toilet) and clean water has created exceedingly unsanitary and unhealthy conditions.25 The most damaged water/sanitation infrastructures are in some of the hardest hits areas of the country: Aleppo, Ar-Raqqa, Deir-ez-Zor, Idlib, Homs and Rural Damascus.26 In a recent assessment report, UNICEF estimates that about 21% of schools (3,899) are no longer functioning as a learning environment, either because they were damaged or destroyed, or because they are being used as shelters/collective centres.27 Where schools are open, the average attendance of students is two days per week. Some of the main reasons for this are: the decrease in the number of teachers, re-purposing of learning environments, and parents’ fear of sending their children to school because of the real or assumed risks to their physical safety.28 School attendance has also been impacted by children and adolescents who drop out in order to try to earn an income for their families.29 Many children, like most of the adult population, have experienced and/or witnessed extreme violence, either in their communities or involving a family member, resulting in mental trauma and psychological distress.30

Turkey On 30 April 2011, the Turkish government opened its doors to the conflict victims and since then escalating numbers of Syrians have found refuge in Turkey. On 11 July 2013, AFAD - the Disaster and Emergency Management Agency of Government of Turkey - announced that the total number of Syrians registered and assisted in 20 camps in 10 provinces increased to 200,017 including 443 Syrians receiving medical treatment in hospitals. According to UNHCR, total number of refugees registered and with registration appointments is 402,163; total number of refugees in camps is 200,017; total number of refugees registered outside camps is 181,445; and total number of refugees with registration appointments is 20,701. The Government of Turkey estimates the total number of Syrians in Turkey to be 490,000.31 The Syrians that are settled in the refugee camps in Turkey are provided by the Turkish authorities with shelter, food, water, medical services, sanitation and washing facilities, and non-food items. In comparison to those living outside the camps or waiting along the border areas, the basic needs of this group of refugees are being fully met and they have good conditions in the camps. Apart from Syrian refugees settled in camps in Turkey, according to a field assessment carried out by DKH’s partner Support to Live (STL), it is estimated that unregistered Syrian refugees are mostly located in Hatay, 21 “Syria Two Years On – The Failure of International Aid so Far”, Medecins Sans Frontieres, February 2013 22 Ibid 23 Regional Analysis Syria, Syria Needs Analysis Project (SNAP), 30 April 2013, pg. 6 24 Syria Crisis – UNICEF Assessment Key Findings on the Situation in the Sectors of WASH, Education & Nutrition (Feb 2013), UNICEF 25 Ibid 26 Regional Analysis Syria, Syria Needs Analysis Project (SNAP), 30 April 2013 27 Syria Crisis – UNICEF Assessment Key Findings on the Situation in the Sectors of WASH, Education & Nutrition (Feb 2013), UNICEF 28 Ibid 29 SYRIA: Humanitarian Needs Overview – a review of secondary data, United Nations Office for Humanitarian Assistance (OCHA), 26 April 2013 30 Syria Crisis – UNICEF Assessment Key Findings on the Situation in the Sectors of WASH, Education & Nutrition (Feb 2013), UNICEF 31 UNHCR Turkey Syria Sitrep 12 July 2013

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ACT Appeal SYR131: Syria Regional Humanitarian Response

Kilis, Gaziantep and Sanliurfa, which are all border provinces in Turkey. Numbers are very roughly estimated as 60,000 Syrians in Hatay, 40,000 in Kilis, 50,000 in Gaziantep and 40,000 in Sanliurfa. The large influx of Syrians into Southern Turkey has quickly filled camps, leaving families to find alternative living arrangements. Other reasons cited for why some families chose to not settle in the refugee camps are as follows: • • • • • •

Recruitment of children and youth into armed groups Gender based violence (sexual harassment, rape) Religious pressure by other camp inhabitants (to practice religious duties) Ethnic tensions (mostly discrimination against the Kurdish minority) Restricted mobility (in and out of the camps) Fear of political violence (especially for ex-public workers)

Within this group of Syrian refugee families living outside the camps in Turkey, some have relatively better financial resources than others who have illegally fled with very limited financial resources. Some Syrians outside the camps have either rented flats or are living with host families, often relatives and friends on the Turkish side. Among those that are not registered with the Turkish authorities are defected army officers or police officers. They are afraid of the reaction of the camp residents due to their former positions within the Syrian government. Even for those with relatively better financial conditions, the majority is unable to make a living without the support of their relatives and neighbours. Through assessments conducted by the STL field teams, the main humanitarian needs were identified as food supplements, non-food items such as hygiene materials, stoves, blankets, fuel for heating, winter clothes and plastic sheeting, and medical services such as mental health support and health care support and finally educational activities. Partly due to the highly limited access of international relief agencies to the refugee community inside Turkey, most of these needs outside the camps are not provided for.

2.3.

Capacity to respond

All ACT Alliance members responding to the Syrian refugee crisis across the region have specialised experience with refugees, and are guided in their response strategy by vigorous international standards and regulations. This ensures the best possible practice in dealing with the extremely vulnerable.

Jordan (LWF, IOCC, DSPR/MECC, FCA) The Lutheran World Federation (LWF) Jordan is a fully registered and operational INGO that has been working with refugees in the country since the 1950s, initially invited by the Jordanian Government to aid in the Palestinian refugee response following the 1948 Palestinian refugee crisis. LWF has offices in Amman, Mafraq, and the Zaatari Camp and intends to expand to other locations in the country. LWF draws on world-wide experience in refugee response and refugee-camp management to bring best practice and lessons learned to its work in Jordan. Past and present interventions include psychosocial support (multi-faceted conflict mitigation projects), NFIs, and education sector interventions, as well as vocational training. LWF has a memorandum of understanding with the Ministry of Education, the Jordan Hashemite Charity Organization, two local Jordanian women NGOs covering a wide geographical area, and is in the process of signing agreements with UNICEF, UN-Women, and possibly UNHCR. The Department of Services to Palestinian Refugees (DSPR) is an integral part of the Middle East Council of Churches (MECC) founded to support Palestinian refugees and needy people in the region. The organisation has served refugees in Jordan since 1952, focusing particularly on women and youth empowerment, child development, environment protection, and health and vocational training. In addition, DSPR grants nointerest loans for the establishment of small projects to enhance the socio-economic well-being of marginalized people. 12


ACT Appeal SYR131: Syria Regional Humanitarian Response

Finn Church Aid (FCA) established a country office in Amman, Jordan in 2012. The organisation has two field locations in Zaatari camp and one office in the King Abdullah Park (KAP) refugee camp. At the moment, FCA is preparing a location in Azraq camp and to expand in the communities. FCA is a partner organization of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Finland and ECHO. In Jordan, FCA has signed a Memorandum of Understanding with a leading governmental entity in humanitarian work, The Jordan Hashemite Charity Organisation (JHCO). FCA is a right based actor and therefore, has three priority areas: right to peace, right to livelihood and right to education. In particular, Finn Church Aid has specialised in Education in Emergencies with a particular focus on Linking Relief Rehabilitation and Development (LRRD). International Orthodox Christian Charities (IOCC) is officially registered in Jordan under the Ministry of Social Development, and has a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) with the Jordan Hashemite Charity Organization (JHCO), allowing IOCC to import shipments of humanitarian supplies to Jordan duty free. IOCC has partnered with JHCO on a wide range of programs, including response to current humanitarian crisis facing Syrian refugees living in the Zaatari Camp and host communities. In the past, IOCC has coordinated with JHCO and several ministries on its programs for Iraqi refugees and vulnerable Jordanians. Programs include: vocational training, therapeutic art and drama activities, personal development sessions, as well as women’s empowerment and health awareness activities.

Lebanon (DSPR/IOCC) DSPR/MECC has been active in Lebanon over an extended period, working first with Palestinian refugees, then applying this expertise to current responses. IOCC is an officially registered and recognized INGO in Lebanon, and has been working in the country since 2001, implementing both development and emergency programs. IOCC’s initial project was the School Feeding and Education Program funded by USDA provided more than 45,000 students in 243 public schools with nutrient-balanced meals, and an accompanying awareness-raising campaign on nutrition, civics and proper hygiene behaviours. With a grant from USAID, IOCC also supported more than 213 public schools in northern and southern Lebanon, the Bekaa, Beirut and Mount Lebanon, through the Education Assistance for Development (LEAD) programme. Nearly 75,000 public school students now have access to equipped science laboratories, computer labs with functioning internet connections, media libraries, repaired sanitation facilities and school supplies. LEAD also strengthened community development and outreach activities. Experience in Lebanon through the DRASATI program includes a five-year school improvement program targeting physical facilities, providing trainings, and building community relations. 19 schools have been rehabilitated to date. Following the July 2006 war in Lebanon, IOCC distributed emergency relief items such as hygiene kits, kitchen utensils, blankets and fuel to more than 3,500 displaced families in 65 villages in southern Lebanon. IOCC also carried out WASH and agricultural assistance projects. UNICEF has made available grants to assist displaced Syrian families to cover the costs for obstetric care for pregnant women to attend antenatal care services, access safe delivery services and receive essential post-natal care for both the mother and her new born. IOCC has identified project locations based upon the geographic and programmatic gaps that were ascertained during the Syria RRP5 development process. These areas, already extremely underserved and disadvantaged with few NGOs and/or governmental structures providing support, house a high number of the displaced, particularly newly arrived and non-registered refugees. IOCC will target the following urban and impoverished areas in Lebanon: Mount Lebanon, North, South and Bekaa.

Syria (IOCC) Since 2002, IOCC has worked with the Greek Orthodox Patriarchate of Antioch and All the East (GOPA) to implement joint emergency relief projects within Syria. In 2007, IOCC started to implement a multi-million 13


ACT Appeal SYR131: Syria Regional Humanitarian Response

dollar US-funded humanitarian aid program directed towards Iraqi refugees of which IOCC has received eight consecutive awards. DERD was established in 1986 with the purpose of supporting financially and technically GOPA’s many community projects. In 1999, it was officially recognized under Syrian law, regulation number 423. The current humanitarian aid project of IOCC/GOPA towards internally displaced, conflict-affected and refugee populations within Syria began in March 2012. As of May 2013, GOPA has 18 offices with over 120 employees throughout the country. These offices are responsible for identifying and registering families in need, and for planning, coordinating, implementing and reporting on humanitarian aid activities within their catchment areas. All offices work closely with local churches, the leadership and organizations of other faiths present, and with local secular NGO/CBO structures, in each of their locations.

Turkey (DKH) Since 2004 Support to Life (STL) is the strategic partner of Diakonie Katastrophenhilfe (DKH) in Turkey. STL is working in line with the humanitarian principles and is recognized as a highly qualified relief organization. Together with STL, DKH implemented projects after the earthquake in Bam/Iran in 2003, after the earthquake in Pakistan in 2005, and after the floods in Pakistan 2010. DKH, together with STL, is working on projects in relation to the Syria crises since October 2012. They are working in close cooperation with local stakeholders such as the community leaders (Muhtars), local authorities, other NGOs working in the area, and with close participation of the beneficiaries. STL is registered in Turkey as a non-governmental organization (Association).

2.4.

Activities of forum and external coordination

ACT Alliance members operational in regards to the Syrian crisis will continue to operate the joint cooperation mechanism known as the Jordan, Lebanon, Syria Forum (JSL Forum). The forum includes ACT members who are supporting and carrying out programmes in the region including FCA, LWF, DSPR/MECC, IOCC and DKH. Each organisation participates in UN working group or cluster meetings, as well as establishing Memorandums of Understanding (MOUs) with various local and international agencies. Agencies are also active in global Cluster Groups as appropriate considering their areas of specialisation.

II. PROPOSED EMERGENCY RESPONSE 1. Target populations, and areas and sectors of response ACT member LWF Jordan Sector of response PSYCHOSOCIAL INCOME GENERATION EDUCATION WASH NFIs SHELTER

Geogr. area of response M

300

500 200 7,500 7,000

6-17 F

Camp and Host Comm. Host Comm.

Host Comm. Camp Camp and Host Comm. Northern Jordan Totals (in individuals):

M

Planned target population 18-65 + 65 F M F M F

0-5

200

200

Totals M

500

F

700

5,000

5,000

200 7,500 7,000

15,000

15,000

200 7,500 27,000

6,000

6,000

15,000 15,000 15,000

15,000

36,000

100 300 200 200 200 11,100 11,300 30,200 30,400 30,400

200 30,400

500 700 71,700 72,100 143,800

14

200 7,500 27,000 36,000


ACT Appeal SYR131: Syria Regional Humanitarian Response

ACT member FCA

Geographic area of response

Planned target population

Sector of response

All sector activities are carried out in:

INFORMAL EDUCATION WASH PSYCHOSOCIAL ENVIRONMENT

Zaatri and Azraq Camp North of Jordan and East Amman As above As above As above Totals (in individuals):

0-5 M F

6-14 M F

15-24* M F

Geogr. area of response

0-5 M 864

Southern Turkey Southern Turkey

2,700 2,650 150 3,790 9,592

Totals M

F

2,700 2,650 150 3,790 9,592 18,580 *In host communities Finn Church Aid's programs target children and youth of any age through rehabilitation of schools and set-up of play grounds. ACT member DKH TURKEY Sector of response NFIs Cash-for-Work

2,500 2,850 150 3,790 9,492

+ 65 M F

Planned target population 18-65 + 65 F M F M F 1,350 2,214 2,106 117 171 100* 100*

6-17 F 801

M 1,377

2,500 2,850 150 3,790 9,492

Totals M F 4,572 4,428 100 100 9,200

*M/F disaggregated data is based on estimation ACT member DSPR Geogr. area of Jordan response 0-5 Sector of response All sector activities M F are carried out in: North, South, FOOD Amman, Balqa WASH - hygiene kits As above LIFE SKILLS As above PSYCHOSOCIAL As above NFIs As above 2,000 2,500 HEALTH As above HEALTH - Nutrition As above Totals (in individuals): 2,000 2,500

ACT member DSPR Geogr. area of Lebanon response Sector of response All sector activities are carried out in: FOOD WASH - hygiene kits SHELTER EDUCATION Totals (in individuals):

6-17 M

4,000 4,000

7,000 7,000

200

400

600

500

8,800

0-5 M

M

15,000 15,000 175

500

14,900 30,675

6-17 F

Planned target population 18-65 + 65 F M F M F

25,000 25,000 500 275 4,500 2,000 675 62,950

Planned target population 18-65 + 65 F M F M F

Totals M

F

19,000 19,000 175 200 2,000 1,100

32,000 32,000 500 675 7,000 2,500 675 41,475 75,350 116,825

Totals M

F

300 300 300 50 950 1,900* *Note: Disaggregated data is based on M/F ratio and family size estimation (125 families = ca. 600 individuals) ACT member IOCC Jordan Sector of response FOOD NFIs -

Geogr. area of response

Throughout Jordan Throughout

0-5 M

F

3,000 3,000

3,000 3,000

Planned target population 6-17 18-65 + 65 M F M F M F

3,000 3,000 15

3,000 3,000

3,000 3,000

300 300 300 50 950

Totals M

3,000 1,000 1,000 10,000 3,000 1,000 1,000 10,000

F

10,000 10,000


ACT Appeal SYR131: Syria Regional Humanitarian Response

winterisation NFIs- hygiene

Jordan Throughout Jordan EDUCATION Amman, training Madaba, Zarqa EDUCATION Throughout material Jordan Totals (in individuals):

ACT member IOCC Lebanon Sector of response FOOD WASH PUBLIC HEALTH– Nutrition NFIs SHELTER PROTECTION

150

150

150

150

150

150

50

50

500

500

0

0

400

400

100

100

0

0

500

500

6,150

6,150

2,500 9,050

2,500 9,050

6,250

Geogr. area of response

0-5 M

Bekaa, South, North, Mt. Lebanon, Beirut Same as above Same as above Same as above Bekaa, North

6-17 F

M

204 196 1,836 1,764 321 784

411 1,020

220

212

275

0

0

SOCIAL COHESION North & Bekaa & LIVELIHOODS 0 0 PSYCHOSOCIAL South 51 49 Totals (in individuals): 3,461 3,326

ACT member IOCC Syria Sector of response

Geographic area of response All sector activities are carried out in: Homs, Damascus, Aleppo, Tartous, FOOD Hassakeh, Daraa, Swaida, Latakia WASH As above NFIs As above EDUCATION As above SHELTER As above PSYCHO-SOCIAL As above CASH-FOR-WORK As above Totals (in individuals):

0-5 M

F

2,448 1,912 1,142 0 153 25 0 5,680

2,352 1,838 1,098 0 147 25 0 5,460

Planned target population 18-65 + 65 F M F M F

255 245 408 392 153 2,295 2,205 3,672 3,528 1,377

334 816

Bekaa, South, North, Mt. Lebanon

2,500 2,500 6,250 2,050 2,050 23,500 23,500 47,000

Totals M

F

147 1,323

1,020 9,180

980 8,820

396 644 620 980 1,632 1,568

256 612

246 588

1,579 4,080

1,517 3,920

265

424

165

159

1,100

1,060

550 2,029

165

160

1,100

4,060

0 10 0 115 0 63 62 102 98 38 4,704 6,034 7,448 8,774 2,766

15 37 2,675

385 1,871

440

Planned target population 6-17 18-65 + 65 M F M F M F

3,060 2,390 1,428 255 191 31 0 7,355

2,940 4,896 2,298 3,825 1,372 2,285 245 0 184 306 31 51 0 600 7,070 11,963

0 140 254 246 18,313 20,753 39,066

Totals M

F

4,704 1,836 1,764 12,240 11,760 3,675 1,434 1,378 9,561 9,188 2,195 857 823 5,712 5,488 0 0 0 255 245 294 114 111 764 736 50 19 18 126 124 150 0 0 600 150 11,0684,260 4,094 28,403 27,296 112,649

2. Overall goal of the emergency response 2.1 Overall goal The overall goal of this appeal is to contribute to regional stability and alleviate the consequences of the Syrian humanitarian crisis in Jordan, Lebanon, Syria, and Turkey.

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ACT Appeal SYR131: Syria Regional Humanitarian Response

2.2 Outcomes    

3.

To maintain the dignity and provide direct humanitarian aid to IDPs and refugees from Syria in camps and host communities, with a particular focus on vulnerable families, and enable them to live in harmony and peace among themselves and with host communities Refugee youth from Syria in camps and host communities are empowered to positively engage in their communities and contribute to decreasing the negative impact on the environment Communities hosting refugees from Syria are supported to mitigate the negative socio-economic impact of the increased refugee population from Syria on national infrastructure (systems and services), and increase direct assistance to vulnerable host communities Implementing ACT JSL members are enabled to better adhere to international humanitarian accountability principles and do-no-harm approaches, and mainstream child protection and community-based psychosocial support in their programming

Proposed implementation plan

3.1 Narrative summary of planned intervention Jordan LWF The strategy of LWF for this appeal is to focus on winterization for the first six months of the year when winter conditions are harsh, mainly in refugee camps, while building the resilience of girls and boys in order to enable them to cope with their environment. An important focus of LWF will also be on building the leadership capacities of community leaders and enabling them to better manage and reduce conflicts among themselves and with the hosts. The winterization component includes rehabilitation of shelter and distribution of winter items such as gas heaters and winter clothing. This support will be provided in camps and host communities and will be coordinated with the relevant UN and international agencies. Building the resilience of communities will be through a holistic psychosocial program that will target community leaders inside and outside of camps through individual and group sessions which will focus on community based psychosocial support (CBPS), psychosocial first aid, counselling, leadership skills, and conflict mitigation and peace building. During the previous appeal, LWF formed one committee that consists of 25 street leaders, women, and young adults. This committee was provided with training and coaching and is now active in one of the major clusters of the Zaatari camp. During this appeal, LWF will continue to work with this committee and will establish 3 more committees in other sectors of the camp in order to better enable communities to take ownership and play a positive role in the life of the camp. A peace-building program, ‘peace oasis’, will be implemented during this appeal period which will aim to build a peaceful environment in Zaatari camp through targeting youth with a focused program of mixed interventions designed to build resilience, improve personal skills, and meet basic psychosocial needs. LWF will conduct trainings and workshops on conflict mitigation skills, communication, problem solving, selfesteem building, and other related topics. Various artistic methods will be employed including writing, dancing, music, drawing, and other youth-related approaches. Meals will be provided to children and young adults participating in the program. A safe/child friendly space will be established and equipped and several animators, community mobilizers, and technical experts will be hired in order to ensure a professional program. LWF’s appeal also includes supporting host communities and enabling them to mitigate the negative socioeconomic impact of the refugee population on local infrastructure such as schools, health clinics, and the job market in general. Under this objective, LWF intends to support local income generation initiatives to help local vulnerable Jordanian families generate additional income. LWF started with supporting one of the local 17


ACT Appeal SYR131: Syria Regional Humanitarian Response

Jordanian communities based NGOs in Mafraq to establish a food processing project and will continue supporting such initiatives in this appeal period. LWF believes that increasing the income of host families will reduce the effects of the Syrian presence and will promote cohesion and stability among both communities. LWF will work with Community Based Organizations (CBOs) on developing successful project ideas that will eventually serve both Jordanian and Syrian families. To reduce pressure on public schools and increase their absorption capacity, LWF will expand and maintain existing schools that enrol Syrian students, through the construction of extra classrooms and minor rehabilitation work. Please note: Output numbers refer to the logframe on page 25ff Output 1.2: Health and health conditions LWF will rehabilitate 100 public WASH facilities in refugee camps, distribute hygiene kits, and conduct hygiene promotion campaign in the north and middle areas of Jordan. Output 1.3: Winter NFIs Gas heaters, gas bottles, gas refill, and warm winter clothing will be distributed in refugee camps and host communities benefiting also vulnerable poor Jordanian families. Output 1.4: Shelter About 100 shelters in host communities where refugees from Syria live will be rehabilitated. The rehabilitation will focus on preparing the shelter for the upcoming winter season and rehabilitating the bathrooms to meet the basic hygiene needs of the refugee families. Output 1.5: Psychosocial support Individual and counseling sessions will be conducted to benefit community representatives with whom LWF is working on various interventions that will benefit the camp. Community leaders will need these interventions in order to deal with their war and displacement traumas in order to be able to better serve their communities. Community leaders will also be given psychosocial first aid training in order to help their community members, especially new arrivals to the camp with psychosocial support. Output 1.7: Peace building and conflict mitigation A program that will build peace building skills and conflict mitigation capacities will be implemented in order to benefit selected community leaders and youth in one of the zones of the Zaatari Camp. A leadership training program that will serve the same purpose will also be implemented. Two Social Mediation Committees will be established in the Zaatari Camp in order to mediate between conflicting parties in the camp and contribute to improving the overall environment of the camp. Output 2.1: Formal and non-formal education LWF will implement a life-skills program (informal education) for Jordanian and refugees from Syria in camps and host communities in the north and middle regions of the country. This program will consist of various life skills training that will contribute to the empowerment of youth in general and enable them to positively engage in their communities. Specific topics of this program will be decided after discussions and assessment of needs that will be carried out in the first quarter of the appeal period. Output 3.1: Livelihoods Together with local partners and key stakeholders, LWF will support the establishment of 6 income-generating initiatives that will aim at providing additional income to local partners while improving the livelihoods of both vulnerable Jordanian and Syrian refugee families living in the north and middle regions of the country. These opportunities will include food processing/agriculture, vocational skills, and other women-related initiatives that will be explored with the communities in the first couple of months of the appeal year. In-depth feasibility analysis of such projects will be conducted once funding is available. 18


ACT Appeal SYR131: Syria Regional Humanitarian Response

Output 3.2: National infrastructure Under this output, LWF will rehabilitate schools, construct new classrooms, and provide school kits. These activities will aim at reducing pressure on public infrastructure as a result of the presence of refugees from Syria.

Jordan DSPR Through their activities, DSPR Jordan stresses the following:  Reaching the neediest people, targeting Palestinian refugees and marginalized needy people  Focusing on women, children and youth  Fostering self-dependency and self-sustainability  Participation as crucial in all development efforts  Grassroots collaboration  Networking and information sharing with NGOs and CBOs DSPR Jordan adopts a methodology based on refugee participation in needs identification, prior to the building of a plan of action or log-frame. This methodology is now extended to include all work done with refugees from Syria. Output 1.1: Food Selection of food items is based on international nutrition requirements and standards, and is guided by cultural diet familiarity. Parcels are developed with a dual focus on hygiene and human dignity, and are tailored to the needs of men, women, and children/infants. Output 1.2: Public Health DSPR will provide educational workshops to increase the capacity of community and health workers. The focus of sessions includes outreach and information promoting breastfeeding, and targeting nutrition and infant feeding. Also covered is the legal framework surrounding the right to breastfeed. DSPR will contribute their expertise around infant feeding through participation in "Nutrition in Emergency" training, in cooperation with the Ministry of Health. This training builds capacity of key stakeholders active in provision of nutrition in emergency scenarios. In total, 15 days of training will be held for multiple groups of beneficiaries. Mother Support Groups will provide space for women to come together and learn from another, while simultaneously linking the community to health care institutions. The aim of such groups is to affect and improve infant feeding and nutrition. Each group is led by a volunteer "lead" local mother who regularly meets with beneficiaries through home visits, to offer expert advice and support around breastfeeding and infant nutrition. Ten lead mothers will be working within the communities. The lead mother trains other mothers in the community, who then create forums, the Mother Support Groups, where they consolidate the training they received through mutual support and discussion. Output 1.3: Non-Food Items NFIs will be distributed based on previous assessments and experience. Distributions efforts are guided by strict methodology and adherence to gender sensitive practices, as well as based on the provision of code-ofconduct training. Output 1.5: Psychosocial support Activities will include the provision of direct psychosocial support in the form of lectures and workshops for adults, as well as children's sessions. Adult sessions will run 4-6 hours a day, focusing on communication and coping strategies. Children's sessions will include evaluation and counselling through provision of leisure

19


ACT Appeal SYR131: Syria Regional Humanitarian Response

activities. Incentives for participation for families will include meal and transportation incentives. All activities are subject to monitoring and evaluation processes.

Jordan FCA FCA envisages its role through this appeal as "To improve the livelihood and wellbeing of youth and adolescents from local Jordanians and Syria refugees". For this to materialise, FCA has a wide spectrum of projects targeted to age group 15-24 years old. FCA is specialised in informal education in emergency and draws on wealth of experience in livelihood, social stability and peace, and climate change and environment Drawing on years of experience in working in refugee camps and disaster areas, FCA realises the importance of enhancing the positive engagement of the youth and adolescents in productive roles in their communities by providing opportunities tailored to respond to the specific needs of this disadvantaged segment. This will be achieved through the following outputs: Output 1.2: Health and NFI Distribution Camps are lacking the proper infrastructure and sanitation facilities. Additionally, the harsh environment in the camps which is conducive to certain skin and digestives illnesses increases the possibility of disease outbreaks. Therefore, FCA will distribute hygiene kits in all camps across Jordan. Output 1.5: Psychosocial and physical wellbeing This is a two pronged output. First, FCA will deliver cycles of physical activities within a framework of psychosocial support. These activities such as football, volleyball, tennis or acrobatics direct participants’ energies positively towards achieving self-actualisation in their area of interest. FCA will implement different activities taking into consideration the continuity of these activities. Central to this, is the concept of Training of Trainer (ToT) which will work as a catalyst for transferring expertise and responsibility to participants, and subsequently leading to more independence and sustainability. Second, the psychosocial component of this output addresses the dire need in camps and community for services directed at youth and adolescents. FCA will use innovative methods which focus on providing training to participants in areas of psychosocial support, conflict mitigation, stress management, relaxation and meditation, and at the same time equipping participants with skills needed to be able to provide peer to peer support. Furthermore, the organisation will form support groups from the participants who proves competency in providing peer to peer psychosocial support. Output 1.6: Recreation, Arts and Transferrable skills Art is a powerful tool in times of crises which enables people to engage in positive activities. FCA will run activities such as theatre, art studios, music classes and more. Recreational activities can include folklore dancing, games or site seeing. FCA will hold transferable skills courses which can be used in different life and work context. Transferrable skills have emerged as vital for self-development and will enable participants to sustain employment. Participants will be trained on communication skills, negotiation skills, problem solving and creative and analytical thinking. Output 2.1: Informal Education As an organisation specialised in informal education, FCA will implement courses in literacy, numeracy and English language for female and male beneficiaries through regular teaching methods, ensuring gender equality. These courses are designed to respond to a gap among refugees and host community individuals who, according to several reliable assessments, are either left out of the education system and have become

20


ACT Appeal SYR131: Syria Regional Humanitarian Response

inactive in their communities as a result of being a refugee, or have not received education at all due to cultural or economic reasons in their home country. FCA will establish and support ICT centres and conduct courses in ICT. This in turn will provide participants with necessary skills vital to their employability. FCA will contribute to motivating beneficiaries and facilitating their access to schools by distributing school kits in host communities in North of Jordan. Output 2.1: Community Mobilisation The essence of success of any activity relies on the participation and support of the community which receives, either directly or indirectly, the outcome of the organisation’s activities. Sense of partnership and ownership will be nurtured for maximum effectiveness of activities. Therefore, FCA will mobilise communities and seek their support through several methods. The organisation, where possible, will form focus groups of beneficiaries before starting any activity to probe their preferences. Moreover, FCA will form parents committees, where possible, and will conduct regular meetings with street leaders in the camps. In addition to this, the organisation will conduct shows and exhibition for its beneficiaries and invite members of the community to attend it. Output 2.2: Environmental and Hygiene Education Awareness FCA will be working on is creating awareness among beneficiaries and their communities about maintaining a clean and healthy environment. Camps, in specific, are deprived from essential means which help refugees to protect their environment. Therefore, campaigns to create awareness on hand washing, water conservation, garbage dumping, sewage, sanitation, and dealing with green issue. Moreover, booklets which contain important information will be distributed in the camps to be used as a reference and guideline for households. Output 3.1: Livelihood FCA is specialised in providing skills training which contributes to enhancing the livelihood of beneficiaries and enabling them to restore control over their lives. The organisation will organise training on income-generating activities with the scope of Linking Relief Rehabilitation and Development. Some of these courses may span over a period of 3 months while others will be of a shorter duration. Output 3.2: School infrastructure and learning environment FCA will conduct separate assessment to identify the needs for improving education facilities to guarantee healthy educational atmosphere and learning environment are enjoyed by beneficiaries. This will include rehabilitating and furnishing classrooms and establishing playgrounds and other necessary facilities. Output 4.1: Capacity Building on cross Cutting issues FCA has Psychosocial, Child Protection, and gender as cross-cutting themes which will be applied throughout all facets of project activities. Therefore, FCA will develop a strategy to lead this integration. Furthermore, staff, volunteers and workers in projects from beneficiaries will be trained on the above concepts in addition to Do No Harm, HAP, INEE and SPHERE in order to be able to understand its relevant importance to the work they do and how to apply them in different work and life contexts. Further, the organisation will focus on gender mainstreaming in all its activities ensuring equality is implemented at project level. Relevant information and guidelines will be disseminated and regular review to best practice will be integrated into the organisation.

Jordan IOCC Output 1.1: Food The selection of food items takes into consideration cultural dietary habits and familiarity. Rations will include rice, sugar, dried beans, bulgur wheat, lentils, salt, and tea, and will supplement the beneficiaries’ daily diet by about 800 Kcal per day for one month. Contents of the dry food parcels will be purchased from local vendors. An open tendering competition will obtain wholesale rates, and an evaluation committee of key IOCC staff will select vendors. 21


ACT Appeal SYR131: Syria Regional Humanitarian Response

Output 1.3: Non-food items NFIs will be delivered to host communities throughout Jordan; they will be sent to areas depending on their need, and will be sensitive to different seasonal needs. NFI items may include: household kits, hygiene kits, school sets, bedding sets, dignity kits and other household items. Output 1.6: Life skills training This objective will be reached through the provision of English language classes and life skills seminars in urban locations including Amman, Zarqa and Madaba. Courses are offered to vulnerable Jordanians from host communities as well as Syrian refugees, to provide a safe space for interaction and community building.

Lebanon DSPR Output 1.3: NFIs DSPR will distribute clothing items and hygiene kits. Output 1.4: Shelter DSPR plans to repair existing infrastructure in Ein-el-Hilweh camp as well as providing cash rent subsidies to refugees. Output 3.2: Education Programming will include additional classes and instruction, as well as exam tutoring. Employment of refugees within these programs (such as hiring teachers from within the refugee community) will increase the beneficiary pool outside of students alone.

Lebanon IOCC Output 1.1: Food Food rations will help bridge the gap between families' food requirements and what they have access to purchase. The selection of food items takes into consideration cultural dietary habits and familiarity. Rations will include rice, sugar, dried beans, bulgur wheat, lentils, salt, and tea, and will supplement the beneficiaries’ daily diet by about 800 Kcal per day for one month. Contents of the dry food parcels will be purchased from local vendors. An open tendering competition will obtain wholesale rates, and an evaluation committee of key IOCC staff will select vendors. Output 1.2: Hygiene promotion This project builds the capacity of existing healthcare workers on community mobilization and hygiene promotion. The behaviour change strategy will utilize suitable communication channels/technologies, materials and culturally appropriate messages for maximum impact. Trained beneficiaries will facilitate community outreach sessions on diarrheal disease prevention through key messages that focus on: a) how to preserve proper hygiene behaviours in an emergency setting, b) maintaining safe water storage, c) treating water to make it potable for drinking, d) critical times to wash one’s hands and to employ proper hand washing techniques, and e) sanitary waste disposal. Specific attention will be given to the needs of vulnerable groups in the community, such as the elderly and those with disabilities. Furthermore, the program will incorporate a practical way to facilitate community participation and accountability in emergency WASH projects. IOCC will distribution water storage containers for the refugees to be able to store safe drinking water and the sanitation/latrine facilities in collective and individual shelters will be repaired or constructed. Output 1.2: Public health Many pregnant women are currently unable to access ante-natal care or to be assisted by a trained and skilled birth attendant. In addition, according to UNICEF, there is a risk for an increase in rates of malnutrition amongst children under five and there is an urgent need to screen, manage and treat malnutrition. This

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ACT Appeal SYR131: Syria Regional Humanitarian Response

activity will support needy beneficiaries in access to essential obstetric care services as well as nutritional management. Pregnant and lactating women will receive essential pre and post-natal care, obstetric care and urgent medical care through subsidised health centers. Infants needing urgent hospitalization will receive assistance. Trained community volunteers will carry out awareness-raising sessions on the importance of breastfeeding and IYCF in emergencies, as well as general nutrition in emergencies. Mother support groups will be created for the support of mothers throughout pregnancy and lactation. CBOs and other local emergency response actors will be sensitised on the International Code for Marketing of Breast-milk Substitutes and the importance of exclusive breastfeeding in light of said Code. The maintenance of optimal health and nutrition for infants and young children in emergencies will also be covered Outreach workers will conduct community outreach activities in order to screen and identify children with malnutrition. Children will be referred to centers for adequate assessment as treatment. Previously produced information, education and communication (IEC) awareness-raising materials will be updated and redistributed as necessary to reinforce the messages disseminated. Sensitization sessions will take place on average once a week, utilizing instructional demonstrations and participatory methodologies, focusing on the importance of IYCF. Participants will be tested before and after the sessions to determine improvements in their understanding and knowledge of the issues. Output 1.3: Non-food Items Refugees and economically disadvantaged members of host communities are in desperate need of household items, bedding, and clothing. The contents of NFI parcels will be purchased from local suppliers through an open tendering process. NFIs will be distributed directly to beneficiaries, from central locations or through local partners. NFI kits are based on an average family size of four persons, though contents and quantities may vary. Distributions are conducted intending to minimize risks to beneficiaries, particularly for female beneficiaries. Output 1.4: Shelter Local companies will do minor repairs that may include carpentry, plumbing, electrical, roofing and/or wall repairs. Quotations for repairs will be solicited from a minimum of three vendors based upon specific criteria. Staff will conduct monitoring and evaluation exercises to ensure maximum impact. Public facilities used as communal shelters will also be targeted for upgrades. IOCC will seek to repair and make basic required adaptations, including WASH infrastructure, to make spaces more habitable. Shelter assistance can take the form of rent support, rehabilitation of public or individual shelters and improvement to water and sanitation facilities. Output 1.5: Psychosocial The aim of the psychosocial programme is to improve the emotional wellbeing of Syrian refugees and foster a good relationship with the host communities; this will be done with a focus on artistic workshops and awareness sessions on human and children rights’ protection. -

These workshops enable beneficiaries to better cope with their status as refugees and give them the opportunity to express all their negative feelings in a positive and constructive way The project is directed towards empowering the Syrian and host community beneficiaries on matters relating to the satisfaction of their needs to express their feelings and protecting their rights, and to provide them with some opportunities for recreation and leisure

Workshops utilise a participatory approach to promote engagement and awareness-raising amongst children, youth, parents and communities. Recreational activities with specific pedagogical and psychological objectives will be implemented, for example arts-based sessions to offer a psychological outlet through creative means. Focuses of workshops will include: increasing their understanding of violence and abuse, drawing the attention of parents and community stakeholders to the protection rights of children. 23


ACT Appeal SYR131: Syria Regional Humanitarian Response

Output 1.7: Protection Many refugee women are unaware of their legal rights or the rights of their children. The Lebanese Government, in collaboration with UNFPA, is currently developing national-level policies and guidelines such as the Standard Operating Procedures (SOP) for GBV (referrals) and a training program that addresses the prevention of sexual exploitation and abuse (SEA), IOCC plans to play a significant part in the roll-out of these standards. Working through MoSA community-based Social Development Centres (SDCs), IOCC will carry out basic gender-awareness and referral pathway trainings with refugee and host community women, community influencers, men of all ages and service providers. IOCC will use internationally endorsed resources to structure and monitor this GBV activity. Dignity kits will also be distributed. Output 3.1: Livelihoods Mother Support Groups (MSG) will be established, and its members trained to run a Community Kitchen initiative. These groups will empower women to support each other in preventing malnutrition amongst their children under the age of five, and ensure that the desired behavioural changes are sustained. The women will be trained on small business operations and management, and the cooperative will provide the participants with a steady source of income. It is hoped the community kitchens become self-sufficient by the end of the grant period. The Community Kitchens will be engaged to provide fresh food pots to vulnerable and need families in the area and to students at local area schools where Syrian refugees are registered.

Syria IOCC Output 1.1: Food The rations will include rice, sugar, dried beans, bulgur wheat, lentils, salt, and tea, and will serve to supplement the beneficiaries’ daily diet by about 800 Kcal per day for one month. The package will not include any milk, so as not to interfere with the promotion of proper infant feeding including breastfeeding. GOPA staff will conduct all procurement and tendering. Output 1.2: WASH promotion This project will utilise an already existing group of healthcare workers and community volunteers who have already been trained in community mobilization and hygiene promotion. The trained healthcare workers will facilitate community outreach sessions on diarrheal disease prevention through key messages that focus on: a) how to preserve proper hygiene behaviours in an emergency setting, b) maintaining safe water storage, c) treating water to make it potable for drinking, d) critical times to wash one’s hands and to employ proper hand washing techniques, and e) sanitary waste disposal. Specific attention will be given to the needs of the especially vulnerable and the program will incorporate a practical way to promote community participation and accountability. Sensitization and information sessions take place regularly. Candle-based household-level water filters that can hold approximately 20 litres will be distributed to 500 families. At the time of distribution, family members will be trained on how to use, clean and maintain their filter. Families will also be trained on how to store their drinking water in clean, covered containers. Hygiene kits include items such as soap, shampoo, bathing soap, shaving cream, toothpaste, toothbrushes, bath sponges, hairbrushes, toilet paper, tissues, sanitary napkins, dishwashing liquid, dish sponges, laundry powder, disinfectant, a toilet brush, and a mop. Infant kits contain baby shampoo, body soap, oil, powder, a sponge, tissues, diapers, disposable slips, baby cologne/astringent, hypoallergenic cream, and a training potty. Output 1.3: Non-Food Items Preliminary results of needs assessment carried out by IOCC/GOPA, indicate that IDPs and conflict-affected communities are in desperate need of household items, such as bedding and clothing.

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ACT Appeal SYR131: Syria Regional Humanitarian Response

Contents of NFI parcels will be purchased from local suppliers through an open tendering process ensuring transparency. An evaluation committee formed by key GOPA staff will receive bids in sealed envelopes and vendor selections will be based on the offers combining the best quality, quantity, availability, delivery terms and price. A sample list of NFIs and approximate quantities is found in Appendix A. All commodities procured will be transported to secure warehouses, which are situated on the premises of partner churches, where items will be packaged into parcels, stored, and dispatched to distribution sites. GOPA has a working logistical structure and the necessary organizational and technical capacity to efficiently manage the procurement, receipt, transport, storage and distribution of the relief parcels. NFIs will be given directly to beneficiaries, either from central locations or through local partners (such as churches and CBOs) where volunteers are engaged to carry out the distributions. IOCC/GOPA develops a bi-weekly allocation plan, adjusted daily to the constantly changing security circumstances. All distributions abide by minimum standards as outlined by the UN NFI Working Group and the Syria Higher Relief Committee. NFI kits are based on an average family size of four persons. Distributions are conducted in a manner to minimize risk to beneficiaries, particularly for female beneficiaries. On some occasions a special request for home delivery can be honoured as well. Outcome 1.5: Psychosocial Interventions Psychosocial activities will be held in safe spaces engaged specifically to remove the participants from their direct stressors. A key focus of the program is to instil in participants stress management coping skills. The activity consists of four-day workshop, where beneficiaries are either family units (parents, care-giver, or heads-of-household, with their children) or adult individuals. Participants are transported to the venue and are provided room and board. A variety of techniques are used during the workshop, including puppetmaking, drawing and illustrations, performance, and drama. Children will have their own psychosocial schedule such as games, sports, arts and crafts, singing and music, during which facilitators/social workers monitor and observe the children’s behaviour. If deemed necessary, facilitators will consult with parents and develop personalised programs in coordination with specialists. Monitoring and evaluation practices will be applied. Output 3.2: Education Educational opportunities will be offered to children of primary and secondary school levels through two main objectives: 1) to enable socio-economically disadvantaged school-aged children to enrol or re-enrol in private schools through the partial or full provision of tuition fees, providing them with school uniforms, educational supplies and transport to and from school; and, 2) to improve the academic-readiness of students who have missed portions of their schooling through intensive summer-school or remedial classes that will help them perform better in the coming school year. One thousand children will be provided with educational services. Output 3.1: Livelihoods (cash-for-work) To ensure that cash-for work (CFW) activities meet the needs of beneficiaries, project suggestions will be solicited from target communities. Activities will be administered in the form of small grants directed at community development projects. Beneficiary selection will be done through a combination of community and staff identification. Where possible, projects will prioritize women and the disabled. CFW projects might include rubbish collection, clean-up of rubble, and other such activities. Each project will be designed to provide temporary employment for as many vulnerable beneficiaries as possible. The number of actual workdays and number of persons provided with temporary employment will vary depending on the size and type of the project and the current security situation in the areas where the activities will take place. CFWs wages will be within the acceptable market rate so as not to create problems within the communities and the local labour markets. Beneficiaries will be given cash-in-hand on a weekly basis. Economic stability will be measured through interviews carried out with the beneficiaries who participate in the CFW projects.

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ACT Appeal SYR131: Syria Regional Humanitarian Response

Turkey DKH Output 1.3: Winter NFIs Families have indicated that after prioritizing food, shelter, medical needs and water they have few funds remaining for NFI items for the coming winter. In Hatay province, DKH, through its strategic partner STL, will distribute winterization packages to 1,500 families or 9,000 individuals living outside the camps in urban areas of Southern Turkey. The kit will include 6 blankets, 1 carpet, 1 stove for heating and 2*15kg pack of coal, 6 set of winter clothes including underwear. The 1,500 beneficiary families will be well equipped for winter, and can use their income for covering other basic. Output 3.1: Livelihoods (Cash-For-Work Program – CFW) Completing the winterization packages, 200 people from the Syrian community will be selected for CFW through DKH Community Centers. After getting training on knitting and receiving a startup kit, the 200 selected Syrians will produce 1,000 blankets and sets of scarf and hat to be distributed to the Syrian beneficiaries as part of the winterization program. The distribution will take place through DKH Community Centers. Selected Syrians will receive payment for each set completed. This activity has a double outcome. It empowers and increases the incomes of 200 Syrians through Cash for Work, and consequently improves their livelihood. It also adds up to the winter items distributed through the winter kits, and helps the most vulnerable Syrians to get prepared for the winter.

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ACT Appeal SYR131: Syria Regional Humanitarian Response

3.2 Log frame

Project structure

Indicators

Means of Verification (MoV)

Assumptions

Goal: To contribute to regional stability and alleviate the consequences of the Syrian humanitarian crisis in Jordan, Lebanon, Syria, and Turkey. 1

2

3

To maintain the dignity and provide direct humanitarian aid, including psychosocial support, to refugees from Syria in camps and host communities, with a particular focus on vulnerable families, and enable them to live in harmony and peace among themselves and with host communities

Targeted refugee youth from Syria in camps and host communities are empowered to positively engage in their communities and contribute to decreasing the negative impact on the environment Targeted communities hosting

 % of targeted refugees from Syria who report that their basic living conditions have improved  Decrease in symptoms associated with psychosocial distress and reduced levels of conflict compared to the baseline  Percentage of targeted families from Syria with increased access to Food and non-food items, shelter, health services, and nutrition and health awareness/information  Refugee youth report they play increased role in their communities

 Qualitative questionnaire/ interviews  Quantitative Survey  Baseline pre and post interventions  Minimum Sphere standards for food are met

 The current crisis does not evolve into a regional war  Access to refugees from Syria in the region is possible by the implementing ACT agencies

 Qualitative questionnaire/ interviews

 Refugee youth have a desire/are able to be active in community

 Qualitative/quantitative

 No drastic/sudden

 Households report increased understanding of environmental issues

 local communities in the region


ACT Appeal SYR131: Syria Regional Humanitarian Response

4

refugees from Syria are supported to mitigate the negative socioeconomic impact of the increased refugee population from Syria on national infrastructure (systems and services), and increase direct assistance to vulnerable host communities. Implementing ACT JSL members are enabled to better adhere to international humanitarian accountability principles and do-noharm approaches, and mainstream child protection, Gender and community-based psychosocial support in their programming

Outputs 1.1 Families of refugees from Syria in camps and host communities have increased nutritional awareness and ability to maintain the minimum daily intake of nutrients, including calorie intake, in order to maintain health and physical well-being.

hosting refugees from Syria report enhanced levels of livelihood

survey in the region

deterioration of the crisis that creates the need to diverse funding to humanitarian relief of refugees only  Host communities are receptive to aid and work with implementing organization

 At least, two Implementing agencies have developed written procedures and guidelines for adhering to best practices in HAP, Do-No-Harm, CBPS.

 Reviewing organizational reports/assessments on progress on the various systems/practices  Pre and post CBPS baseline

 There is an organizational willingness to learn and explore the possibility of adhering to quality standards in humanitarian affairs.  Availability of technical resources and expertise

 80% of families receiving food parcels report improved nutritional status  10% increase, from UNICEF data, in beneficiary women who exclusively breast feed their infant for the first 6 months of life  50% of targeted beneficiaries report increased awareness in nutrition and health

 Beneficiary surveys/questionnaires conducted with random sample of 10% of all families receiving assistance

 Nutritious items for inclusion in the food parcels continue to be available in the local markets  The security situation continues to allow for program staff to access beneficiaries in catchment areas  Beneficiaries continue to be willing to participate in the project  Beneficiaries do not move out of the project catchment area

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 Survey for nursing mothers


ACT Appeal SYR131: Syria Regional Humanitarian Response

1.2 Refugees from Syria in camps and host communities have increased health awareness and improved health status/conditions.

 75% of 350 women & their newborns receive PNC within 3 days after delivery  80% of beneficiary families report knowing 3 of 5 critical times to wash hands  80% of beneficiary households report improvement in the health status of their members  90% of targeted population meet the minimum Sphere standards in health

 NGO Health reports  WHO records/report  Survey/Questionnaire

1.3 Families of refugees from Syria living  90% of targeted beneficiaries report in camps and host communities increased coping ability with the winter  Questionnaire for targeted beneficiaries have increased ability to cope with conditions (LWF)  Interviews with selected the harsh winter conditions.  80% of families report reduced key stakeholders economic burden as a result of receiving the NFI kit (IOCC)

1.4 Families of refugees from Syria in camps and host communities live in improved and hygienic shelters.

 95% of beneficiary families receiving shelter support are protected against the natural elements (LWF & IOCC)  95% of beneficiary families state that they live in hygienic shelters (LWF)

 Field visits to targeted shelters (observation)  Questionnaire for beneficiary households

 Availability of hospitals, clinics, and doctors to treat women and newborns within 3 days after delivery  No epidemics prevail as a result of increased influx  No drastic increase in refugee influx that reduces the effectiveness of health programs  Beneficiaries are receptive to health awareness activities  Activities are sensitive to community and culturally relatable.  Winterization items/kits are available in the local markets, or can be obtained from an external source  Winter conditions do not affect the distribution process

 Agreement with the implementing agency with regards to the maintenance work.  Refugees have access to shelter  Beneficiaries are receptive to

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ACT Appeal SYR131: Syria Regional Humanitarian Response

1.5 Children and adults refugees from Syria, including refugee leaders, have increased resiliency and improved physical and psychosocial well-being that will enable them to cope with their environments in camps and host communities

1.6 Children and adults of refugee families from Syria and vulnerable host families are engaged in artistic and recreational activities and acquire new life and vocational skills that will contribute to their empowerment. 1.7 Domestic and community conflicts, including gender-based violence, among targeted refugees from Syria themselves and with host communities are decreased

 90% of targeted beneficiary street leaders report improved psychosocial well-being including reduction in symptoms associated with psychosocial distress  70% of targeted beneficiaries report improvement in their emotional and physical well-being, an sense of connectedness and safety 90% of targeted youth report they have gained new competencies and skills in the areas of intervention

 Percentage decrease in the number of refugee community conflicts in targeted areas  General reports of violence and demonstrations reduced in numbers in targeted areas  % of targeted communities where refugees report a decrease in the number of violent conflicts and tensions both internally and with host communities  % of targeted communities were host communities report a decrease in the 30

 Well-being/resiliency tests for selected beneficiaries  Questionnaires for parents  Baselines

psychosocial activities  Beneficiaries continue to be willing to participate in the program  Beneficiaries do not move out of the program catchment area  Availability of qualified counselors/social workers

Survey of targeted beneficiaries

 Governments allow vocational/life skills training for refugees (specially Jordan)  Trainers in various fields are available.  Youth are willing to participate in these activities  Targeted beneficiaries are receptive to project activities  No drastic increase in community conflicts as a result of increased influx of masses and/or intervention of political faction

 Reports of security/Camp management  Reports of NGOs/UN agencies  Reports from schools  Focus groups and interviews with refugees and host communities


ACT Appeal SYR131: Syria Regional Humanitarian Response

2.1 Targeted youth and adolescents in camps and host communities are motivated and have increased access to formal and informal education opportunities

 Questionnaire for targeted beneficiaries  Activity reports of implementing agencies

 Scholastic materials are available to students  Students are able to daily access the school they are attending  Schools in the catchment area remain open  Students take their studies seriously & pass their exams

 Percentage increase of understanding of environmental issues among targeted beneficiaries

 Questionnaire  Interviews with selected beneficiaries

 Targeted beneficiaries are receptive to the activities

 80% of targeted families report increased income

 Questionnaire of targeted communities

 No major deterioration of the economic and/or political environment in the targeted countries

 Survey/questionnaire

 Refugees from Syria continue

 2.2 Youth and adolescent refugees as well as project staff, teachers, trainers, and volunteers have increased understanding of the importance of a clean and healthy environment. 3.1 Vulnerable families of host communities, Syrians, and Syria refugees have increased income that will enable them to cope with their difficult living conditions 3.2 Public schools in host communities

number of violent conflicts and tensions between themselves and refugees 3% decrease from baseline, in the # of GBV cases reported, as per the national GBVIMS Percentage increase in the targeted beneficiaries who report they are more motivated Percentage increase in the number of beneficiaries enrolled in informal education opportunities Percentage increase in the number of beneficiaries having access to ICT facilities for education % increase in boys and girls in target areas that attend formal education.

 2 Community Kitchens are running successfully & bringing in a profit  90% of targeted children state that 31


ACT Appeal SYR131: Syria Regional Humanitarian Response

have improved learning environment and increased capacity to enroll refugee students

4.1 ACT JSL implementing partners and staff acquire knowledge and understanding of the principles, tools, and approaches of child protection, Gender, HAP, Do-noharm, peace education, and CBPS mainstreaming 4.2 ACT JSL Implementing partners have increased access to resources in child protection, HAP, Do-No-Harm, and CBPS in Arabic language

they have increased motivation as a result of receiving school kits and uniforms  All targeted schools report increased enrollment of refugees from Syria  Staff of implementing ACT partners report improved understanding of principles and increased capacity to start implementing some of the guidelines and requirements

 Interviews  Organizational/project reports

 Hard and soft resources on these topics are available at the offices of implementing agencies (All ACT members)

 Interviews with management and staff  Organizational reports

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 Staff Questionnaire  Interviews with staff and management of implementing agencies  Written tests pre and post trainings

to be allowed to join local schools

 Experts in these fields are available and accessible to the implementing agencies  There is top management commitment of the targeted agencies to learn the new principles and guidelines  Funds are available to purchase/print resources


ACT Appeal SYR131: Syria Regional Humanitarian Response

Activities (LWF Jordan): 1.2.1 Rehabilitate 100 public WASH facilities in refugee camps 1.2.2 Distribute 25,000 hygiene kits in camps and host communities in the north of Jordan 1.2.3 Conduct a hygiene promotion campaign in Zaatari Camp, Mafraq, and Irbid. 1.3.1 Distribute 50,000 sets of winter clothing, including thermal underwear, to adults and children in camps, and refugees and local children in Mafraq and Irbid. 1.3.2 Distribute 3,000 gas heaters, including 3,000 gas bottles, to 3,000 families in camps, Mafraq, and Irbid. 1.3.3 Provide heating gas (refill) for 3,000 families for a period of 3 months. 1.4.1 Rehabilitate 100 shelters hosting refugees in the north of Jordan 1.5.1 Conduct 200 individual counseling sessions for 50 community leaders/representatives in Zaatari camp who can later use these skills in their work in the camp, especially with new arrivals. 1.5.2 Conduct 24 group counseling sessions for 80 community leaders in Zaatari Camps. 1.5.3 Conduct a psychosocial first aid program for 50 community leaders in camp. 1.7.1 Implement a ‘peace oasis’ program in Zaatari Camp for Syrian boys and girls that will aim at building a culture and environment of peace in the camp through working with children and young adults in safe areas in one of the largest zones in the camp. (see Narrative for further information) 1.7.2 Conduct a leadership and conflict mitigation program (120 hours) for 80 community leaders in Zaatari Camp 1.7.3 Provide soft and hard materials for community leaders in Zaatari camp on peace building and conflict mitigation 1.7.4 Establish and maintain two social mediation committees in Zaatari Camp who will work in their communities on peacefully resolving problems and conflicts and reducing tensions in the camp. 2.1.1 Implement a life-skills program (informal education) for Jordanians and refugees from Syria and in camps and host communities in north of Jordan 3.1.1 Start 6 income generating initiatives with local Jordanian NGOs that will generate income for at least 50 households in the North of Jordan. 3.2.1 Construct 30 classrooms in Jordanian schools that will absorb at least 1000 new students in the North of Jordan 3.2.2 Rehabilitate/ maintain 10 existing schools in the North of Jordan 3.2.3 Distribute 10,000 school kits to Syrian and Jordanian students in local schools in the North of Jordan 4.1.1 Conduct 3 workshops for LWF staff on CBPS, HAP, Do-No-Harm, and Child Protection (45 hours total)

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ACT Appeal SYR131: Syria Regional Humanitarian Response

Activities (DSPR Jordan): 1.2.1 1.2.2 1.2.3 1.2.4 1.2.5 1.3.1 1.5.1 1.6.1

Distribute 8,500 food parcels to vulnerable Refugee and host families in various host communities in Maan, Aqaba, Petra, Wadi Moussa, Madaba, Amman, and Husun at a 50/50 ratio Distribute 8,500 hygiene and dignity kits to vulnerable refugee and host families in Maan, Aqaba, Petra, Wadi Moussa, Madaba, Amman, and Husun at a 50/50 ratio Conduct 36 one-day-sessions on health and nutrition in targeted communities on food preparation, hygiene conditions, nutrition alternatives, feeding infants and breast-feeding, first aid, primary health care, and feeding of pregnant women Conduct 9 free medical days for refugees from Syria in various host communities targeting women and children with special focus on vulnerable women Distribute 4,000 parcels of kitchen utensils to refugee and host families in Maan, Aqaba, Petra, Wadi Moussa, Madaba, Amman, and Husun at a 50/50 ratio Distribute 4,000 parcels of infant clothing to refugee and vulnerable host families in Maan, Aqaba, Petra, Wadi Moussa, Madaba, Amman, and Husun at a 50/50 ratio Implement 36 psychosocial support sessions for refugees from Syria in various host communities Implement 36 life skills sessions for refugees from Syria in various host communities on four main areas: building self-esteem, conflict resolution, problem solving, and communication skills

Activities (DSPR Lebanon): 1.1.1 1.2.1 1.3.1 2.1.1 1.4.1 1.4.2

Distribute food parcels to 250 families in Shatela, Ein ElHelweh and Dbayeh camps Distribute 250 hygiene parcels to refugees in Shatela, Ein ElHelweh and Dbayeh camps Distribute clothes to 250 families in Shatela, Ein ElHelweh and Dbayeh camps Provide non-formal education services to 100 students Provide shelter subsidy to 250 refugee families in Ein -el Hilweh and Shatela camps Install bathrooms and kitchens

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ACT Appeal SYR131: Syria Regional Humanitarian Response

Activities (IOCC Jordan): 1.1.1 1.2.1 1.3.1 2.1.1 3.2.1 4.1.1

Distribute 4,000 food parcels to 4,000 refugee and host families throughout Jordan Distribute 4,000 hygiene kits to 4,000 refugee and host families throughout Jordan Distribute 1,000 winterization kits to 1,000 families Conduct an English language program for 1,000 refugee and Jordanian school children and adults in Amman, Madaba and Zarqa Distribute 5,000 educational/students kits to Refugee and vulnerable families of school children Conduct 3 workshops for LWF staff on CBPS, HAP, Do-No-Harm, and Child Protection (45 hours total)

Activities (IOCC Lebanon): 1.1.1 1.1.2 1.1.3 1.2.1 1.2.2 1.2.3 1.2.4 1.2.5 1.2.6 1.2.7 1.3.1 1.4.1 1.4.2 1.4.3 1.5.1 1.7.1 3.1.1 4.1.1

Distribute 2,000 food parcels to vulnerable refugees from Syria across the country Distribute a minimum of 1 food pot to 500 vulnerable families in Minyara and/or Rahabeh Conduct 100 health/nutrition awareness sessions that will benefit 2,000 beneficiaries across the country Distribute 2,000 hygiene kits and 2,000 infant kits to 2,000 households across the country Conduct hygiene promotion campaign that will reach out to 2,000 beneficiaries across the country Provide mother-support training sessions for 50 health care workers & social worker across the country Provide solid waste disposal services to 2,000 Refugees from Syria across the country Distribute 2,000 water tanks to 2,000 vulnerable families across the country Distribute 2,000 water testing and treatment kits Distribute 2,000 dignity kits to 2,000 refugee women from Syria Distribute 1,000 winterization kits to 1,000 vulnerable families across the country Rehabilitate 40 shelters for 40 families across the country Assist 200 refugees from Syria with shelter assistance Assist 100 host community families across the country with shelter assistance Provide 140 psychosocial support workshops that will benefit 500 refugees disaggregated by sex across the country Conduct 100 gender sensitization sessions to 2500 beneficiaries & health service providers Train 150 women in mass food production and basic business administration/practices Conduct 3 workshops for LWF staff on CBPS, HAP, Do-No-Harm, and Child Protection (45 hours total)

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ACT Appeal SYR131: Syria Regional Humanitarian Response

Activities (IOCC Syria): 1.1.1 1.2.1 1.2.2 1.2.3 1.2.4 1.3.1 1.5.1 1.5.2 2.1.1 2.1.2 3.1.1

Distribute 6,000 food parcels to 24,000 vulnerable Syrian families across the country. Distribute 3,000 hygiene kits to 3,000 vulnerable Syrian families across the country Distribute 1,000 infant kits to 1,000 vulnerable families across the country Distribute 500 water filters to 500 vulnerable households across the country Conduct 30 hygiene promotion session across the country that will benefit 750 beneficiaries Distribute 2,800 NFI kits to vulnerable Syrian families across the country Conduct 8 psychosocial workshops for 250 Syrian beneficiaries across the country Provide psychosocial support to 250 beneficiaries. Psychosocial sessions are support and active listening sessions which are done for a group. Individual sessions only take place at the request of the beneficiary. Contribute to the tuition fees of 500 students across the country Provide 500 school-aged children with opportunities to attend remedial classes for catch-up purposes Implement 5 cash-for-work initiatives that will provide 750 beneficiaries with opportunities to generate cash

Activities (FCA Jordan): 1.2.1 Distribute 5000 hygiene kits in Zaatari, Azraq and North of Jordan. 1.5.1 Conduct 20 training sessions for 240 youth and adolescents on topics related to peer-to-peer support, stress management, meditation, and conflict mitigation in Zaatari, Azraq, and north of Jordan. 1.5.2 Form 10 Support Groups for CBPS, meditation, and conflict mitigation in Azraq, Zaatari, and North of Jordan. 1.5.3 Conduct 32 training cycles in physical education for 570 youth and adolescents for duration of 3 months for each cycle with focus on and TOT in Zaatari, Azraq, and North of Jordan. 1.6.1 Conduct 36 recreational programs for 470 youth and adolescents in Zaatari, Azraq, East Amman and North of Jordan. 1.6.2 Conduct 20 life and transferable skills training programs that will benefit 230 youth and adolescents in Zaatari, Azraq, and North of Jordan. 2.1.1 Establish and support a total of 4 ICT centers in Zaatari, Azraq, and North of Jordan 2.1.2 Conduct 24 training courses in ICT for 300 youth and adolescents in Zaatari, Azraq, and North of Jordan 2.1.3 Conduct a total of 32 informal education courses in literacy and numeracy for a duration of 3 months per course that will benefit 340 youth and adolescents in Zaatari, Azraq, and North of Jordan

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ACT Appeal SYR131: Syria Regional Humanitarian Response

2.1.4 Conduct 36 English language courses for 360 youth and adolescents in Zaatari, Azraq, East Amman and North of Jordan. 2.1.5 Organize 24 community meetings with the parents of participants and street leaders of camps to mobilize communities and create a sense of ownership in Zaatari, Azraq, and Northern Jordan. 2.1.6 Organise a total of 6 exhibitions, sports shows with participants of the arts, physical and recreational activities for community mobilization in Zaatari, Azraq, and North of Jordan. 2.2.1 Conduct 42 campaigns on Environmental Hygiene Education Awareness sessions for 220 youth and adolescent participants on topics related to wastewater, sewage, sanitation garbage dumping, clean water storage, and hand washing behaviour in Zaatari, Azraq and North of Jordan. 2.2.2 Distribute 5000 booklets, flyers and posters on Environmental Hygiene Education Awareness in Zaatari, Azraq, and North of Jordan. 2.1.1 Conduct 20 income generating training programs for 480 youth and adolescents in Zaatari, Azraq, and Northern of Jordan. 3.2.1 Distribute 5000 school kits in North of Jordan and East Amman. 3.2.2 Rehabilitate and furnish 2 schools in North of Jordan and prepare playgrounds and other facilities for enhancing learning environment.

4.1.1 Conduct 5 workshops to all project staff for capacity building and cross cutting issues on CBPS, Do No Harm, Child Protection, HAP, INEE, and SPHERE. 4.1.2 Disseminate information, guidelines to project staff on gender mainstreaming in all FCA's activities. 4.1.3 Develop a strategy to lead the integration of CBPS into the activities

Activities (DKH Turkey) 1.3.1 Distribute 1,500 ‘household winter support kits’ to 1,500 urban Syrian refugees in Southern Turkey 3.1.1 Distribute 1,000 cash kits through a Cash for Work program to 200 Syrians (5 kits of $33 for every beneficiary) who will produce 1000 blankets and sets of scarf/hat to be distributed among Syrian population.

37


ACT Appeal SYR131: Syria Regional Humanitarian Response

3.3 Implementation methodology 3.3.1

Implementation arrangements

While implementation efforts vary by partner, country and project, all ACT Alliance partners work diligently to coordinate and implement activities in a manner that ensures maximum impact. The partners work closely with other organizations whose activities are harmonious with the goals and interests of the ACT Alliance, including UN agencies, government agencies, local and international NGOS, and CBOs and faith-based organizations (FBOs). Forum members will continue to implement projects for as long as the need exists, and the security situation enables such. . In the current situation it is crucial that the ACT members are prepared to possible rapid changes. Thus there is a need for preparedness planning concerning staff and projects and, if necessary, revisions of plans need to take place. Partners ensure sustainable impact when possible, by building the capacity of local organizations and other stakeholders. Projects also aim to strengthen the capacities of beneficiaries to organize themselves to better manage their needs and coping mechanisms related to the humanitarian crisis in their communities. Project beneficiaries are identified through various means, including but not limited to: communication with local community leaders/influencers, home visits, assessments, and information-sharing with other agencies. Beneficiary selection includes primary and secondary beneficiaries. Primary target populations may include IDPs, refugees, and members of host communities, which secondary target populations may include those involved in the implementation of relief activities. Implementing agencies also work with tested vulnerability criteria to identify those with the greatest need. 3.3.2

Partnerships with target populations

Each agency has consulted with the refugees themselves, local committees, other emergency response actors, host governments, and UN Sector Working Groups to ascertain that the identified gaps in service and program areas truly reflect the needs of the beneficiaries. Agencies circulate data generated by each project with the mentioned organizations to streamline information-sharing in order to harmonize strategies and programmatic responses with coordinated standardized procedures. Memorandums of Understanding have been signed between ACT members and local Jordanian organizations, including the Jordan Hashemite Charity Organization and different governmental agencies. In camps, ACT members continuously consult community leaders/street leaders who were involved in the selection of all camp-based activities. Proposed activities are always designed in a culturally appropriate manner, based on combined decades of experience in the region, to ensure maximum impact. Any projects, capacity building, training initiatives or community-based awareness-raising sessions are organized utilizing data from needs assessments, observation, situational analyses, information-sharing, implementation of similar activities in the region, and feedback provided from both the beneficiaries and the local authorities. Identification of partners depends on the composition of the local community. Where appropriate, prior to distribution or implementation community leaders and volunteers are trained on the process of delivering the aid items. 3.3.3

Cross-cutting issues

ACT Forum partners take into account all standard cross-cutting issues relevant to a humanitarian aid intervention. These include but are not limited to: human rights, beneficiary accountability, gender, youth, disability and climate change. Specifically, Forum identifies the priority cross-cutting issues of conflict sensitivity, gender, and protection. Forum members have attended workshops on topics such as the use of the Gender Marker in project proposal writing, and continue to integrate lessons learned into everyday practice, such as the integration of gender mainstreaming into project planning.


ACT Appeal SYR131: Syria Regional Humanitarian Response

In this appeal, ACT members agreed to mainstream as much as possible the Community Based Psychosocial Support (CBPS) principles adopted by the Inter-Agency Standing Committee for Mental Health and Psychosocial Support in Emergency Settings (IASC MHPSS) in all of the implemented activities. Ongoing efforts will be made by the forum members to better adhere to the Humanitarian Accountability Partnership principles. For example, Forum member activities meet HAP benchmark 3, "beneficiary participation" by conducting focus groups and awareness raising activities in conjunction with project activities. Code of conduct policies are in place and disseminated for Forum member's staff. Central to approaches on conflict sensitivity is the Do-No-Harm approach, and the humanitarian principles of protecting life and health and maintaining a neutral, impartial, and independent position. Forum members do not discriminate based on ethnic, religious or political backgrounds of the populations served. In order to reduce the potential for harm, partners emphasise cooperation and consultation with local organisations and volunteers. Implementing agencies continue to take gender into consideration in program design and implementation. While generally good practice, this element is now a focus of the planning process for the coming UNHCR Regional Response Plan for Syria, version six. Protection concerns for the program focus on ensuring respect for the rights of vulnerable groups. This includes children, people with special needs, the elderly, and girls and women, in particular those most at risk of abuse and exploitation. All partners are committed to strict adherence to the ACT Alliance Code of Conduct and the Sexual Exploitation and Abuse policy. 3.3.4

Coordination

ACT coordination takes place throughout operations. The ACT Appeal was a team effort by ACT implementing partners, from the initial planning phase (discussion of needs and response strategy to said needs) to the writing process. ACT implementing agencies discussed project elements such as sector interventions and geographical locations to avoid duplication of efforts and increase the visibility of the ACT Alliance with more dispersed interventions. ACT members have agreed to have common warehouses and joint distribution facilities where possible. ACT members are active in all of the UN-led sectoral working groups, ensuring continuous coordination and collaboration with the UN agencies and other INGOs. This includes technical and sub-working groups, such as for example, Hygiene Promotion or GBV sub-working groups. In addition, this appeal took into consideration revision 5 of the UNHCR Regional Response Plan (RRP5) and it used, where appropriate, outcomes similar to some of those mentioned in the RRP. ACT members will agree on common methods of promoting the alliance to working groups while maintaining the individual identity of each member organisation. That said, continuous information sharing and sharing of best practices is a priority. Each implementing agency is responsible for coordinating with the relevant national ministries associated with the area in which the NGO is working (for example the Ministry of Education, the Ministry of Health). ACT members work with the Jordan Hashemite Charity Organisation (JHCO) for coordination of distribution in host communities, and tax-free procurement of goods. When possible, common procurement will take place to maximise efficiency 3.3.5

Communications and visibility

ACT Forum members will continue to work on ways of promoting the ACT Alliance identity during procurement, storage, and distribution. ACT Alliance members acknowledge the source of funding for any and all projects funded by the ACT Alliance. The ACT Alliance logo is incorporated, whenever possible, on items distributed to beneficiaries, on printed materials used during trainings and/or distributed during marketing promotions. ACT Alliance’s support will be acknowledged verbally during community events and/or during 39


ACT Appeal SYR131: Syria Regional Humanitarian Response

media campaigns. However, a low visibility strategy will be respected when required by the sensitivity of the issue. ACT Forum members will also commit to the circulation of monthly updates which will include humanitarian from the field that will reflect the crisis and the response of the Alliance. ACT Alliance response will also be reported individually by each organization and as a forum to the various UN-lead working groups and UNHCR in particular. ACT members will also use ACT Alliance logos in the form of flags at camp-based offices and at distribution centers in camps and host communities. 3.3.6

Advocacy

Due the sensitive nature of the crisis, advocacy efforts will attempt to ensure the safety of beneficiaries and staff at all times. Forum members are involved in advocacy on multiple levels, including locally in countries of operation, and from their organisational headquarters on a more global scale. ACT Forum members host visiting ACT Alliance members, as well as international government and church representatives to raise awareness of the nature and scale of the humanitarian crisis in Syria and neighbouring host countries. 3.3.7

Sustainability and linkage to recovery – prioritization

Fighting inside Syria continues, and the escalating supply of weapons and ammunition to various factions engaged in the conflict suggests that the situation will not stabilise anytime soon. For the time being, focus largely remains on providing life-saving assistance. However, programs such those in psychosocial support, shelter upgrades, and education will have long-term benefits and aid in the normalisation process, when the recovery phase becomes possible. Where possible, organisations are building the skills and capacities of Syrians, as well as stakeholders in refugee host communities. Due to the continuing nature of the crisis, it has become particularly important to address the needs and stabilisation priorities in host communities. Finally, capacity building of NGOs and CBOs will also have longterm strengthening benefits for civil society. Should a component of the appeal not be fully funded, where possible a reduced number of units will be provided, with an appropriate reducing in staff costs. Otherwise, priority will be given to tangible assistance and the provision of life-saving aid and items. Priorities will also be in line with the latest available information from coordinating agencies, such as UNHCR. 3.3.8

Human resources and administration of funds DSPR - Organizational Structure - Jordan

General Assembly Area Committee Chairperson

Steering Committee DSPR (ACT Project)

Area Committee

Projects & Programs Subcommittees Finance

Executive Director

Clinics

Training Centers

Services

Programs

Transport

40

Finance

Secretary

Loans

Showroom

Educational

Accounts

Business

Cashier


ACT Appeal SYR131: Syria Regional Humanitarian Response

FCA Organisational Structure, July 2013

Regional Representative

I-OPT Coordinator

JSL Coordinator

Administration & Finance Coordinator

Logistics Officer

AZRAQ Camp Project Coordinator (Vacant)

Field Officer x2 (Vacant)

Humanitarian Programme Coordinator

Zaatri Camp Project Coordinator

Humanitarian Emergency Coordinator

KAP Camp and North of Jordan Project Coordinator

Field Officers x3

Field Officer x2

(one vacant)

(One vacant)

FCA maintains offices in both Zaatari camp, and Amman, with full-time local and international staff in each location. International specialists are recruited and retained when necessary, for example in connection with specialised programs in Zaatari camp. Appeal Funds are managed according to FCA financial standards which are in line with the International Financial Standards ensuring maximum monitoring and control of cash flows. FCA financial system ensures transparency in cash management with various checks and balances in place. Furthermore, FCA adheres to ACT Alliance requirements on reporting and monitoring of funds. Requests of funds are submitted to the Head Quarters in Helsinki on a quarterly basis in accordance to the annual pre-approved budget. This financial forecast is prepared by the Programme Coordinator and reviewed by the Finance Coordinator in Jordan. The financial forecast, then, is reviewed in the HQ by the head of the Humanitarian Team for final approval. Procurement and logistics procedures follow the best practice in the field. A minimum of three offers are requested in order to make a decision on any purchase of more than Euros 300. Sealed offers are always requested and decision on purchase involves an ad hoc internal committee which consists of the Representative, Programme Coordinator and/or Emergency Coordinator and/or Project Coordinator. Decision on offers is made based on the most competitive offer and best quality in addition to the supplier’s business history. IOCC IOCC’s Board of Directors governs the policies and operations of IOCC and oversees stewardship of the organization’s resources. An Executive Director and CEO are responsible to the Board and identify the needs, develop strategic plans, manage operations and provide overall accountability. At the regional level, IOCC activities are overseen by the Regional Director, located in Beirut, Lebanon, who supervises the development of broad strategic planning for the Lebanon, Jordan and Syria country offices and ensures adherence to internal and donor policies, best practices, and relevant standards. At the country program level, qualified 41


ACT Appeal SYR131: Syria Regional Humanitarian Response

technical professionals are on staff in each country to design, implement, and monitor and evaluate planned activities. Appeal funds are handled in accordance with IOCC standard financial management and review practices, ensuring maximum oversight in the use of funds as well as minimizing any potential risks related to cash reserves kept by country programs and partners. Requests for funds are submitted to the IOCC Regional Office in Beirut by the country offices in the region and by GOPA. Money is transferred from the IOCC head office in Maryland, USA, to the IOCC Regional Office in Beirut upon monthly request by the Beirut office, whose request is in turn based on an accounting of the previous advance according to the pre-authorized budget plan. The IOCC Regional Office’s Finance Manager reviews all such requests before approval by the IOCC Regional Director. Accounting and financial reports are produced by the Regional Office based on financial documentation provided by each country office and GOPA. IOCC HQ staff review all expenditures and conduct periodic ground-level internal reviews, in addition to IOCC’s annual global audit and any donor- or country-mandated country-level or project-level audits. Country Director

IOCC Jordan:

Finance and Admin Officer

Program Manager

Project Coordinator

Project Coordinator

GOPA/IOCC Syria:

42

Logistician

Project Coordinator


ACT Appeal SYR131: Syria Regional Humanitarian Response

IOCC Lebanon:

Lutheran World Federation (LWF) LWF Jordan has established offices in Amman and Zaatari camp, with a soon-to-open office in the Northern city of Mafraq. LWF Jordan falls under the financial jurisdiction of the LWF regional office in Jerusalem. In the country office, qualified international and local staff are employed, with consultants occasionally employed to augment staff capacity. LWF employs additional Syrian staff inside Zaatari camp, from amongst the refugee population. LWF staff are trained in best humanitarian practices, and strictly adhere to SPHERE and Red Cross Codes of Conduct, among others. LWF has a procurement policy in place and will adhere to the internal control mechanisms, such as store procedures, inventory taking and checking, internal and external audits. The LWF Regional Representative and the Chief Finance Officer from Jerusalem, the Geneva Program Officer, and staff from Funding Partners will make regular visits to the program. Monthly finance reports are being prepared, shared and discussed in the Country Management Team. Monthly cash-flow projections are made and form the basis of calling for fund transfer from the LWF Geneva office. Financial and Narrative reports will be prepared for the ACT Alliance, as per the agreed upon reporting details. Emergency Program Director Psychosocial Program Manager (Vacant) Psychosocial Specialist

Senior Program Coordinator (Vacant)

Admin and Finance Officer

Office Assistant

Project Development Officer

Project Manager (BMZ)

Civil Engineer Project Officer

Social worker 1

Logistics Officer

(Vacant) Logistician

Social worker 2

(Vacant)

Social worker 3 43


ACT Appeal SYR131: Syria Regional Humanitarian Response

DKH STL, the strategic partner of DKH in the region, has already established an office and operational set-up in Hatay Province. There is a full-fledged Logistics/Security and Admin/Finance departments. A Program Coordinator will supervise the planning and implementation of proposed activities, while the Project Manager will be the head of the Action. The Project Manager will be setting up the team needed for the successful execution of all proposed activities. STL has locally recruited project officers and field staff on its team who are Arabic speakers, both Turkish and Syrian. In terms of administration of funds, DKH will transfer the funds to the implementing partner’s bank account solely allocated for this project. All payments over 500 Euro are made through bank transfer and an advance is issued to STL Hatay Field Office according to the needs. Admin/Finance department is responsible at the field level to enter the expenses into the accounting software and to prepare draft financial reports, which will be reviewed by the Project Manager and Operations Manager. DKH will prepare financial reports to justify expenditures with full transparency to ACT Alliance.

3.4 Planned implementation period The planned implementation period for ACT Forum members is 1 September 2013 until 31 August 2014, with the exception of DKH, who is planning for 1 September 2013, until 31 January 2014.

3.5 Monitoring, reporting and evaluation All partners adhere to strict monitoring and evaluation methods. Forum members are committed to ensuring that all activities are being implemented in a timely fashion as per the action plan and that beneficiaries receive quality assistance in a dignified and respectful manner. Staff hired for the program will be responsible for monitoring activities and reporting discrepancies, challenges, and successes. When appropriate, partners will conduct random follow up with beneficiaries through home visits, or phone calls or interviews, to conduct qualitative beneficiary satisfaction surveys to solicit feedback. When appropriate, program monitoring will involve several or all of the following methods:  Repeated site visits: Program staff will carry out site visits to observe program implementation, meet with beneficiaries to collect feedback on initiatives and liaise with partners, allowing the replication of good practices of corrective measures if necessary.  Frequent reporting: Regularly scheduled reporting by program staff is to be submitted to the program managers. Feedback will be provided to partners and beneficiaries. Country-level reports will be used by the program manager to report to various headquarters and to the ACT Alliance.  Capacity building trainings: the effectiveness of workshops will be examined through pre- and post-training tests, as well as workshop evaluations. Detailed reports will be produced describing the proceedings as well as resulting initiatives and lessons learned.  Beneficiary satisfaction surveys: In order to gauge the quality of project activities within the target communities, feedback from the beneficiaries will be solicited through beneficiary satisfaction surveys. Information gathered will inform program implementation and strategy. Projects are designed to encompass crucial and much-needed relevant relief assistance and to have in place monitoring systems where all components are specific, measurable, attainable, realistic and time-bound. The Forum is in the process of identifying possible dates for joint monitoring visits by ACT members. Coordinated monitoring sessions will be designed to minimise potential disruption to project activities and allow for

44


ACT Appeal SYR131: Syria Regional Humanitarian Response

maximum coordination of Forum members, to the benefit of visiting partners. Evaluation of all projects will be undertaken to evaluate the impact, effectiveness and sustainability of project interventions Specifically, evaluation practices aim to:     

Evaluate the achievements and results attained in terms of changes in the wellbeing of the beneficiaries Assess the efficiency and effectiveness of the project based on the indicators established in the project formulation Assess the sustainability of the actions implemented Identify the main lessons learned during project implementation, for consideration of future projects Formulate recommendations based on the weaknesses identified in the design and execution of the project

Act Forum members are presently preparing for a Forum-wide evaluation process, from which best practices and lessons learned shall be drawn. Should it be necessary, a revised version of this appeal may be prepared, based on suggested recommendations for project improvement. Please see the Logical Framework for details on indicators, targets, means of verification and assumptions/risks.

III. THE TOTAL ACT RESPONSE TO THE EMERGENCY Some agencies, such as LWF, have listed all ongoing and upcoming activities as a part of the appeal. Other agencies, are conducting activities outside of those listed in this ACT Appeal. IOCC Jordan for example, is conducting the following activities (from diverse funding sources):  NFI distributions for Syrian refugees and vulnerable Jordanian families in urban settings throughout the country and in the Zaatari camp  Food parcel distributions for Syrian refugees and vulnerable Jordanian families in urban settings throughout the country and in the Zaatari camp  Life skills trainings for children and youth of Syrian refugee families in Amman  Distribution of school uniforms and training suits for school children in Zaatari and throughout the country to Syrian children and children of vulnerable Jordanian families  Distribution of needed medicines in the Zaatari camp  Distribution of "Gift in Kinds" DKH/STL's response to the Syrian crisis focuses on refugees living outside camps in South Turkey, as they appear to be the most needy, in comparison with those settled in the camps. After carrying out a number of field assessment visits in Southern Turkey, STL field team prioritised humanitarian assistance in the border districts and villages of Hatay province. DKH/STL strategy outside of the Appeal is based on two main complementary pillars: subsidising the basic needs of the most vulnerable Syrian refugee families; and provide protection to Syrian refugees. Pillar 1, needs subsidies, has occurred since October 2012, through the provision of support to the most needy families settled in the urban areas of Hatay, Kilis and Sanliurfa Provinces. Food and Non-Food items have been distributed through relief aid packages. An ongoing project is ensuring food security through an electronic voucher program. Pillar 2, protection is as follows. Through DKH/STL Community Center in Altinozu, Hatay Province psychosocial support, legal advice, vocational training – language and computer courses –, awareness raising workshops, games for education, and referrals to health services are provided.

45


ACT Appeal SYR131: Syria Regional Humanitarian Response

IV. APPENDICES TO THE APPEAL DOCUMENT Appendix 1: Map of Region Source: UNHCR. Inter-Agency Emergency Response, Syrian Refugees. 2013-08-14


ACT Appeal SYR131: Syria Regional Humanitarian Response

Appendix 2: Budgets - Alphabetically by organisation DKH Turkey Budget ACT APPEAL Budget Requesting ACT member: DKH Turkey

Unit Cost

Appeal Budget 0.00 Appeal Budget

local curr.

local currency

TOTAL INCOME EXPENDITURE DIRECT COST (LIST EXPENDITURE BY SECTOR) A. Non-food items A.1 Blanket (%50 Wool, 1.5 x 2 m) A.2 Carpet (Plastic) A.3 Stove for Heating (Bucket Type) A.4 Coal pack (25kg*4) A.5 Underwear A.6 Socks A.7 Polar Sweater A.8 Raincoat B. Early recovery & livelihood restoration B.1 Cash for Work Other Sector Related Direct Costs C. Project Personnel C.1 Project Manager C.2 Project Officer (2 staff) C.3 Field Officers (4 staff) Rapid Support Team Communication/visibility cost Beneficiary Selection TRANSPORT, WAREHOUSING & HANDLING Transport (of relief materials) Hire/ Rental of Vehicles (2 Vehicle) Fuel Truck Rental Fuel Staff Travel Warehousing Rental of warehouse (400 sqm) Wages for Security/ Guards Handling Logistics Officer Salaries / wages for Drivers Daily Labour

No. of untis

Type of unit

USD

Per Person Per HH Per HH Pack 2 Per Person 2 Per Person Per Person Per Person

9,000 1,500 750 6,000 18,000 18,000 9,000 9,000

20 14 150 13 10 3 17 19

per work

1,000

99

937,500 180,000 21,000 112,500 75,000 180,000 54,000 148,500 166,500 98,500 98,500

56,640.1

5,500 3,500 2,600

104,100 27,500 35,000 41,600

510,087.5

53,593.2

Month Month Month

5 10 16

Month Month Day Per Trip Per Trip

10 10 44 44 15

1,600 850 350 150 300

16,000 8,500 15,400 6,600 4,500

8,705.5 4,624.8 8,379.0 3,591.0 2,448.4

Month

4

2000

8,000

4,352.7 0.0

Month Month Month

5 10 4

2,600.0 2,000.0 1,750.0

13,000 20,000 7,000

7,073.2 10,881.9 3,808.7

99,000

26,116.5

6,500

3,536.6

TOTAL TRANSPORT, WAREHOUSING & HANDLING CAPITAL ASSETS ( over US$500) e.g. Computers and accessories

Appeal Budget 0.0 Appeal Budget

Laptop/Desktop

5

1,300


ACT Appeal SYR131: Syria Regional Humanitarian Response

Printers Office Furniture Vehicles Communications equipment e.g. camera, video camera, sound recording, satellite phone‌

Lumpsum

1 1

500 15,000

500 15,000 0

272.0 8,161.4 0.0

Camera

1

500

500

272.0

22,500

12,242.1

2,280,200

620,320.8

TOTAL CAPITAL ASSETS TOTAL DIRECT COST INDIRECT COSTS: PERSONNEL, ADMINISTRATION & SUPPORT e.g.

Staff salaries Program Coordinator %25 Logistics Manager %25 Finance And Admin Manager %25 Finance Officer Office Operations Office rent %50 Office Utilities %50 Guesthouse Rent Guesthouse Utilities Office restructure / maintenance / insurance %50 IT/Technical Maintenance Office Supplies %50 Office stationery Bank Charges Visibility Communications Telephone and fax Other Risk Insurance

Months Months Months Months

1 1 1 5

7,000 5,500 5,500 2,600

8,750 6,875 6,875 13,000

4,760.8 3,740.6 3,740.6 7,073.2

Months Months Months Months Months Months Months Months Months LumpSum

3 3 5 5 3 5 5 5 5 1

4,000 1,000 1,250 500 500 100 250 500 35 5,500

10,000 2,500 6,250 2,500 1,250 500 1,250 2,500 175 5,500

5,440.9 1,360.2 3,400.6 1,360.2 680.1 272.0 680.1 1,360.2 95.2 2,992.5

Months

5

500

2,500

1,360.2

Per Person

11

180

1,980

1,077.3

72,405

39,395.1

7,500 0

4,080.7 0.0

7,500

4,080.7

2,481,605

702,155.2

74,448.15

21,064.7

TOTAL INDIRECT COST: PERSONNEL, ADMIN. & SUPPORT AUDIT, MONITORING & EVALUATION Audit of ACT appeal Monitoring & Evaluation

Estimate Estimate

1

TOTAL AUDIT, MONITORING & EVALUATION TOTAL EXPENDITURE exclusive International Coordination Fee INTERNATIONAL COORDINATION FEE (ICF) - 3%

7,500

TOTAL EXPENDITURE inclusive International Coordination Fee

2,556,053

723,219

BALANCE REQUESTED (minus available income) EXCHANGE RATE: local currency to 1 USD Budget rate

2,556,053

723,219

1.84

48


ACT Appeal SYR131: Syria Regional Humanitarian Response

DSPR Jordan Budget Appeal Budget 0.00

TOTAL INCOME EXPENDITURE Type of Unit

No. of Units

DIRECT COST (LIST EXPENDITURE BY SECTOR) e.g. Food security Parcel 8,500 Water, sanitation & hygiene Parcel 8,500 Health(Medical Days) Day 9 Nutrition Session 36 Infants Clothes Parcel 4,000 Kitchen Utilities Parcel 4,000 Emergency Preparedness Lump sum 9 Protection Psychosocial Support Training 36 Education (Live Skills Training) Training 36 Early recovery & livelihood restoration Mine action Other Sector Related Direct Costs e.g. Salaries & benefits for direct staff (e.g. nutritionist, engineers, program officer / coordinator, driver of nutritionist etc.) (List expenditure by sector) Needs Assessment & Training Rapid Support Team Communication/visibility cost Beneficiary Selection Other Sector Related Direct Costs

Unit Cost JOD

Appeal Budget USD

425,000 255,000 18,000 18,000 116,000 120,000 9,000 0 18,000 18,000 0

600,282.49 360,169.49 25,423.73 25,423.73 163,841.81 169,491.53 12,711.86 0.00 25,423.73 25,423.73 0.00

10,600

14,971.75

5,000

7,062.15

5,000

7,062.15

20,000

28,249

3,600

5,084.75

3,600

5,085

200 200 0 0

282.49 282.49 0.00 0.00

Communications equipment e.g. camera, video camera, sound recording, satellite phone‌

1,000

1,412.43

TOTAL CAPITAL ASSETS

1,400

1,977

TRANSPORT, WAREHOUSING & HANDLING Transport (of relief materials) Hire/ Rental of Vehicles Fuel Warehousing Rental of warehouse Wages for Security/ Guards Handling Salaries for Logistician and Procurement Officer Salaries / wages for labourers Salaries / wages for Drivers TOTAL TRANSPORT, WAREHOUSING & HANDLING CAPITAL ASSETS ( over US$500) e.g. Computers and accessories Printers Office Furniture Vehicles

TOTAL DIRECT COST

50 30 2,000 500 29 30 1,000

Appeal Budget JOD

Appeal Budget 0.00

500 500

1,445,763 49


ACT Appeal SYR131: Syria Regional Humanitarian Response

INDIRECT COSTS: PERSONNEL, ADMINISTRATION & SUPPORT e.g. Staff salaries Salaries e. g % for Programme Director) Salaries e. g % for Finance Director) Salaries for accountant and other admin or secretarial staff ‌..) Office Operations Office rent Office Utilities Office stationery Communications Telephone and fax Other Insurance

11,864.41 7,627.12 18,361.58

6,000 0 1,500

8,474.58 0.00 2,118.64 0.00 2,118.64 0.00 0.00

1,500

TOTAL INDIRECT COST: PERSONNEL, ADMIN. & SUPPORT AUDIT, MONITORING & EVALUATION Audit of ACT appeal Monitoring & Evaluation

8,400 5,400 13,000

Estimate Estimate

TOTAL AUDIT, MONITORING & EVALUATION TOTAL EXPENDITURE exclusive International Coordination Fee INTERNATIONAL COORDINATION FEE (ICF) - 3% TOTAL EXPENDITURE inclusive International Coordination Fee BALANCE REQUESTED (minus available income)

0 1 35,801

50,564.97

0 4,800

0.00 6,153.85

4,800

6,153.85

45,062.07

1,502,069

1,351.86

45,062.07

46,413.93

1,547,131.00

46,414.00

1,547,131.00

EXCHANGE RATE: local currency to 1 USD: Budget rate 0.71

DSPR Lebanon Budget INCOME

local currency

TOTAL INCOME

USD

0.00

0.00

EXPENDITURE Type of

No. of

Unit Cost

Unit DIRECT COST (LIST EXPENDITURE BY SECTOR) e.g. Food security Family Water, sanitation & hygiene Family Health Nutrition Non-food items Family Shelter and settlement Family Emergency Preparedness Protection Psychosocial Support Education Students Early recovery & livelihood restoration Mine action

Units

local currency

50

378 378

900,000 900,000

340 66

765,000 1,080,000

198

900,000

Appeal Budget local currency

Appeal Budget USD

340,200,000 340,200,000 0 0 260,100,000 71,280,000 0 0 0 178,200,000

226,800 226,800 0 0 173,400 47,520 0 0 0 118,800

0

0


ACT Appeal SYR131: Syria Regional Humanitarian Response

e.g.

Other Sector Related Direct Costs Salaries & benefits for direct staff (e.g. nutritionist, engineers, program officer / coordinator, driver of nutritionist etc.) (List expenditure by sector) Needs Assessment Rapid Support Team Communication/visibility cost Beneficiary Selection

TRANSPORT, WAREHOUSING & HANDLING Transport (of relief materials) Hire/ Rental of Vehicles Car Fuel Warehousing Rental of warehouse Wages for Security/ Guards Handling Salaries for Logistician and Procurement Officer Salaries / wages for labourers Worker Salaries / wages for Drivers

2,250,000

18,000

12,000,000

8,000

1

3,450,000 2,700,000

3,450,000 2,700,000

2,300 1,800

1

2,160,000.0

2,160,000

1,440.00

8,310,000

5,540

0 0 0 0

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0

0.00

0

0

1,228,980,000

819,320

0

0.00

0 1,800,000

0.00 1,200.00

0 0 750,000

0.00 0.00 500.00

1,600,000

1,066.67

1,750,000

1,166.67

5,900,000

3,933.33

6,000,000 10,800,000

4,000.00 7,200.00

16,800,000

11,200.00

TOTAL TRANSPORT, WAREHOUSING & HANDLING CAPITAL ASSETS ( over US$500) e.g. Computers and accessories Printers Office Furniture Vehicles Communications equipment e.g. camera, video camera, sound recording, satellite phone‌ TOTAL CAPITAL ASSETS TOTAL DIRECT COST INDIRECT COSTS: PERSONNEL, ADMINISTRATION & SUPPORT e.g. Staff salaries Salaries e. g % for Programme Director Salaries e. g % for Finance Director Salaries for accountant and other admin or secretarial staff Office Operations Office rent Office Utilities Office stationery Communications Telephone and fax Other Insurance TOTAL INDIRECT COST: PERSONNEL, ADMIN. & SUPPORT AUDIT, MONITORING & EVALUATION Audit of ACT appeal Monitoring & Evaluation

27,000,000

Estimate Estimate

TOTAL AUDIT, MONITORING & EVALUATION 51

200


ACT Appeal SYR131: Syria Regional Humanitarian Response

TOTAL EXPENDITURE exclusive International Coordination Fee INTERNATIONAL COORDINATION FEE (ICF) - 3% TOTAL EXPENDITURE inclusive International Coordination Fee BALANCE REQUESTED (minus available income)

1,259,990,000

839,993

37,799,700.00

25,199.80

1,297,789,700

865,193

1,297,789,700

865,193

The budget needed to achieve the desirable objectives was built on accurate calculations depending on DSPR experiences and will cover the cost of actual needs of refugees such as food and NFI, medical days, psycho social- well being, nutrition and health and life skills programs. DSPR will control the utilisation of the budget through following highly effective procedures.

FCA Budget

INCOME INCOME- FIRM PLEDGES (made both through ACT Secretariat and directly) Date 25.8.2013 Sep.2012

Appeal Budget JOD

Donor Name MONDO MFA

TOTAL INCOME EXPENDITURE

%

Unit Cost

Appeal Budget USD

0.00

0.00

36,784.60 450,209.00

52,110.20 637,780.00

486,993.60

689,890.20

Appeal Budget JOD

Appeal Budget USD

Type of

No. of

Unit

Units

session group

20 10

1,500.00 5,550.00

30,000.00 55,500.00

42,207.00 78,082.95

booklets cycle Event

1000 36 6

3.00 3,160.00 1,400.00

3,000.00 113,760.00 8,400.00 210,660.00

4,220.70 160,048.94 11,817.96 296,377.55

course course cycle course Centre

32 36 32 20 2

2,312.50 2,150.00 4,100.00 3,650.00 35,000.00

74,000.00 77,400.00 131,200.00 73,000.00 70,000.00

104,110.60 108,894.06 184,585.28 102,703.70 98,483.00

course Centre Kit

24 2 5000

2,666.00 25,000.00 31.00

63,984.00 50,000.00 155,000.00

90,019.09 70,345.00 218,069.50

school

2

50,000.00

100,000.00 794,584.00

140,690.00 1,117,900.23

DIRECT COST (LIST EXPENDITURE BY SECTOR) Psychosocial Support Psychosocial support Psychosocial groups Psychosocial/CP/Gender mainstreaming Recreational and Arts Activities Events and exhibitions Subtotal Education Literacy and Numeracy Courses English Language Courses physical education Activities Transferrable skills courses ICT Centre in camps ICT courses in community and camps ICT Centre in community Distribute school kits School infrastructure and learning environment Subtotal

52


ACT Appeal SYR131: Syria Regional Humanitarian Response

Early recovery & livelihood restoration Income generating skills training Community mobilisation Subtotal Water Sanitation and hygiene Environmental and Hygiene Education Awareness Hygiene kit Subtotal Other Sector Related Direct Costs Program Coordinator (1) Emergency Coordinator (1) Education Specialist (1) Project Coordinator (3) Field Officer (7) Monitoring and Evaluation Officer Site preparation/expansion/maintenance Needs Assessment capacity mapping Communication/visibility cost Staff Personal Development International expert visits from HQ Accommodation for expert visit Per diem Subtotal

Course meetings

20 20

campaign Kit

42 5000

month month month month month month

12 12 12 12 12 12

site assessment exercise lumpsum workshop trip night day

4 1 1 1 5 4 40 40

3,500.00 150.00

70,000.00 3,000.00 73,000.00

98,483.00 4,220.70 102,703.70

525.00 21.00

22,050.00 105,000.00 127,050.00

31,022.15 147,724.50 178,746.65

100 100 100 100 100 100

2,125.00 3,500.00 3,500.00 5,100.00 5,390.00 1,800.00

25,500.00 42,000.00 42,000.00 61,200.00 64,680.00 21,600.00

35,875.95 59,089.80 59,089.80 86,102.28 90,998.29 30,389.04

100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100

24,000.00 5,000.00 5,000.00 4,000.00 3,000.00 1,250.00 70.00 80.00

96,000.00 5,000.00 5,000.00 4,000.00 15,000.00 5,000.00 2,800.00 3,200.00 392,980.00

135,062.40 7,034.50 7,034.50 5,627.60 21,103.50 7,034.50 3,939.32 4,502.08 552,883.56

1,598,274.00

2,248,611.69

Total DIRECT COST (LIST EXPENDITURE BY SECTOR) TRANSPORT, WAREHOUSING & HANDLING Warehousing Rental of warehouse Wages for Security/ Guards in camps Hire/ Rental of Vehicles for office operations (6) Fuel Handling Salaries / wages for labourers/cleaners/helpers on and off camps Salaries / wages for Drivers

month guard

12 22

100 100

500.00 2,950.00

6,000.00 64,900.00

8,441.40 91,307.81

month month

12 12

100 100

6,600.00 1,800.00

79,200.00 21,600.00

111,426.48 30,389.04

labourer Trip

15 6

100 100

2,200.00 100.00

33,000.00 600.00

46,427.70 844.14

205,300.00

288,836.57

TOTAL TRANSPORT, WAREHOUSING & HANDLING CAPITAL ASSETS ( over US$500) Computers and accessories Printers/1 multi-purpose/1 small Office Furniture/relocating for expansion

Pc Printer

5 2

100 100

1,000.00 2,000.00

5,000.00 4,000.00

7,034.50 5,627.60

lumpsum

1

100

6,000.00

6,000.00

8,441.40

53


ACT Appeal SYR131: Syria Regional Humanitarian Response

Communications equipment e.g. camera, video camera, sound recording, satellite phone‌ TOTAL CAPITAL ASSETS

gadget

3

100

500.00

TOTAL DIRECT COST INDIRECT COSTS: PERSONNEL, ADMINISTRATION & SUPPORT Staff salaries Representative Admin and Finance Coordinator Finance Officer Programme Coordinator Jordan (local, cost share 15%) Legal adviser fee (cost share, 10%) Logistics Coordinator Logistics Officer Admin Assistant ACT Forum Coordinator Subtotal Office Operations Office rent Office Utilities Office stationery

2,560,662.11

10 15 15

400.00 300.00 150.00

4,800.00 3,600.00 1,800.00

6,753.12 5,064.84 2,532.42

month month month month month month

12 12 12 12 12 12

15 10 50 50 50 25

375.00 50.00 1,100.00 550.00 350.00 100.00

4,500.00 600.00 13,200.00 6,600.00 4,200.00 1,200.00 40,500.00

6,331.05 844.14 18,571.08 9,285.54 5,908.98 1,688.28 56,979.45

month month month

12 12 12

100 100 100

550.00 35.00 100.00

6,600.00 420.00 1,200.00 8,220.00

9,285.54 590.90 1,688.28 11,564.72

month

12

100

1,000.00

12,000.00 12,000.00

16,882.80 16,882.80

session person year month month

5 25 1 12 12

100 100 100 100 100

2,500.00 500.00 500.00 1,500.00 150.00

12,500.00 12,500.00 500.00 18,000.00 1,800.00 45,300.00

17,586.25 17,586.25 703.45 25,324.20 2,532.42 63,732.57

106,020.00

149,159.54

10,000.00 10,000.00

14,069.00 14,069.00

20,000.00

28,138.00

1,946,094.00

2,737,959.65

58,382.82

82,138.79

TOTAL INDIRECT COST: PERSONNEL, ADMIN. & SUPPORT AUDIT, MONITORING & EVALUATION Audit of ACT appeal Monitoring & Evaluation

1,820,074.00

12 12 12

Subtotal Other Staff PS,CP and Conflict Mitigation training sessions Medical Insurance Office Insurance Safety and Security Bank Charge Subtotal

2,110.35 23,213.85

month month month

Subtotal Communications Telephone and fax & mobile

1,500.00 16,500.00

Estimate Estimate

TOTAL AUDIT, MONITORING & EVALUATION TOTAL EXPENDITURE exclusive International Coordination Fee INTERNATIONAL COORD. FEE (ICF)- 3% 54


ACT Appeal SYR131: Syria Regional Humanitarian Response

TOTAL EXPENDITURE inclusive International Coordination Fee

2,004,476.82

2,820,098.44

BALANCE REQUESTED (minus available income)

1,517,483.22

2,130,208.24

EXCHANGE RATE: local currency to 1 USD Budget rate

1.4069

IOCC Jordan Budget Appeal Budget USD

INCOME Donor Name TOTAL INCOME

Actual USD

Type of

No. of

%

0.00 Unit Cost USD

Unit

Units

Financing

USD

0.00 Budget USD Budget USD

Food Security Food assistance

parcel

1,000

100%

200

200,000.00

Water, Sanitation & Hygiene Hygiene kits

parcel

1,000

100%

160

160,000.00

Non-Food Items Clothing kits Infant kits Dignity kits Bedding sets Household kits Carpets Hot water bottles School sets

parcel parcel parcel parcel parcel pcs pcs kits

2,000 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000

100% 100% 100% 100% 100% 100% 100% 100%

113 35 20 150 95 50 10 60

225,000.00 35,000.00 20,000.00 150,000.00 95,000.00 50,000.00 10,000.00 60,000.00

Early Recovery & Livelihood English language classes (500 for Amman @ $85/60 hrs + 300 Madaba @ $520/9mths + 200 Zerqa $200/200 hrs)

course

1

100%

238,500

238,500.00

EXPENDITURE

DIRECT ASSISTANCE

TOTAL DIRECT ASSISTANCE Other Sector Related Direct Costs Salaries & benefits for staff Country Director (1) Project Manager (1) Project Officer (3) Admin/Finance Officer (1) Administrative Assistant (1) Janitor (1)

1,243,500

month month month month month month 55

12 12 12 12 12 12

50% 50% 50% 50% 50% 50%

6,500 1,800 3,900 1,300 750 400

39,000 10,800 23,400 7,800 4,500 2,400


ACT Appeal SYR131: Syria Regional Humanitarian Response

Benefits direct programme staff / local labor law Capacity Building Needs Assessment Communication/visibility cost

lump lump lump psc

30% 1 1 1

100% 100% 100% 100%

87,900 6,000 5,000 5,000

TOTAL OTHER SECTORS RELATED DIRECT COSTS TRANSPORT, WAREHOUSING & HANDLING Transport (of relief materials) Shipping and ITSH GIK, Ocean Freight and ITSH Warehousing Rental of warehouse Common Warehouse (IOCC + LWF) Distribution cost Handling Logistician Officer Casual Labour (Street Leaders; refugees, etc)

26,370 6,000 5,000 5,000 130,270

lump lump

1 2

0.0% 100%

0 15,000

0 30,000

lump month lump

1 12 1

0% 100% 8%

0 1,000 1,005,000

0 12,000 80,400

month month

12 12

100% 100%

1,300 45

15,600 540

TOTAL TRANSPORT, WAREHOUSING & HANDLING

138,540

CAPITAL ASSETS (over US$500) Computers Vehicles

unit unit

2 1

100% 100%

1,500 30,000

3,000 30,000

CAPITAL ASSETS ( Under US$500) Printers/small office equipments Office Furniture

lump lump

1 1

100% 100%

4,000 1,500

4,000 1,500

TOTAL CAPITAL ASSET

38,500

TOTAL DIRECT COST

1,550,810.0

INDIRECT COSTS: PERSONNEL, ADMINISTRATION & SUPPORT Staff salaries ACT Forum Coordinator (1) month Regional Relief Coorinator (1) month Regional Finance Manager (1) month Regional Communication Officer (1) month Regional Administration Officer (1) month Benefits indirect programme staff / local labor law lump

12 12 12 12 12 25%

25% 25% 25% 25% 25% 100%

400 4,000 4,200 3,500 3,000 45,300

1,200 12,000 12,600 10,500 9,000 11,325

Staff Travel Local Per Diems/Lodging Local Travel Regional & International Per Diems/Lodging Regional & International Travel

month month day trip

12 12 50 14

100% 100% 100% 100%

300 600 390 700

3,600 7,200 19,500 9,800

Office Operations Office rent Office repair and maintenance Office utilities Office supplies Computer supplies

month month month month month

12 12 12 12 12

50% 50% 50% 50% 50%

1,000 100 500 250 300

6,000 600 3,000 1,500 1,800

56


ACT Appeal SYR131: Syria Regional Humanitarian Response

Equipment repair

month

12

50%

100

600

Communications Telephone and fax

month

12

50%

400

2,400

Other Bank charges

month

12

100%

200

2,400

TOTAL INDIRECT COST: PERSONNEL, ADMIN. & SUPPORT AUDIT, MONITORING & EVALUATION A-133 Audit Local Audit Legal Assistance & Fees Monitoring & Evaluation (1) TOTAL AUDIT, MONITORING & EVALUATION

115,025

lump lump lump month

1 1 1 12

100% 100% 100% 25%

2,000 3,000 1,000 3,500

2,000 3,000 1,000 10,500 16,500

TOTAL EXPENDITURE exclusive International Coordination Fee

1,682,335

INTERNATIONAL COORDINATION FEE (ICF) - 3%

50,470

TOTAL EXPENDITURE inclusive International Coordination Fee

1,732,805 300,000

Gifts in Kind provided by IOCC/School Kits & Hygiene Kits TOTAL PROGRAM EXPENDITURE including in-kind BALANCE REQUESTED (minus available income)

2,032,805

EXCHANGE RATE: local currency to 1 USD Budget rate

1.00

57


ACT Appeal SYR131: Syria Regional Humanitarian Response

IOCC Lebanon Budget INCOME

Budget

TOTAL INCOME

0.00

EXPENDITURE

USD 0.00

Type of

No. of

Unit Cost

Appeal Budget USD

Unit

Units

USD

Food Security Food assistance

parcel

2,000.00

60

120,000.00

Water, Sanitation & Hygiene Hygiene promotion sessions Hygiene kits Infant kits Water storage containers/tanks Water testing & treatment kits Water system rehab/construction Desludging holding tanks & latrine pits Rehab/Construct latrines Collect & dispose solid waste

person parcel parcel pcs kit pcs pcs pcs pcs

2,000.00 2,000.00 2,000.00 2,000.00 2,000.00 2,000.00 2,000.00 2,000.00 2,000.00

4 50 50 20 12 10 1 50 1

8,000.00 100,000.00 100,000.00 40,000.00 24,000.00 20,000.00 2,000.00 100,000.00 2,660.00

Non-food items Winter needs Household kits Bedding sets

parcel parcel parcel

1,000.00 500.00 500.00

100 200 50

100,000.00 100,000.00 25,000.00

Psychosocial Support Psychosocial Support (workshop, activity, session for 200 child over 1 year)

child

200.00

550.00

110,000.00

Health Health awareness sessions ANC/PNC support Mother support training for health & social workers Referral health care for deliveries & lifesaving interventions

sessions beneficiary beneficiary beneficiary

100.00 500.00 50.00 500.00

500 350 500 542

50,000.00 175,000.00 25,000.00 271,000.00

Nutrition Nutrition workshops & IYCF Educational & training materials Active case finding for cases of malnutrition Referral health care for management of malnutrition

workshop pcs outreach beneficiary

6.00 2.00 675.00 100.00

10,000 10,000 50 150

60,000.00 20,000.00 33,750.00 15,000.00

Shelter and settlement Substandard shelters improved Vulnerable refugee HH receive shelter assistance Vulnerable unregistered HH receive shelter assistance Returnee Lebanese HH receive shelter assistance Host community HH receive shelter assistance Collective shelter capacity increased

household beneficiary household household household household

40.00 100.00 100.00 100.00 100.00 100.00

2,400 900 900 900 900 2,000

96,000.00 90,000.00 90,000.00 90,000.00 90,000.00 200,000.00

2,000.00

58

116,000.00

DIRECT ASSISTANCE

Protection Dignity kits

parcel 58


ACT Appeal SYR131: Syria Regional Humanitarian Response

Mobilisation on GBV

sessions

Early recovery & livelihood restoration Women's Coops trained & working in food production

100.00

52

5,200.00

3.00

50,000

150,000.00

beneficiary

TOTAL DIRECT ASSISTANCE

2,428,610

Other Sector Related Direct Costs Salaries & benefits for staff Country Director (1) (50%) Program Manager (1)

month month

12 12

6,500 4,000

39,000 48,000

Project Officer (8) Technical Advisors (6) Accountant (2) Information Officer (2) Monitors (4) Office Assistant/Driver (1) Janitor (1) Benefits direct programme staff / local labor law Capacity Building Needs Assessment Communication/visibility cost

month month month month month month month lump lump lump lump

12 12 12 12 12 12 12

11,200 18,000 3,000 2,600 4,800 1,000 500 580,200 6,000 5,000 5,000

134,400 216,000 36,000 31,200 57,600 12,000 6,000 145,050 6,000 5,000 5,000

25% 1 1 1

TOTAL OTHER SECTORS RELATED DIRECT COSTS

741,250

TRANSPORT, WAREHOUSING & HANDLING Transport (of relief materials) Shipping and ITSH GIK, Ocean Freight and ITSH Warehousing Rental of warehouse Common Warehouse (IOCC + LWF) Distribution cost Handling Loading/Offloading Packaging/Labeling

lump lump

1 1

10,000 15,000

10,000 15,000

month month month

12 12 12

1,000 1,000 750

12,000 12,000 9,000

month lump

12 8,000

500

6,000 16,000

2.00

TOTAL TRANSPORT, WAREHOUSING & HANDLING

80,000

CAPITAL ASSETS (over US$500) Computers

unit

4

1,500

6,000

CAPITAL ASSETS ( Under US$500) Printers/small office equipments

lump

1

6,000

6,000

Office Furniture

lump

1

2,000

2,000

TOTAL CAPITAL ASSETS

14,000

TOTAL DIRECT COST

3,263,860.00

INDIRECT COSTS: PERSONNEL, ADMINISTRATION & SUPPORT Staff salaries ACT Forum Coordinator (1) (25%) 59

month

12

400

1,200


ACT Appeal SYR131: Syria Regional Humanitarian Response

Regional Relief Coorinator (1) (25%) Regional Finance Manager (1) (25%) Regional Communication Officer (1) (25%) Regional Administration Officer (1) (25%) Benefits indirect programme staff / local labor law

month month month month lump

12 12 12 12 25%

4,000 4,200 3,500 3,000 45,300

12,000 12,600 10,500 9,000 11,325

Staff Travel Local Per Diems/Lodging Local Travel Regional & International Per Diems/Lodging Regional & International Travel

month month day trip

12 50 14

12

500 1,200 344 500

6,000 14,400 17,200 7,000

Office Operations Office rent (50%) Office repair and maintenance (50%) Office utilities (50%) Office supplies (50%) Computer supplies (50%) Equipment repair (50%)

month month month month month month

12 12 12 12 12 12

2,000 400 1,200 800 300 200

12,000 2,400 7,200 4,800 1,800 1,200

Communications Telephone and fax (50%)

month

12

800

4,800

Other Bank charges

month

12

150

1,800

TOTAL INDIRECT COST: PERSONNEL, ADMIN. & SUPPORT

137,225

AUDIT, MONITORING & EVALUATION A-133 Audit Local Audit Legal Assistance & Fees Monitoring & Evaluation (1) (25%) TOTAL AUDIT, MONITORING & EVALUATION

lump lump lump month

TOTAL EXPENDITURE exclusive International Coordination Fee INTERNATIONAL COORDINATION FEE (ICF) - 3%

1 1 1 12

2,000 4,000 3,000 3,500

2,000 4,000 3,000 10,500 19,500

3,420,585 102,617.55

TOTAL EXPENDITURE inclusive International Coordination Fee Gifts in Kind provided by IOCC/School Kits & Hygiene Kits TOTAL PROGRAM EXPENDITURE including in-kind

3,523,203 150,000

BALANCE REQUESTED (minus available income)

3,673,203

60


ACT Appeal SYR131: Syria Regional Humanitarian Response

IOCC Syria Budget INCOME TOTAL INCOME EXPENDITURE

Type of unit Unit

No. of units Units

Appeal Budget USD 0.00

Actual Budget USD

Unit Cost USD

Appeal Budgrt USD

0.00

DIRECT ASSISTANCE Food assistance

parcel

Water, Sanitation & Hygiene Hygiene promotion Water filters Hygiene kits Infant kits

session pcs parcel parcel

Non-Food Items Clothing kits Bedding sets Household kits

parcel parcel parcel

6,000

50

300,000.00

2,000.00 350.00 30.00 20.00

60,000.00 175,000.00 90,000.00 20,000.00

1,000 1,500 300

75.00 55.00 142.00

75,000.00 82,500.00 42,600.00

1,000

600.00

600,000.00

3

7,000.00

21,000.00

30 500 3,000 1,000

Shelter & Settlement Rent Subsidies (3 months)

family

Psychosocial Support Psychosocial Support

workshop

Education Tuition & Fees Support Remedial Courses

student student

500 500

450.00 400.00

225,000.00 200,000.00

Early Recovery & Livelihood Cash-for-Work

project

20

6,000.00

120,000.00

TOTAL DIRECT ASSISTANCE 2,011,100 Other Sector Related Direct Costs Salaries & benefits for staff Country Director (1) (50%) Program Manager (1) Project Officer (4) Finance Officer (1) Accountant (1) Administrative Assistant (1) Information Officer (6) Monitors (6) Office Assistant/Driver (2) Janitor (2) Benefits direct programme staff / local labor law Capacity Building Needs Assessment

month month month month month month month month month month lump lump lump

12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 20% 1 1 61

4,500 1,100 2,600 400 800 400 2,400 2,400 600 500 161,400 6,000 5,000

27,000 13,200 31,200 4,800 9,600 4,800 28,800 28,800 7,200 6,000 32,280 6,000 5,000


ACT Appeal SYR131: Syria Regional Humanitarian Response

Staff Care Danger pay to staff

lump lump

1 1

5,000 5,000

TOTAL OTHER SECTORS RELATED DIRECT COSTS

5,000 5,000 214,680

TRANSPORT, WAREHOUSING & HANDLING Transport (of relief materials) Shipping and ITSH (8%) GIK, Ocean Freight and ITSH Warehousing Rental of warehouse Common Warehouse (IOCC + LWF)

lump lump

1 1

845,100 15,000

67,608 15,000

month month

12 12

1,000 1,000

12,000 12,000

Distribution cost Handling Loading/Offloading

month

12

500

6,000

month

12

500

6,000

Packaging/Labeling

lump

13,330

1.50

TOTAL TRANSPORT, WAREHOUSING & HANDLING

19,995 138,603

CAPITAL ASSETS (over US$500) Computers Vehicles

unit unit

5 1

1,500 30,000

7,500 30,000

CAPITAL ASSETS ( Under US$500) Printers/small office equipments Office Furniture

lump lump

1 1

4,500 4,000

4,500 4,000

TOTAL CAPITAL ASSETS 46,000 TOTAL DIRECT COST

2,410,383.0 0

INDIRECT COSTS: PERSONNEL, ADMINISTRATION & SUPPORT Staff salaries ACT Forum Coordinator (1) (50%) Regional Relief Coorinator (1) (50%) Regional Finance Manager (1) (50%) Regional Communication Officer (1) (50%) Regional Administration Officer (1) (50%) Benefits indirect programme staff / local labor law

month month month month month lump

12 12 12 12 12

Staff Travel Local Per Diems/Lodging Local Travel Regional & International Per Diems/Lodging Regional & International Travel

month month day trip

Office Operations Office rent (4)

month

400 4,000 4,200 3,500 3,000 90,600

2,400 24,000 25,200 21,000 18,000 22,650

12 12 50 14

400 800 344 500

4,800 9,600 17,200 7,000

12

1,600

19,200

25%

62


ACT Appeal SYR131: Syria Regional Humanitarian Response

Office repair and maintenance Office utilities Office supplies Computer supplies Equipment repair

month month month month month

12 12 12 12 12

400 1,200 800 300 200

4,800 14,400 9,600 3,600 2,400

Communications Telephone and fax

month

12

400

4,800

Other Bank charges

month

12

200

2,400

TOTAL INDIRECT COST: PERSONNEL, ADMIN. & SUPPORT

AUDIT, MONITORING & EVALUATION A-133 Audit Local Audit Legal Assistance & Fees Monitoring & Evaluation (1) (50%) TOTAL AUDIT, MONITORING & EVALUATION

213,050

lump lump lump month

1 1 1 12

TOTAL EXPENDITURE exclusive International Coordination Fee

INTERNATIONAL COORDINATION FEE (ICF) - 3%

2,000 7,000 2,000 3,500

2,000 7,000 2,000 21,000 32,000 2,655,433 79,662.99

TOTAL EXPENDITURE inclusive International Coordination Fee Gifts in Kind provided by IOCC/School Kits & Hygiene Kits TOTAL PROGRAM EXPENDITURE including in-kind BALANCE REQUESTED (minus available income)

2,735,096 150,000.00 2,885,096

63


ACT Appeal SYR131: Syria Regional Humanitarian Response

LWF Jordan Budget TOTAL INCOME

0.0

0.0 Appeal Budget USD

Type of unit

No. of units

Facility Kit Campaign

100 25,000 1

4,500.0 20.0 25,000.0

450,000.0 500,000.0 25,000.0

635,593.2 706,214.7 35,310.7

Non-food items Winter clothing Gas Heaters Gas Bottles Gas refills

Set Heater Bottle refill

50,000 3,000 3,000 18,000

7.5 50.0 42.0 10.5

375,000.0 150,000.0 126,000.0 189,000.0

529,661.0 211,864.4 177,966.1 266,949.2

Shelter and settlement Rehabilitate Shelters

Shelter

100

1,000.0

100,000.0

141,242.9

session session workshop Program workshop Month Booklets lump sum

200 24 15 1 24 9 2,000 1

50.0 250.0 500.0 174,400.0 500.0 2,000.0 2.0 5,000.0

10,000.0 6,000.0 7,500.0 174,400.0 12,000.0 18,000.0 4,000.0 5,000.0

14,124.3 8,474.6 10,593.2 246,327.7 16,949.2 25,423.7 5,649.7 7,062.1

18,000.0 20,000.0 10.0

540,000.0 200,000.0 100,000.0

762,711.9 282,485.9 141,242.9

40,000.0

240,000.0

338,983.1

3,231,900

4,564,830

EXPENDITURE

Unit Cost JD

Appeal Budget JD

DIRECT COST (LIST EXPENDITURE BY SECTOR) Water, sanitation & hygiene Rehabilitate public wash facilities in Camp Distribute Hygiene kits Hygiene Promotion campaign

Psychosocial Support Individual counseling sessions Group counseling session Psychosocial first aid training workshops Peace Oasis Program Leadership training workshops Support social mediation committees (80 members) Brochures and printed booklets Camp Office infrastructure Education Construction of classrooms Maintain 10 schools Distribute School Kits

classroom school kit

Early recovery & livelihood restoration Income Generation Initiatives

Project

30.00 10.00 10,000.00 6

Sub-Total

Other Sector Related Direct Costs Salaries & benefits for direct staff (e.g. nutritionist, engineers, program officer / coordinator, driver of nutritionist etc.) Psychosocial Support Psychosocial Specialist (2) Psychosocial Consultant / Technical supervision Social workers(4) (Syrians from the camp) Staff Benefits (psychosocial consultants) (12.25%) Transportation of field staff to field offices Senior Program Officer (25%) Meeting space infrastructure Incentives for community leaders (50) Meals and hospitality International travel for consultants Accommodation costs Per diem

Month Day Month lump Month Month lump Month Month trip day day

12 24 12 12 12 12 1 12 12 3 30 30

3,000.0 400.0 1,000.0 375.0 400.0 600.0 3,500.0 2,000.0 240.0 1,300.0 90.0 17.0

36,000.0 9,600.0 12,000.0 4,500.0 4,800.0 7,200.0 3,500.0 24,000.0 2,880.0 3,900.0 2,700.0 510.0

50,847.5 13,559.3 16,949.2 6,355.9 6,779.7 10,169.5 4,943.5 33,898.3 4,067.8 5,508.5 3,813.6 720.3

Education Civil Engineer (including 12.25% benefits)

Month

12

2,000.0

24,000.0

33,898.3

64


ACT Appeal SYR131: Syria Regional Humanitarian Response

Senior Program Officer (25%)

Month

12

600.0

7,200.0

10,169.5

Livelihood Support Senior Program Officer (25%)

Month

12

600.0

7,200.0

10,169.5

Month Month

12 12

600.0 1,400.0

7,200.0 16,800.0

10,169.5 23,728.8

Month

9

900.0

8,100.0

11,440.7

lump Month Month

1 12 5

8,000.0 500.0 1,000.0

8,000.0 6,000.0 5,000.0

11,299.4 8,474.6 7,062.1

201,090

284,025

Non-Food Items Senior Program Officer, including benefits (25%) Project Coordinator Distribution Coordinator (camp based) (including benefits) (List expenditure by sector) Needs Assessment / Consulting services Communication/visibility cost Beneficiary Selection Sub-Total TRANSPORT, WAREHOUSING & HANDLING Transport (of relief materials) Hire/ Rental of Vehicles Fuel

Month Month

3 3

1,500.0 500.0

4,500.0 1,500.0

6,355.9 2,118.6

Warehousing Rental of warehouse Alarm System for warehouse Wages for Security/ Guards (2)

Month lumpsum Month

12 1 12

1,000.0 700.0 1,100.0

12,000.0 700.0 13,200.0

16,949.2 988.7 18,644.1

Handling Salaries for Logistician and Procurement Officer Staff Benefits (12.25%) Salaries / wages for labourers (4)

Month Month Day

12 12

1,000.0 125.0 80.0

12,000.0 1,500.0 4,800.0

16,949.2 2,118.6 6,779.7

50,200.0

70,904.0

60.00

TOTAL TRANSPORT, WAREHOUSING & HANDLING CAPITAL ASSETS ( over US$500) Computers and accessories Printers Office Furniture Vehicles Communications equipment e.g. camera, video camera, sound recording, satellite phone‌

Laptops Printer lumpsum

3 1 1

1,200.0 300.0 2,000.0

3,600.0 300.0 2,000.0

5,084.7 423.7 2,824.9

lumpsum

1

1,500.0

1,500.0

2,118.6

7,400.0

10,452.0

3,490,590.0

4,930,211.9

42,000.0 21,000.0 18,000.0 12,000.0 13,800.0 6,600.0 24,000.0

59,322.0 29,661.0 25,423.7 16,949.2 19,491.5 9,322.0 33,898.3

TOTAL CAPITAL ASSETS

TOTAL DIRECT COST INDIRECT COSTS: PERSONNEL, ADMINISTRATION & SUPPORT Staff salaries Emergency Program Director Month Finance and Administration Officer Month Senior Logistics Officer Month Logistics officer Month Program Assistant Month Office Assistant Month Jerusalem Office Management Cost Month Staff Benefits 65

12 12 12 12 12 12 12

3,500.0 1,750.0 1,500.0 1,000.0 1,150.0 550.0 2,000.0


ACT Appeal SYR131: Syria Regional Humanitarian Response

Social security contribution (12.25%) Office Operations Office rent Office Utilities (electricity, heating, water, cleaning) Office stationery Communications Telephone and fax Fuel for rented vehicles and Generator Insurance Workshops for LWF staff Other : Vehicle Rental (2) Insurance

Month

12

1,157.6

13,891.5

19,620.8

Month Month Month

12 12 12

1,100.0 700.0 140.0

13,200.0 8,400.0 1,680.0

18,644.1 11,864.4 2,372.9

Month Month Month workshop Month year

12 12 12 3 12 1

400.0 900.0 450.0 1,500.0 1,500.0 800.0

4,800.0 10,800.0 5,400.0 4,500.0 18,000.0 800.00

6,779.7 15,254.2 7,627.1 6,355.9 25,423.7 1,129.94

218,871.5

309,140.5

5,000.0 3,000.0

7,062.1 4,237.3

8,000.0

11,299.4

3,717,461.5

5,250,651.8

111,523.8

157,519.6

3,828,985.3

5,408,171.4

3,828,985

5,408,171

TOTAL INDIRECT COST: PERSONNEL, ADMIN. & SUPPORT AUDIT, MONITORING & EVALUATION Audit of ACT appeal Monitoring & Evaluation

Estimate Estimate

TOTAL AUDIT, MONITORING & EVALUATION TOTAL EXPENDITURE exclusive International Coordination Fee INTERNATIONAL COORDINATION FEE (ICF) - 3% TOTAL EXPENDITURE inclusive International Coordination Fee

BALANCE REQUESTED (minus available income) EXCHANGE RATE: local currency to 1 USD 0.71

Budget Narrative 1) Income generation initiatives: These initiatives will be explored with potential local partners once funding becomes available. LWF worked with some local partners on general income generating ideas in the areas of: 1. Food processing: Dairy products, pickles, dry and herbal foods, Couscous, and other kinds of processed foods 2. Handcrafts 3. Sewing 4. Beauty salons and other women-related projects. LWF will provide the necessary infrastructure and training for selected local partner NGOs. The initial budget of every project will depend on a quick feasibility study that will be produced once funding is available. 2) Support Social Mediation Committees: LWF will establish 3 social mediation committees in addition to the one established in the previous appeal and each committee will consist of 20 members. Each member will receive 25 JDs a month as a symbolic amount in order to encourage participants to continue to be active in their communities. They will also be provided with month meals as part of their contribution to our work

66


ACT Appeal SYR131: Syria Regional Humanitarian Response

3) Psychosocial Specialists: LWF currently employs a psychosocial specialist based in the Zaatari Camp. LWF plans to expand the work in the camp and therefore budgeted for another psychosocial specialist in case more funding is available for the program. 4) Senior Program Coordinator: This is a new position that will be created if LWF receives a significant amount of this appeal. This position will be responsible for coordination and follow up of all projects of the organization. 5) Peace Oasis Program: The total budget program will include a mix of activities that will focus on increasing the resilience of youth and building their capacity in building peace and reconciliation among their families and wider communities in general. A safe area will be established to conduct the various activities. Art therapy and other techniques will be used to achieve the program objectives. Various topics will be covered that will include communication and peace building skills, life skills training, as well as other interventions. Provision of meals for participating young adults will take place and animators will be hired together with community mobilizers who will work on reaching out to the various youth groups in the camp. The technical details of the program are being finalized by LWF staff and specialized experts. A preliminary breakdown for this program is below: Peace Oasis Program Budget breakdown Art Therapy Sepcialist Animators (4) Meals Vocational trainers (3) Training space preparation Psychosocial specialist Materials, Stationery, Other Guards (2) Transportation Officer Community Mobilizers (6) Total

Day Month lump Sum Day Space Day lump Sum Month Month Month Month

30 12 1 60 1 30 1 12 10 12 10

300 2000 24000 300 40000 300 10000 800 500 900 1500

9000 24000 24000 18000 40000 9000 10000 9600 5000 10800 15000 174400

6) First Aid training and Group counselling sessions: These activities will be given by specialized consultants who have long years of experience and the daily rate of such consultants in Jordan is around 300 JDs. LWF will try to get lower prices per day and will seek consultants from the whole region. 7) Psychosocial Consultant: This consultant will be brought if LWF receives enough budget to expand the psychosocial support component of the appeal. This consultant will give high level supervision and advice to the psychosocial specialists, who might not have the desired skills and technical capacity. This consultant will/might be needed for a maximum of 2 days a month. The budgeted amount of JD400 is the minimum daily rate of an international consultant. In case the consultant is available in the country, then the local rates will be used. In addition, a budget line for travel is allocated in case the consultant was not from Jordan.

67

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