Jesus College Annual Report 2020

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jesus college • cambridge

2020

one hundred and siXTeenTh annual reporT



jesus college • cambridge

2020

one hundred and siXTeenTh annual reporT


The wood engravings in this edition have been specially created for the Annual Report by the British artist Ian Stephens

copYrighT This publication is protected by international copyright law. all rights reserved. no part of this publication may be reproduced or used in any form or by any means – graphic, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, taping or information storage and retrieval systems – without the prior permission of the copyright holders, except in accordance with the provisions of the copyright, designs and patents act 1988.


contents message from the master

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Fellows and other senior members 2019-2020

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articles

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college news

history of pandemics Mary Laven Thomas Willis and Thomas sydenham on plague in early modern england Alistair Compston rethinking the post-covid body Clare Chambers loneliness: a “modern plague” Rebecca Barr “decade on”: a project for job-seekers Nathan Brooker on being a maverick and marmite Vicar Roger Harper against the death penalty Peter Garnsey cholmondeley award for poetry Rod Mengham Quadruple helix dna and a tale concerning reductionism Kim C. Liu a life in the day of our head chef Tom Stewart people art at jesus 2019-2020 The chapel chapel music The libraries and archives books and articles by members and old members of the college donated to the libraries 2019-2020 The intellectual Forum science & human dimension project – plans and retrospective bursary development and alumni relations office

societies

45 49 53 58 61 64 67 71 74 76 80 84 89

sports clubs members’ news

20 27 29 32 36 38 44

107 people births marriages and civil partnerships

131 134 134

obituaries

137

awards & results

169

jesus college cambridge society (jccs)

179

college history

“...and scholars...” some questions of terminology Peter Glazebrook master, disciplinarian and debt settler Robert Athol

183 185



message From The masTer I Jesus College Annual Report 2020

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message from the master hat a first year to look back on. i have immersed myself in the history and Wtradition of the college, been welcomed and guided by the wonderful

Fellowship, alumni and staff, and got to know our academically adventurous body of students. Two events bookended my michaelmas term. in early october, in a centuries-old ritual, i swore an oath in latin in front of the gathered Fellowship and became the 41st master of jesus college. i was very proud to join their ranks. as the term ended i found myself again in the chapel for the annual rendition of raymond briggs’s The Snowman read by emeritus Fellow dr anthony bowen with piano, violin and singing supplied by our very talented students. anthony sat in a comfortable armchair, on the spot where i’d taken my oath a few weeks earlier. The chapel was packed and he was encircled by pyjama-clad students on beanbags. it was a moment when i felt the “comfort” of jesus. however, in 2020 that feeling of comfort was replaced and dominated by coVid-19. The impact of coVid-19 on the college has been profound and, as i write, continues to be profound. as the situation developed we all had to adapt, change and pivot. in early march our brilliant and provocative graduate conference took place over the course of a weekend in the Frankopan hall. The graduate community listened to research presentations. They are a close community, drawn from across the world. jesuans who typically greeted each other with slaps on backs and hugs. That was my pivot point. The next day i had to write a note to the whole community that contained a key sentiment … “we do not shake hands at jesus college anymore”.


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message From The masTer I Jesus College Annual Report 2020

The college has followed both the government and the university guidelines since we entered lockdown and cancelled all the physical in-person elements of our easter term. however, life and education went on; albeit in a different form. our Fellowship engaged with online teaching and maintained incredibly high standards. under the special arrangements put in place for examinations, only finalists and some 3rd-year students on four-year courses were given classed results. These students performed outstandingly with 6 starred Firsts, 64 Firsts, 66 2.1s and 3 2.2s being awarded to jesuans. our college staff have done their utmost, throughout difficult circumstances, to assist all our students; we have had clear messaging from our communications team, helen harris and Kelly Quigley-hicks; and complete support from our Tutorial office, ably managed by dr Tori mcKee. The resilience of our students, in the face of the cancellation of their final term of the year, was truly heartening. despite the global pandemic, i feel lucky to have become master of jesus at this point in time. coVid-19 derailed what should have been a straightforward year of getting to know the college over the course of the events, celebrations and governance meetings that form the spine of any institution’s calendar. however, what it did present was a unique opportunity to witness and be part of a community rising to a challenge. i have been impressed by the tenacity, ingenuity and creativity of our entire jesus community, both in handling the shutting down of college, though we have been home to over 200 graduates over the lockdown period, and in the meticulous planning for the re-opening of college in october 2020. jesus has striven to put in place appropriate measures for the safety and wellbeing of our members. on top of these i am confident that we have good habits of flexibility such that we can all adapt should new challenges arrive. even against a backdrop of coVid-19 the college has had many highlights this year and i would urge you to read the section in this annual report (pages 53-54) outlining the many achievements of our Fellowship. The year started with ‘The Fortieth’; an event that brought the whole community together to celebrate 40 years of women undergraduates. alongside this was the excellently curated exhibition ‘sisters, servants and students: 850 years of women at jesus college’. i took a particular delight in my first 50, 60 and 70 years-on lunches for alumni as well as the reunion dinner in january for those who matriculated in 1964-1967. i hosted our traditional master’s lodge breakfast for the jesus college boat club prior to the Fairbairn races in december. The W1 won the Viiis for the third time in a row and special mention must be made of the 1st novice men who came second in their class. i also started a new tradition … sports breakfasts for all our sporting teams. all i can say is ultimate Frisbee is very well attended. i learnt lots from passionate climbers and sailing enthusiasts and rugby playing alumni will be proud to know that the rugby team struck a particularly impressive sight trooping into the lodge resplendent in full club blazers and ties. music continues to flourish. our college choir gave performances across the country in the run up to christmas. The chapel resonated with the sounds of the jesus college music society (jcms). i’m so impressed with the level of musicianship


message From The masTer I Jesus College Annual Report 2020

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at jesus. as an aside, i have conducted Zoom sessions with all the incoming Freshers and can report that we are in for a treat. so many musicians and dancers will be joining our community. one of the things i spoke about at the matriculation speech in october 2019 was the concept of ‘the imposter syndrome’. my angle on it was to tell students to embrace it. jesus is a safe place to reinvent yourself, to try things for the first time and grow through the experience. That’s why stand out jcms events for me include ones in which students conducted a full orchestra, some for the first time and the more relaxed ‘blues and chill’ where one student sang and played the guitar, excelling in her debut public performance. The spirit of art and invention is growing. We established an art club for students, staff, Fellows and alumni based at the cricket pavilion. it’s a space for people to reconnect with their art and relax. Eliot’s Face, the twenty year old art journal, which had had a hiatus for a few years, was revived and we hosted the first ghost story writing competition in honour of a previous master, arthur gray. Ten entries, from Fellows, students and staff, were published in a small collection. in the space of three weeks, and in response to the forced coVid-19 semi-shutdown of the college, we developed an online platform, imaginatively named, ‘Virtual jesus’. it served as an outlet for ideas, events, film, curation of content and our first Zoom play. it’s now a new official college society and i hope it will allow students to experiment with content curation and creation as well as establishing new audio and film-making skills. in october i started a series of talks in the master’s lodge entitled ‘The business of…’. speakers from different sectors and businesses talked frankly about their life stories, how they got into their roles, how to go about getting a job in that sector and how to stand out on a cV or at an interview. sectors ranged from finance to film to ai law, corporate communications and banking. jesuans nick hornby and lawrence mallinson gave talks. This academic year i hope more alumni can share their stories with a new generation. one of the positives of our new normal is of course the adoption of previously unused mass interaction technology. We opened up ‘The business of…’ talks to recently graduated jesuans via Zoom. given the positive feedback we will continue to do this. ‘The business of…’ talks are only one strand of what will be a new focus on career assistance at jesus. They will sit alongside opportunities in mentoring, industry insight, experience and agency. i am mindful that the fallout from coVid-19 for our young jesuans going into the work place will be far reaching. The college council has approved the creation of a careers committee to oversee the strategic embedding of careers assistance. it will augment the existing strong provision of the centralised university careers service. i hope to report on its progress in next year’s annual message. Thank you to students and alumni who wrote to the college on a variety of issues. The latest being the admission of our incoming Freshers after the difficult national assignment of a level results. our community’s passion for the widening of participation and its sense of fairness was truly impressive. This year we will admit 147 undergraduates, an increase in expected numbers of 5%. no one has been asked to defer their place. 80% of our new intake of home students are from state schools and colleges, 5% higher than last year. We have also continued to build on our


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message From The masTer I Jesus College Annual Report 2020

excellent progress in widening participation: 17.5% of our confirmed home offer-holders are from areas of lowest progression to higher education compared with the university of cambridge target of 12.7%. This will be our most socially diverse cohort ever. statistics don’t really tell the story of the week a level results were released. i would like to thank our admissions team (Tutors plus jenny jenyon) for the individual conversations they had with each offer holder and the liaison with their schools during the week after the results were published. i have said that cambridge is not a bastion of elitism but it has to be a bastion of excellence … the amazing young people about to join us personify that excellence and are a testament to the excellent wider admissions teams that helped young people through the admissions procedure. jesus received 1,201 applications and we continue to be one of the most popular colleges in terms of application numbers. i must mention our graduate Tutors. We had thought coVid-19 might lead to a lessening of graduate applicants. Whilst there has been a fall off in some areas at the time of writing we have 187 offer holders. readers of this Annual Report will be aware of the fabulous West court building delivered under my predecessor professor ian White. We can now add to West court by updating our existing kitchens, making upper hall fully accessible and at the same time be the first college to introduce environmentally friendly ground source heating – the work has already started. in preparation, we took what might have been a temporary solution and created a fully functioning permanent addition to our facilities. a much-loved part of our college history and architecture has had its potential released! That’s the only way to describe the marshall garage’s transformation from may ball and furniture storage to a brand new hall, upper hall and cafeteria area. at the outset of our main kitchen project we had been looking to use this space as a temporary solution to the main kitchen project. With the benefit of a few tweaks in design we now have a brand new exciting space; a testament to sustainable building conservation. coming to a new environment such as jesus has been made easier by the enormous welcome of the Fellowship. it is with great sadness that we had to mark the death of two Fellows who contributed so much to the academic and pastoral life at jesus. professor michael Waring and dr john adkins are hugely missed. it was my privilege to get to know them both during my first year. Finally, i would like to thank the council and the college officers, richard anthony, bursar; james clackson, president; and geoff parks, senior Tutor. i would also like to thank stuart Websdale our domestic bursar, who shares a common trait with all of our staff departments at jesus; embracing the art of the possible. someone who also does that is grahame appleby, our head porter who, after 25 years, is heading to spain, retiring with his wife alex to a life of archery, goats, chickens and travel. my abiding memories from my first year of knowing grahame are his laughter, care and leading of the annual christmas formal singing of The Twelve Days of Christmas – this year the Fellows stayed in the room and joined in. Thank you for your wonderful support. i wish every jesuan a healthy, happy and successful year ahead. Prosperum iter Facias.


FelloWs and oTher senior members 2019-2020 I Jesus College Annual Report 2020

Fellows and other senior members 2019-2020 Master ms s alleyne obe

Fellows professor james clackson (president, Fellows steward, brian buckley Fellow in classics) professor p h nolan cbe professor i paterson Frs professor m l s sørensen dr g T parks (senior Tutor, Financial Tutor) dr r mengham professor r cipolla Freng dr s Fennell (senior Treasurer mcr) professor d i Wilson scd ceng dr j W ajioka professor m r laven dr T s aidt professor T d Wilkinson (graduate Tutor) dr V mottier dr F m green professor i h White Freng professor j a dowdeswell (brian buckley Fellow in polar sciences) professor n g berloff professor s clarke (ron davies Fellow in natural sciences) dr W Federle dr b Walton (dean of college) professor o a scherman dr r e Flemming (Welfare Tutor) dr c e chambers professor j j baumberg Frs professor g n Wells professor d j Kelly (Keeper of the plate) dr c m burlinson (Vivian cox Fellow in english, secretary to council, admissions Tutor) dr b m b post professor a h brand Frs

Classics Chinese Management Chemistry Archaeology Engineering English Engineering Land Economy Chemical Engineering Medicine History Economics Engineering Social & Political Sciences English Engineering Physical Geography Mathematics Chemistry Biology Music Chemistry Classics Philosophy Physics Engineering Social & Political Sciences English Linguistics Biology

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FelloWs and oTher senior members 2019-2020 I Jesus College Annual Report 2020

dr m j edwards (deputy graduate Tutor, Keeper of the old library, gurnee F hart Fellow in history) professor K s lilley professor c mascolo professor c-b schoenlieb dr r morieux mrs a KĂźnzl-snodgrass (Welfare Tutor) dr r reich dr F g stark dr s schnall dr m T conde dr d a cooper (curator of Works of art) dr T savin professor s j colvin professor a Vignoles dr s V stinchcombe professor V m p m d carvalho professor K a steemers dr Y peleg (Welfare Tutor) dr m harper (admissions Tutor science) dr u schneider dr c Fenton-glynn dr d nally dr s stacpoole (assistant graduate Tutor) dr h Williams (Welfare Tutor) dr h Taylor professor e benvenisti (c.c. ng Fellow in law) professor p j Williamson dr s dutton dr s andres dr j green dr m elliott dr j huppert (director of intellectual Forum) mr r pinel (director of music) dr r F anthony (bursar) dr j dinwoodie dr l Tagliapietra dr a j grant dr j a linebaugh dr j berenbeim dr e d robson ms e Williams (director of development & alumni relations, senior Treasurer jcsu) dr j bellingham (Welfare Tutor)

History Chemistry Computer Science Mathematics History MML (German) MML (Russian) Law Psychology MML (Spanish/Portuguese) History of Art Engineering MML (German) Education Medicine Economics Architecture AMES (Modern Hebrew Studies) Pharmacology Physics Law Geography Neurology Earth Sciences History International Law Management Studies Physics Mathematics Social & Political Sciences Economics

History Classics Veterinary Sciences Classics English History

Physics


FelloWs and oTher senior members 2019-2020 I Jesus College Annual Report 2020

mr j grower (Yates glazebrook Fellow in law, senior Treasurer may ball) professor j danesh dr r evans ms j bulstrode ms e osorio Whewell mr c eigen mrs m de Vincent-humphreys rev’d j crockford (dean of chapel, Welfare Tutor) dr j hirst (admissions Tutor recruitment) dr r barr dr n guyatt

Law Medicine Natural Science History and Philsophy of Science English Natural Science MML

Natural Science English History

Emeritus Fellows dr c j adkins cphys Finstp dr j a hudson dr j e roseblade professor m j Waring scd Frsc dr W c saslaw mr p r glazebrook ma professor j T Killen phd Fba professor s c heath littd (honorary Keeper of the old library) professor p d a garnsey phd Fba dr s b hladky dr d e hanke dr m r minden mr n ray ma ariba professor j b Thompson dr j r howlett (praelector, Welfare Tutor) dr g c harcourt ac littd Frsn Fassa Facss professor W j stronge dr r d bowers professor lord renfrew of Kaimsthorn ma scd hondlitt Fba (honorary Fellow) professor r Freeman scd Frs dr m c p oldham professor j soskice professor d a s compston cbe Frcp Fmedsci Frs professor m m arnot Facss The rev’d dr T d jenkins his excellency judge j r crawford ac sc Fba (honorary Fellow) professor sir bruce ponder Frcp Frs dr a j bowen ma professor j c W mitchell professor s a T redfern professor j m bacon

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FelloWs and oTher senior members 2019-2020 I Jesus College Annual Report 2020

mr s j barton ma professor lord mair cbe Frs Freng (honorary Fellow) professor h le b skaer mr r j p dennis ma

Honorary Fellows professor p W anderson ma Frs sir samuel brittan ma hondlitt The hon a r gubbay ma llm sc honlld lord renwick of clifton ma honlld hondlitt Frsa professor lord rees of ludlow Kt om Frs honFreng Fmedsci professor r F Tuck ma Fba professor dame sandra dawson dbe ma Fiph Fcgi hondsc cim sir david hare ma honlittd Frsl sir antony gormley obe ma honlittd reverend professor b W silverman ma phd scd Frs lord Watson of richmond cbe ma FrTs professor lord renfrew of Kaimsthorn ma scd hondlitt Fba (emeritus Fellow) mr m perahia Frcm professor K e Wrightson ma phd Fba Frhists professor e s maskin Fbahon mahon dhl professor T F eagleton ma Fba hondlitt The rt hon lord justice jackson pc mr j a o’donnell ma Kcsg Frco Frscm Fgcm Frcm sir david h Wootton sir colman Treacy sir richard long ra cbe his excellency judge j r crawford ac sc Fba (emeritus Fellow) professor robert evans FlsW Fba sir jonathan ive Kbe professor lord mair cbe Frs Freng (emeritus Fellow) professor sir alan Fersht The rt hon lord justice irwin pc professor roberta gilchrist dphil Fsa Fba alison Wilding ra dr belinda Wilkes


FelloWs and oTher senior members 2019-2020 I Jesus College Annual Report 2020

St Radegund Fellows mr j W hudleston mr r p Kwok ma (1972) mr p j Yates ma (1978) mrs s j Yates ma (1980) mr b n buckley ma (1962) ms j m sainsbury ma (1989) professor p j a Frankopan ma (1990) dr l rausing professor p baldwin mr g F hart (1994)

Fellow Commoners mr j cornwell ma hondlitt Frsl (editor of the annual report) professor b a K rider phd hon lld dr s s saxena dr p Taneja rev dr j leach dr j Filling

Teaching Bye-Fellows dr g l Taylor dr a-e schmidt mr j spray

Lector mlle a lebel

French

OJM CPDAs dr T Yunusov dr c markou dr j perry dr e Fowden dr r sileo ms d padley

College Post Doctoral Associates (CPDA) dr h becker-lindenthal dr F day ms T harte dr c jeppesen dr e coker dr s saxena dr s servia-rodriguez dr j Woitkowitz dr m Young

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FelloWs and oTher senior members 2019-2020 I Jesus College Annual Report 2020

dr s galasso dr l marshall dr e Quigley dr m scroggs dr r shojaei dr e stoakes

Senior Research Associates (JC SRA) dr s steele mr j s cornwell dr m al-hada dr j Zhang

Society of St Radegund charles rawlinson (1952) david bennett Firdaus ruttonshaw (1968) gurnee hart (1994) andrew sutton (1965) christopher rodrigues (1968) alasdair morrison (1968) Tomรกs carruthers (1986) richard briance (1971) david Wootton (1969) patrick Wilson (1974) peter day (1968) charles hoare nairne (1989) martin clarke (1975) adrian Frost (1976) ron davies (1953) Tony Thorne (1958) michael booth (1959) paul burnham (1967) christopher Kirker (1969) christine jennings albert goh (1990) d g marshall of cambridge Trust

david hibbitt (1962) susan hibbitt stephen heath (1964) bob rao (1972) Kay ian ng (1986) james de uphaugh (1985) edward ma (2000) Kay ashton (1982) james ashton (1982) john sheldrick (1967) sandy rattray (1988) james marshall (1986) duncan martin (1987) andrew harbor (1975) john dugdale bradley (1961) john driscoll iii (1983) james rudolph (1965) Wang minming gavin stark emily Winslow stark max hadfield (1961) William burnside (1970) leigh collins (1967)


articles


Engraving of a plague doctor by Paulus Fuerst-Schnabel von Rom, 1656


precedenTed eVenTs I Jesus College Annual Report 2020

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past pandemics mary laven

Jesus academics discuss historical perspectives on COVID-19 the nation entered lockdown, as newsreaders and journalists repeatedly told us that we were living through ‘unprecedented times’. We historians were less sure. From the antonine plague recorded by the roman physician galen to the black death, from the cholera outbreaks of the nineteenth century to ‘The great influenza’ of 1918-19, from aids and sars to ‘swine flu’, a succession of devastating epidemics has shaped human history. Finding herself increasingly frustrated by the constant litany of the ‘never before’, rebecca Flemming, Fellow in classics, historian of the roman empire and expert on ancient medicine, proposed a virtual panel at the intellectual Forum on ‘precedented events’. The idea was to explore the relationship between coVid-19 and past experiences of epidemics. To our roundtable of three Fellows (rebecca Flemming, hillary Taylor and mary laven, 1989), we were delighted to welcome back former student rachel clamp (2014),

who is now studying for a phd at durham university on ‘plague nurses’ in early modern england. not only is there nothing new about a global pandemic, but the measures to which we are now becoming accustomed (social distancing, disinfectant, quarantine, ppe) have all been in use for centuries. in the early modern period, state authorities responded quickly and decisively to the horrors of an epidemic. italian cities started establishing plague hospitals, known as lazzaretti, from the fifteenth century. These not only served to care for the sick but also functioned as isolation units. a sophisticated system of quarantining developed which was designed to stop the spread of disease by holding newly arrived people and goods in a secure space. mass graves were dug outside the city walls. schools and workplaces were closed. pre-empting the virtual church services and religious ceremonies which have taken place across the globe this year, bishops set up

The pentagonal lazzaretto at Ancona, built in the eighteenth century


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precedenTed eVenTs I Jesus College Annual Report 2020

The Plague in Saint Jacob’s Parish in Leuven, artist unknown, Brabant, 1578 - Museum M - Leuven, Belgium

portable altars at street corners and encouraged their flocks to lean out of the windows in order to hear mass. health professionals took their protective clothing seriously. plague doctors were instantly recognisable by their wide brimmed hats and sticks, used to keep the infectious at arm’s length. They wore leather gloves and boots, a body-length linen gown covered in wax, and face masks. The distinctive beak of the mask was filled with dried flowers and spices, intended as a filter to purify the air. strategies of containment and prevention were accompanied by energetic programmes of social care. in Florence, during the 1630-31 plague, the authorities delivered food, wine and firewood to quarantined households. Their daily allowance was two loaves of bread and a pint of wine; on Tuesdays, families were treated to sausages; on Fridays, in keeping with catholic fasting practices, there was no meat, just healthy salad leaves. The research of rachel clamp, which focuses especially on the north of england, has drawn attention to the vital role of women in caring for the sick. Female plague nurses, often known as ‘keepers’, were employed by parishes to count bodies, monitor infection and fumigate the houses of the dead. but they were also crucial in offering

practical and emotional support to families suffering from the plague. like key workers today, they exposed themselves to intense risk in order to bring food, water and clean laundry to needy families. There was no cure for the plague, just as there is no cure for the coronavirus. but we are mistaken if we presume that health professionals are only there to cure us. clamp’s work challenges us to reconsider the relationship between care and cure – not only in the early modern world but in the age of covid. new research of this kind alerts us to the ways in which the history of epidemics has traditionally been written from a top-down perspective, privileging elite male voices. clamp’s work reveals that female healers, once considered uneducated, unskilled and marginal figures, had a central part to play in managing past epidemics. but this is not to deny that epidemics have always functioned to exacerbate inequality. as hillary Taylor commented, plague was not ‘the great leveller’. as we have seen in recent months, rates of infection run highest in the poorest parts of the world; the high incidence of coronavirus among ethnic minorities in this country has been especially shocking. historians have carried out detailed


precedenTed eVenTs I Jesus College Annual Report 2020

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Instacart delivery bags carrying avocados and quinoa to wealthy American households

statistical work on how the seventeenthcentury plagues affected rich and poor households, and how it was experienced differently in rich and poor neighbourhoods. but there is also a rich seam of anecdotal and literary evidence that casts light on the heightened dynamics of class during an epidemic. We read of servants being left behind in the infected city without any means of survival as their master and family took flight, or of maids being sent out to do the shopping and laundry while their employers shielded themselves at home. during lockdown, Taylor found herself drawn to a series of articles in the New York Times that featured interviews with nannies and cleaners working for rich american families. as wealthy new Yorkers fled the city to take refuge in their second homes, their staff lived in fear of being laid off. other poor americans and migrants found work with instacart, picking up groceries for those who preferred to stay at home. lured by the promise of high tips, they would often find that their ‘gratuities’ had been cancelled as soon as they left the shopping at the door step. The evidence that we were able to bring to our panel discussion is a powerful reminder of the relevance of history to current times. but the process of elucidation is never one-way, and rebecca Flemming ended the

discussion with some comments on the dialogue that exists between past and present. There is no doubt, she pointed out, that the history of pandemics will be forever altered by our experience of coVid-19. We are more aware than ever that illness is not just a medical phenomenon, to be charted in terms of new viruses or scientific breakthroughs. nor can an epidemic be adequately recorded with statistical data or analysed with the instruments of modelling. mass sickness is something which we experience at a communal and a cosmic level. The emotional and affective dimensions are profound and long-lasting. The spaces with which we are familiar are reconfigured; even more disorientating, time is compressed and expanded in ways that are difficult to grasp or understand. but from out of these discombobulating experiences, communities and individuals show resilience and kindness alongside prejudice and self-interest. historians looking back on earlier precedents will want to incorporate all these elements in their research. if we have a lesson for the future it is to resist the call for a ‘return to normal’. What is normal is not necessarily good. let us pick up the pieces from coVid-19 in order to build a fairer and more sustainable future.

https://www.jesus.cam.ac.uk/articles/precedented-events-historical-perspectives-covid-19


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hisTorY oF medicine I Jesus College Annual Report 2020

Thomas Willis and Thomas sydenham on plague in early modern england alastair compston

Emeritus Professor of Neurology and Fellow of Jesus finds echoes today in selected readings from 17th century books on medicine is fragile and there is no shortage of health illnesses poised to take its place. but when

the same disorder moves rapidly through the population, something strange is happening. The people then ask: ‘why is this; and what is to be done?’ in these situations, physicians are rarely short of plausible explanations and solutions to the problem. confined to home, as lady day came and went and the dog days of summer approached, readings from the seventeenth century that came to hand from domestic bookshelves seemed to draw parallels with the evolving experience of coVid-19. in early modern england, physicians and scientists started to challenge the slavish reiteration of what the ancients had taught. scholasticism was giving way to epistemology based on inductive baconian reasoning and deductive cartesian logic. The evidence of what the senses could register, and ideas derived from the imagination that were verifiable by experiment, were replacing traditional dogma. in this climate, two physicians in particular wrote on fevers and infectious disease: Thomas Willis (1621-1675) and Thomas sydenham (1624-1689). They were rivals for being regarded as the most influential physician in london during and after the epidemics of the 1660s. The concept of contagion was understood since people living in close proximity clearly shared an increased risk. beyond that, nothing was known. contagion might be of the person, of the aether, or of the devil. anthonie van leeuwenhoek (1632-1723) and robert hooke (1635-1703) had peered down microscopes and, independently, seen ‘small animals’ or ‘animalcules’ beyond the resolution of the human eye. but it was a long time before the link was made between epidemics and microorganisms, more than one hundred years

before the introduction of vaccination by edward jenner (1749-1823), and two centuries away from a clear statement on the principles that robert Koch (1843-1910) required for concluding that a disease is microbial and infectious. news travelled slowly and the distinction between an epidemic and a pandemic might only be appreciated in retrospect. sydenham concluded that the cause of epidemic disease lay in factors extrinsic to the body. This is a point ‘which i believe no man has hitherto sufficiently observed … those labour in vain who deduce the reasons of divers fevers from a morbific cause reserved in the body: For it is evident that if any person who is very well, travels to some parts of the Kingdom, he will be seized with the Fever that rages there’. epidemics are seasonal and recur. They are not due to the weather but proceed from ‘a secret and inexplicable alteration in the bowels of the earth whereby the air is contaminated with such effluvia as dispose bodies to this or that disease’. so much for the seed. as for the soil, sydenham explains that, weakened by co-existing disease, epidemics pick on those already unhealthy: ‘whatsoever disease prevails … will have dominion over the rest … to whose genius the epidemicks … accommodate themselves … the fever wander[ing] here and there [does] plainly partake of that inflammation’. any complacency that the physician has settled the matter invariably proves misplaced. once sydenham had ‘met with a method of cure … till this species was extinct’, another is likely to erupt. With each new wave ‘one or two i had first in hand would be in great danger, till i had found out the Genius of the disease, and then i could again proceed readily to the curing of it’.


hisTorY oF medicine I Jesus College Annual Report 2020

There were three categories of epidemic to consider. not of immediate concern, indeed a matter of some amusement, were the reports of strange happenings in places where all sorts of devilry were prevalent. in 1374, at aix-lachapelle, men and women arriving from germany formed circles in the street and danced for hours on end, blind and deaf to others, haunted by visions, shrieking out the names of spirits, and often seeing into the heavens where the saviour sat enthroned alongside the Virgin mary. Those afflicted with the dancing mania fell to the ground, groaning and convulsing, until restrained by cloth bands. The condition, designated st john’s dance and st Vitus dance, spread to the netherlands, belgium and germany. even though Thomas sydenham dignified the st Vitus variant of the dancing mania as acute chorea [now known to be a complication of streptococcal throat infection], he was otherwise not persuaded by the organic nature of uncontrolled dancing in groups. brief epidemics of the dancing mania also characterised the bite of the Tarantula. There followed ‘a numbness, and Trembling, also convulsions, and loosning of the members … with a great loss of strength’. but, as Thomas Willis relates, most remarkable was that those stung ‘as soon as they hear musical instruments, presently they are eased of their pains, and leaping into the middle of the room, they begin to dance and jump about’ until the fiddlers cease their play, at which point those ‘Tarantulasized’ fell to the ground and resumed their former contortions. musicians were hired to play and keep the victims quiet but those affected were ‘not excited indifferently with any musick, but with certain kinds of Tune, and that they dance to some measures, before others’. Witchcraft or the devil are suspected when the contortions or gesticulations are such that ‘no sound man, nor mimick, or any tumbler can imitate’; and when the strength of the contractions exceeds ‘all humane force’, or strange matter is passed by vomiting ‘or a live eel … voided by stool’. With a wink to his readers, Willis concludes that no sooner was a child or well-connected adult affected by convulsions than ‘the next old woman is accused of witchcraft, she is made guilty, and very hardly, or not at all, the wretch escapes the

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flames, or an halter’, whether or not the convulsions were cured through the efforts of physicians. it was not difficult to dismiss these rumours from abroad. closer to home were hazards that the wary might hope to avoid by not living in squalor or going to war. Willis’ description of the pestilential fever (‘febres pestilenentes ac malignæ in specie’) or camp fever describes typhus among the oxford troops during the civil War. War typhus was well known in continental europe, but england had previously been spared. Willis relates that in the spring of 1643, the earl of essex, with 15,000 foot soldiers and 3000 horses, besieged reading then held by the King. eleven days after entering the town, essex found it infected and many of his men became unwell. essex decamped to Thame but, as the epidemic increased, essex thought better of moving on oxford and suggested to parliament that peace be sought with the royalists. Willis observed matters from their perspective. in the event, both armies were affected and the disease proved more deadly than their military foes so that both sides fought ‘not with the enemy, but with the disease’. essex retreated to the banks of the Thames where the majority of his men perished. The King moved to oxford and, living in the fields or town and villages, his army fared no better: ‘For his Foot [soldiers] being pack’d together in close houses, when they had filled all things with filthiness, and unwholsom nastiness, and stinking odors (that the very air seemed to be infected) they fell sick by Troops and as it were by squadrons’. civilians were not spared: ‘the entertainers of the soldiers’ started to perish and around the summer solstice the fever began ‘to lay hold on the husbandmen, and others inhabiting the country’. For at least ten miles around the city, in each house it entered ‘those who were sick of this Feaver, were avoided by those who were well, almost as much, as if they had been sick of the plague’. The fabric of country life suffered. Writing after the event, Willis reflected: ‘i remember in some Villages, that almost all the old men died this year, that there were [not] any left who were able to defend the manners and privileges of the parish, by the more anciently received Traditions’.


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The early manifestations were fever and, as the ‘adust matter’ moved to the brain, ‘the sick kept to their beds with raging … stupefaction, with great Weakness, and sometimes with convulsive motions’. by the summer, people were erupting in ‘Whelks and spots … little blisters or measles, now small and red, now broad and livid: in many, buboes (as in the plague) about the glandulas’. Those who survived suffered ‘most horrid distractions of the animal spirits … benummedness of the senses, Tremblings, Vertigo, debility of members, convulsive motions … and divers other distempers of the head’. a courtier staying in oxford did well for himself by selling a powder the colour of ashes ‘at a great price’ which produced a mighty sweat when half a dram was taken with liquor. it turned out to be made of powdered toads, purged with salt, washed in good wine and calcined in an earthy pot. coincidentally, the epidemic waned during the autumn of 1643 and was gone by the winter. For Willis, the cause had been a combination of ‘the souldiers camps … imputed … to their nastiness and stinking smells, but in some sort to a common Vice of the air’ encouraged by climatic conditions, the spring of that year being moist and ‘slabbery, almost with continual shours’ followed by a hot summer. sir edward greaves

(1608-1680) argued that oxford may have afforded some ‘divine immunity from the spread of infection’. he agreed with Willis that filth, dung, and carcasses of horses and carrion encouraged the condition by rendering the air pestilential. greaves was of the view that cleaning the streets would have done much to abate the epidemic. The brewers might also have helped by drying their malt, boiling their beer for longer, and adding more hops. lest anyone doubt that the condition was contagious, greaves recommended that they chance their luck and enter an infected household. but much more threatening than the dancing mania and camp fever were diseases which, like a thief in the night, might sneak upon even the most vigilant as they went about their business, and rapidly overwhelm the population. now the lottery of health or distemper was upon all citizens, independent of wealth or status. everyone was at the mercy of an unknown force responsible for rude and potentially catastrophic interruption of innocent and worthy lives. in this context, one disease hovered over the people: the plague. The life-cycle of infection by Yersinia pestis involves three species: the rat harbours the infection; the rat-flea ingests infected blood; and the human recipient is bitten by that

The title page of Willis’ treatise on fevers, the second edition but the first to include the allegorical engraved frontispiece with the quotation from Lucretius, ‘Ita res accendunt lumina rebus’ [In this way facts throw light on facts]. A short accompanying verse explains that nature kindles celestial fires, from which the sisters distribute the light they receive to benefit themselves and others.


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flea. at first, person-to-person infection does not occur and nursing of cases can proceed without special precautions. however, pneumonic plague follows the bubonic form and this does spread between humans, resulting in high mortality. outbreaks of the plague had occurred in the british isles over the three centuries before Willis and sydenham started work as physicians. restrictions on foreign travel and importation during the civil War and early years of the restoration may have limited recent outbreaks. Willis explains that plague is a pestilential fever resulting from air-born infection, propagated by contagion, its severity and rate of dissemination varying between epidemics. apart from the symptoms of fever, plague is characterized by boils, buboes, carbuncles, whelks, inflammations and malignant pustules. The flesh falls away, the swellings suppurate and the skin is covered in ‘black, blue and purple spots’. Willis gives a brief account of the outbreak in oxford during 1645. it was not severe and the worthy dr henry sayer (nk): ‘a very learned physician, and happy in his practice, many others refusing this province, boldly visited all the sick, poor, as well as rich, daily administered to them physick, and handled with his own hands their buboes and virulent ulcers, and so cured very many sick, by his sedulous though dangerous labour’. Wisely, dr sayer protected himself from the sick by taking a large draught of sack before perambulating ‘about the borders of death and the very jaws of the grave’. he refreshed himself with another slug once the work was done. as to treatment, sayer used a vomit [emetic] of crocus metallorum followed by the induction of sweating. but his luck did not hold. summoned to Wallingford castle where the disease was raging: ‘being so bold, as to lie in the same bed with a certain captain (his intimate companion), who was taken with the plague, [sayer] quickly received the contagion of the same disease’. his previous skills were now of no avail and ‘with great sorrow of the inhabitants, nor without great loss to the medical science, he died of that disease’. in his splendid account of the plague in britain, john shrewsbury (1898-1971) pauses before launching into the dreadful outbreak of 1665

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to give an account of poor dr sayer and challenge the diagnosis: the doctor was ‘naturally antipathetic to fleas’ and so remained immune to the plague but probably died of ‘the old irish “bed-sickness”, in other words typhus fever’ brought about by sleeping with the friend in whom he had induced vomiting and sweating, thus spraying the bedroom with infected droplets. as dr sayer had discovered, Willis confesses that outcome from the plague ‘is chiefly committed to nature’, and ‘physick is the midwife’. prevention is a matter for the ‘republick, and belong to the magistrate’ in cleaning the streets of ‘Filths, dunghills, and all stinking things’, providing wholesome food at public expense, burning all infected material, isolating the sick from the sound, and rapidly removing dead ‘carcasses and householdstuff ’. apart from these civic measures, the individual can help by attention to ‘labour, meat, drink, sleep … [and] …Venus should be taken moderately’. The ‘passions of the mind’ should be contained by eschewing fear and sadness. amulets containing ‘arsenic, Quicksilver and the powder of Toads and other poisons’ are to be worn about the neck. matters changed with the london plague of 1665. The onset was stuttering with the first cases developing during the winter of 1664 in st giles-in-the-Fields. The illness erupted in may 1665 and raged until october. mortality was around 85%. almost one third of the population died over seven months, 32,332 of 38,195 deaths in the city during the month from mid-august being attributable to plague. once the availability of consecrated ground was exhausted, bodies were buried in large communal pits dug outside the city boundaries. in the parish where Willis subsequently lived, there were 2883 plague burials, or 60% of all deaths in 1665, equating to 17% of the resident population. numbers were deliberately underreported or made clandestine in order to avoid the deprivations of isolation and almost certain death for those confined to living with the sick. The authorities set up ‘pest-houses’ to which infected individuals were moved in order to protect the population. infected premises were quarantined for forty days after which the house was marked with a white cross for a further twenty days whilst fumigation and


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The title page of Sydenham’s treatise on fevers, based on clinical notes made after the Great Plague of London, strictly a third edition of the Methodus curandi febres (1666) but substantially amended and enlarged thereby constituting an entirely new work, with the portrait by Abraham Blooteling after Mary Beale.

airing took place. Those who could left the city for their personal safety and because trading was suspended. They returned to resume commerce in october after which a second peak of deaths occurred in november. Through death and desertion, the streets were largely empty. amongst the measures that were thought to protect from the plague were smoking tobacco, and sniffing disinfectants and other pungent odours. Fires were lit in the streets to cleanse the air. cases occurred within and outside london throughout 1666. The plague spread along the Thames valley by riverine portage and approached oxford in the summer. but the city was spared by the autumn frosts despite the earl of clarendon (1609-1674) warning: ‘Wee have reason to complayne of the ill government of the citty of london which for want of shuttinge up infected houses, hath skattered the contagion over the kingdom … god knows how longer we shall continue free, many villages aboute us being infected’. eventually the epidemic settled not, as has been suggested, from the incineration of rats during the great Fire of 1666 but through spontaneous loss of virulence of Yersina pestis and restriction on travel from continental europe and the levant. although, in 1659 when his treatise on fevers was first published, Willis already had

views on medicines designed to evacuate the poisons through one orifice or another – vomits, cathartics, purgatives, diuretics or sudorifics – and reduce fever in cases of the plague, his pharmacopoeia was refined in the treatise written in 1666 but published posthumously. A plain and easie method (1691) adds little to Willis’ experience of the plague. he offers a number of prescriptions containing metals and a meadow-full of botanic and animal ingredients. Two which Willis says his patients much appreciated were ‘aqua limacum’ and ‘aqua lumbricorum’, the slimy liquors of slugs and worms. it appears, however, that Willis had little faith in his prescriptions for the plague. in 1659, he had invoked ‘the help of the omnipotent god being requested through prayers’; and in 1666, his advice is that ‘wine and confidence are a good preservation against the plague’. Thomas sydenham was more proactive. he rehearsed several important principles of epidemics in his writings on the plague. The outbreaks are intermittent but may recur. Whatever the exact nature of the evil disposition that promotes ‘this morbifick furniture … the clemency and goodness of almighty god is to be reverenced; because the pestilential constitutions of the air producing the plague … rarely rages violently in england oftner than once in the space of thirty or forty


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years’. The disease spreads through contact with an infected person or artefacts they have handled, but only if the immediate environment remains contaminated: ‘this disposition of the air is conveyed by Fomes [bedding or clothing] or by the coming of some plaguy person from an infected place to another [but] is not epidemic unless also the disposition of the air incline to it’. it might therefore be expected that: ‘once the pestilential seeds are transmitted from one to another in a series, it could not be but that once entered into any great city, it should increase the Funerals more and more till none will at last remain to whom it might impart its venom’. This does not always happen. The london plague ‘increased the number of the dead to some thousands in a single week in august but was almost gone by the end of november’. one reason why epidemics are self-limiting is that some individuals are more, and others less, prone to the disease: ‘a dreadful Fire will presently be kindled … if a body [is] furnished with humours disposed to receive the infection’. sydenham is sensitive to the criticism that he may come across as ‘rash and arrogant’ in writing of a cure for the london plague when he was careful to distance himself from the city during the epidemic. he treads a very thin line in arguing his case. The fault lies in overheating, ‘inflammation’, of the blood. The initial shivering and fever then proceed in one of two ways: the development of purple spots heralding certain death, or sequestration of the ‘adust’ material and the happy eruption of buboes, imposthumes and abscesses which discharge the evil and effect a natural cure. sydenham has two important points to make. medicines that interfere with this ‘solution of the disease, appointed by nature … disturb the oeconomy of the whole body, and turn all things topsie-turvie’. stimulating discharge of morbific matter concentrated in buboes and other swellings by increased sweating may drive the pestilent material back into the blood, only for it to reappear as the ominous purple spots. Those fortunate enough to improve by discharge of the abscesses can go about ‘their business and without any

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sensible hurt … except those unfortunately falling into the hands of an ignorant physician and composing themselves to sweat by his advice … demonstrating the injury of this unlucky counsel by their own death’. sydenham argues that, by injudicious use of forced sweating, ‘the number of those whom the plague destroyed was not a little encreased’. but nature is not always kind to those with the plague. sydenham’s other proposal is therefore to apply medical art early rather than seek to rescue desperate cases. Willis had already explained that the role of the doctor is to act swiftly in ‘prevention of this malignant disease’ for if ‘medicines are not stay’d for some hours, no nor minutes … remedies gathered from art’ may effect a cure. notwithstanding his earlier admonitions, sydenham’s strategy is to remove the morbific material before it has accumulated to excess by bleeding, followed rapidly by sweating. he appeals to physicians who were closely involved in treating cases in london whether any would disagree with him that these measures, taken before the swellings appeared, resulted in any deaths from the plague. he tells of a case, during the civil War, when a surgeon filled porringers with vast quantities of blood from soldiers in a particular garrison ‘at first coming of the disease’, not one of whom died. sydenham’s regimen for civilians showing early manifestations of the plague is to bleed much and often and then use the strongest sweating medicines, with the patient wrapped in flannel and given hot drinks. but at the first sign of a swelling or bubo, he backs off: ‘i have not yet dared to bleed, tho’ in a body unapt to sweat, lest … the morbific matter flowing back to the empty Veins’. For all his experience and impeccable logic, sydenham advocated practical measures as making best sense: ‘When one Town is grievously afflicted with the plague, another not far distant, by warily prohibiting any commerce with the infected place, should keep clear of it’. and when ‘i was endangered by the near approach of the plague to my own house, at length, by persuasion of Friends, i accompanied the vast number of those that left the city, and removed my Family some miles from thence’.


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The title page of Willis’ posthumous work setting out his remedies for the plague, a topic on which he had already written in De febribus (see Figure 1), with the portrait engraved by Robert White based on the original by his mentor David Loggan first printed in 1667.

a threat from afar that looms closer; something evil in the air with fear of other people’s breath and things they might have touched; those with co-morbidity and the elderly more vulnerable than the rest; medical services overwhelmed, and special measures needed for disposal of the dead; keeping one’s distance by moving away from the crowds; quarantining and avoiding houses with the sick; the poor at particular risk and those in better circumstances impoverished by the turn of events; commerce shutdown to the detriment of traders; empty streets and restriction on travel; civic measures, subsidies and support of the flagging economy; rumour-mongering and manipulation of statistics to prevent civil unrest; criticism of government policy; improbable claims for medicines that cure the disorder; the mental strain of listening to extravagant rumours and dependence on responsible communication; waiting for time to stifle the epidemic and fearing that another wave will follow; acts of selfless heroism and less altruistic behaviours. it happened once before. it is happening again.

readings: 1. charles creighton, A history of epidemics in Britain, two volumes, cambridge (1891-1894) 2. justus hecker, ‘The dancing mania’. in: The epidemics of the middle ages, london (1844) 3. Friedrich prinzing, Epidemics resulting from wars, oxford (1916) 4. jFc [john] shrewsbury, A history of bubonic plague in the British Isles, cambridge (1970) 5. Thoma[s] sydenham, Observationes medicæ circa morborum et curationem, london (1676) 6. Thomas sydenham, The whole works, london (1701) 7. Thomas Willis, Pharmaceutice rationalis, parts 1 and 2, london (1679) 8. Thomas Willis, The remaining medical works, london (1681) 9. Thomas Willis, A plain and easie method for preserving those that are well from the plague, london (1691)

parts of this article are taken from ‘All manner of ingenuity and industry’: a bio-bibliography of Dr Thomas Willis. 1621-1675, to be published by oxford university press in 2021, the quatercentenary of Willis’ birth.


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rethinking the post-covid body clare chambers

Professor of Political Philosophy and Jesus Fellow Clare Chambers on prospects for “a better tomorrow” he pandemic focuses our minds on our Tbodies. it makes us profoundly aware that

we rely on our bodies working well: on our heart’s beat, on our blood’s flow, on our lungs’ breath. it forces us to acknowledge the fragility of function. in normal times many of us focus more on how our bodies look than how they work. cosmetic surgery has become a mainstream practice, with new cosmetic procedures constantly being developed. psychologists diagnose an epidemic of appearance-related anxiety. a recent survey found that the top three pressures faced online by british girls aged 11-16 were “to look pretty all the time”, “to get more likes”, and “to have a pictureperfect life”.1 Will coVid-19 disrupt these worries about how we look? might it push us into valuing how our bodies feel from the inside? could it let us care more about our health than our beauty? one theme of lockdown has been what to wear. a japanese company made the news for its “work from home pyjamas”: comfy loungewear beneath, a formal shirt from the mid-chest up – the only part visible when videoconferencing. many of us are selecting our comfiest clothes, freed from the tyranny of the work uniform or the office dress code. during lockdown we find out where in our wardrobe our real friends are. do you find that the clothes you are wearing to stay at home are very different from the clothes you used to wear? has your perspective shifted from outward appearance to inner comfort? do you normally dress to please others, whereas now you need only please yourself ? does this feel liberating?

or are you dressing much the same as usual? is that because you always dress for comfort, wearing the clothes that feel good to you? or is it because your external appearance is still fundamental to your sense of self ? does looking good make you feel better? contemporary culture encourages us to objectify each other, and also to objectify ourselves. When we objectify ourselves we focus on how we look to others, and how we compare to others. We think primarily about how we appear rather than how we feel. This self-objectification reaches its pinnacle with the selfie: the photograph we take of ourselves and then post online for others’ approval. The selfie enables us to objectify ourselves in the most direct sense, because we can take our image and manipulate it digitally. over 70% of girls filter the images they post online. We create the image we think others want to see. lockdown offers us the chance to escape constant surveillance. it offers a period of

https://www.girlguiding.org.uk/globalassets/docs-and-resources/research-and-campaigns/girlsattitudes-survey-2019.pdf p. 17.

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© BBC

invisibility, a space where we are not always on display. it offers an excuse for letting the grey show, letting the hair grow, letting the diet go. it lets us experiment, to find out which things we to do our bodies make us feel good and which don’t. Were our beauty practices really for ourselves, or were they for others after all? We long for life to get back to normal; to have the luxury of worrying more about our looks than our lives. but how will the virus affect our attitudes to our bodies? When our

social interactions are almost entirely online the pull of the image may become even stronger. We can continue to curate and enhance our virtual image, editing and refining it before we present it to the world. but perhaps the pandemic will situate us firmly in our bodies as biological and material things, emphasising their health and function as their fundamental value. perhaps the virus could pull us back from the appearanceobsessed visual culture that has caused so much harm to our mental health.

clare wrote and recorded this piece for the bbc Rethink series, which asked “how the world should change after the coronavirus pandemic”. other contributors included lady hale, Tim berners-lee, emma dabiri, jarvis cocker, the dalai lama, and the pope. clare’s essay was featured on the bbc World service, bbc radio 4’s Woman’s Hour, and bbc 5 live.


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loneliness: a “modern plague” rebecca anne barr

Jesus Fellow and University Lecturer in Gender and Sexualities reflects on Mary Shelley’s exploration of isolation has been called a ‘modern plague’. loneliness coVid-19 spreads that plague in differing ways: changing our relation to each other in public spaces and private homes, transforming our civic behaviours and our intimate feelings.1 our willingness to stay distant has become the ultimate testament to our love for one another. The extraordinary pressures of pandemic estrange us from our feelings, threatening to dissolve both society and community. pandemic threatens the ultimate trauma of separation and loss. in 1824 mary shelley published a novel, The Last Man, that conjures up just such a trauma. in this futurist fiction a plague sweeps across continents, annihilating civilizations and causing global unrest. a novel that begins as the collective biography of a circle of friends, loosely based on shelley’s own, gradually gives way to a tale about the inexorable power of disease, until only one individual remains – the solitary narrator, lionel Verney. if, as jill lepore has recently written, ‘the plague novel is the place where all human beings abandon all other human beings’, then The Last Man is unconventional.2 inspired by the enlightened ideals of a man called adrian (modelled on shelley’s husband, percy bysshe), Verney and his friends understand the international consequences of the plague, and the need for political action. They oppose self-serving populist policies promoted by england’s resident demagogue, a man known only as ryland. shelley’s characters refuse to abandon each other, intervening to assist others, and sacrificing themselves for the greater good. Together they pursue a final desperate ‘scheme of migration’ 1

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Mary Shelley, by Richard Rothwell. Oil on canvas, exhibited 1840. NPG 1235. © National Portrait Gallery, London. CC BY-NC-ND 3.0.

to italy in the hope of salvaging the remnant of humanity. but shelley is unsparing in her depiction of the limits of individual agency and the fallacy of personal exceptionalism. “each person ‘trusted that their beloved family would be the one preserved’, but the plague demolishes ‘that pertinacious optimism which … characterized our human nature’.” The Last Man transforms the felicity of youth and intelligence and love through a narrative which compels the reader to confront the fact that horrible things are not reserved for the poor, the immoral, or the stupid, or those who happen to be in other countries.

Keith snell, Spirits of Community: English Senses of Belonging and Loss, 1750-2000 (bloomsbury, 2016), p. 1. jill lepore, ‘What our contagion fables are really about’, The New Yorker, march 30, 2020.


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Percy Bysshe Shelley, by Alfred Clint, after Amelia Curran, and Edward Ellerker Williams. Oil on canvas, c. 1829. NPG 1271. © National Portrait Gallery, London. CC BY-NC-ND 3.0.

but while The Last Man uses the plague as a catalyst for its deconstruction of society, culture, and friendship, it is not ultimately a tale of deadly infection. it is a story about an apocalypse of loneliness. shelley had explored loneliness before. Frankenstein’s creature is, after all, romanticism’s avatar of ultimate alienation. The creature’s wretched fate demonstrates the monstrous deprivations of basic sociality: not to share in family is to be tormented by exclusion. but in The Last Man, the experience of familial affection only serves to amplify the pains of solitude. as it progresses, the novel accumulates scenes of death: infants, parents, wives, husbands, brothers, sisters. its bills of mortality are unremitting; shelley presents the reader with the impossible calculus of loss. The novel’s account of global pandemic draws on her reading of daniel defoe’s The Journal of the Plague Year (1722), a work which tries to capture the impact of contagious disease by shifting between bare enumeration, anecdote, and the isolated perspective of its first-person narrator – the quasi-anonymous h.F. Yet if Journal of the Plague Year provides shelley with an historical account of the paranoia, confusion, and horror of contagious disease, it also furnishes her with a sense of 3

individual alienation peculiar to defoe. in The Last Man’s crowning catastrophe, Verney’s two remaining friends are drowned in a storm. he finds himself alive on the shore of italy: “For an instant i compared myself to that monarch of the waste – robinson crusoe. We had both been thrown companionless – he on the shore of a desolate island: i on that of a desolate world.” The schemes of material accumulation and improvement that crusoe finds diverting cannot comfort shelley’s relic. While defoe’s desert island is reassuringly temporary, shelley’s castaway’s predicament is permanent. ‘shall i wake, and speak to none, pass the interminable hours, my soul, islanded in the world, a solitary point, surrounded by vacuum?’, Verney asks.” such vertiginous sense of isolation, both temporal and existential, fuels the terror of the final pages of The Last Man. humanity has receded ‘like a tide … leaving [the individual] blank and bare in the midst.’ plague is merely shelley’s pretext for presenting the malaise of ‘utter irremediable loneliness’: a condition of pathological intensity. The Last Man thus deconstructs the optimistic possibilities of transcendence found elsewhere in romantic writing. in her novel Mathilda, shelley was able to imagine a ‘perfect solitude’ where generous stores of selfsubsistence meant you ‘wish for no friend’ because your own thoughts were company enough. Verney, wandering disconsolately from one empty town to another, leaves in each a desperate message: ‘Friend, come! i wait for thee!’ The irony of this long novel is that it is written without hope of a readership, yet desperately seeks an audience. This tragic predicament – on the cusp between the need to communicate and consciousness of its futility – is beckett without the jokes. Who is Verney in this empty world? The stark conditions of a friendless futurity dramatically reframe the philosopher david hume’s lament: ‘Where am i, or what? From what causes do i derive my existence, and to what condition shall i return?’3.”

david hume, A Treatise of Human Nature (1739-40), london, 1987, p. 316.


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in The Last Man, loneliness is a kind of primal anguish: the reactivation of worldannihilating pain which critics have frequently connected to the traumatic death of shelley’s mother, mary Wollstonecraft, days after her birth. as mary jacobus has argued, shelley’s writing is ‘suffused with maternal mourning as well as survivor guilt’.4 Verney’s grief – denatured and dispossessed – is that of the childless mother. The Last Man is an astonishing work, but it does not spare its readers. its vision of the hapless survivor living a kind of posthumous existence resonates with contemporary feelings of climate grief as well as the sense of helplessness as we confront coVid-19. can such a book assist in this present moment? peter melville has argued that Verney’s despair becomes ‘a kind of antibody that allows him to live with and confront the devastation and loneliness of his tragic fate’. by the close of the novel, Verney’s persistence makes him a monument to human endurance: ‘a figure whose psychical fortitude sustains and produces an enduring synthesis between contrary mental states – between hope and despair – which in turn embodies … the spectral image of good health’.5 Framing shelley’s novel within the current coVid-19 crisis, eileen hunt botting notes that ‘Verney realizes that even if he is the last man on earth, he must live as though he is not. he must sustain humanity by acting upon his profound sense of the interconnectedness of

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Sadak in Search of the Waters of Oblivion, by John Martin. Oil on canvas, 1812.

his fate with other forms of life – human or not’.6 if the literature of loneliness inoculates against the risks of enforced, unwilled isolation, it does so by reminding us of what we stand to lose if we forget each other. rebecca barr (@r_a_barr) is a lecturer in the Faculty of english at the university of cambridge.

mary jacobus, First Things: Reading the Maternal Imaginary (routledge, 1995), p. 107. peter melville, ‘The problem of immunity in The Last Man’, sel: 1500-1800, 2007, 47:4. eileen hunt botting, ‘mary shelley created ‘Frankenstein’, and Then a pandemic’, The New York Times, march 13, 2020.

previously printed on solitudes past and present https://solitudes.qmul.ac.uk/blog/pandemic-andthe-horrors-of-absolute-solitude/


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career menToring I Jesus College Annual Report 2020

“decade on”: a project for job-seekers nathan brooker

Jesusan Nathan Brooker (2008) describes how alumni “ten years on” can help recent graduates

patel knew she wanted a job in mehnaz finance, she just had no idea how to go about getting one. “looking back, i really didn’t know anything”, she says. “and i didn’t feel like there was anyone i could ask.” mehnaz is in her second year studying maths at Queen mary, university of london. about 18 months ago, she went to a talk they had organised on mentoring. When she got home, she started searching on the internet. “They said social media was a really useful place to find things like this, so i typed #mentor into instagram and started scrolling”, she says. “and then your post came up.” mehnaz had found a post from decade on, a new mentoring charity that i set up with my friend rosie smith (girton, 2008). our aim is to connect young adults from less-privileged backgrounds with people who are about 10 years into their chosen career, whether that be finance, government, journalism, or many other professions that can be difficult to break into if you are not part of the right networks. mehnaz matched with rosie, who works in deal advisory for Kpmg. “When i first contacted rosie, i emailed her about 20 questions – i had a lot of things to ask her.”

in some respects, mehnaz is typical of the students who sign up for decade on. neither of her parents stayed in education beyond high school – her father grew up in india, and now owns a clothing business, which her older brother and sister help run. Together with her siblings, mehnaz is part of the first generation of her family to go to university. but landing a prestigious job in finance still felt somehow out of reach. “i actually have a cousin who works for a consultancy firm”, she says. “i could have asked her for advice. but she went to a private school and then an elite university, and i didn’t. our lives are just different, i guess.” The fact that mehnaz went to an ordinary state school should not limit her search for a career. but it does. and in many professions, it is getting worse – and that is before we take into account the damage the coronavirus pandemic will do to social mobility in this country. in 2019, research from the sutton Trust found that people who go to independent schools are significantly over-represented in the top professions. in the uK, about 7 per cent of the population attend private school, and yet they account for 65 per cent of senior judges, 59 per cent of permanent secretaries, and 44 per cent of newspaper columnists. last year, 57 per cent of the people who sat in the house of lords went to private school, an increase of 8 percentage points on 2014. “We find ourselves an increasingly divided society”, said sir peter lampl, founder of the sutton Trust, when the report came out. “social mobility, the potential for those to achieve success regardless of their background, remains worryingly low.” The report recommends that high quality careers advice needs to be available to young people from all backgrounds: “all school pupils should receive a guaranteed level of careers


career menToring I Jesus College Annual Report 2020

advice from professional impartial advisers.” and this, to put it bluntly, is why we set up decade on: because the careers advice that we received at school and beyond was completely useless. * * * at my comprehensive in south east essex, my teachers devoted about three afternoons to careers advice. mostly, this involved spending an hour in the computer library on Kudos, a new program that the school had invested in. You had to input your predicted grades and your strengths and weaknesses and, using some very clever algorithm, it would reveal to you your perfect career. so i typed in all my information, and waited for the results. at school, i loved english and science, and had strong grades in maths, history, drama and French. maybe it would tell me i should be a barrister, i thought, or a scientist of some kind – what if it told me i should be an astronaut? That would really be one in the eye for mr mason, who took me for physics and thought i never applied myself in class. suddenly, it had an answer. What i should do as a career, it told me, was be a stagehand. a stagehand. someone who works in the back of a theatre, moving the scenery, testing the sound and lighting and handing the props to the actors. i’ll be honest with you, it wasn’t what i had in mind. rosie, who went to a school a few miles down the road from me, took the same test. it told her she should be a sign writer. needless to say – and i assume this will come as a disappointment to the developers

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who worked on Kudos – rosie did not become a sign writer, and i never worked as a stagehand. instead, i became a journalist. i am now an editor at the Financial Times. in my current role, i cover both uK and overseas property markets for the FT Weekend, and i write a regular column. Today, i could not be any happier with the way my career is developing. but that was not always the case. From the stagehand incident onwards, i took many missteps and wrong turns along the way because, like mehnaz, and a lot of the people who sign up to decade on, i did not have anyone i could have turned to for guidance – until i came to cambridge. perhaps my biggest misstep came after i left my first university in 2007. i had decided i wanted to become a journalist as a student there, and then had the good fortune to graduate at the beginning of the credit crunch. With no jobs going for journalists – and no idea about how i would go about getting one anyway – i started applying for anything i could find. after months of searching, something finally came up. i saw the ad online, applied for it, landed the interview, and got the job. i would be working for a website in Folkestone, Kent, writing about car parks. The company sold all sorts of extra services to people who were going on holiday, and one of the main ones was selling car parking spots that were cheaper than the expensive long-stay car parks at uK airports. so i wrote about that for about six months, until one day i thought: i am not sure my life is quite working out the way i had planned. so i applied to study a master’s degree at cambridge, and arrived at jesus college in the autumn of 2008.


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career menToring I Jesus College Annual Report 2020

When i graduated the second time, it was a different story altogether. The university careers service lined me up with an internship at heyday Films, which turned into a job at the bbc; i was a member of the jesus college media society, set up by john cornwell, which helped me apply for internships at national newspapers, and being part of a network of people from the Varsity newspaper meant that i had peers starting out at the Guardian, the Evening Standard and the Daily Mail who i could turn to for advice and guidance. so, i moved to london and started interning and freelancing at various newspapers – and have never looked back. until one evening in 2017, in a pub in highbury, when i started reflecting on this with rosie. * * * rosie had noticed that so many of the people she knew in finance – and the same could be said for the people i had met in journalism – had much more privileged upbringings than we had. and that either from their private schooling, or through family networks, they were able to connect with professional people who could give them advice and set them on the right path. many seemed to have breezed into their current jobs; rosie and i felt like we had to wade through treacle to get there. and we are white and working class – for the thousands of people who had much harder upbringings than ours, or are from minority backgrounds or groups that face discrimination, it must feel like you have to run

a marathon just to get to the starting line with everyone else. so we set out to make elite networks available to as many people as we could – and for free. To do that, we created our own mentoring service. What we wanted to do was connect people who were just coming out of university with mentors who were about 10 years into their chosen career. We wanted mentors who had enough experience to give their mentees a good overview of their profession, but not so much that the routes into that industry had changed since they started themselves. so that is where the name came from: decade on. We put together a website (now mercifully redesigned by one of our trustees – www.decadeon.com) and started roping in mentors. i asked some journalists that i knew, and rosie brought in some people from top accounting firms, and we started from there. soon we had a network of about 50 mentors spanning sectors such as finance, media, law, tech and government. in 2018, we registered with the charity commission and started accepting mentees to join the programme. at first, progress was slow. Working around our day jobs, it is difficult to find the time to help set up and run a charity. We created social media accounts on Twitter, Facebook, linkedin and instagram and started advertising. but it was difficult to get any traction. We wrote blog posts and shot video content and spread the word however we could. and, slowly, we started to see a stream of mentees sign up via the website.


career menToring I Jesus College Annual Report 2020

Then, around the beginning of this year, things really started to take off. The outbreak of the coronavirus has dealt a hammer blow to the economy that will be felt for years to come. according to research from the resolution Foundation, the hardest hit will be younger workers and the low paid. both are more likely to be employed in sectors that have been largely or entirely shut down by the pandemic – such as hospitality, travel and retail. For those just leaving education, the impact will be especially great, as entering employment during a recession scars income and opportunities for years to come. according to research from the nuffield Foundation, people in my age group – known as the ‘crisis cohort’ because we entered the workplace around the time of the financial crisis – still faced higher unemployment, lower pay and worse job prospects up to a decade later. For the young people entering work now, this must be a very scary time. in march, at the beginning of the lockdown, the number of job vacancies in the uK had dropped to just 8 per cent of what it was at the same time in 2019. The parallels with the financial crisis were clear to the trustees at decade on, because it was something we had all lived through ourselves. and we wanted to do something to help. so in june, decade on hosted its first webinar, called ‘careers & crises: how to navigate the jobs market through Turbulent Times’. The event was hosted by one of our trustees, prasanna Kannan (girton, 2008), and i sat on the panel with decade on mentors from tech, finance and web design to relive our experience of finding a job during a recession and essentially try to reassure those who attended and answer any questions they might have about improving their employment prospects. We had nearly 500 people sign up for the event, and in the minutes after it closed we were getting new mentees coming to the website and enrolling in the programme. our mentee numbers have nearly tripled in the month since, and we are struggling to connect everyone to the mentors that we have. so at this moment in time we are looking for more mentors. and we are looking for more funding so we can employ someone to run the programme full time.

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at the same time, we have become an official partner of Tortoise media, the news platform co-founded by former bbc news director james harding. decade on mentees can now get free subscriptions to Tortoise, and mentors can get annual subscriptions for half price. We are hoping to collaborate with Tortoise on some of their upcoming next gen Thinkins, a series of webinars aimed at younger adults. in the meantime, we have the daily task of accepting new mentees, trying to match them up with mentors and checking in on how existing relationships are developing. some people join decade on looking for a long-term relationship with someone who can advise them over several years, for others it might just be a few questions or some cV-writing tips. Whatever the length or depth of the relationship, it doesn't really matter to us. What matters is that we are there to help out bright, young people who are trying to get into a profession that they have no clue about getting into. We are there so that no one has to move to Kent to write about car parks ever again. so, if you know any young adults who are looking to start their career and are in need of some advice, tell them to check out decade on. it is completely free. and if you are interested in helping out by volunteering to become a mentor or can help in any other way, please get in touch. The networks we create at cambridge are life changing, let’s share them around.


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alumnus reFlecTions I Jesus College Annual Report 2020

on being a maverick and marmite vicar roger harper

An alumnus (m1976) reflects on the influence of Jesus College on his career as a prison clergyman

esus college harbours mavericks. j. cameron jWilson was director of studies for modern

languages when i applied in late 1974 to read French and russian. unknown to me, until his obituary in 2014, cameron exercised extreme leniency to his students. he was also known as a firm christian. i failed the entrance exam, a narrow fail cameron Wilson assured me. my a-level French result had been lower than expected, a fail in my eyes. my interview presentation was above average and my a level history result notably higher than expected. cameron made the extraordinary decision to admit me to jesus, but not until 1976. i had taken my a-levels while still 16. cameron, it seems, thought i needed to grow up a bit before cambridge. maybe he sensed a fellow maverick in the making. has anyone else been admitted after failing the exam? This question did not matter to maverick cameron Wilson. my 21 month ‘gap year’ enabled me to become a volunteer secondary teacher in a rural school in Kenya, the most formative

experience of my life, crucial in me moving on from ex-roman catholic distant deism to involved christian faith. The move was completed at cambridge, partly through the welcome and enthusiasm of the college christian union. ‘Who will pay me to do what i am trained in – writing essays about French and russian 19th century literature?’ on leaving jesus, the answer seemed obvious and despairing: no-one. my cambridge church involvement had alerted me to the published need of the church of england for more clergy. (The church continually swings from needing more clergy to needing more money to pay the clergy, and back again.) i envisaged the life of a parish priest as more interesting than any alternative. This was my simple ‘call.’ To my surprise, the church accepted me for training. my training at jesus has proved useful for clergy life. not only on the one occasion, in 1985, when i hosted a russian orthodox bishop as part of a soviet ‘peace’ delegation to derbyshire. studying languages trained me to listen, to pay close attention to how others express themselves, to fit in with their natural expression rather than mine. Writing essays trained me to present my view of a complex text, with strong encouragement to make it a fresh view. my clergy pastoral work has been listening to and praying with people, entering into and using their ways of expressing themselves. my clergy teaching work has been presenting my, sometimes fresh, view of the complex text of the bible, helping others to have their lives shaped by the god of jesus and the bible. listening to close relatives of those who have died and then, at the funeral, conveying their view of the person, in their language, as is not possible for them in their immediate grief. listening to new parents and engaged couples


alumnus reFlecTions I Jesus College Annual Report 2020

and church members who had been abused as children and many others as parish priest. listening to hospice patients to whom i was chaplain and, now, to prisoners to whom i am currently chaplain. Taking their expressed needs and calling to god to respond, while helping them to call to god themselves. much of this, in pandemic, through a closed cell door. looking intently at the bible passage for the week and presenting a fresh view which connects with what those listening have told me. adapting and developing courses to nurture faith. Translating the language of theology into the language of everyday life. in pandemic, prisoners receive a sunday message in a leaflet. over the years, some of my views have become stronger. a section of people in several churches have deemed my views unacceptably fresh. not just a maverick but a marmite vicar: some like him, some loathe him. The entire farewell speech of one church Warden was ‘Well roger! it has been an experience … You have helped me to move down paths which i never knew existed. personally, i thank you.’ all present knew that others in that church strongly resisted moving anywhere unfamiliar. my welcome in prison is more widespread. The writing skills encouraged at jesus have been further developed. articles for the national broad-evangelical ‘Christianity’ magazine. a whodunit ‘A British Crash’, revolving around a death and a funeral, with a far-from-omniscient narrator similar to those in dostoevsky’s novels. a doctrine book ‘The Lie of Hell’ based on a close examination of the two distinct words of jesus in the gospels for the abode of the unrepentant dead: hades and gehenna. my view that these refer to two distinct places, with significant consequences, has been deemed ‘fresh’ by scholars in the field. a website, ‘gaymarriagemaybe’ presenting robust middle ground in the christian debate. a blog, as required now for any Writer: ‘rogerharper.wordpress.com.’ posts this year on ‘praying against coronavirus’ and ‘The death of george Floyd: confessing sin,’ the latter with reference to the jesus college ‘legacy of slavery Working party’. currently working on

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‘Jacob: The Full Story’ a trilogy of short novels depicting the life and times and strange god of the man who became israel. This promises to be controversial. and making notes for ‘Wholly Dating’ a guide to dating for christians which includes addressing in some detail the question ‘how far do christians go before marriage?’ debated since at least my days in jesus college christian union. maverick writing has led to a maverick publishing company, in which the influence of jesus college can also be seen. my whodunit and doctrine book were both rejected by publishers as ‘not what we do’, not fitting our categories. Friends joined me is setting up a new publishing company. i had already been challenged to develop a model of commercial company which is more a Fellowship of investors and workers than the property of investors in which workers are managed like any other raw material. ladder media ltd. has become the first christian equitable company (cec). The call of jesus to make ‘love your neighbour as you love yourself ’ the foundation of everything was the strongest element in developing the cec model. a shareholder company prioritises the needs of investors in decision making and profit distribution. a cooperative prioritises the needs of workers in decision making and profit distribution. What models do we have which treat the needs of investors and workers as equally important? business experts told me that such a model does not exist. hence cecs. The basic category is of membership, both investor members and Worker members with equivalent rights and responsibilities. jesus college is also a membership institution, a Fellowship which cannot be bought or sold, nor bequeathed to the next generation. jesus college has grown and flourished over many years, benefiting many people, helping to generate wealth and influencing our nation and our world. jesus college gives hope that commercial companies with a similar structure can produce similar fruits. christian equitable companies have so far been treated as a maverick idea. Would any members be interested in hearing, harbouring, even helping along, such maverick thinking?


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hisTorY I Jesus College Annual Report 2020

against the death penalty peter garnsey

Emeritus Jesus Fellow and Professor of the History of Classical Antiquity explores the work of the first abolitionists he first comprehensive attack on the death Tpenalty issued from two italians, giuseppe

pelli of Firenze and cesare beccaria of milano, in the early 1760s. neither knew of the existence of the other, although they were contemporaries and near-neighbours. beccaria’s On Crimes and Punishments caused a sensation at its publication in 1764, and it has had a profound impact on the development of penal law ever since. he is regarded as the pioneer of the modern criminal justice system, and deservedly so. pelli’s Against the Death Penalty on the other hand was unknown until 2014, when it was first published. he had held it back from publication, leaving it in his files, substantial but unfinished, in 1761, that is, three years before the publication of beccaria’s work. i resolved to produce an english translation of pelli’s Treatise and to bring the two abolitionists into contact with each other, comparing the two Treatises and their historical and intellectual contexts (forthcoming, princeton up 2020). in pelli’s case the contextualisation of his work turned out to be particularly rewarding. Whereas beccaria has been well served by legal historians and criminologists over the years, pelli has attracted little scholarly attention. pelli did however leave behind among his manuscripts a multi-volume diary, Efemeridi, containing a day-by-day account from 1759 to 1808 of his thoughts, ideas, interests, activities, the company he kept, his mental and physical state – and the weather. This enormous work, which has recently become accessible on the internet, is an immensely valuable source for the social, cultural and intellectual history of Florence in the second half of the 18th century, seen through the eyes of a prominent citizen who made his mark as a man of letters and culture rather than as a politician: the high point of his career was his tenure of the post

of director of the uffizi gallery (1775-1793). i was curious as to why pelli decided to write his Treatise and why he abandoned it or suspended its composition. in a letter to beccaria, one of two letters of congratulation, pelli claimed that he had given up the project because of a conflict of interest. he was referring to his appointment as a senior judge in the criminal courts of pistoia and pontremoli within the grand duchy of Tuscany. There is a problem, which a close study of the diary reveals, and then helps to resolve: there is a gap of a little more than a year between the abandonment or suspension of the Treatise and his appointment as judge. Through the diary one can track the chronology of the composition of his Treatise and, in more detail, the progress of his career. i arrived at the conclusion that pelli’s problem was basically that his financial situation was weak and uncertain. put bluntly, he needed a job, one that gave him an income adequate to sustain the lifestyle of an aristocrat. he could not risk annoying the great and the good who held the key to appointments and promotions in Tuscany. This was the situation well before he accepted the judgeship, a post moreover that he had not coveted and was unequipped for. The situation was more complicated than this, in two main respects. First, Tuscany was a grand duchy of the habsburg empire, and political, administrative and judicial careers were controlled by officials who served the empire whether based in the imperial capital Vienna or in the capital of Tuscany, Florence. secondly, an attack on the death penalty from his pen would certainly have infuriated the ecclesiastical hierarchy. The catholic church was a state within a state in the italian provinces and in every other catholic country. it was international in nature, recognized the primacy of the pope, was enormously wealthy, and claimed and exercised the right to control


hisTorY I Jesus College Annual Report 2020

censorship, education and social welfare (T. v blanning, Joseph II, p .16). pelli as a faithful catholic would have thought twice before making a public statement on the death penalty which was diametrically opposed to the position of the church. if we look sideways at beccaria, a milanese aristocrat, we find that the general situation was similar. lombardy was actually more directly controlled by the austrian monarchy than was Tuscany, while the power of the church was equally pervasive. beccaria too looked to the imperial administration for employment. his position however was stronger than that of pelli: he had the patronage and the protective network that pelli lacked, as a junior member of the unofficial academy into which he was coopted, the so-called academy of Fisticuffs. so beccaria went ahead and published. he published anonymously, in this revealing that he expected a hostile reception. he received one: virulent attacks from within the church, the placing of his book on the prohibited list, and in some places, its incineration. it was only with the 5th italian edition of 1766 that he dropped his anonymity and acknowledged his authorship. by then however he had attracted the favourable attention of certain key officials of the habsburgian empire, notably the imperial chancellor count von Kaunitz and the resident governor of lombardy, count von Firmian. his future was now secure, so long as he proved a useful and pliant member of the imperial administration, which indeed he did, for the rest of his days. The larger question with regard to context however is this: how did it come about that pelli and beccaria contemplated breaking the silence that surrounded the death penalty? it bears repeating that they had no predecessors. no one before them had mounted a comprehensive attack on the death penalty. and why did this come about in italy, rather than, say, France? The encyclopedist andré morellet, in an admiring but patronising letter to beccaria, confessed his surprise at discovering that ‘bonne philosophie’ existed on the southern side of the alps. The famous ‘philosophes’ of the French enlightenment, Voltaire and rousseau included, were not abolitionists.

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Justitia rejects death penalty, favours forced labour. Design: Beccaria 1765

These are big questions, and i have only begun to find an answer to them. We learn from the diary – which is rather less revealing in this matter than one might have hoped – that pelli had for some time been considering writing against the death penalty when a conversation among friends brought things to a head. nine months later (sic) a friend encouraged him to write, and this time he took up the challenge. none of the friends are named, and some detective work is required to round up plausible candidates. What emerges is that there was a group of progressive thinkers within the church – clerics and others like pelli himself who were devout catholics – who were strongly critical of the iniquities and corruption of the existing criminal justice system and were prepared to contemplate taking their feeling of repugnance a step further than anyone had done hitherto. They thought they had a champion for the cause in pelli, who in the event shied at the last hurdle. or perhaps they were merely toying with the idea, and were surprised, but a little nervous, when pelli took it up. in any case the result was the same. nerves got the better of pelli, in the end.


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cONdANNE 1741-1767

SENTENZE

campione

ANNO

Death sentences in Milan. Note spike in 1765

What moved progressive catholics even to entertain the possibility of launching an attack on the death penalty? The brutality and injustice of the criminal law system of pelli’s day were all too visible, and at its acme of the hierarchy of penalties stood execution, in its many forms, some of them unimaginably cruel. it may not appear surprising to us that a man of firm religious faith, strong moral convictions, and deep humanitarian sentiment should have composed a Tract against the death penalty with the backing of a small group of like-minded people. one might add that the ground had been prepared for pelli to some extent by predecessors. one thinks first of montesquieu’s De l’Esprit des Lois (1748) and, in particular, his powerful advocacy of proportionality in the punishment of crime, a principle so fragrantly transgressed in the existing criminal law system. but there was also montaigne, whose essais (1580-) happen to have been a constant companion of pelli in his walks in the countryside, as is amply documented in the diaries. montaigne had condemned needlessly cruel executions and torture, and had acknowledged, on the basis of his experience as a magistrate, that sometimes innocent people were executed. neither montesquieu nor montaigne took the further step of condemning the death penalty as such. it would be unwise to underestimate the courage that it would have taken for a man in pelli’s position to have done so.

beccaria’s position was different in significant ways, as i have already suggested, and we can now take the argument a little further. in lombardy in the 1760s two powerful forces with complementary aims came together. The first was the austrian habsburg empire, whose monarchs and top officials were bent on attacking the institutions and culture of the ancien regime in lombardy as elsewhere. over the course of around half a century they introduced substantial changes in the society, economy and administration of the province. To implement this ambitious programme they needed allies and agents, and they found them, in large part, within the aristocracy of milan and lombardy. These ‘young Turks’ (not all of them however in the first flush of youth) themselves sought reform of the social and economic (as well as the judicial) institutions of lombardy. in addition they wanted positions of influence for themselves, access to which was blocked by a deeply entrenched and ultra-conservative nobility. in practical terms this meant service in the imperial administration, which, as we have seen, was itself reformist in intent. beccaria rode to fame and fortune on the crest of this wave. ii The approaches of pelli and beccaria – who, we remember, were contemporaries – are interestingly different. pelli lines up with the


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dutch and german natural law philosophers of the past, joining in the debate that had been in progress since the early 17th century on the state of nature, the transition to civil society by way of the social contract, and the ends and justification of punishment. his work likewise fits into the genre of the erudite juristic treatise, though the learning on display is rather light in comparison with that of his main sources, grotius, heineccius and pufendorf. none of his predecessors however had contemplated denying the necessity, utility and justice of the death penalty, as pelli did. beccaria’s Treatise in contrast is a manifesto: it is passionate, highly rhetorical and openly polemical, and he is uninterested in debating with, or even citing, predecessors. in addition, whereas pelli’s outlook is firmly catholic, as shown among other things by the prevalence in his account of the notion of original sin , which in his vision underlies both criminal behaviour and the penal law itself, beccaria follows the secularist tendencies of the French enlightenment philosophers in making a clear distinction between sin and crime. his trademark doctrine, which stemmed from a utilitarian interpretation of the social contract, is that the penal system must essentially be directed at avoiding public harm and promoting private good, or as he famously stated ‘the greatest happiness shared among the greatest number’. in fact pelli also arrived at such a utilitarian and minimalist view of the criminal justice system, although by a different route. Their argumentation overlaps significantly at the point where they attack the alleged efficacy of the death penalty as a deterrent. in addition, pelli – following the natural philosophers in this – is particularly concerned with rebutting the retributionist argument for the death penalty, whereas beccaria is uninterested in this . For beccaria in particular the essential end of punishment is deterrence or prevention, and it is precisely in respect of this end that the death penalty is found wanting. it is worth noting that deterrence and retribution still figure among the arguments of supporters of the death penalty in our world, even though the case for the former in particular is harder than ever to sustain in the face of the cumulative evidence. in the united

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states, for instance, states that operate the death penalty can be shown to have generally higher crime rates than abolitionist ones. i turn, in this last section, to the issue of the impact of the first abolitionists on the historical trajectory of the death penalty. The discussion must necessarily be centred on beccaria. iii beccaria and pelli were ahead of their time. not many in their day – not even les philosophes of the French enlightenment – rebelled against the death penalty. notoriously, France introduced the guillotine in the course of the revolution as an ‘egalitarian’ form of the death penalty, equally applicable to the aristocrat and the common man. as beccaria acknowledged in the closing chapter of his Treatise, the best hope for reform lay with enlightened monarchs; and in fact the death penalty (along with torture) was abolished in the grand duchy of Tuscany in 1786 by leopold ii – for a time. What did not happen following the appearance of beccaria’s On Crimes and Punishments was a speedy conversion of the world to the cause of the abolition of the death penalty. more than 250 years have passed since those italians thinkers broke the ice. a survey published in 2000 reports that no fewer than 71 countries still retained the death penalty and had recently practised it. in fact this represented progress, because as recently as 1965 only 25 countries had abolished the death penalty. in recent decades the abolitionist case would appear to have made a significant advance. abolition of capital punishment is now (since july 2001) a precondition for membership of the european union. even more recently, pope Francis rewrote item 2267 of the catholic catechism, to the effect that the death penalty is no longer judged to be ‘admissible’. This was announced in an official statement on 11th may 2018. on the other hand, there has been a resumption of executions in some countries that were previously considered at least de facto abolitionist: this is also the case in a number of states in the usa. (some us states have never renounced the death penalty.) backsliding is


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always possible. The catechism of the catholic church could be amended yet again. Who knows what the next pope, flanked by conservative cardinals and Vatican bureaucrats, will decide? in the uK the death penalty was abolished for murder for a trial period of 5 years as late as 1965 and then again in december 1969 for a further five years (r. hood, The Death Penalty (2012) p.9ff). in the decades that followed no fewer than 13 attempts were made to revive it for some categories of murder, such as terrorism and the murder of children. capital punishment was not removed from the statute book until 1998. even so, in the following year, 1999, 56.0% of the respondents to a survey of british social attitudes agreed with the statement: ‘For some crimes, the death penalty is the most appropriate sentence’. recent surveys have come up with roughly the same level of support for its reintroduction. The present home secretary not long ago took up an anti-abolitionist stance. Why did abolitionism make progress in relatively recent times? The resolution of the european parliament of july 2001 on the death penalty provides an important clue. This stated that ‘the abolition of the death penalty, which

is iniquitous, degrading and contrary to the universal principles of justice, is essential to the affirmation of human dignity and the progressive development of human rights, the first of which is the right to life.’ This declaration condemns the death penalty as immoral, unjust, and an assault on human rights, which are characterised as universal. no other considerations are brought into play. From the middle of the 20th century human rights have received greater emphasis in the debate over capital punishment. This was in part a response to the atrocities associated with nazism, Fascism, state socialism, and the second World War. in addition, proceeding pari passu with this reaction, there was a progressive development of political rights which underlined the importance of human rights. The nett result has been that the moral argument against the death penalty has assumed greater importance, as distinct from the utilitarian arguments which beccaria and pelli advanced. The term ‘human rights’ was introduced by jean-jacques rousseau, in his Social Contract (1762), a work published just after pelli had finished writing, and while beccaria was preparing to write. This, together with its

Confraternity of St John the Beheaded receives severed head, 1764


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equivalent, ‘natural rights’, which has a longer history, meant essentially the right to life and specifically the right to preserve one’s own life. self-preservation in grotius, hobbes and their successors ‘was a paramount principle and the basis for whatever universal morality there was’ (r. Tuck, The Rights of Peace and War, p. 5); pelli and beccaria too embraced this ‘thin’ concept of human rights. The right to life was not necessarily held to be sacrosanct. There were those who argued that it was forfeited when the laws of nature had been breached. This contention is associated in particular with john locke; it was a century later taken up by critics of beccaria, for example gaetano Filangieri, in his influential La Scienza della Legislazione (1780-). a version of the argument has persisted through to the present day: it is held that there are some crimes, such as murder, which justify taking the life of the offender. notoriously the united states, which regards itself as a champion of human rights, has retained, and still practises, capital punishment. The French and american declarations of human rights of the late 18th century did not endorse the abolition of the death penalty. nor did the united nations declaration of human rights of 1948, which limited itself in clause 5, to outlawing torture and ‘cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment or punishment’. This is not surprising in view of the fact that the five permanent members of the security council (china, usa, britain, France and russia) were all anti-abolitionist and had a veto over the resolutions of the general assembly. subsequent attempts by un commissions and congresses to enforce the adoption of an international human rights norm that would abolish executions universally have failed to win the consent of a two-thirds majority of member states.

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so the moral argument against the death penalty, while it has become more prominent, and is regarded by abolitionists as sufficient and decisive, has not yet won the day. nor is it likely ever to do so. The moral beliefs that underpin a doctrine of human or natural rights are essentially variable, and no mechanism or institution exists which could enforce any particular set of such beliefs and give them universal validity (r. geuss, History and Illusion in Politics, 138-145). in any case, the argument against the death penalty from utility, which receives such emphasis in the works of both beccaria and pelli, has not lost its relevance in the contemporary world. For the imposition of the death penalty to be legitimate and reasonable, it must be rooted in benefits for at least some of the classes of persons affected by capital offences, and more so than alternative penalties that are available. The achievement of cesare beccaria through his Treatise On Crimes and Punishments was to make the sentence of death and its execution problematic. The death penalty suddenly became an object of debate: it had to be argued for, because its legitimacy had now been questioned. This is what some contemporary historians call ‘le moment beccaria’. in fact, it was beccaria’s alternative to the death penalty, forced labour, which, in the generations that followed, was picked up and applied, in one form or another ( normally in combination with imprisonment), by governments and reformers alike, together with his conceptualization of the penalty as ‘slavery’ or ‘servitude’. beccaria, ironically, emerges as a prime candidate for the title ‘Father of penal servitude’. but that is another story.


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cholmondeley award for poetry rod mengham mengham, jesus Fellow and university rodreader in modern english literature, is recipient of the 2020 cholmondeley award for poetry, widely considered the leading life achievement accolade for british poets. The award is made by The society of authors that assists writers at all stages of their careers. The cholmondeley awards were founded in 1966 with a gift by the late lavinia dowager, marchioness of cholmondeley. jesus alumnus j. h. prynne received the award in 2015. other recipients include: simon armitage, 2013; christopher logue, 2005; geoffrey hill, 1999;

roger mcgough, 1998; carol ann duffy, 1992; james Fenton, 1982; and philip larkin, 1973. We mark the occasion by re-publishing the poem ‘As It Is’ from rod’s most recent chapbook, 2019 the vase in pieces (oystercatcher). The poem was written in honour of the 80th birthday of jeremy prynne, and refers to another jesuan poet, r. F. langley. Further work by rod can be found in Unsung: New and Selected Poems (salt, 2001), Chance of a Storm (carcanet, 2015) and Grimspound & Inhabiting Art (carcanet, 2018).

as iT is to J. H. P. memory is recast from the ground up and in your hand is the touch of the proper means. being far northerly, we do not open our mouths in the cold but speak close and inward: tragedians of labour, resting between roles. in a momentary slumber, i imagine going to catford for its errant springs and anti-rousseauisms where night-birds rampage through the undergrowth of ideals, and r.F. langley flings his coat on a bush. The atmosphere is tremulous & wavy as the mark of a ram’s horn snail on the wall of a suffolk lean-to. and i drink to remember the polish clouds hallmarked for onward trading. a purchase is but a purchase in the hymning of product-placement. but you bring the invisible into the visible world and cross out the in- in infinity to accommodate the living, and pull them out alive. The 5th essence is the usefulness of the detail embedded in this foundation stone. When the stars are inlaid in a vacant strip of no man’s sky, and the fishes swim down under five crushing fathoms the bottom of all the land is this stone.


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Quadruple helix dna and a tale concerning reductionism Kim c. liu

A College Postdoctoral Associate describes their thoughts on contrasting scientific paradigms, inspired by their PhD research into the DNA quadruple-stranded helix hat molecular structures have aesthetic Tappeal is a fairly uncontroversial remark amongst scientists, especially those with any appreciation for chemistry. perhaps one of the most widely recognised atomic arrangements are the entwined spirals of the dna double helix. no other molecule exemplifies the adage “function from structure” so persuasively; the double helix is essential for dna to carry out its role as the hereditary blueprint for life. When this structure was first described in 1953, Francis crick summarised as much to his 12-year old son, writing “we think we have found the basic copying mechanism by which life comes from life”. however, dna can in fact adopt other structures. dna’s inherent potential for forming complex structures has been exploited in nanotechnology, with the term ‘dna origami’ coined in 2006 to describe methods of precisely folding dna into arbitrary shapes. at this point, a dna scientist may be inclined to ask the following: is double helix dna the only dna structure in living cells? one other candidate structure is quadruple helix dna, known as the g-quadruplex.

The genetic information carried by dna is organised into genes, which encode different characteristics. many human genes with sequence similarities have been observed, in an artificial environment, to fold into g-quadruplexes. a number of these genes are associated with cancer progression and neurodegenerative diseases such as als, and therefore have clinical relevance. it is hypothesised that g-quadruplexes play a role in the activation or deactivation of genes – when cellular machinery (enzymes) read the genetic code, the shape of the g-quadruplex acts as a roadblock and prevents the gene from being expressed. if g-quadruplexes exist in cells, understanding how they work could provide alternative means of anticancer treatment, and revolutionise dna-targeting therapeutics. it is important to clarify that observing formation of a g-quadruplex from a human gene in a tube is not sufficient evidence for its natural existence inside a living cell. nonetheless, the field has gathered promising evidence to suggest that the g-quadruplex does exist, including in human cells. research

Figure 1: Two shapes of DNA – the well-recognised double helix, and the alternative quadruple-helix known as a G-quadruplex. If a strand of DNA is thought of as a rope, a double-helix DNA is like two entwined ropes, and a G-quadruplex is like a knot in the rope.


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Figure 2: Schematic of a simple model for gene expression control by G-quadruplexes.

over the last two decades (including seminal work by dr julian huppert) led to the following significant experiment.1 a g-quadruplex antibody, a molecular probe designed to specifically seek out only g-quadruplexes, is delivered to cells with their internal structures fixed in position. The antibody is re-extracted with the dna caught by this probe. by reading the letters of this dna (sequencing), we find that the trapped genes contain g-quadruplex forming sequences. For many, this is convincing evidence for the g-quadruplex’s existence in cells. despite the cell being dead, it is rationalised that the g-quadruplexes are frozen in place from when the cell was alive. The antibody fishing rod, which is asserted to interact only with the quadruple-helix structure, captures g-quadruplex shaped dna and allows extraction. by reading its sequence, we confirm that the extracted dna subscribes to expectations of what a g-quadruplex often looks like. however, a sceptic may ask the following – how does one prove that the freezing process

or the antibody did not somehow induce the formation of the g-quadruplex structure from an ordinary double/single stranded dna? additionally, double helix dna is very stable – when would double stranded dna even get the opportunity to change into a g-quadruplex? The universal acceptance of the double helix structure derives from an understanding of its biological function and how this correlates with the chemical structure. The mere extraction of g-quadruplexes from cells says little about why the g-quadruplex exists, and how exactly these structures influence the cell’s genes, or cause disease. until the simple roadblock picture for g-quadruplexes is expanded in greater detail, a basis for questioning their existence may always persist, and the described experiment would not constitute enough proof for the g-quadruplex’s existence. considering this experiment as evidence for the existence of the dna g-quadruplex highlights an often-overlooked difficulty in science. even as experiments become more technically advanced and provide more

Figure 3: Proving the existence of G-quadruplexes – only G-quadruplex DNA is captured by the antibody. The DNA captured is sequenced and reveals genes which contain G-quadruplex forming sequences.

1

r. hansël-hertsch et al., Nature Genetics 2016.


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Figure 4: R. Munroe, “Purity”, from webcomic xkcd (https://xkcd.com/435/)

powerful support to a hypothesis, challenges to a model can proceed ad infinitum, beyond utility. one assumes that there exists a level of evidence beyond which a challenge of this nature is interpreted as pedantry. deciding where to draw this line is arguably one of the most important aspects of scientific research – ‘just one more experiment’ can always be conceived. With respect to this alternative dna structure, the dichotomy at play here is between those who are more concerned with molecular structures and interactions, and those who are more concerned with emergent properties of complex systems. The former more readily accept the evidence this study has provided for the existence of g-quadruplexes; the latter acknowledge the necessity of the work but do not deem it sufficient. i am not-so-subtly avoiding a binary opposition, but ‘chemists’ and ‘biologists’ often approach living systems along a spectrum of two contrasting directions. chemists who study biology often find much appeal in the idea that all of life’s processes can be explained by fundamental chemical interactions. after all, biological systems are composed solely of atoms and molecules and are without any other ‘alien’ influence, for want of a better word. This aesthetic is exemplified in molecular biology, which has provided often extraordinarily detailed descriptions of fundamental cellular processes. a wholly analogous concept was proposed by physicists around the beginning of the 20th century, when science began to

2

h. chang, ambix 2017.

realise the predictive ability of quantum mechanics. The logic is the same – chemistry studies molecules, molecules are made up of atoms, and physics studies atoms. i include an xkcd webcomic for an amusing interpretation, and point the reader towards professor hasok chang’s persuasive works on this matter for a deeper understanding.2 This attitude, known as scientific reductionism, was largely unsuccessful in its attempts to reduce chemistry to physics. a universal adoption of biology-chemistry reductionism also often proves unfruitful. This issue derives principally from complexity. The design of experiments involving living subjects (bacteria, cell culture, organisms etc.) and related troubleshooting often relies upon the experimenter’s direct experience. i myself find it almost impossible to determine exactly why my biological experiment is successful, or which steps are failing when not, due to the sheer number of different factors involved. Think about growing a house plant – what is it about the soil, temperature, humidity, light, water or combination thereof that makes it grow or not? The thought of trying to explain the chemical logic of every step whilst i grow and manipulate cells is daunting. i can’t imagine how one deals with an actual organism such as a fruit fly or mouse. here i paraphrase professor chang’s view on reductionism – chemistry is certainly applied in biology, but biology is more than just applied chemistry. The line at which a scientist decides that evidence becomes sufficient i believe is based


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largely on that scientist’s experiences, both personal and from within their field. The differing attitudes to the g-quadruplex’s existence therefore derives from a spectrum of attitudes to biology-chemistry reductionism, and the different scientific experiences these opinions are based on. i find myself constantly reminded that the phrases in vitro and in vivo, translating as ‘within the glass’ and ‘within the living’, for me refer to a test tube experiment and a cell culture experiment respectively, whilst others consider the cells to be in vitro and only the whole animal in vivo. The story of the quadruple helix dna structure and providing evidence for its existence in living cells highlights that different scientific fields hold different paradigms – what is considered good evidence by one field is not necessarily good enough for another. my own phd research into g-quadruplex dna therefore suggested to me a surprising conclusion; subjectivity plays a not insignificant

role in science. From here, i formed a number of observations. consideration of how different scientists ‘think’ and how their paradigms work is essential during scientific communication or collaboration; good scientific evidence is necessary but sometimes not sufficient. a truly interdisciplinary scientist does not only work on a mixture of historically assigned scientific questions; rather, they are able to flexibly apply the mindsets of different fields to solve a given question. These issues become more challenging and pertinent when communicating science to the general public, and when scientific discourse is politically charged (e.g. global warming, genetic therapy, pandemics) or has financial incentive. intellectual curiosity aside, science aims to generate utility (such as new medical treatments) from its results. instead of disagreements between the paradigms of different fields, it is this utility which may guide a more objective valuation of scientific truth.


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a life in the day of our head chef Tom stewart have been at the college for over 5 years i now and it has flown by – a sure sign that i

am enjoying myself. i have been cooking since aged 17 and spent 18 years in the commercial industry before deciding to look at positions within the university of cambridge. after a two-year stint at downing college i saw the head chef position advertised at jesus college. From the first moment i travelled up the driveway i was determined to get the job. all the colleges are beautiful in their own right, but coming from the small village of Therfield just outside royston it was amazing to find 24 acres of beautiful gardens in the centre of cambridge. my days and weeks are quite hard to plan and i support my teams when business levels are high. i love the buzz of the service and it is one of my great pleasures serving meals that i know are top-quality. There is nothing more satisfying than seeing empty plates and hearing wonderful feedback. my time is split between the office writing or planning upcoming events, and the kitchen preparing and overseeing them. i am extremely lucky to be surrounded by such a professional group of staff throughout the department. our conference office are understanding of the pressures that are put on the kitchen and they are always considerate when taking bookings. The juggling of internal and external business can be tricky and every now and then we find ourselves running from one room to another with numerous menus – but this all adds to the excitement! The kitchen can serve approximately 900 meals a day throughout the site starting with cooked-to-order breakfast in the West court dining room; sandwiches, salads and cakes in The roost café; cafeteria lunches and dinners; hot or cold buffets, afternoon teas, evening canapé receptions, and up to eight course restaurant quality evening meals. menus can be chosen from the seasonal changing conference pack or we can write bespoke menus to suit our clients’ requirements. i think that this is another

reason why working here at the college is so satisfying. one minute you may be making 120 portions of moussaka and then sous vide cooking 5 kg of cornish cuttlefish! an average day will consist of 50 diners in the West court dining room for breakfast, 75 hand-made sandwiches and cakes in the roost, 250 staff, students and fellows going through the cafeteria and high Table for lunch. Then there could be 40 people having a hot and cold buffet lunch, 150 students and staff going though cafeteria for dinner, 150 students and 15 fellows dining at formal hall and dinners for around 70 in various other dining rooms. so, as you can imagine by the end of the day we are ready to get home to our families! This may mean that the team are producing in the region of 7 or 8 different menus in a single day. The logistics of working from a basement kitchen is another part of my role that can be far from simple. We have a number of satellite kitchens from where we plate and serve meals. The food is largely prepared and cooked in the main kitchen and then sent out to the platingup areas. The team members are each allocated 1 or sometimes 2 areas to concentrate on for that service and they take responsibility of the food for that group of guests. We try to limit this to 25 diners per chef but this can be


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difficult when there are numerous functions spread over the site. With enough preparation, organisation and a good helping of motivation we always seem to get it done. The planned refurbishment of the college kitchen has been an exciting part of my work. our kitchen is now 25 years old is really showing its age in places. alongside the build of the new kitchen we are also lucky enough to be getting a second kitchen and dining area that is planned to last for up to 20 years. This will be a great space to work from and after seeing some of the temporary arrangements that have gone into other colleges whilst their departments have been renovated i think we are very lucky to have such a good quality facility. The team here are very well established and this is all down to the way in which they are looked after by the college. my longest serving staff member has been here for 34 years and has been a real help to myself as he knows the college catering routine like no one else. We have two teams of chefs who work on opposite shifts and this can make it like running two different kitchens. This also helps to add a little bit of competition between the teams! and as we know a little competition is not always a bad thing. The catering department has gone through a number of changes since i started including the expansion into West court. This has meant an increase in food production with b&b guests and the all-day offerings in The roost café. it took some gentle persuasion to get the kitchen team to increase their workload without much of an increase in staffing but i believe it has paid off in the end and i would like to think that we are competing with the best coffee shops in and around cambridge. another change that has taken place over the last 5 years is the increase in special diet requirements and allergen procedures that have been put in place. We have had to re-think the way in which we produce our menus. Trends such as veganism and vegetarianism have greatly increased over the last few years and we have gone from cooking the occasional vegan meal upon request to producing 100 portions each day for the cafeteria alone. This has meant a lot of time researching and trying out vegan and vegetarian meals has taken place. We have

even gone on vegan masterclasses at the university of birmingham to help grow our knowledge and understanding of the ingredients. We are lucky to have a great range of local suppliers allowing us to use top quality ingredients at great prices thanks to the university’s enormous buying power. This means that we can serve fresh meat and fish to our students daily alongside seasonal and locally sourced fruits and vegetables whenever possible without the hefty price tag! over the years we have improved the way in which we engage with the college community to make sure that their requests, likes and dislikes are listened to. Through student questionnaires and chefs forums we listen to these requests and ideas and adjust the food offerings so that the majority of people can confidently find the meal that suits them. another part of my role that i have come to love over the years is the themed menus that we serve regularly. it is interesting looking into the annual celebrations that take place around the world and seeing the types of food that are eaten at these occasions. a lot of time goes into researching these themes and learning about different cultures and types of cuisines from all over the world. i have also really enjoyed organising the college feasts. They are amazing occasions in the college calendar and helpful marker points for where we are seasonally and academically in the year. These are between 5 and 7 course grand occasions and we will block all other business on those evenings so that we can focus all our efforts into the meal and ensure that everyone is left thoroughly satisfied by the quality of both food and service. We always come away with a real sense of satisfaction and there are always comments like ‘wouldn’t it be nice to do just this every evening!’. so, after 5 years here at the college i find myself at a most surreal point of my career. The college is going through some of the most dramatic and uncontrollable changes in its history. even though it has been daunting at times it is exciting to watch how we keep moving forward and progressing our services as a department. a great deal of thought and planning has been put in place to make sure that the catering is still as important now as it always has been.


college news



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people Awards, honours, projects, significant lectures Fellows Professor Madeleine Arnot chaired the cambridge emergency and displacement group bringing together colleagues in the social sciences and humanities, and the academic advisory board, for the uniceF/cambridge university press project The Learning Passport which aims to help close the global ‘learning poverty gap’. Dr Jenny Bulstrode was appointed lecturer in history of science and Technology between the ucl sTs department and the royal institution of great britain. Dr Clare Chambers has been promoted to professor of political philosophy. she has also been appointed a member of the nuffield council on bioethics. Professor Sarah Colvin has been awarded a senior prize fellowship at humboldt centre at bayreuth university. The project investigates epistemic violence to assess stories’ potential to create and overcome divisions. Dr Maite Conde has won the modern language association of america Katherine singer Kovacs prize for her book Foundational Films: Early Cinema and Modernity in Brazil (university of california press, 2018). Mr John Cornwell won the 2019 Wilbur award for the best feature coverage of religion and society in 15 major magazines of north america. The piece published in Vanity Fair focused on the papacy and clerical sexual abuse. Professor John Danesh, professor of epidemiology, is leading a £20 million national alliance designed to help understand and control the coronavirus infection. Professor Julian Dowdeswell has been awarded the W s bruce medal from the royal scottish geographical society for his contributions to glaciology and polar science. Dr Shailaja Fennell has been appointed reader in regional Transformation and economic security. she also received the Vice chancellor’s research impact and achievement award this year, in early career researcher category. Dr Julian Huppert has received a ministerial appointment as a member of the home office’s biometrics and Forensics ethics group. he is also chair, cambridgeshire and peterborough nhs ethical committee during and after the covid crisis. Professor Mary Laven has won the ronald h. bainton prize for history and Theology for the joint-authored book The Sacred Home in Renaissance Italy (j2018). Professor Kathryn Lilley has been elected member of the european molecular biology organisation (embo) in recognition of her high-quality life science research. Dr Rod Mengham has been awarded a 2020 cholmondeley award by the uK society of authors. Professor Bruce Ponder has been appointed trustee of cancer research uK, the world’s largest cancer charity. he has also been invited by the governing board of the european aids clinical society to chair the committee responsible for the evaluation of cancer centres within europe that apply for recognition as a ‘comprehensive cancer centre of excellence’. cambridge is one of two centres in europe so far to have achieved this recognition.


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Dr Brechtje Post has been appointed professor of phonetics and phonology. Dr Rebecca Reich won the 2019 prize for best First book from the american association of Teachers of slavic and east european languages for her State of Madness: Psychiatry, Literature, and Dissent After Stalin. The book was also shortlisted for the prize for best book in literary scholarship. Professor Colin Renfrew has received on behalf of the cambridge Keros project, which he heads, a Field discovery award at the 4th shanghai archaeology Forum. Dr Simone Schnall is a co-investigator on the new productivity institute, funded by £32 million, the largest single economic and social research investment ever made in the uK. she will investigate how social capital – social relationships, skills and abilities – contributes to wellbeing and productivity. she also leads a research project to support the re-opening of the colleges and the university following the early stages of the coVid-19 pandemic. she is serving on the jury selecting the “Frontiers of Knowledge awards”, which recognize and encourage world-class research and artistic creation, and consist of a prize of 400,000 euros. Dr Preti Taneja was the unesco Fellow in prose Fiction at the university of east anglia in 2019 and gave the keynote lecture at the british shakespeare association’s 2019 annual conference shakespeare, race and nation. she has been appointed to a permanent lectureship in creative Writing at newcastle university. Professor Anna Vignoles was awarded a cbe in the Queen’s birthday honours, 2019. she has been appointed the new director of the leverhulme Trust. Dr Ben Walton has been appointed reader in music history.

New Fellows Ms Amy Goymour is a university senior lecturer in land law and has been a member of the law Faculty in cambridge since 2005. she read law as an undergraduate at downing and after graduation, worked as a research assistant in the property & Trust law Team of the law commission for england and Wales for a year, before studying for the bcl at jesus college, oxford. she returned to cambridge in 2004 as a cTo and Fellow in law at Fitzwilliam college. she was a newton Trust lecturer in law from 2005 to 2012, interrupted by a 3-year fixed term appointment as a university lecturer in property law, and was appointed as a university lecturer in land law in 2012 and was promoted to senior lecturer in 2017. she has considerable experience in directing studies and was lead director of studies at downing where she also served as a Tutor gaining experience as a supervisor for the compulsory first-year civil and second-year land law papers; she has supervised jesus students for land law for several years. she has considerable experience of access/outreach/widening participation work, having been the law Faculty’s access officer and contributed regularly to sutton Trust summer schools. ms goymour is a doctrinal land lawyer and is particularly interested in the impact of human rights law on matters related to land law, and private law more generally. she is presently working on a book Key Ideas in Land Law, which will begin with the social, geographical and economic theories of land use and then examine the extent to which the doctrinal rules of english law adhere to these ideals.


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Dr Matt Wilkinson read natural sciences at King’s college cambridge, matriculating ba in 1997. in 2002 he completed his phd on pterosaur flight as a student at Queens’ college and was a junior research Fellow at clare college from 2003 to 2007. he then took an ma in performance at mountview academy of Theatre arts. since 2008 he has pursued a freelance career as a science communicator, zoologist, writer and voice artist. over the same period, he held academic Visitor status in the department of Zoology for which he lectured and ran practical classes and field courses. he has supervised jesus’s bns students, been involved with admissions interviewing in 2019 and, has experience of directing studies for sidney sussex college. dr Wilkinson’s first book Restless Creatures, a popular science exposition of the evolutionary history of locomotion, was published in 2016. he is currently working on his second book Why Aren’t There Any Dragons? which seeks to explain evolutionary constraint to a general audience by examining why various imaginary/mythological creatures do not and could not exist. Dr Ramsay Bowden read pre-clinical and clinical medicine at jesus college and matriculated in 2004, she then studied for the mphil in Translational medicine and Therapeutics as a part-time student and for a phd based in the department of biochemistry from december 2016, submitting her thesis in march 2019. she currently holds the position of nihr academic clinical lectureship in medical genetics at the university of cambridge. dr bowden’s research interests concern the genetic causes of rare diseases. Focusing on xeroderma pigmentosum, an ultraviolet hypersensitivity syndrome, as a model genetic disease, dr bowden has developed a gene editing approach that enables the role of key subsets of genes to be identified. This insight enables new treatment pathways to be developed.

Research Fellows Ms Camille Cole has recently completed her phd in the history department at Yale university. she received her ba (summa cum laude) in politics and middle eastern studies from pomona college in 2012. This was followed by a gates scholarship at cambridge, from which she received an mphil in historical studies in 2013. cole’s current research is concerned with the relationship between capitalism, the state, and empire in late ottoman iraq. in exploring how iraqi elites employed a number of (il)legal methods to consolidate and ‘improve’ their property holdings, it challenges mechanistic accounts of ottoman history and global economic development which locate power and initiative in the ‘centre’ (istanbul or europe) rather than the ‘periphery’ (the area in and around basra). she has a number of publications, one of which – ‘precarious empires: a social and environmental history of steam navigation on the Tigris’ in the Journal of Social History – won the 2016-17 joel a. Tarr envirotech prize for the best article on the relationship between technology and the environment in any journal. an accomplished linguist, camille reads documents in arabic, ottoman/modern Turkish, persian and French.


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Dr Harry McCarthy has recently completed a phd at the university of exeter, where he received a ba in english and French in 2015; he took the oxford mst in english 1550-1700 in 2016. his research centres on cultural and performance history in early modern english drama. his phd thesis, Boy Actors on the Early Modern English Stage: Performance, Physicality, and the Work of Play focuses on the active, physical contributions of boy actors to the plays in which they performed. central to his approach to boy playing is the triangulation – unprecedented in work on early modern theatre history – of historical research mapped onto close reading of early modern plays, practice-based research into onstage physical display, and ethnographic observation of edward’s boys (a twenty-first-century boy company operating out of King edward Vi grammar school in stratford-upon-avon) in rehearsal and performance. his outstanding research record includes articles in two of the most prestigious literary historical journals (Shakespeare Survey and English Literary History), and he has excelled also in public engagement, having led a research in action workshop at the sam Wanamaker playhouse, at shakespeare’s globe. his postdoctoral project, On Foot: Pedality in the Early Modern Cultural Imagination, is about the cultural import of feet (both moving and metrical); it will read early modern understandings of podiatry and the rhythms of perambulation back into the prose, poetry, and plays of the age. Dr Sebastian Marino graduated from the universidad de chile with a bs as the top student in astronomy before gaining a ms in astronomy from the same university in 2015. he then moved to cambridge for his phd. in 2018, he was offered a prestigious nasa hubble/sagan fellowship, which he however declined to start as a postdoc at the max planck institute for astronomy in heidelberg in 2018. his publication record is outstanding, with 30 peer-reviewed papers in total, including 9 as first author and 6 as second author. his research topic is exoplanetary systems, focussing on their cometary components (exoKuiper belt), and he is interested in the formation, evolution, and architecture of planetary systems. during his fellowship, he aims to broaden his studies to include several additional exosolar systems and will in particular look at the mechanisms of volatile delivery and gas accretion to planets, ie trying to answer the question how earth got its water. his assessors judge him to be altogether outstanding and rapidly emerging as a leading astronomer in the exciting area of extrasolar planetary systems, for which the nobel prize in physics was awarded in 2019 to, among others, didier Queloz in cambridge.

New French Lector Théo Martins studied philosophy at the École normale supérieure (paris). prior to becoming the French lector he studied public affairs at sciences-po paris, social sciences at lycée henri-iV and philosophy at the ecole normale supérieure (ens ulm) and at the pantheon-sorbonne university. he graduated in drama in paris 15th and 10th districts conservatories of dramatic arts. specialising in 17th century French writer blaise pascal, Théo is due to prepare for his phd this year.


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New Teaching Bye-Fellows Dr Eduard TalamĂ s Mr Paul Fannon

Incoming College Post Doctoral Associates (CPDAs) Dr Alexander Boys has a 3-year research fellowship post at the department of chemical engineering and biotechnology on the human Frontier science program (hFsp). Dr John Dudley has funding until February 2022 as a research associate at the department of engineering researching how Virtual reality and augmented reality applications can be made accessible for disabled and elderly users. Dr Vivek Gupta has a 3-year research associate position in islamic art (research and outreach). Dr Cassi Henderson has funding until july 2022 at the institute for manufacturing researching the development of improved lower-limb orthoses, or braces, using 3d printing. Dr Kim Liu has a 3-year postdoctoral research associate position at the mrc laboratory of molecular biology researching the integration of automation for synthetic and molecular biology. Dr Clarissa Rios Rojas has a 3-year research associate position at the centre for the study of existential risk on the science of global risk programme. Dr Nina Seega has a permanent contract as a research strategy director at the institute for sustainability leadership. Dr Lalitha Sundaram has a 3-year position as a postdoctoral research associate at the centre for the study of existential risk.

Outgoing Fellow Dr Sebastian Andres has left to take a lectureship position in manchester.

Outgoing Research Fellows Dr Jane Dinwoodie has left to take a lectureship position at ucl. Ms Jenny Bulstrode has left to take up a lectureship in history of science and Technology between the ucl sTs department and the royal institution of great britain.

Outgoing Research Fellow Dr Preti Taneja has left to take up a lectureship in creative Writing at the university of newcastle. Outgoing Teaching Bye-Fellows Dr Elaine Schmidt Mr John Spray

Outgoing Old Jesus Member College Post Doctoral Associate (OJM CPDA) Dr Temur Yunusov

Outgoing College Post Doctoral Associates (CPDAs) Dr Sandra Servia-Rodriguez has left to take up a job with ocado Technology as a data scientist. Dr Christoph Markou Outgoing French Lectrice Mlle Aline Lebel.


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art at jesus 2019-2020 donal cooper, curator of Works of art his has been another busy year for the curator and Works of art committee, with two Tsuccessful exhibitions in the West court gallery, although our programme from march onwards was inevitably curtailed by the coVid-19 shutdown. in perhaps the most important development this year we welcomed the master, sonita alleyne, as our new chair, succeeding lord renfrew, the founding chair of the Works of art programme. We are grateful to our new master for taking on the chair, and above all we wish to record our profound thanks to lord renfrew for his instrumental role in establishing the visual arts and especially the Sculpture in the Close biennial shows at the centre of college life. at the end of this year, one of our longest serving members, dr anthony bowen, is stepping down, and the curator would like to express his particular gratitude to anthony for his generosity and wisdom, especially for his role ensuring warm relations with colleagues on the gardens committee. The academic year began with the exhibition The Stars Down to Earth (12 october15 december 2019) of sarah morris’s work, curated by dr rod mengham and timed to coincide with the anniversary celebrations to mark forty years since the admission of female undergraduates. sarah morris, herself an alumna of jesus, was an ideal choice for a monographic show, the possibility arising through dr mengham’s long-standing links with White cube in london, who also represent the artist in new York. We were very pleased to welcome the artist and her gallerists to cambridge for lunch with the master on 22 october. on the 3 december we ran a screening in the Frankopan hall of three of sarah morris’s films which the artist and her gallery kindly allowed us to show in cambridge, including two of her powerful city portraits (Midtown, 1998, and Capital, 2000) as well as her interview with the hollywood scriptwriter robert Towne (2006). The event was organized in conjunction with the Fitzwilliam museum society and jcsu art committee, establishing a template for potential future events in relation to West court gallery exhibitions. our lent term exhibition was our first show of contemporary arab art, showcasing the intricate folding books and prints works by the palestinian artist Kamal boullata: Jerusalem in Exile (24 january-13 march 2020). The exhibition, co-curated by the artist’s

Stars Down to Earth


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Jerusalem in Exile

widow lily Farhoud and our college postdoctoral research associate dr claudia Tobin was planned before the artist’s unexpected death in july 2019, but took on additional resonance in its wake, as the first attempt to review boullata’s extraordinary life and unique artistic achievement. The show represented a broader collaboration with additional support from the Faculty of asian and middle eastern studies (Fames) and the department of history of art, with instrumental contributions from dr elizabeth Fowden (jesus cpdra), professor Khaled Fahmy (Fames), dr deniz Türker (Fames and history of art) and alicia lethbridge (jesus final year history of art undergraduate and president of the Fitzwilliam society). it opened with an international symposium that gathered together the world’s leading scholars and writers on islamic art and gathered significant international press attention. The latter part of the exhibition’s run was inevitably curtailed by the onset of coVid-19, leading to the cancellation of a number of associated events in late February and march, including a showing of the Stranger at Home film on boullata and a reading by the artist’s long-time collaborator, the leading syrian poet adonis. nonetheless, Jerusalem in Exile represents our most ambitious show to date, and the first time that we have used the museum-standard display cases purchased by the college last year in the West court gallery.

Boullata Symposium


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Melancholia

The coVid-19 lockdown required the postponement of two exhibitions. The first was our easter Term show of recent work by the artists’ collaborative ‘art & language’ in conjunction with jill silverman Van coenegrachts. The second was our summer show of jeremy deller’s Sacrilege – a 1:1 scale inflatable replica of stonehenge originally created for the 2012 olympics – in collaboration with the Vinyl Factory and cambridge city council, which promised to be a ground-breaking event renewing the Sculpture in the Close series at the same time as opening the college to new audiences in the city and its schools. We hope that both initiatives can be rescheduled in the near future when the public health situation allows, and we are immensely grateful to our artistic adviser, Frances morris (director of Tate modern), for her continued support in establishing connections and creating opportunities for our exhibition programme. The college has again benefitted from generous gifts from donors and artists. bryan Kneale ra and benson-sedgwick foundry agreed to transform the long-term loan of Kneale’s scintillating steel sculpture ‘lucifer’, displayed between the chapel and library, into a permanent gift to the college’s sculpture collection. The college was also delighted to receive the donation of a large andrea büttner print from cambridge-based printmaker Kip gresham. meanwhile, our portrait of professor lisa jardine, jesus’s first female Fellow, by claerwen james was loaned to the exhibition We Are Here at the heong gallery at downing, having earlier replaced henry Viii in hall to mark the fortieth anniversary of the admission of women undergraduates. last september our honorary Fellow alison Wilding ra personally restored her Melancholia sculpture in the Fellow’s garden, renewing the delicate ceramic flowers scattered over the concrete disc. commissions for dr michael minden’s (pictured above) and professor janet soskice’s portraits by professor jean bacon and oliver soskice respectively were approved by council, bringing our series of presidents’ portraits up to date.


The chapel I Jesus College Annual Report 2020

The chapel james crockford, dean of chapel my first year in post as dean, there has been much intothisobserve, discover and develop in understanding what

makes jesus chapel such a special, engaging and inclusive community, and what contributions it can and does make to broader college life. When i arrived on the cusp of michaelmas, i was heartened to receive such a warm reception and enthusiastic support from our new master and the Fellowship, as well as chapel colleagues and students, together with our many chorister families, choir patrons and alumni. The year got off to a joyous start as we celebrated ‘The Fortieth’, giving thanks for four decades of female students at jesus at a special choral evensong led jointly with the revd canon philippa boardman mbe (1982). The service welcomed members from the early years of mixed admission, and included an introit by choir alumna joanna Ward, She is more precious than rubies, commissioned for the occasion by margaret White. it was an honour to mark this anniversary in our college life in chapel, and to celebrate our increasingly diverse and open community. Through michaelmas and lent terms the regular rhythms of daily prayer and reflection continued, attracting students from across the college community, of all faiths and none, to services, discussions and events. Through a varied programme we seek to offer opportunities for students to integrate their intellectual, personal, spiritual and moral sensitivities and sensibilities. For some, it is a case of finding some decompression space and time within the stresses of cambridge life. others discover forms of discourse and critical thought on some of life’s deepest questions. all, i hope, know chapel as a refuge and place of welcome whatever life brings. it is extraordinary that i get to call my ‘office’ such a place of beauty, peace and kindness, and it’s a privilege to be opening that gift up to others.

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sunday evensong addresses are very much the main event of chapel life. These included a series on contemporary questions of human identity (‘being human in 2020’) and a series interpreting the experience of evensong from non-faith perspectives (‘What did evensong ever do for us?’). speaker highlights included lord evans of Weardale, former head of mi5, and welcoming back several jesuans – canon rowan Williams, dr ayla lepine, and former director of music mark Williams. sunday morning eucharist continues to attract a homely group of students, singers, and fellows and their families, all keen to catch up over coffee and croissants afterwards. The chapel also provided a focus for remembering our departed friends and colleagues, dr stephen siklos and professor michael Waring, and a special evensong rededicating the glorious pugin lectern recently restored in memory of one of my predecessors, the revd dr john hughes. advent and christmas services were, as always, very well supported, and in some instances oversubscribed, and along with remembrance, matriculation and college feast services provide an act of recognition and solidarity as the community gathers together. We also offered some less traditional forms of worship, some experimental. in February, a late night jazz Vespers saw musicians from cambridge university jazz orchestra offer reflective jazz meditations interspersed with spoken performances of readings and psalms, and was very warmly received. in the wake of growing violence in hong Kong, we held an ecumenical Vigil for peace in the candlelit stillness of the nave. and in lent term, we hosted ‘sacred stillness’ – a set of lunchtime breathing meditations to discover the power of silence. i am grateful for such energy and breadth from student volunteers from a variety of faith traditions who read and steward, and for our ordinands training with us from Westcott house. The chapel programme this year has included topical pizza discussion nights and a book group, as well as trips and social outings, which do much to sustain the sense of community, friendship and exploration around chapel life. one of my highlights of the year was a memorable group trip of college members to explore the new cambridge eco-mosque on mill road, followed by a delicious bedouin meal together. We enjoyed running regular ‘Walk and Wag’ excursions of students, staff and fellows down the river with benny and pippy the beagles (joined by fellow adorable canines poppy, carson and reggie too!). chapel collections have broadened our horizons too, raising money for a rocha uK (environmental sustainability), cambridge Women’s aid (supporting local


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victims of domestic violence), sing inside (prison music outreach), and lyn’s house (local care community). between all these endeavours, chapel reaches out across the college and beyond. The global pandemic brought huge challenges to the college community, and chapel responded in many ways to meet pastoral need and continue to offer what we do in new ways. easter Term saw the virtualisation of chapel life on the ‘Virtual jesus’ online media platform, a collaboration by college students and staff. The chapel zone of Virtual jesus offered an impressive simulated tour of the chapel (through a matterport project developed by dr donal cooper and professor roberto cipolla), along with wellbeing and multi-faith prayer links and resources. students and fellows from a range of faith and non-faith perspectives also contributed to the hugely successful Thought for the day podcast, offering reflections to help us through lockdown. sunday ‘evensong-lite’ broadcasts from chapel incorporated reflection, prayer and music, and found a large audience on social media. The end of Year service online provided a memorable celebration of chapel life, with various students reflecting on what chapel has meant to them. We look forward enormously to welcoming our college community back into chapel safely, and doing all we can to help replenish spiritual and mental energies that have been so tested in the last few months. chapel life is very much a team effort, and this year has seen much change of staffing in the chapel team, bringing new opportunities and gifts to what we offer. i am grateful for the company and support of the revd dr Zachary guiliano and catherine nancekievill as they have settled into their roles with energy and openness, and to richard pinel, alice Kane and dewi rees, whose diligence, good humour, and enthusiasm make chapel such a lively, grounded, and inspiring place to be. To them and all those who have helped make chapel such a rewarding and lively home, i offer my many thanks.


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chapel music richard pinel, director of music academic year began with a huge change for the chapel, in the arrival of james crockford Tashisdean of chapel and chaplain. despite having extremely large shoes to fill he did so extremely quickly and is universally popular among chapel goers, choral scholars, choristers and their parents and our large network of choir patrons. before michaelmas Term began we had the extremely poignant funeral for stephen siklos and, despite the choir not being in residence at that stage, we were able to bring together an excellent octet of singers who were joined by various instrumentalists including my predecessor, mark Williams, on the piano. during this period we also instituted a new tradition – that of an informal concert given by the choristers for their parents and the choir patrons. This successful event was precipitated both by a desire amongst some patrons to come to something whilst the evenings were still light and also to encourage the choristers and boost their confidence. it sparked off an excellent term for them. many of the new choir-members each year have no experience of singing in a chapel or church environment. it is a more standard route in the current age to have risen through the ranks of youth choirs, and even the national Youth choir. These choirs place an emphasis on high quality singing, however this is often done at the expense of sight-reading training, which can make life for a new choral scholar somewhat tricky. in september we came up with a highly-successful solution to this – a workshop for the entire choir led by me and our three singing teachers which worked on various skills necessary for a successful choral scholar. This gave a huge lift to the start of the term and really paid dividends. i would go so far as to say that the choir was as good as it has ever been in my time when we went our separate ways in march, one can only guess where this may have led over the course of easter Term were it not for the pandemic. With 11 new members, including three new hadfield/rawlinson graduate choral scholars, this achievement is a testament to the hard work and dedication of all of our choir-members. other special events in michaelmas Term included the choral Workshop and special evensong for attendees of the Fortieth anniversary day. This included the premiere of a piece written by formal choral scholar, joanna Ward, which was commissioned as a parting gift to the college by mrs margaret White. For the all souls day requiem we sang the setting of the Requiem Mass by grayston ives, in a version newly arranged by the composer for organ and harp. later in term,

Š Nick Rutter


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© Nick Rutter

our regular seasonal celebrations were complemented by concerts in edington priory in Wiltshire and st michael’s, Framlingam. The year finished with an informal performance at the Fitzwilliam museum for the Friends of the Fitzwilliam and a christmas concert in jesus chapel to a capacity audience including britten’s Ceremony of Carols accompanied by harp. The choir’s first commitment of lent Term was an evensong for the old members’ reunion, which saw a particularly musical cohort return to the chapel and to the hall for dinner. shortly thereafter the college choir formed part of the large chorus required for the cambridge university music society performance of mahler’s Second Symphony under the baton of andrew gourlay. over the course of the term the choir sang joint services with the choirs of gonville and caius college (at jesus) and Queen’s college (at Queen’s) and welcomed the chamber choir of palmers green high school to join us for an evensong. This was particularly special as all but one of the visitors had never performed any classical music before. Their director, ayisha akkari (a jesuan and former graduate choral scholar) is flying the college and choir flag in her terrific work with them! before activity came to an inevitable halt, there were three particularly musical highlights to point out: at the end of january the choirs were joined for the weekend by a quartet of baroque string players, led by monicca hugget (a living legend in the field of baroque music performance). This was made possible through the generosity of her brother, matthew huggett, who sang in jesus

© Nick Rutter


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choir for three years during the 1990s. at the very end of term the choir joined forces with britten sinfonia for a concert and recording in jesus chapel. Whilst the burgeoning pandemic necessitated various restrictions on audience numbers and spacing for the recording itself, the results were truly excellent. as i write this i am involved in the post production of the recording and it will serve as a wonderful ‘good news’ story for the college when it comes to be released. The recording featured the newly-revised Requiem by grayston ives and marks the first recording collaboration between the choirs of jesus college and britten sinfonia. These ensembles have been linked since the orchestra was founded (thanks in part to mr charles rawlinson, who is also president of the choir patrons’ association). just as in many other areas of college life, there is also a litany of things cancelled due to the pandemic. There was due to be an exciting tour of canada for the combined choirs, a concert of poulenc’s Stabat Mater in the Windsor Festival in the presence of hrh The count of Wessex to name but two of them. despite this there are various happier bits of news to report, in that our inaugural jesus college choral composition competition (funded by former choral scholar and alumnus mr max hadfield) was still able to take place and the first winner was announced as miss sarah cattley. likewise the news of the choristers’ online activity drew the attention of world-renowned composer nico muhly who has written them a new piece as a gift. during the unusual and tough easter Term, the choristers’ have managed to continue to meet online for their choir activities. Whilst no performances are possible it has been worthwhile to continue their musical development in a new way, and to keep this tightly-knit team together. many of them have little or no provision of music in their schools and so it is a great service to the local community that we can provide this. The adults of the college choir have worked together to produce two recorded services of Virtual Compline and a special anthem for ascension day. These have attracted record viewing figures on our social media channels (1.5k views of the first Virtual compline and 3.3k views for the ascension video, the second compline goes live too late to include viewing figures here). in addition to this, the director of music and the assistant organist have both released pre-recorded organ recitals, each attracting around 1 k viewers and the choristers recorded a video of the japanese song The Red Dragonfly which has had over 28k views. our link with the girl choristers of st catherine’s college remains strong and this was further deepened with a new outreach initiative – the cambridge chapels Youth choir. This saw teenagers meet for a few days each half term (in michaelmas and lent) to sing a service in jesus chapel and another at st catherine’s. This demographic was identified as one not served by the rich variety of choral opportunities in the city and it was very well received by the participants and their parents. as ever, i must thank all of my colleagues for their support – alice Kane, dewi rees, Zach guiliano and catherine nancekievill and particularly james crockford.

© Nick Rutter


The librarY & archiVes I Jesus College Annual Report 2020

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The libraries and archives michael edwards, Fellow librarian and Keeper of the old library robert athol, college archivist rhona Watson, Quincentenary librarian The Old Library

year the old library made a new acquisition: a copy of gilbert Wakefield’s A New Translation Tofhisthose Parts of the New Testament which are Wrongly Translated in our Common Version (1789). Wakefield, who born in 1756, matriculated at jesus in 1772 and became a Fellow soon after graduating, in 1776. Wakefield’s intellectual interests were in biblical criticism and classical scholarship, but he was also a political and religious radical. he taught at dissenting academies in Warrington and hackney from the late 1770s. a vocal opponent of the slave trade and of William pitt’s ministry, Wakefield was imprisoned from 1798 to 1801 for his pamphlet A Reply to some Parts of the Bishop of Landaff's Address, which strongly criticized the government. The pamphlet we acquired dates from a slightly quieter period in his life, and reflects his commitment to applying scholarly and critical methods to the text of the bible. This copy is significant partly because it seems still to be bound in the original paper wrappers; its first purchaser, and subsequent owners, never had it bound. copies in this state survive less frequently than their better-dressed, leather-bound cousins, so this is an interesting survival, and a welcome addition to the collection.


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A New Translation of those Parts of the New Testament which are Wrongly Translated in our Common Version

many of the existing treasures of the old library are already well known, but this year also saw a new discovery. i identified six books in the collection that originally came from the private library of the philosopher anne conway (1631-1679); they are, in fact, the only known survivors of that collection. conway was an important figure who pursued philosophy at a time when many women were actively discouraged from doing so, and whose philosophical system took on better-known male philosophers such as descartes. i wrote about the discovery at greater length in this year’s Jesuan News and in a scholarly article in the journal The Seventeenth Century, which will appear out later this year. discoveries like this are important to historians, but they also show that the printed collections of the old library still have many more surprises awaiting researchers. research into the provenance and ownership history of rare books is a growing field, and i hope that, as the old library is catalogued in more detail, there will be more discoveries to come. The jesuan collection, now settled in its new home in the Webb library, also continues to grow thanks largely to generous donations from members of the college. as always, new donations are warmly welcomed. our multi-year project with the national association of decorative and Fine arts societies (nadFas) to clean our collection of printed books has also continued, progressing through the shelves at a rapid but painstaking pace. cleaning the books is essential part of ensuring that the collection survives in the best possible condition; work is currently paused due to the coVid crisis, but will restart in due course. The coVid-19 lockdown and its challenges have also meant that the old library has temporarily closed to visitors and readers. We hope to reopen and to begin welcoming back visitors later in the autumn.

College Archives

an unusual year all round for everyone, not least in the college archives which 2020closedhasatbeen the end of march followed by the furloughing of archives staff in mid april. This of course has impacted upon the volume of work and amount of progress that has taken place in the college archives, but nonetheless, progress has been made! as in previous years, our superb team of student volunteers have continued to work on the project to index the college accounts and catalogue the corresponding original receipts, dating from the 17th to the early 20th centuries. huge thanks go to the ongoing contribution from Vera Wolkowiecz, david Wilson, alice o’driscoll, Vicky gray, roisin donohoe and grace


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The ‘Sisters, servants and students: 850 years of women at Jesus College’ exhibition was held in the newly refurbished Marshall Room earlier in the year

Whorrall-campbell. new volunteers in the archives are amy ainsworth, Francesco albe, ella bishop, Kate Falardeau (King’s), james Fox (caius), casey haughin, sarah ibberson (st edmunds), anna marie pipalova, emily rhodes, sian round, daniel sheridan, alice Whitehead (Queens), saija Wilson and liya Wizevich. casey has also continued cataloguing the archaeological finds which were transferred from the city council in october 2018 and this collection should hopefully be fully catalogued before the end of 2020. lesley hindley has continued to volunteer, still contributing towards her professional archive qualification, completing the cataloguing of the steve Fairbairn correspondence and starting on the unenviable task of sorting through box files containing four decades worth of archival enquiries. rachel perry eichhorst volunteered working on the financial records project, to gain experience for a career change, subsequently taking up a position as assistant archivist at caius. The finance records project continues to reveal further insights into college history and those who lived and worked here including detailed descriptions of works done to the college kitchens, wider building developments within the college, providing provenance for items of silver and art work still in the college’s possession, the daily lives of tenants of college properties and the charity afforded to various individuals including destitute widows, prisoners in the town jail and ‘deserving poor’ of parishes to which the college was connected. many of the finds made by volunteers, along with other items held in the college archives, often provide inspiration for the ‘archive of the month’ feature which is continuing in popularity and are also often highlighted on the college archives Twitter page. unfortunately of course, the coronavirus pandemic cut short this years volunteering project, with many of the volunteers travelling home by mid-march. We did, however, enable volunteering at a distance by scanning and digitising many of the receipts and uploading the images into the archives catalogue so volunteers could continue cataloguing receipts from home. Volunteer pat holder, continues to repack and rehouse student files and maps and plans of the college site and external properties, a job for which we are most grateful. architecture student volunteer Yufei li has then catalogued these same maps and plans, tying in with the estate papers cataloguing being undertaken by Katy green, the assistant archivist. Katy, who started in august 2019, has continued apace with the cataloguing of the college’s estate papers which has greatly improved the efficiency with which we are able to answer complicated property related queries from the college solicitors. Katy has also been doing a super job since coming back off furlough and manning the archives one or two days a week, enabling urgent queries, particularly from the college solicitors, to be answered. michaelmas term 2019 also saw a weekend of celebrations surrounding the 40th anniversary of the admission of female undergraduates, for which the archives put together the exhibition Sisters, servants and students: 850 years of women at Jesus College which was on display in the marshall room until the beginning of january 2020. For those unable to visit the exhibition in person, an online


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version of the exhibition has been made available on the college website https://www.jesus.cam.ac.uk/college/about-us/history/women-jesus-college donations of records have been made to the archives throughout the year including additions to the peter hurford collection direct from the family, copies of the student magazine ‘bullsheet’ from the late 1980s and early 1990s, numerous sports photos from the 1930s to the 2000s, various items including menus, event listings and correspondence relating to numerous student clubs and societies. These accessions are always much appreciated and any further donations of college related items from alumni are always greatly received. The catalogue descriptions for the collections and documents above mentioned can also now be viewed on the new online archives catalogue at: https://collegecollections.jesus.cam.ac.uk/index.php however, the most significant progress with cataloguing personal and research papers has been of those of ian stewart, lord stewartby, which were deposited in may 2018. Following initial discussion about the collection with both deborah stewart, lady stewartby, and William macKay, a numismatics expert, dr bill day was appointed as project cataloguer and completed the cataloguing of the majority of the papers, including particularly significant correspondence relating to the research area of numismatics. The catalogue for this important collection will be made available at https://collegecollections.jesus.cam.ac.uk/index.php/ian-stewart-baron-stewartby

The Quincentenary Library many parts of college, the Quincentenary library has had a challenging year, but has likecontinued to provide help, support, and books to the college community, thanks to the dedicated work of rhona Watson, chris barker, adam Williams and alex perkins. after a period of closure, the library was one of the first college libraries to provide a ‘click and collect’ service for students to borrow books and other materials; it was also one of the first libraries to offer ‘book to browse’ and ‘book to study’ options to allow students in residence to use the library building. library staff have spent a lot of time this summer planning how the Quincentenary library can reopen safely in the autumn. as well as detailed plans for reopening, new initiatives for the coming year include creating an ‘interesting Times’; board games collection and a re-launch of the light reading collection with an online catalogue. some things will change, but the library will continue to play a vital part in the academic life of the college.


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books and articles by members and old members of the college donated to the libraries 2019-2020 The donations acknowledged here are those received before the end of june 2020. any items received after that date will be listed in next year’s report. AMBROSIUS, I. (1971) Valon Portailla (sofia, Kulttuurikeskus sofian, 2019). BARR, R.A. (1996, Fw 2019-) i) Literacy, Language and Reading in Nineteenth-Century Ireland edited by r. barr, s. buckley and m. o’cinneide (liverpool, liverpool university press, 2019); ii) Ireland and Masculinities in History edited by r. barr, s. brady, j. mcgaughey (basingstoke, palgrave macmillan, 2019). BEASLEY-MURRAY, P. (1963) Retirement Matters for Ministers: A Report on a Research Project into how Baptist Ministers Experience Retirement (chelmsford, college of baptist ministers, 2018); ii) Entering New Territory (chelmsford, college of baptist ministers, 2019); iii) Make the Most of Retirement: A Guide for Ministers (abingdon, bible reading Fellowship, 2020). BERRY, H. (1995) Orphans of Empire: the Fate of London’s Foundlings (singapore, ethos books, 2013). BRAITHWAITE, T. (1994) Partnership and LLP Law/g. morse & T. braithwaite (new York, oxford university press, 2020). CORNISH, A. (1976) Biosynthesis and Mode of Action of Quinoxaline Antibiotics and Derivatives Thereof (cambridge, university of cambridge, 1982). DATE, C.J. (1959) i) E.F. Codd and Relational Theory: A Detailed Review and Analysis of Codd’s Major Database Writings (morrisville, lulu press, 2019); ii) Database Design and Relational Theory: Normal Forms and All That Jazz, 2nd ed. (berkeley, ca, apress, 2019); iii) Logic and Relational Theory: Thoughts and Essays on Database Matters (basking ridge, nj, Technics publications, 2020). DAVIDSON, L.A. (1997) The Routledge Handbook of International Development, Mental Health and Wellbeing (abingdon, routledge, 2019). DURRELL, M. (1961) Hammer’s German Grammar and Usage (sixth edition) (london, routledge, Taylor & Francis group, 2017). FOWDEN, K. (ojm cpda 2016-) Artist’s Books by Kamal Boullata: Jerusalem in Exile edited by K. Fowden with contributions by a. lennsen and c. Tobin (beirut, dongoola limited editions, 2020). FOX, K.R. (1974) Interaction Between Quinoxaline Antibiotics and Nucleic Acids (cambridge, university of cambridge, 1980). GLOVER, D.R. (1977) Don’t Worry About the Robots: How to Survive in the New World of Work (auckland, allen & unwin, 2018) GRAVATT, D.B. (1960) Dying for Heaven...? (leominster, dayone publications, 2019).


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HARE, D. (1965, hon Fw 2001-) Happy the Hare: A Commonplace Book (privately published, 2020). HOLTZ, T.C. (1973-74 [Thouron scholar]) Architecture, Drawings & Paintings 2010-2020 (hyattsville, privately published 2020). KAY, A.B. (1964) Whatever Happened to Barry Chambers?: 1944-1963 (Kibworth, book guild ltd, 2019). MARETT, A.J. (1972, Fw 1975-78) i) Songs, Dreamings, and Ghosts: the Wangaa of North Australia, 2nd edition. (middletown, Wesleyan university press, 2009); ii) For the Sake of a Song: Wangga Songmen and their Repertories (sydney, sydney university press, 2013). McCULLUM, A. (1974), i) A Guide to The Winter’s Tale (upstart crow publications, 2019; ii) A Guide to Measure for Measure (upstart crow publications, 2019). MENGHAM R.A. (1973, Fw 1989-) Rokowania i Potyczki = Parleys and Skirmishes rod mengham; przeł. Tadeusz pióro i adam Zdrodowski (Katowice: ars cameralis silesiae superioris, 2007). MORRELL, P.S. (1965) Airport Finance and Investment in the Global Economy, by anne graham and peter morrell (london, routledge, 2017). PARR, D.M. (1955) The GHP Archive (colchester, privately published, 2017). PARKINSON, S.R. (1969) i) A Companion to Portuguese Literature (Woodbridge, Tamesis, 2009); ii) Alfonso X, the Learned: Cantigas de Santa Maria: An Anthology (cambridge, modern humanities research association, 2015).


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ROLLS, E.T. (1964) i) The Orbital Cortex (oxford, oxford university press, 2019); ii) Cerebral Cortex: Principles of Operation (oxford, oxford university press, 2016); iii) The Brain Emotion and Depression (oxford, oxford university press, 2018); iv) Emotion and Decision-making Explained (oxford, oxford university press, 2014). RAY, N.J. (Fw 1979-) & christian illies, Philosophy of Architecture. Chinese translation by Lina Tao (Xi’an jiaotong-liverpool university press, 2018). STARK, F.G.F. (Fw 2012) a. p simester, j. F. spencer, g. r. sullivan, & g. j. Virgo Simester and Sullivan’s Criminal Law Seventh Edition. (oxford, hart publishing, 2019). THOMAS, F. (1931) Memoirs of a Migrant (singapore, ethos books, 2013). TOBIN, C. (cpda 2016-2019) Ways of Drawing: Artist’s Perspectives and Practices, edited by julian bell, julia balchin & claudia Tobin (london, Thames & hudson, 2019). TONGUE, A.F. (1959) i) Incidental Music to Iphigenia in Tauris, by ralph Vaughan Williams, edited by alan Tongue (Wellington, n.Z, promethean editions limited, 2019); ii) incidental Music to The Bacchae by ralph Vaughan Williams, edited by alan Tongue (Wellington, n.Z, promethean editions limited, 2019); iii) Incidental Music to Electra by ralph Vaughan Williams, edited by alan Tongue (Wellington, n.Z, promethean editions limited, 2019). VIRSTEDT, S.J. (1997) Effect of the Purine 2-amino Group on the Structure and Nucleosome Binding of Some High Affinity DNA Sequences (cambridge, university of cambridge, 2001). WADSWORTH, S. (1908) A Judge in Madras: Sir Sidney Wadsworth and the Indian Civil Service, 1913-47 (oxford, c. hurst and company (publishers) limited, 2020). WARING, M.J. (Fw 1965- 2007; eFw 2007-2019) i) A Product of Acetate Metabolism by a Pseudomonad (cambridge, university of cambridge, 1962); ii) Antimicrobial Agents and Nucleic Acids (cambridge, university of cambridge, 1965). WETHERED, J.F.B. (1949) Sailing By: Poems by Julian Wethered 1950-2014 (Kingston, julian Wethered, 2014). WEST, J.H. (1989) The Faithful (london, mantle, 2017). WHITEHOUSE, A.F. (1987) Pull Back Your Power (rethink press, 2019). WILLIAMSON, P.J. (Fwc 2010-2016; Fw 2016-) & De MEYER, A. (Fw 2006-2010) Ecosystem Edge: Sustaining Competitiveness in the Face of Disruption (stanford, stanford university press, 2020). Other gifts, given by the following: William Waters and Alaistair Carew-Cox Damozels & Deities: Edward Burne-Jones, Henry Holiday & Pre-Raphelite Stained Glass 1870-1898 (Worcester, seraphim press ltd, 2017). James Kelly Mrs Dalloway’s Party Poopers: a Quarrel on Cue (oxford, oxford university press on behalf of The cambridge Quarterly, 2019). Professor Peter Kornicki Captain Oswald Tuck: and the Bedford Japanese School 1942-1945 (london, pollino publishing, 2019).


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The inTellecTual Forum I Jesus College Annual Report 2020

The intellectual Forum dr julian huppert, director he intellectual Forum’s third functioning year has involved a great number of exciting Ttalks, conferences and other stimulating and successful activities which have brought

together thinkers from around the college, alumni community, and the wider world. in keeping with our aims, we have sought to provide a range of new opportunities Fellows, staff, students and alumni of the college. We are keen to continue to provide these opportunities in the coming year, and would welcome more interaction with the alumni community, as audience or speakers. highlights from the year have included external speakers such as professor amanda Vickery, who gave the 2020 lisa jardine lecture, and raymond antrobus, a deaf spoken-word poet who entertained a captivated full house with readings from his latest publication The Perseverance. We have also welcomed politician stephen Twigg, Financial Times writer and jesus alumna miranda green, nasa astrophysicist and honorary Fellow belinda Wilkes, and writer and jesus alumnus simon reid-henry. our collaboration with the cambridge Festival of ideas continued this year, which allowed us to share some of our Fellows’ ground-breaking research with the wider public, and show off the beautiful Frankopan hall. Talks this year were a huge success, with sold-out events such as dr sarah steele and professor david stuckler’s ‘behind the ringpull’; a glimpse of the truth into food conglomerates such as coca-cola and the influence they have. law Fellow julius grower gave a fascinating interactive talk about whether the public agree with tenants of the common law (worrying, they largely disagreed), and college president professor james clackson’s gave an unforgettable lecture on swearing and other taboo language to a rapt audience; this and other events are available online from the college Youtube site. The intellectual Forum also hosted a number of hugely significant international conferences, including the third Yidan prize conference in march celebrating the two winners of the Yidan prize, the largest prize in the world in education, as well as a global climate Finance conference with award-winning film director Kelly nyks. Kelly managed to capture much of this conference for an upcoming documentary, and we are looking

Daniel Beltrá photography presentation: From Antarctica to the Amazon


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Attendees at The Yidan Prize Conference

forward to seeing our very own Frankopan hall on the big screen! We also hosted an anglo-russian ‘track 2’ conference, with attendees from both countries discussing smart cities and digital healthcare. The long running rustat conferences have been re-named as the jesus college conferences and continued to run very successfully. This year the conferences have been focussed around the future of homes, housing and urbanisation, as well as food, farming and climate change. both of these conferences welcomed very high-level attendees, resulting in some incredibly poignant discussions. These conferences rely on annual membership from benefactors, and we are always happy to hear from anyone interested! We have also continued our programme of hosting summer student interns; this year giving the opportunity to three exceptional projects looking in to the effects of coVid-19 on school meals, philosophy and ai, and mapping and identity. unfortunately, a few of our events (including all of those planned for the cambridge science Festival 2020), were postponed due to coVid-19. however, we did not let this prevent us from continuing to host engaging events with the college community, and spent the summer term providing weekly online panel discussions for the college community – the first of these, on historical lessons, is written up elsewhere in this report. These, too, were successful, and have opened the door for us to experiment with more digital content in the future. There is something for everyone and we would love to see you at some of our events next year, whether in person or online! Raymond Antrobus poetry readings


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science & human dimension project (shdp): plans and retrospective jonathan samuel cornwell, executive director of the science & human dimension project the academic year 2019-20 at the london Frontline club with a collaboration Wone began a conference titled ‘how Technology is changing journalism in a post-Truth age’,

an event of the research project ‘russian readings’. shdp brought together key members from its network of writers, investigative journalists, editors, techies, and shaped an agenda which discussed the effect of new technology on journalism: manipulation of facts, fake news; social media in political campaigning; prospects for regulation, and legislation. ‘russian readings’ was launched in 2018 with seminars at the university of leeds and the university of oxford (organised in partnership with the british association for slavonic and east european studies, a member of the academy of social sciences), covering issues on media and urban activism. Future Plans: Venice Biennale 2021 shdp is producing a series of symposia at the majlis exhibition at the Venice architecture biennale. The 2021 biennale (postponed from 2020) will address the question: How will we live together?, an urgent theme given the coVid-19 pandemic, climate change and migrant crises. our collaboration will focus on the majlis – meaning a council or a traditional meeting place, public or private, in the regions of the arabian gulf. constructed from bamboo, one of the most sustainable natural building materials, the Venice exhibit is designed by renowned architects simón Velez and stefana simic, and covered with fabric made by weavers from a women’s collective in the atlas mountains of morocco. The symposia will run from may and november 2021 and take place in the majlis, situated in the gardens of the abbey of san giorgio maggiore, the benedictine monastery and Venetian landmark. The symposia will address the theme of ‘living together’ from a variety of perspectives: low carbon buildings; city dwelling; intemperate climates; food security; relationship between community and traditional crafts. speakers will come from an international and interdisciplinary mix of expertise, including researchers from the university of cambridge. college members in Venice during the biennale are invited to join the symposia. Technology Platforms and Data – The Manipulation of Choice rapid progress in the technologies that drive collection and analysis of data has the potential to solve or mitigate many social, industrial, and technological crises. however, such solutions come with risks as well as benefits. as we emerge from lockdown, we plan a series of discussions and outreach publications to raise public awareness of the scope and extent of the advantages and disadvantages of new data technologies and platforms: the convenience and satisfaction to consumers and businesses; and the social and ethical dilemmas. harvesting of personal data not only makes predictions but yields consequences: for example, addiction to social media leads to manipulation as well as expansion of choices. We will also question the structure and status of the big technology platforms which some now liken to sovereign states, rather than simply businesses. The forum will build on our previous work in artificial intelligence, involving specialists in information technology alongside behavioural psychologists, ethicists, and public policy participants from industry, government, and the media.


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Working under pandemic conditions Traditional conference formats are challenged by coVid-19 social distancing measures. While it is possible to reach an almost unlimited number of people online, watching hours of talking heads on screen is exhausting and unappealing. We shall be testing new formats to improve our conference experience. outreach via the media remains a crucial priority. at the same time we aim to produce podcasts of presentations and interviews, as well as animated content for school and university student audiences. reviving an earlier successful shdp conference (science – The next generation 1998), we plan meetings for early career scientists and technologists across a broad span of disciplines. We encourage college junior and old members interested in our work to make contact at jc2160@cam.ac.uk Thirtieth Anniversary covid severely curtailed our activities. Yet as well as planning for the future, the lock-down has afforded an opportunity to review our origins and progress. in 1989, on sabbatical from Fleet street, john cornwell was offered funding from a family charity to start up a public understanding of science forum. on a visit to the princeton institute of advanced studies, he consulted professor Freeman dyson the eminent theoretical physicist and futurist. our thirtieth anniversary has sadly coincided with Freeman’s death in February 2020. Freeman advocated bringing together alternating specialist researchers with senior science journalists to discuss current vital topics in the natural sciences, medicine and technology. he believed this was preferable to the lone celebrity expositor eager to talk Professor Freeman Dyson FRS 15 December 1923 – 28 February 2020 on each and any topic. “There is no such thing as a unique scientific vision”, he said. “science is a mosaic of partial and conflicting visions . . . one of the central facts about science is that it belongs to everybody who is willing to make the effort to learn it.” a small team of voluntary part-timers came together, including Tudor jenkins – ai researcher, as media manager, and a succession of rapporteurs, the most recent being nathan brooker – formerly a jesus graduate student, now a Financial Times editor (his article on student mentoring appears in the articles’ section of this edition). Four colleges in cambridge, three in oxford, and one in london, offered shdp a home. The enthusiasm of the then master, colin renfrew, brought the project to jesus. Two jesus Fellows acted as principal advisers and links to college council: jeremy butterfield of hps, and the physicist, the late john adkins; many other Fellows have offered assistance down the years, including alastair compston, paul alexander, Tim jenkins, nick ray and stephen heath. our current Fellow sponsor to council is simone schnall. The project proposes its future activities to council, and reports retrospectively.


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in 1992 we brought Freeman dyson over from america to speak at our first major symposium on the debate over radical reductionism in science versus holistic and emergent perspectives. The text was published in the New York Review of Books (25 may 1995), and formed the introduction to our first volume of conference presentations titled nature’s imagination, alongside contributions from first-class expositors of their specialities: gerald edelman, oliver sacks, patricia churchland, margaret boden, mary midgley, john barrow, roger penrose, and others. published by oup, the book was enthusiastically reviewed in Nature “a collection of intellectual vignettes welded together into a drama that anyone interested in complex systems and philosophy will want to read and savour”. it was also reviewed in an essay by the eminent physicist stephen Weinberg, again in the New York Review of Books: “reductionism redux” (october 10, 1995), becoming a classic text in the reductionism debate. national and international coverage of nature’s imagination set a standard of media outreach in years to come. We have aimed to bring scientists and people in the humanities together, while the qualitative conclusions are communicated to a wider public. our activities and investigations have generated articles in Nature, New Scientist, The Guardian, The Observer, Sunday Times Magazine, Brain, Science, New Statesman, as well as many broadcasts, including the bbc’s Today, start the Week, and beyond belief. in more recent years we have produced short films for online viewing. Through the intervening years the project has published eight books with oup, penguin, and bloomsbury. outreach beyond the college and university was successful from the outset. involvement of undergraduates has always been a challenge. The coleridge society, which we revived after an abeyance of several decades, formed a popular attraction for junior members, college staff, and family members. There were occasions, such as the night when Francis crick talked on consciousness, when we attracted more than 400 attendees, prompting a move from upper hall to the chapel. in october 2003 we produced the play “copenhagen” to a packed audience at the new arts Theatre. The playwright michael Frayn came to take questions from the mostly student audience. after coVid-19 we intend reviving both the college media society and the coleridge society.

TV producers David Chikwe and Emma Reeves discuss the depiction of AI in film and TV with Zoe Wible (University of Kent) and Dr Hallvard Haug (Birkbeck, University of London) at the SHDP AI in Sci-Fi Film and Literature conference


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Funding and the Rustats The science & human dimension project was eventually funded by a variety of individuals and corporate institutions. in 2009 we established the rustat conference series, providing start-up funding of £150,000 from our own resources, to cover the first three years. The conferences were named after Tobias rustat, a 17th century benefactor of the college (following a recommendation of our legacy of slavery Working party, the meetings were renamed jesus college conferences). it was year of the banking collapse; the goal was to broaden topics to include urgent economic, political, and societal issues. The third conference on june 10, 2010 was entitled ‘infrastructure and the Future of society’. professor lord mair, then master, writes: ‘[the conference] organised by jonathan cornwell and myself, and attended by ray o’rourke, chairman and chief executive of laing o’rourke group, helped facilitate funding for the laing o’rourke chair in engineering and the centre in the same name in the engineering department’. With the establishment of the intellectual Forum, and the new West court buildings, we were able to pass over the former rustat conferences with their membership funding, to dr julian huppert, the new director of the Forum. meanwhile shdp has covered a span of themes in scientific medicine: stem cells, immunology, monoclonal antibodies, neurology, recreational drugs, and especially oncology. professor bruce ponder writes: “in the mid 1990s, we set out to build a new cancer centre in cambridge, to leverage the interaction between world class cambridge science and the clinic. in this we were greatly helped by funding – some £30m in total – from li Ka-shing his interest was catalysed by articles on cambridge medicine he read in the Sunday Times Magazine by john cornwell as director of the science & human dimension project, initial funding, attracting more funding, enabled us to build what is now an internationally recognised centre… [expanding to] over 600 active participants from physical and biological sciences, institutes, pharma, biotech, clinical, public health, and legal, social and ethical disciplines across all of cambridge.” The most recent cycle of six shdp conferences was supported by funding we secured from deepmind and the Templeton Foundation, focused on artificial intelligence. collaborating with demis hassabis, ceo of deepmind, we brought together ai technicians and constituencies of academics in the humanities, including literature studies, philosophy, anthropology, ethics, and psychology. as the project reaches its thirtieth anniversary, we express our gratitude to the master and Fellows of jesus for offering the project a base, and those beyond the college who helped make things happen, including professors lord martin rees, john naughton, the late gerald edelman, and the late peter lipton. books published under the auspices of shdp: Nature’s Imagination ed. john cornwell, introduction Freeman dyson; Consciousness and Human Identity ed. john cornwell, introduction mary midgely; Explanations ed. john cornwell, introduction peter lipton; Hitler’s Scientists john cornwell; Power to Harm john cornwell; God and the Physicists ed. john cornwell and michael mcghee; Darwin’s Angel john cornwell; Scientist as Rebel Freeman dyson.

Further information can be found on the project’s website: www.science-human.org


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bursarY I Jesus College Annual Report 2020

bursary richard anthony, bursar tenth year in which i have been a bursar, firstly at st edmund’s college and 2020moreis therecently at jesus. To say that it has been an extraordinary and unprecedented year is

an understatement. although the college never closed during the pandemic (we had at least 120 students in residence in college accommodation and maintained a catering service throughout), it was very strange to walk through the college during may Week in silence. i should therefore start by paying tribute to the staff and fellows, who have sustained the college, some remotely and away from the support of their colleagues, at such a difficult time. in a college where place and community are so important, holding meetings by Zoom or Teams has not been an easy adjustment, and i very much look forward to a time when the college returns to a more normal pattern of activity. on the financial side, very few students in residence has meant little income from student rents or catering, and there has been no external conferencing business, on which the college is now reliant to support its core educational activities. The college moved swiftly to reduce its costs, in particular making use of the coronavirus job retention scheme. difficult decisions were made to close down or substantially curtail activities. despite the financial losses, the college remains in a robust financial position, although there is considerable risk in the future in terms of the uncertainty of income, the ongoing cost of college operations, and the performance of the endowment, which is particularly reliant on rents from properties in and around cambridge. more recently, the focus has been on planning for the reopening of the college and the start of the michaelmas Term. We very much look forward to many of our students returning or arriving at cambridge, and our aim is to make their experience as positive and collegiate as possible. putting aside the pandemic, the college has made substantial progress on the Kitchen project, which, as i reported last year, involves a major redevelopment and upgrade of our main catering and dining facilities. The project will transform the ‘medieval’ working conditions for our staff, but also provide for full disabled access to the hall and

A computer generated image of the extension work currently being carried out as part of the Kitchen Project taken by the architect Paul Vonberg


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upper hall, a much large servery for our students where we can offer wider range of meals, and a more sustainable and efficient operation. Key to this was obtaining planning permission in march this year, after a long and drawn-out process with cambridge city council and historic england. We immediately started work on the redevelopment of the Forum buildings (the old marshalls workshops), which will be the home for our catering and dining when the main Kitchen and hall are closed. here the college had an opportunity to reconfigure and upgrade buildings originally designed as a large garage, and more recently used for student activities and storage. We will surely be the only college to have its dining hall located in a building that was previously used to repair motor vehicles. in the Forum there is enough space to accommodate the hall, upper hall, servery and the Kitchen, all on one level and with several exits and entrances (a bonus in a coVid-conscious world). The Forum hall, when completed, will retain its striking industrial architecture, and i do hope at some point in the future you will have an opportunity to see what we have done. We will be moving our catering and dining operations to the Forum in time for the start of the michaelmas Term. The downside of coVid will be a delay to the completion of the Kitchen project, so we do not expect to return to the hall and new Kitchen until july 2022. The past academic year also saw the college focus on sustainability and the environment. Through a reformed environmental committee, chaired by the president, the whole college community has been taking action to improve our environmental performance. With food, we have looked at sourcing our products from more sustainable sources, improved our non-meat dining options and introduced meat-free Tuesdays for both caff and high Table. The college now buys its electricity from renewable sources, much of it from a solar farm in cambridgeshire. When undertaking building work, the college has committed to pursuing projects which are environmentally enhancing, from fitting secondary glazing to some of our older properties to moving all-electric in the kitchens. The electricity supply to the college will be upgraded to help us move away from gas as fuel for heating and hot water, a key part of which will be the installation of a ground source heat pump as part of the Kitchen project. The college recently achieved a gold award in the cambridge green impact awards. as regards the endowment, the

Entrance to the newly finished Forum taken by the architect Paul Vonberg


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college has been consulting internally and externally on developing a new responsible investment policy. in november 2019 the college hosted a conference on climate change and the endowment focused specifically on the collegiate university, and in january 2020 we became the first college to join the responsible investment network universities. The college’s endowment continues to be managed to provide steady, long-term real rates of return, supported by advice from the college’s Financial and property investment committees. property in and around cambridge remains a focus for significant future gains. greater cambridge is currently reviewing its local plan, and the college made a number of submissions in relation to its property on station road, to the west of cambridge off grange road, and as part of the cambridge south development (between the m11 and the cambridge biomedical campus). We were pleased to receive planning permission to replace the redundant garages on elm street (backing onto new square) with one and two bed houses. in 2018/19 returns from the college’s financial and property investment assets were 6.6%, slightly below the target of 4%+rpi, with lower returns in the financial markets being compensated for by gains in the property portfolio. although financial markets have held up surprisingly well during 2020, there is still significant risk associated with brexit and longer-term consequences of the pandemic for both financial and property investments. The broader outlook is one of considerable uncertainty, not least of which is associated with coVid-19. The impact on the college’s conferencing business is particularly unclear. The funding and future of pensions, notably uss, are of particular concern. The threat of a cut in undergraduate fees appears to have subsided, but the college continues to face a high level of public interest in student access and participation. The college has seen consistent improvements in the social diversity of its undergraduate intake. however, there is ongoing pressure to increase resources spent on education at a time when fee income for uK students is static. The college has a persistent substantial deficit on its education account (see below), which is supported through donations, returns from the endowment and conferencing income, all of which are threatened by the current economic uncertainty.

College Income & Expenditure 2018/29


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at the core of the college’s services to its members are its very dedicated staff. in september 2019, we welcomed alexis moreau as manciple, who joined us from robinson college, followed by jo Webb in april 2020 as head of hr, joining us from st catherine’s college. i would like to make special mention of cheryl Few, who left the college in january after 10 years’ service as hr manager; her advice and support has been invaluable to me and my predecessors. one of the more pleasurable duties of my position is to write to members of staff who have been given long-service awards. of particular note is michael morris, who has been with the college for 40 years, an astonishing record of service! Ten years jamie andersen – porters hugh granger brown – porters jenny man – housing stephen sayers – butler Fifteen years susan Webb – iT Twenty years peter moore – maintenance jill hynes – hr geoffrey howe – porters justin harborow – catering Zelda goreing – catering patricia donoghue – housekeeping Twenty-five years jacqueline poskitt – college nurse graham appleby – head porter Thirty years susan chapman – housekeeping Forty years michael morris – gardens

e Forum Hall


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deVelopmenT and alumni relaTions oFFice I Jesus College Annual Report 2020

development and alumni relations office emily Williams, director of development and alumni relations he past academic year got off to a very promising and celebratory start when sonita Talleyne obe was admitted as the 41st master, the first woman to lead jesus college

since its foundation in 1496. a year of firsts ensued with the college community coming together (properly socially distanced of course) in countless unforeseen ways. michaelmas and lent Terms were characteristically busy; we welcomed alumni back to college for 50-, 60-, and 70- Years on lunches, and a popular reunion dinner for those who matriculated in 1964, 1965, 1966, and 1967. These opportunities to interact in college with members of the alumni community are always so rewarding and inspiring, if even a bit surprising to learn of the many creative ways in which some of our former students managed to slip back into college over the walls after the gates were shut and locked for the night. our annual programme of events grew in michaelmas Term when we hosted three new events – a postgraduate alumni reunion event, a ‘celebration of classics’ hosted by the college held alongside the Faculty of classics triennial greek play and ‘The Fortieth’. ‘The Fortieth’ in particular was a special celebration, marking 40 years of mixed education, with over 200 alumni, Fellows, staff and students coming together to celebrate the college and its community. our september 2019 Telephone campaign was again a highly successful one, showing that Telephone campaigns remain an incredibly valuable means of engaging alumni. our student callers spoke with over 400 alumni who shared insights into their time as students, offered career and life advice and donated funds in support of the college’s core priorities. While we are thrilled that so many alumni contribute financially to undergraduate


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Student callers in the 2019 Telephone Campaign

bursaries and postgraduate scholarships, maintaining and upgrading our beautiful buildings and, the hallmark of a cambridge education, the supervision system, we are equally delighted that alumni have the opportunity to catch up with current students. a new and popular addition to this year’s campaign saw our student callers contacting recent graduates just to “check in” and see what their first year after graduation had been like! in honour of ‘The Fortieth’, with continued philanthropic support from alumni and the college, we established a new bursary to support undergraduate students in financial hardship. We were also delighted to work with the intellectual Forum on hosting the lisa jardine lecture with professor amanda Vickery, an annual event we envisage becoming our flagship alumni lecture. We continue to increase capacity in our office to build on our fundraising and alumni engagement success. We welcomed ms Yulia shpak to the newly created role of database and prospect research administrator, whilst mrs ali spragg had to leave us to return to the iT office due to increasing demand for online services. From the close of lent Term we have put all our events on hold. in june, we organised virtual events in lieu of the donors’ garden party and the society of st radegund dinner, and are working to make sure our events remain accessible and engaging in a virtual format. We have missed hosting all of our events; we were particularly sad that the april reunion dinner, for matriculation years 1931-57, was unable to go ahead – our youngest attendee would have been a spritely 81! We even cancelled our march Telephone campaign after only three days – albeit three very successful ones. if there is any joy to share from this difficult and uncertain period it has been seeing the college come together to support our community. We implemented an alumni-calling initiative that began with reaching out to the alumni who were missing their april reunion dinner. once lockdown measures were announced we expanded this initiative to reach out to alumni aged over 70 who were part of the vulnerable category identified by public health england. We have also sought to keep our alumni community engaged via Facebook


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and Twitter, the college website, and our e-newsletters, through which we share highlights from students, Fellows, and alumni. The entire college community has given so much this year to make the most of these unprecedented times. although we will be very glad to return to some form of normality, i have been consistently impressed by the innovative ways in which all members of the college community have supported each other. i would like to take this opportunity to thank the team: ali, alice, amy, nikki, ryan and Yulia, for all their hard work and efforts throughout this past year. it truly takes a village. Recognition of Major Benefactors We were unable to host our annual society of st radegund dinner this june, but we are delighted to be able to welcome gurnee hart (1994) as our newest st radegund Fellow, and max hadfield (1961), William burnside (1970), and leigh collins (1967) as new members of the society of st radegund. We look forward to being able to celebrate their induction properly. Bequests The college wishes to record its great gratitude for bequests received during the 2019/20 academic year from the following individuals: professor christopher hogwood; mrs gita Furber de la Fuente; clive oxley (1957); mr phil and mrs lucy Vignoles; mr lewis ingram; bryan dixon (1957); john day (1945).

We would normally share our calendar of events for the forthcoming academic year alongside this report. Whilst we will of course still look to celebrate these auspicious occasions, in particular reunions and anniversaries, we hope you will appreciate they cannot be the social events as we have known them. We continue to monitor government guidance on social distancing and large gatherings, in addition to the safety and well-being of our resident community. We thank you for your understanding.


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societies Student Union The jesus college student union has had a busy year so far after handing over from the previous committee who prepared us well for the year ahead We started the year building on the successes of last year’s inaugural ‘refreshers’ Week’, which the first-years loved! They really enjoyed the silent disco put on by our ents officers matt and ollie, and the international language café ran by our international officer satya, where over a dozen different languages were represented. our green officer Zak has been working closely with college on sustainability and ethical investments, and at the lent Term ogm, over 50 students discussed the issue, with pizzas faithfully provided by our secretary sameer! We have continued to push for greater sustainability in college and the domestic bursar’s extensive knowledge of the subject has been very helpful to bring jesus closer to achieving our sustainability goals. students particularly enjoyed the bursar’s open sessions on ethical investments and the jcsu is planning a bank-switching party next term. The jcsu has sought to listen to student concerns carefully – our services officer heather introduced a services requests form and we have held discussion Forums for marginalised groups in college. in lent Term, led by our Treasurer, Will davison, we introduced sad lamps in the library, and these have proven very popular! We were also able to work with the dean of college to reform the college disciplinary system to essentially remove the use of monetary fines as punishments in college. our lgbTQ+ officer ben has had numerous successes, from introducing a gender expression Fund to setting up the college’s first lgbTQ+ college families. our Women and non-binary officer jess molyneux has also led the way by introducing sustainable period provisions and increasing all Women/nb gym hours. our Vice-president octavia rooks made sure that second years had a halfway hall to remember, and working with the manciple and the senior Tutor we were able to cut the price by almost 1/3 and provide subsidised tickets for those on bursaries. The food was absolutely delicious and the wine flowed freely all night! a particular highlight for me this year was observing the legacies of slavery Working party alongside our erm officer bobby. it has been an absolute privilege to engage in long-term structural change in college and seeing it transform in real time to become a better and more welcoming institution. The pressures of the coronavirus pandemic have made this year particularly challenging for students, staff and Fellows. jcsu committee members have shown resolve in dealing with the pandemic to still operate effectively despite the demands of the pandemic. our Welfare officers, honor and Tom have been running bake-offs, sending out facemasks and being points of contact for those who need them. communications officer jacob powell put a particularly large amount of work into Virtual jesus, a platform established to keep jesus’ famous community spirit alive despite us being away from college. Virtual jesus will continue as a resource into michaelmas term, being repurposed for use during our ‘blended’ Freshers’ Week. our access officer cormac has selected college families, continuing the tradition of putting all of the freshers named ‘james’ in one family. our Freshers’ officer libby and i are currently involved in making sure the student experience for Freshers’ Week is as brilliant as usual, and we’re hoping for more attendance at morning events given that the nightclubs will be closed! libby has put an enormous amount of work into Freshers’ Week despite sitting her end of year medicine exams almost simultaneously!


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i have been impressed and humbled by the herculean effort on the part of the jcsu committee and the college in dealing with the coronavirus pandemic and i want to pay tribute to everyone involved in ensuring the smooth running of college despite these pressures. it has been an honour serving as jcsu president and seeing a very difficult situation bring out the best in the people of jesus college. i wish those graduating this year the best of luck and i’d like to thank everyone for the support shown to the jcsu and its concerns this year. Aurelio Petrucci *

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Middle Combinaton Room (MCR) The academic year 2019-20 has been a successful and interesting one. jesus college mcr is known for being very active with social events, friendly and welcoming to all students. This year, we welcomed over 180 new postgraduate students to our community. at the start of michaelmas Term, we hosted our popular mcr Freshers Fortnight, which included a Welcome hall and a speech by our new master – her first address to new students at college. We held our other staple events, including a welfare brunch, punting, Formal swaps, movie nights and wine-tasting. events didn’t stop there! our halloween-themed graduate halls, christmas super hall and burns night super hall sold out in record time. all grad halls and high Table Tuesdays continue to be popular Formal bookings. a big thank-you to the social officers, chris green, joe shaughnessy and luis alberto ramírez garcía, for continuing to host this range of events for our postgraduate community. as for academic events, our academic officer, laura Taylor, has so far organised two Thesis halls, during which Fellows and college post-doctoral associates explain their research in three minutes. laura also put on our postgraduate conference, with keynote speaker craig bennett, ceo of The Wildlife Trusts, followed by a hugely enjoyable dinner. i’d like to thank laura and everyone involved for making this day such a success. The mcr committee also helps to look after the welfare of the postgraduate students. our welfare officers have continued to support the mcr community with brunches, workshops, yoga and conversational english Tea. as we arrived in mid-march, we soon realised we would have to rethink how we function as a community: the loss of easter term marked the start of ‘Virual jesus’. Virtual jesus is an initiative to provide college-content online and was spearheaded by our communications champion and mcr Vice-president, orla Woodward. along with the jcsu communications officer, jacob powell, a jesuan computer scientist, david adeboye, and a team of content managers, they created a virtual environment for all jesuans to stay connected throughout the remainder of the academic year under the pandemic. a big thank you to orla and the team for their hard work in keeping the community together during the easter Term. For postgraduates who remained in onsite college accommodation during lockdown (~100), we banded together and had a little community. it was nice to see students maximise the use of the college grounds for their daily exercise, and as restrictions eased we were gradually able to have socially distanced dinner together outside in small groups and continuing to maintain a sense of community. We were very lucky to have the catering team continue to provide two hot meals per day during weekdays throughout lockdown. Thank you to the manciple and catering team for keeping this service operating. The role of mcr president has enabled me to work with college to help provide the best method of re-integration of students to the college environment and i look forward


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to see how the community progresses with the new challenges ahead. as a final year phd student, and mcr president, i am honoured to have behind me the most supportive committee, college community, Tutorial department and college staff. Bee Fonseka *

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Big Band jesus college big band (jcbb) has had another successful year, building off of last year’s successes, and securing several gigs in a short space of time. With jack lawrence at the helm as musical director, working with saffie patel as president, the band was able to completely overhaul our repertoire for the first time in a few years, and position ourselves well for the future. This year saw many returning faces to jcbb, as well as some new ones, but we’ve all had a blast. Tuesday rehearsals featured not only plenty of talented music making, but also invigorating debates about lawyers being wizards, and which biscuit stacks constitute acceptable sandwiches! We started our year with a reprise of last year’s in clare cellars for a sold out (not to mention hot and crowded!) event between clare ents and jesus. it was a very fun night and a great chance to introduce some of the new members of our band. our audiences’ enthusiastic dancing to the likes of Uptown Funk could always make us smile and give us the motivation to play one more song. We also really enjoyed playing at blues and chill in november, showing off some of our new repertoire and our wonderful new vocalist, the amazing ariella gordon! lent Term saw another fun gig, as we played over brunch for the john hughes arts Festival, with jack and ariella trading vocal solos, and even an incredibly special feature of the dean, james crockford, on alto sax! We spent much the rest of the term working on repertoire and performing at may ball auditions, which went very well and we managed to line up several performances in the summer, but sadly events out of our control meant that these did not come to pass. hopefully all our hard work in learning new music can really pay off next year as we wow people with all we’ve learn over the months! The horns this year could not be stopped, with the trumpet section of henry gale, eva cottingham-mayall, izaac mammadov, and sam rogers always providing a firm and


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reliable lead. izabella perera and oliver hope (alto saxes), saffie patel and barney medhurst (tenor saxes) were accompanied by jacob dale, giving us his unique take on what a baritone sax can do. matthew moore, Finn Kinsler o’sullivan and jack lawrence (trombones) were joined this year by Thomas pelling, who always knew when to throw in a good sad trombone noise in rehearsals! We could always count on a laid-back groove to be laid down by ben james (keys), rowan Fox (bass) and nick Taylor (drums) in the rhythm section. ariella gordon (and occasionally myself!) were the icing on the cake, with their fabulous vocals soaring over the top of the band, and sometimes being quite literally instrumental in attracting a crowd! it has been so enjoyable and rewarding to make music with this group of friends all year, and i hope next year, with rowan Fox taking over as musical director, will be just as fun. Jack Lawrence *

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Christian Union The jesus college christian union (jccu) is a group of undergraduate students in college that meets as a constituent part of the cambridge inter-collegiate christian union (ciccu). We are united by our christian faith and we seek to make jesus known around college. at the start of michaelmas term we welcomed many freshers to the group, some of whom we met on the ciccu ‘Freshers getaway’ in late september. This was an exciting beginning to the year, and it was fantastic to see both new and old faces at our meetings. We held a number of ‘church search breakfasts’ on sunday mornings so that new members could find out about cambridge churches from older students. Throughout michaelmas and lent term we met twice weekly for a Friday morning prayer meeting and a saturday evening bible study meeting, which was re-named as ‘explore’ this year. during ‘explore’ meetings, we read through different passages of matthew’s gospel, discussing what the good news of jesus means for our lives. We also ran some ‘Text-a-Toastie’ events in college, where members of college gave us a question or a topic that they would like to talk about, and we delivered a toastie and chatted with them in return. at the end of michaelmas term, we celebrated christmas by attending the ciccu carol services in great st mary’s church. These were wonderful evenings filled with fun, singing and the story of jesus’s birth. at the beginning of lent term, some of our members went away on the ciccu getaway, which was a great chance to enjoy christian fellowship and think about the term ahead. a big highlight of lent term was the ciccu events week, this year named ‘life: is there meaning in the mess?’. students from across the university gathered to explore where and how we find meaning in the lives that we live and how the christian faith speaks into our personal stories. We are very thankful to Vi russell, a graduate of Queen’s college, who joined us as a ‘college guest’ for this week. The easter holidays saw a change of leadership at jccu, just as lockdown began. This was undoubtedly a strange time for all, but the new reps did a wonderful job of holding weekly bible study and prayer meetings on Zoom during the easter term. This was a brilliant way to continue to be encouraged by each other, read the bible and pray together even if we could not physically meet. in addition, we ran a ‘Text-a-postie’ event, where members of college could ask a question about the christian faith and receive a postcard from a member of jccu in response.


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We would like to extend our huge thanks to The rev’d james crockford for the invaluable support that he has offered to jccu this year; it has been wonderful to get to know him as the new dean of chapel. Callie Smith and Tim Smith *

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College Colours Awards The college colours awards aim to recognise exceptional contribution to college sports in a sporting or non-sporting capacity, rewarding both excellence and contribution. The awards recognise cumulative contributions and achievements with most recipients being towards the end of their course and having demonstrated success and commitment throughout their time at college. The recipients, who are nominated and voted in by the current captains of all the college sports, are true role models for college sport and highlight the time and dedication that goes into sport at jesus college. This year the awards were posted specially-made badges as unfortunately it wasn’t possible to hold a ceremony this year. college colours were awarded to: • edward hyde: awarded for his extraordinary contribution to a wide variety of college sports, principally hockey, squash and cricket. ed was squash captain in his second year, a key player throughout his time here, leading the team to cuppers semi-finals as captain. he is always keen to contribute to different sports as well, finding time for the odd football match on top of his other collegiate and university sporting commitments. he managed all this alongside the spectacular feat of competing for 6 different university sports, obtaining two Full blues and several half blues, and winning hawk of the Year 2020. Nominated by Dougie Dolleymore. • harriet pinto: hattie is a valued member of both the ladies and mixed hockey teams at jesus, as well as the ladies and mixed netball and lacrosse teams. she was a key contributor to a cuppers win in mixed hockey, a league win in women’s hockey and three consecutive jesus-jesus Varsity hockey wins. she has shown admirable dedication to all her sports, always playing and making herself available with great sportsmanship and enthusiasm. The netball team always appreciated her speed and agility, achieving semi-finals two years running in cuppers with her help. Nominated by Sejal Karmarkar, Lucy Bell and Jamie Hogg. • patrick merchant: patrick’s consistent and well-rounded participation in jesus hockey has reaped dividends both on and off the pitch. his dedication and high levels of commitment contributed to the exceptional success of jesus in hockey in recent years, with cuppers wins across all teams in his second year. he also has been a generous and friendly face, regularly hosting socials and cooking for all of jchc in his kitchen, doing all this and his strong field defence with a smile on his face. Nominated by Oscar Bray. • hannah sanderson: hannah has been a stalwart of jesus Women’s Football for all of her three years, and took on the mantle of captain in her second, leading the team to cuppers finals. in her third year she went on to captain the university second team, but still found time to run training sessions for her college, supporting the captain emma and helping many to flourish at a sport they had never tried before. she has also made sure she has played every match, come rain or high wind, and is always generous with her time and energy and a positive influence to all, a true credit to herself, her sport and jesus college. Nominated by Emma Lezé. • meredydd Kippax-jones: during his four years at jesus, meredydd has been diligent and conscientious member of the men’s Firsts, and his skill was instrumental in the


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excellence performance of the team, with a cuppers win this year, and 2nd in the league, amongst other achievements. meredydd is a dedicated and talented badminton player, but also was a regular on the pitch with jesus rugby, and his enthusiasm and consistency mark him out as a true asset to both his sports. Nominated by Chuen Low. • cara james: cara is an immensely talented athlete, leading cuac this year as president and excelling in the heavy throw discipline, so she has been a real asset as both as captain of jesus athetics this year, and as a thrower in each of her years, including cuppers victories and second place. she has also played an important role in the jesus amazons, a society for female athletes and the promotion of sport amongst women, by fostering social ties and increasing funding for the society, with the aim of encouraging participation in sport and rewarding the existing. Nominated by Eliza Bond. • jakub priban: jakub founded jesus Volleyball in 2018, single-handedly securing new funding, access to regular training and increasing participation and skill in the sport amongst jesuans. he led the team to cuppers finals this year, an impressive achievement for so new a club. he has also been a steadfast and committed member of jcbc, rowing throughout his time, and taking on various roles of responsibility such as stash sec, and is always enthusiastic to help fellow sportspeople in need of players, including a few dalliances in mixed netball. Nominated by Bentley Carr. Lara Tritton *

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Eliot’s Face Eliot’s Face is jesus’ arts magazine, and returned from hiatus as lockdown began, as a way for us to fill our suddenly empty weeks away from cambridge. it is intended as a space to play: for wit, wordplay, the self-aware, any works in progress, and generally art for art’s sake. We include art from all members of the college community, from alumni to staff to the current student body. our first issue as editors coincided with 20 years since the magazine first began, back in 2000. We wanted to celebrate this rich history with a special edition, Eliot at 20. We reached out to alumni, and the response was incredible, with people who matriculated as far back as 1953 excited to contribute. We were delighted with the range of submissions we received – paintings, photography, poetry, and prose, ranging from the emotional and serious to the giddy and light-hearted. publishing Eliot from home came with its own set of challenges, mainly ensuring that we could still produce a print edition. This resulted in a few days of posting and packing, where Eliot ended up travelling as far as australia! When asking people to purchase a copy, we asked for charitable donations for our two chosen charities: student minds cambridge and the national Theatre. our total money raised came to £266.84! as we return to cambridge, we’re excited to continue what began in lockdown, and see Eliot spread its wings to return home. look out for a new edition in michaelmas – and if you’re a jesuan in any shape or form who creates art, send it to us at: eliotsface-editor@jcsu.jesus.cam.ac.uk Lucy Bell & Olivia Emily *

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Feminism Society This year has seen a blend of the comfortingly familiar and some very new terrain for Femsoc, as we faced the challenges of faciliatating feminist discussion amidst the pandemic just as the new committee were hitting their stride. at the beginning of the year, we saw a surge in attendance from both male and female freshers who joined our discussions on consent, contraception, intersectionality, social media and beauty, and women’s bodies in patriarchy. in michaelmas, we also hosted a collaboration with green Week to discuss gendered climate injustice and women’s role in environmental movements. Throughout the year, we have also hosted craft and college nights, a really enjoyable way of fostering female creativity, providing a space for relaxation and unstructured feminist conversation. in lent, Femsoc supported the Week of the Woman celebrations in the run up to international Women’s day with a nuanced discussion on whether feminism should (and could) be an all-female movement. We held our regular weekly discussion on topics from ‘daddy issues’ to women in pop culture. one highlight was learning about the history of the ‘c’ word from guest speaker sorcha Keenan, which prompted a lively and well-attended discussion on gendered obscenity, reclamation, and the role of language in social movements. a number of us joined the reclaim the night march (just a few weeks before the country went into lockdown), which, as always, was an evening of mixed emotions: empowering and energetic but profoundly emotive and thought-provoking. The pandemic made easter term a little trickier: our intimate weekly discussion groups in the jcr became impossible. nevertheless, we did our best to continue facilitating regular feminist discourse by hosting weekly reading group sessions, with participants invited to share the feminist theory or fiction which they were getting stuck into over lockdown. in the wake of the black lives matter viral moment which followed on from the tragic death of george Floyd in may, we felt it was important to address the ways in which misogyny and white supremacy intersect, and hosted a discussion on black feminist theory. We focussed on the work of audre lorde, reni eddo-lodge, and Kimblerle crenshaw, and discussed the say her name movement as well as the role of anger in activism. having just recruited our inter-year committee for 2020/1, we’re really excited about what this academic year will bring, and feel ready to face the challenges of coVid-19 and the new normal. We look forward to welcoming the freshers into a supportive and stimulating feminist space! Jess Molyneux


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Graduate Conference The mcr hosted its annual conference on saturday 7th march. The event was a showcase of the outstanding research completed by the mcr community and was thoroughly enjoyed by all. it is very rare that an academic event is as truly interdisciplinary as the graduate conference at jesus college. i hope that everyone who attended left having learnt something new and enjoyed engaging with research far removed from their own work. sixteen mcr members gave talks at the conference with all presentations being of an exceptional standard. our talk judges, graduate Tutors professor Tim Wilkinson and dr sybil stacpoole, had a difficult task when choosing our prize winners. They awarded the best Talk by a phd student to jake moscrop. jake presented a visually stunning presentation where he clearly explained his work on improving pollination of broad beans. The runner up prize was awarded to justine provino for her memorable presentation which included a discussion on whether a medieval manuscript is more of a book than a contemporary artist’s book made of cheese. Finally, ella monkcom won the best Talk by a master’s student prize. ella gave a thought-provoking talk entitled ‘i was just in a world of horror and pain – breastfeeding expectations and women’s realities’. over lunch, sixteen mcr members gave poster presentations. This provided an excellent opportunity to informally learn about the work of our friends in the mcr. joy shih, belinda Fonseka and Will duggleby were our prize winners. They presented work on pulmonary arterial hypertension, ‘calcite (romeo) and stearic acid (juliet): a love story Torn apart by an aqueous reality’ and the heineke-mikulicz non-transecting urethroplasty technique respectively. i would like to thank our postdoctoral associate judges dr Felix day and dr roberto sileo for their judging expertise. The last item on our academic programme was a Keynote interview with craig bennett conducted by the mcr green officer Will Fleming. craig bennett is the outgoing ceo of Friends of the earth and will soon take up a new position at the Wildlife Trust. Will and craig discussed topics ranging from extinction rebellion’s environmental campaigning methods to rewilding in the uK and hs2. To finish an enjoyable and rewarding day, the mcr enjoyed pre dinner drinks at the master’s lodge followed by dinner in hall and a lively evening in the bar. i would like to thank the mcr committee for their help and support with organising the conference and setting up on the day. orla Woodward and jared perlo were both excellent session chairs. sybil stacpoole and Vanessa bowman also provided invaluable help and advice. Finally, i would like to thank all of the mcr members who attended the conference and especially those who took the time to present. The day would not have been possible without their hard work and commitment. Laura Taylor *

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Green Initiatives 2019/20 was a big year for environmental related issues in jesus college with a lot of changes and more to come. in october we held our first ever jesus college green Week and raised £132 for local homelessness charities Wintercomfort and jimmy’s. We held multiple events across the week and hope we can do something similar again. This year we organised: • • •

The first fully-vegan green formal a plant sale with scotsdales a film screening of The True Cost (2015)


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Zannah Lindlay (ex JCSU Green Officer), Daniel Zeichner MP and Councillor Rosy Moore at the Hopes for the Future workshop

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jesus college climate Forum hosted by the intellectual Forum a fashion clothes swap in collaboration with nu Wardrobe a workshop with hope for the Future on political campaigning where we welcomed our local mp daniel Zeichner and councillor rosy moore.

We also launched the jesus college a-Z student sustainability guide which includes a huge number of things everyone can do to ensure they are as sustainable as possible whilst living in college, cambridge and beyond. The latest version can be found at online because there is something for everyone (mcr.jesus.cam.ac.uk/wp-content/uploads/2020/09/a-Zstudent-sustainability-guide-2020.pdf). students have also been campaigning and working with college staff to make the institutions as sustainable as possible with good progress being made. We’ve seen small changes such as introducing no-meat Tuesdays at caff and formals and putting food compost bins in all college accommodation and achieving a gold colleges award for the green impact audit; to big changes like the commitment from jesus to divest from all direct fossil fuel industries. Following the recent decision by the university to divest from all direct and indirect fossil fuel industries, it is hoped that jesus will follow and be even bolder in shaping a sustainable future and the student body will campaigning throughout the year on these issues. students are also being consulted as jesus devises its investment strategy and seeks to set targets for carbon neutrality which we hope will be as ambitious as we know the college is capable of. here’s to more big steps in 2020/21! Will Fleming *

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Jesus Singers This year jesus singers saw a large increase in new members, not only from jesus college itself but from the wider university community. Following the annual Freshers’ Fair, the group welcomed back its existing members and waved hello to an array of new faces, from recently matriculated jesuans to returning alumni and some new inter-collegiate friends. With emma drewett and joseph Tedds as its new co-presidents, sarah bradley as its fabulous musical director and alice buckley as its head of publicity, jesus singers began to tackle a fresh repertoire for its yearly Winter concert. during michaelmas, the group vigorously rehearsed the difficult pentatonix piece Mary, Did You Know?, a festive song that was counterbalanced by the classic-hits Happy Ending by mika and The Longest Time by billy joel. magdalene Voxsoc, who once again joined jesus singers at this year’s concert, brought with them a collection of christmas hymns, including Good King Wenceslas and Ding Dong Merrily On High, to dress the show with a sprinkle of festivity. highlights of the concert emerged in fantastic solo and duet performances, which showcased not simply the vocal talents of the performers but their instrumental capabilities too. agnes Fung, final-year student and former president and musical director of jesus singers, delighted the audience with Everybody Wants to Rule the World, ornamenting her skilled piano-work with elegant vocals. bentley carr evoked both sympathy and laughter from the audience when performing I Still Call Australia Home from behind the piano with his deep-bass tones. returning to the piano for a wonderful duet performance, bentley also welcomed Froher Yasin to the stage, whose powerful voice beautifully complemented bentley’s and brought their rendition of City of Stars to life. jesus singers was also pleased to announce the solo-performance of its new member Thomas Freitag, who confidently performed And So It Goes with guitar in hand, which received a warm round of applause from the audience. in lent term, jesus singers returned to sing!, a joint concert featuring various non-audition choirs across cambridge. here, the group performed a star-themed repertoire, featuring Rule the World, When You Wish Upon A Star, and Reach For The Stars. This fun and exciting range of songs brightened rehearsals and made for a fantastic final concert together, especially for those current members who will be graduating and leaving this year. Though the academic year has been abruptly and unexpectedly cut short – resulting in the cancellation of jesus singers’ last concert, usually performed alongside the jesus college orchestra – we are still thankful for all of the hard work and time that each member has devoted to jesus singers and look forward to embracing new memories, songs and singers next year! special thanks go to sarah bradley for all of her hard work throughout the year, from arranging music and leading warm-ups to teaching pieces and conducting


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performances. it is with sarah’s guidance that jesus singers produced such beautiful and refined performances and we look forward to welcoming her back next year as both president and musical director! Emma Drewett *

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Jews for Jesus College Society michaelmas began as we left off last year – full of verve and vibrant cross-communal college conversation. at our traditional Kashruth Pop-Up Stall (now enshrined in the Jews for Jesus constitution – which was itself re-written for the third consecutive year), we served the finest treats from Kosher Kingdom (nWl’s premiere kosher dining destination). also worthy of mention is the warm induction offered to new members of Jews for Jesus, such as rafi levy and natan maurer, by michal chinn and Ze’ev shirazi at the college Freshers’ Fair. Together with daniel and ariel, michal and Ze’ev particularly enjoyed greeting all new members of college interested in the society with a friendly Shalom and a peaceful piece of Tehillim (psalms) as part of our – new-for-this-year – focus on the intersection between mindfulness and Halakhic practice. in fact, the coexistence between secular mindfulness and Orthoprax was the focus of our Michaelmas Seminar Series (mss), with visiting talks by many members of the wider university and jewish communities. one keen attendee provided, in our annual Jews for Jesus feedback survey, the following comments: “many of the davidic psalms were written in moments of great sorrow and distress for the author, and its passages are known as some of the most comforting and profound in jewish literature – because of this, jesus college was the perfect environment for us to study them”. We thank this attendee for their comments, as we thank all others. in the Q staircase, several members of the Jews for Jesus community sought to bring the learnings they took from the mss into the practical realities of their daily lives. in assigning kitchens, not known as a moment of calm and mindfulness, several decided to debate the intricacies between Halakhic categorising tactics, and ultimately a summit was called between two factions – this mediated by harav Yekusial (William) gelley, a qualified dayan (religious judge), true Masmid (exceptionally conscientious individual) and eved Hashem (servant of g-d), who we thank for providing his services imzist (without charge). Jews for Jesus also continued our keen interest in Hassidut. This spiritual movement sees meaning and religious profundity in mundanity and shared human experiences. cleaving to these principles, our fine wine and dining meet and greet in the middle of michaelmas was a superb demonstration of the beauty which can be found through sharing lives in community, in sincerity and honesty. We continue to thank rav mordechai Zeller, trained clinical psychologist and sexologist, and former cambridge university chaplain, for teaching us how to live intentionally in this way. of interest, too, was our Hannukah celebration: this time we served the tastiest mulled wine possible within Kosher constraints, and we were grateful to the porters for granting permission to host an entire Shmitti-Minyan (religious quorum of over seventy) in our contained space between the two Q kitchens, and our Pantry (small room at 3Tl, said to be one-half of the way to Shemayim due to the Shidduchim it has birthed). While our physical presence in jesus this year was sadly cut short in march, we are deeply proud of our contributions to the college community in these perpetually strange times. Jews for Jesus continued its regular programming throughout the lockdown, but this time from Zoom, although not on the sabbath or holidays (as is the Ashkenazi custom). We – ariel and daniel – graduated earlier this year, and are greatly saddened at no longer possessing the privilege of being part of the wider network of wonderful college


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Ariel Cohen (Co-President, 2018-2020) and Michal Chinn (Co-President, 2020-2022) commemorate the rededication of the Second Temple in Jerusalem at the time of the Maccabean Revolt against the Seleucid Empire together

communities. however, we are delighted to inform our readers that michal chinn and jeremy schiff have been elected presidents for this coming year. While the process was as healthily contested as usual, we are convinced that the Jews for Jesus society has been left in safe and secure hands, and we are following their creative plans with interest—if they manage to accomplish even a K’zayit (small ancient biblical measurement), let alone a K’beitzah (small-to-medium ancient biblical measurement), of what each promised in their respective manifestos, then the society is in for one of its strongest years ever! Finally, a beautiful part of a community is the creation of new ones within the larger entity. in this spirit, we would like to wish rachel linfeld (2019 mphil health, medicine, and society) and daniel lederman (2017 ba law) a huge Mazel Tov (congratulations) on their respective engagement and marriages! We hope, im yirtzeh Hashem (g-d willin) to see many more from among our members! all that remains, then, is to wish this year’s incoming presidents, michal chinn (2018) and jeremy schiff (2018), bhatzlacha (good luck) in their endeavours. personally, it is our pleasure to wish the entire college community a hearty shana tova (good year). Thank you for granting us the distinct honour and privilege to serve you over the past three years. Ariel Cohen & Daniel Lederman, *

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John Hughes Arts Festival The john hughes arts Festival was at the heart of college this year, its gallery having found a new home in the marshall room after the Forum started undergoing building works. and heart was very much the focus of the festival, as festival directors sorcha and astrid made the conscious decision to bring the festival back to its roots: as a way to remember john hughes. This year’s committee was the first that was made up of people who never personally knew john and, as such, the committee chose the theme ‘evergreen’ to symbolise the renewing of john’s legacy and the hope that it will carry on for many years to come.


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This year saw a large increase in numbers attending the gallery’s launch night, lured not only by the art and live music, but the promise of local beers to try. alongside the gallery, the committee ran a three day programme of events from calligraphy to live music, sketching to the, now customary, end of festival formal. The workshops and talks were not only for art fanatics, but for students who perhaps haven't been in touch with their creative sides as much recently, students who needed a break from the chaos of the cambridge term or who were looking for a new activity they could try with people that perhaps they hadn't met before. For us, it was important to bring the festival back to john and to the centre of college; to bring it back to a feeling rather than it merely being an artistic show. Astrid Godfrey *

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Law Society This year has been an interesting one for the jesus college law society. due to the global circumstances, i cannot write as we usually would with congratulations to the winners of our annual first-year mooting competition, nor thank everyone for attending our always looked forward to annual dinner. That being said, we had a very successful beginning to our year in michaelmas term, organising a number of well-attended networking events with major law firms. continuing to build on these relationships is an important part of the committee’s role and i would always encourage any alumni who are interested in sharing their experiences after their time studying at jesus to reach out. on the subject of alumni, we were able to hold the annual glanville Williams society reception in london, early in lent Term. many thanks to squire patton boggs for hosting this event and to all alumni who came to join us. We have made a concerted effort this year to extend the reach of jcls within college, involving both those studying other subjects but interested in a future career in law in our events and more graduate students. i am looking forward to seeing this continue in the future. Thank you to my committee for their support and all the best to the new committee going forward. Jessica Tucker *

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May Ball The may Week mega event was held on 28th june as a virtual celebration of may Week, following the cancellation of all the may balls earlier this year. We live-streamed a huge range of performances – may ball headliners, stand-up comedy, various acts by student-run societies and sports clubs – hoping to recreate some of the traditional may ball experience. over 10,000 people tuned in over the course of the night, raising almost £15,000 for the big mac charitable campaign for local coronavirus causes. This added to the £28,000 the campaign had already raised through donated ticket refunds. highlights of the evening can be watched back on our Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/mayweekmega/ The idea event was formed back in april, not long after the cambridge-wide cancellation of all may Week events this year. i’d been working with all the may balls in their planning up until that point, and had been involved in all cancellation discussions. The prospect of this virtual event was just so exciting, and all the may balls were happy to


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lend their support. The final committee that took this forward have – to this day – never met in person, and the entire event was able to be crowdsourced. 2020 has certainly been a strange year for everyone, and no one imagined they would be finishing the academic year stuck at home. We were so glad to be able to put on this event and inject some may Week spirit into peoples’ homes. We certainly couldn’t have pulled it off without the trust and contributions of cambridge students, staff and many more. Charlotte Milbank *

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Medical & Veterinary Society The story of the 2019/2020 academic year has been one of radical change, a significant theme in jcmVs even months before coVid-19 arrived in Wuhan. beyond the truncation of our college experiences, two prominent figures parted ways with preclinical life. anatomy supervisor dr john rawlinson officially retired, and we wish our eccentric bard of the body many pleasant years of retirement. on more sombre terms, the passing of professor michael Waring has generated a conspicuous absence in college. professor Waring had been a fixture of medical and veterinary studies for decades in jesus and memories of his supervisions transcend generations. We joyfully report that professor Waring bequeathed his famous teapot to the society, along with many beverages with which to fill it. jcmVs speaker events continued to grow in their popularity and quality in 2019/2020. molecular biologist and author professor nessa carey delivered a stimulating lecture on the enormous potential of gene editing, along with discussion of the inevitable ethical challenges we will face. separately, medical director of cuh Trust dr ashley shaw gave students valuable insight into the often-overlooked role of leadership in medicine. The jcmVs annual dinner was an especially memorable occasion, uniting students, fellows and alumni. it was inspiring to learn about the work of our guest speaker, jesus alumnus dr nick prince, based at picu in st george’s. Finally, our 6th years


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presented accounts of their diverse elective experiences, encouraging students to consider new destinations. alongside these speaker events, this year saw a continuation of the annual traditions that mark our medical and veterinary experiences at jesus. minced pies and mulled wine and jim’s pictionary were unfortunately the only events permitted to proceed, however they again helped to cultivate the special community we have in college. notably, minced pies and mulled wine featured the first guest appearance of our master (and honorary medvet), sonita alleyne. i would lastly like to pay some tributes. it has been an honour to work with my co-president, joseph jollans, along with the rest of the committee – anderson, Faheem, michal and sejal. We collectively would like to thank all of the staff that have made our events possible, in particular our medical and veterinary fellows that strive to integrate with us like none of their peers. a special thanks to dr sybil stacpoole for her endless support and generosity. most importantly, thank you to our members for being a family away from home and a group of people that we were proud to serve. We wish the best of luck to our successors in the year ahead. Jamie Brannigan *

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Music Society jesus college music society has had a greatly enjoyable and eventful year. as one of the most active college music societies, we have continued to expand the opportunities available to jesuans, whilst still achieving music-making of the highest quality. The year began with the Freshers’ recital, where we heard performances from nine new jesuans, as well as our new dean of chapel. instrumental awards were given to alice barbe (piano), ernest lok (piano), mary offer (viola/conducting) and megan robinson (flute/conducting). The orchestra remained the centrepiece of college music-making, welcoming many new players and a host of new conductors. our michaelmas concert featured favourites from elgar and Khachaturian, the wonderfully pastoral On the Banks of Green Willow by butterworth and sibelius’s triumphant Karelia Suite. jcms also offered two conducting masterclasses this year, led by highly regarded conductor paul brough. The experience was hugely educational and enlightening, giving the orchestra’s conductors guidance for the upcoming concert and allowing many others to try something new. The term ended with our annual reading of The Snowman. The story was once again brought to life by the enchanting voice of dr anthony bowen, alongside the dexterous playing of jason richards and Victoria daramy-Williams and the solo Walking in the Air, sung by becky Kershaw. With the fairy lights, tinsel, and a performance of White Christmas from the jesus gents, the event got everybody into the festive spirit. lent term began with the jesuans’ recital, showcasing a number of talented performers including the newly-formed gsus string quartet. Blues and Chill remained as popular as ever and hosted three events in lent term, including a collaboration with jcsu’s Week of the Woman. highlights included vocalists martha spencer and eliza bond, who have become rather synonymous with this event, the jesus college big band, and an endearing performance of Raindrops Keep Fallin’ on My Head, played on trumpet (cara james), bassoon (izzy monnickendam) and piano (octavia rooks). a new venture for the music society and a real highlight of this year was jcms’s bach Festival, a week of concerts featuring performances of chamber, choral and solo works. The festival was directed by brian Woods-lustig, an alumnus of jesus college choir, and at the end of the week jesuans past and present came together in a performance of the


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phenomenal Mass in B Minor, in memory of dr stephen siklos. The bach Festival made up part of the jcms recital series. other notable performances this year included sublime singing from The Ricci Ensemble, performing some obscure sixteenth-century madrigals; bach’s joyous advent cantata, directed by assistant organist dewi rees; vocal recitals from louis Wilson and ellie hargreaves; and the supremely talented wind quintet The Mistral Winds, performing music by Taffanel and poulenc. lent term ended with the david crighton concert, in memory of the late master. This year marked the 20th anniversary of his death and the concert opened with the rousing Overture from Die Meistersinger von Nürnberg, acknowledging his love of Wagner. The crighton concerto award was awarded jointly to izzy monnickendam and lizzy nightingale, who gave exceptional performances of elgar’s Romance for Bassoon and mozart’s Horn Concerto No.3 in E flat Major, respectively. a triumph for celebrating the more obscure orchestral instruments! We also heard mendelssohn’s The Hebrides, conducted by first-year music student mary offer. The concert ended with the bombastic Finale from saint-saens’ Organ Symphony, leaving both the orchestra and audience on a tremendous high. This year’s recipient of the david crighton prize, awarded to the undergraduate considered outstanding as a performer or conductor, was sarah bradley, leader of the jcms orchestra and musical director of the jesus singers. it was quite devastating to find out that we would not be returning for easter term, with our may Week concert and garden party usually a great end to the year. however, with the launch of Virtual jesus, we were able to create an online recital series and a Virtual blues and chill event, videos for which can be found on the Virtual jesus YouTube channel. This year’s recipient of the renfrew prize, awarded to the student making the most significant contribution to the musical life of the college, was becky Kershaw. The success of this year would not have been possible without the hard work of our committee. Thanks goes especially to next year’s president, jason richards, who has provided continual assistance throughout the year. although there is some uncertainty about how the music society will operate next year, there is no doubt that it will continue in its successes, whether through real-life or virtual events. Becky Kershaw


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Badminton jesus badminton club has had an outstanding year and it has been great to welcome many new players at club nights. The club has built on last year’s momentum in both league and cuppers matches, resulting in two jesus teams reaching cuppers finals at the end of lent term, with jesus i securing first place. my thanks to the captains and the rest of the committee for their support with running the club this year: Fred, chuen, Feri, anran, alena, molly and shikhar – you have been utterly brilliant. With jesus badminton in the capable hands of next year’s committee, i have no doubt that the coming year will be just as spectacular. Hannah Lin

Men jesus i maintained its strong record of performance this year, retaking first place in the cuppers league after stellar performances from a fresh-faced but skilful team. special credit goes to long-time veterans meredydd Kippax-jones and Fred alford, both of whom have acted as a bulwark for the club and make for a dynamic yet lethal pair on court. We not only saw more freshers join the club this year, but had stellar performances from them with rohit Kale, michael li, and Thomas Williams. alongside stephen smith, they all played a pivotal role in turning matches around with their experience and finesse, most notably in a tense cuppers final game against Queens i. despite narrowly missing out on both league titles by the smallest of margins, it has been a spectacular year for the team and it’s been a pleasure captaining the jesus i team which has never been stronger. i wish michael li the best of luck with the upcoming year. Low Chuen Leik


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jesus ii had a very interesting season last year. We were definitely one of the best 2nd teams amongst all the college teams, but owing to some of our top players graduating, we started off the michaelmas term quite poorly and ended up in the bottom two of the open league division 2. Thus, we got demoted to division 3 for lent term. however, we managed to get ourselves together for the lent term and were finally able to work out our best possible pairings. With the combination of veteran players such as Feri Wibisono, richard dewsnap, matthieu Wilson, Will duggleby, matthew harris, and new faces in the team such as simon guo (jia), anran jin, aiden chan, alena gorb, and sam lachmann, we managed to smash most of our opponents in division 3, coming on top. There were several occasions when we managed to turn the situation around when facing a strong opponent. overall, every member of the team worked hard last term and showed their determination to get our team promoted to division 2, where we belong. Feri Wibisono jesus iii had a thrusting season last year. promoted from division 6 to 5 after the first half season, this team has never given up the ambition to go up further: we ended as the runners-up of division 5. unfortunately, we didn't get promoted further owing to a miscalculation in the league table, but the team deserves applause for its strong will and always being able to fight opponents better than us. i would like to thank every player who has devoted time and effort to this “unprofessional” third team. special thanks to second and ladies team captains Feri and alena for always being able to help when i was short of players. i hope the team can keep on its pride and march forward. Anran Jin

Women The women’s team had a strong start for michaelmas league with wins against clinical school, churchill, and selwyn despite not always having a full team. The second half of michaelmas proved to be much tougher as our team lost against Trinity 1 and emma. due to issues with the match arrangements had to forfeit christ’s, which ultimately resulted in us being ranked fourth in the league table. nevertheless, it was nice to have new people joining our team and watch them improve throughout the term. lent term turned out to be both exciting and challenging as three jesus teams (men’s i, mixed i, and Women’s) ended up in cuppers semi-finals. due to unexpected last-minute changes of players, our women’s team was unable to compete in the final, as we lost 1-2 to this year’s women’s cuppers champions, medwards, in the semi-final. of note, is an exceptional performance from shiyu deng and gao Yujie, who, despite joining the club at the beginning of this year with very little experience, played a very tight game against medwards third pair, losing by only a couple of points. also, a huge thank you to charlotte Waygood for stepping in and playing at very short notice. and of course, our performance in the semi-finals would have not been as fantastic if not for the efforts of anisha bakhai, whom we wish all the best on her year abroad, and melissa rgjudo ng, whom we also thank for all her contributions to the jesus women’s team in the past couple of years. The lent league kicked off with some smashing wins against homerton, medwards, and clinical school. even though we still did not manage to beat Trinity 1 and christ’s, we had a number of very close games with some top performances from many players. We were especially happy to see hannah lin back with us as she recovered from her injury and was finally able to join our team again. additionally, due to the lack of available players, we had to forfeit 3 games to emma leading to another unfortunate loss, which again put us in fourth position overall.


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To sum up, it has been another great year for jesus badminton team thanks to invaluable contributions from hannah, molly, Xiaolei, shiyu, anisha, gao, melissa, and charlotte. it has been a pleasure to be the captain of such an amazing team, and best of luck to hannah lin, who will take over the role of women’s team captain for the next year, and who, i am sure, will lead the team to more great wins next year! Alena Gorb *

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Basketball jesus college basketball club enjoyed a challenging but successful year. in michaelmas, we ended the term where we began, right in the middle of division 3, while history repeated itself in lent with an identical result. With only three returning college league players due to half the squad graduating last year, the main goal for the first two terms however was to work on our team co-ordination and consistency rather than fly up the divisions. i believe this was achieved to great success, but we wouldn't realise this until the cuppers run. The addition of new point guard charles lu, who was voted season mVp by his teammates, allowed everyone to get involved in games and play around his talent after seeing our draw for the cup, initially my heart sank. in the second round we would face the lithuanian society, who obliterated jesus in the exact same match last year. looking beyond that, the bracket fell strongly in our favour, where neither of the two other strongest perceived teams, King's college and darwin 1, could be met until the very final match. The cuppers squad was marginally different to league games. university first team players sam bedell and mofe owolabi could now join the team, with the former having 4 years of experience as a blue and mofe being in his first. a weakened jesus squad eased past pembroke in the first round, but the lithuanian society game would not be missed by a single teammate. The highly-anticipated clash would begin exactly as it began last year. The litsoc shooter seemed unstoppable and robotic, amassing a 38-18 lead over jesus almost single-handedly in the first half of the match. in the half-time break, the team felt deflated, as we had not played below expectations and were still defending well. after some

Jesus versus Churchill Cuppers Quarterfinals


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motivational comments from sam and myself, the overall morale lifted and our heads were held high for the second half. slowly, we crawled back into the game. after his dunk, mofe caught fire, sinking three after three until the scoreline was almost dead even. Two points down with only seconds left on the clock, mofe let fly the final touch of the ball that game, a three-pointer that sealed the game for jesus 62-61 and confirmed the match as arguably the most explosive comeback in college basketball history. after this game, it felt like the team could face up to any other side in the tournament. jesus’ final game of the year was the next round of cuppers against churchill, where we won 40-33 off the back of strong defensive play. should the year have continued, we would have faced caius+clare in the semi-finals, followed by either King’s or darwin 1 in the finals should we have won that game. it was unfortunate that easter term did not go ahead, as this might have been the best chance at a cuppers title the team has ever had. Nick Trilloe *

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Boat Club Men our michaelmas started with a pre-term week of hard training on the cam to set the standard for the Fairbairns campaign. The week was tough, but highly beneficial for many in the squad who were stepping up from last year’s lower boats, getting some decent training down before the busy full term. returning from the 2019 m1 crew were matt anderson, michael schaich and michael hall, joined by myself returning after a year abroad and matt Feuer from the 2018 m2 crew. The rest of the squad was made up of former m3 and m4 rowers, who took the challenge of the harder training schedule in both hands, giving a much needed boost to the intensity of our sessions. We were ably coxed this year by coxing captain olivia emily and sarah bradbury, who joined us from australia with a wealth of coxing experience. eager to get as much racing experience as possible for a relatively inexperienced squad, we entered crews into uni iVs, ely head and Winter head. each experience gave the squad more to focus our training on, with great improvements made at each step. The main highlight for the squad was Winter head, with the crew finding a good rhythm off the start and posting a promising time by coach martyn rooney’s watch. unfortunately, the official timings were mixed up, leaving it unclear how m1 ranked against the other cambridge colleges. The main event of the term was the Fairbairn cup. This year the men’s side was able to enter both and m1 and an m2 crew. m1 had a good race right up until the final corner, where the boat’s steering seized up, sending the crew into the bank. Fortunately there was no damage to crew or boat, but sadly m1 was forced to sit and watch as the other crews rowed by. however, the position did allow for raucous cheers as the m2 crew rowed past, completing the course in competitive time comparative to the other m2 crews of the day. The term was excellent for the men’s novice crews, with a large intake and good coaching providing a good platform on which to build in the next term. The novice men’s 1st boat achieved a stellar 2nd in the novice Fairbairn cup, and were able to improve on their efforts the next day as the jesus m3 in the senior race, finishing the term in high spirits. before lent term began we took a squad of twelve men and two coxes on camp to amposta, spain. This year half of the squad had been novices in the previous term, murray jallands, rhys Williams, gil Krikler, jona metcalfe, max Turner and aditya


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James Crockford and some of the M1 crew

Celebrating 40 years of women at JCBC


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ravindrakumar as rowers and cox harry regan taking the opportunity away from the busy cam water to really improve on what they had learned. The camp provided a great space to solidify the core squad which would be taken into the lents campaign. The lent term started with hot competition for places in the 1st boat and a good 2 km test on the ergs, well attended by many of those who had noviced in the previous term. We began training early making individual changes as the term progressed to try different combinations and to give less experienced rowers a feel for the higher intensity of the senior squad. The term was plagued by bad weather, and the races we entered to get experience were cancelled due to high winds. We did still manage to get good training done, even in windy conditions, sometimes being one of the only m1 crews out on the river. The hard training gave us a good edge on the final day of the lent bumps, when windy conditions affected other crews who had failed to test themselves earlier in the term. The lent bumps were an excellent opportunity for the squad to grow; only myself and stroke Faheem bhatti had previous top division lents experience, and the m2 crew consisted entirely of novices from the last term apart from altaf Furhan. The crews improved day by day, m1 learning from the first day’s bump to row over on the second day. on the third day the crew put in a valiant effort against a decent Trinity hall crew, to be bumped just before the railway bridge. as mentioned above, the final day was considerably more windy, and the m1 crew were able to use their experience to push away from an aspirational King’s m1 to deny them blades, putting a very positive end on a week which had required a lot of the inexperienced crew. The week is sure to prove invaluable as many of the rowers continue their studies at jesus in the coming year, in whatever fashion rowing may take whilst maintaining appropriate consideration for coVid-19. The men’s side had one trialist this year, harry roach, who put in a good effort that would have seen him race with the university 3rd Viii. We are proud of his efforts and sad that the races which so many had dedicated so much to were unable to go ahead. i look forward to seeing the squad mature under the leadership of president and men’s captain dan cochrane. he will no doubt be ably advised by head coach johnathan conder who continues to work tirelessly to ensure that the crews and boats of the jcbc are kept in the finest condition. Christopher Saner

Women We had just over two crews worth of rowers returning to the senior squad, including four from the last mays boat and three experienced rowers new to the squad. We had an exciting start to term, with an eight racing in the moscow marathon in an exchange kindly set up by alumni dominic reed. in exchange two crews then visited us from moscow to compete in the invitational category of Fairbairns. The novice term saw a reformulation of the novice program, in a new curriculum designed with much time and effort by coaches jc and stella, helped out by charlotte jackson and aiden chan. They raced in Queen’s ergs, emma sprints, clare novices and Fairbairns. The first race of term for the seniors was ely head, in which W1 4+ and W2 8+ raced in near-perfect conditions, with W1 achieving their first win of the year. The same four competed in university 4s a week later. having beaten pembroke and Kings to reach the finals, we secured a victory against caius with our best row of the week. W1 and W2 then went on to compete in Winter head in two 8s, and whilst in W1 we were disappointed with our result, we used this to refocus and motivate our last two weeks of training. Fairbairns was a great end of term, with W1 winning and W2 coming fourth.


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Fairbairns saw the celebration of 40 years of rowing at jcbc, and we were delighted to welcome six alumni crews including members from the 80s. an anniversary boat club dinner followed, with 170 attending including the first womens’ 4+. speeches by sally adams and nikki mcallen commemorated the event. We were also delighted to welcome the new master and her partner to the races and dinner. at the start of the new year we headed to amposta, spain for a weeks training camp. This was a successful change of location from previous years, as the large river allowed us to put in good mileage and the accommodation was very good. on returning to cambridge we started to prepare for bumps, and with an unusually large number of novices trialling for W2 we began selecting the second and third boats. although we started term with a W4, this turned into a larger W3 squad by the time of bumps. astrid godfrey also put in a lot of time this term tubbing a number of novices. W2 was coached very ably and enthusiastically by hugh spaughton and clare jackson, respectively a cox and rower alumni of cuW. W2 had a great start to term, producing a promising time on the newnham head course which fell midway among the racing W1s. W1 were disappointed not to be able to race in many of the races we entered this term, bedford head, pembroke regatta and Wehorr all unfortunately being cancelled due to weather conditions, as was a weekend of planned sparring with m1 in ely. however we had trained well and hard through ergs, weights sessions and outings, and so although the lack of races meant the start line was relatively unquantified the spirit of the crew was good. We went into bumps excited and determined to have a go at headship. W3 and W2, both relatively inexperienced crews, had mixed bumps weeks. W3 bumped twice and then were bumped and overbumped. W2 started as the highest W2 and rowed over twice and were bumped by selwyn 1 and emma 2. W1 had an elated first three days, bumping newnham on the first day on the plough reach and then rowing over in front of a downing-newnham bump on the second. The nerves were high on the third day, as we knew that downing presented a greater threat than newnham and were going for headship. however we had a strong row with downing not getting more than half a length at any point. The final day saw high winds and downing attempted, very successfully, a different approach of fly and die, which we did not match and we were bumped on the plough reach. although the final day was gutting and not what we were aiming for, we had an excellent week and were pleased with how the crew performed under race pressure. although easter term saw us spread out around the country, the boat club kept together in a virtual form. group yoga, strength and conditioning, and zumba (run by W1 member lara Tritton) sessions were held weekly via Zoom. henri, our s&c coach, came up with some ingenious bodyweight circuit sessions which were especially popular. Whilst many from the top boats had taken ergs home to train over lockdown, training with everyone else in these sessions soon became a highlight. at the end of the term we competed in the ‘Virtual may bumps’. Whilst inevitably a very different event, Virtual bumps aimed not to truly replicate the may bumps but rather to allow an opportunity for some of its team and inter-collegiate competition. For four days each member of a crew ran 800m, and submitted their times. These were entered into an algorithm which simulated when “bumps” on surrounding crews would have occurred, and the day’s results were then announced by camFm, in a commentary narrated as if from the banks of the cam. jcbc entered W1, m1, W2 and m2 crews into the student divisions, and all of the crews saw some impressive individual times. jcbc had a further three crews competing in the alumni division, The oarfull 88s (matriculated 1988-91), The 21 malcolm streakers (2006), and rowvid-19 (2015). Whilst next year looks to bring unusual challenges i look forward to seeing what


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Women’s captain callie smith and Vice maddi jackson can achieve. i would like to thank all of those who have supported and coached the Women’s side this year, in particular jonathon condor and martyn rooney who coached W1, as well as henri cherrington our weights coach, and all those involved in W2 and lower boats coaching. Poppy Hill

Boat Club Trust Those of us who enjoyed university careers uninterrupted by external events find it difficult to conceive the affect of coVid-19 on the student experience. The best part of the year, all those events – academic, sporting, cultural, social – to which students and dons had been working, looking forward and/or dreading, for one, two, three or more years, removed at a stroke . . . and the prospect of the suspension stretching, as i write, seemingly longer into the future. in contrast, in common with the great majority of jesus students, i enjoyed three, in this sense, undisturbed years in which i and my contemporaries had the chance denied to last and this years’ groups, to show what we could do, to fulfil the dream, without external distraction. occasionally, down the years, the Fairbairns and the lents have been lost to bad weather, or other external factors, but nothing on this scale. The worst that happened to me was having, in my first and second years, to row the Fairbairns the wrong way, upstream, because of the construction of the then new road bridge just downstream from the boathouses: trivial in comparison. i admire hugely the resilient spirit in which the current members of the jcbc have addressed the situation. all but four of the jcbc’s ergs were taken home by students so that they could keep up the training; the women’s crews held group yoga, strength and conditioning and Zumba sessions via Zoom; jesus crews took part in Virtual may bumps at the end of last term. both poppy hill, president and Women’s captain, and chris saner, men’s captain, write with fondness and without resentment of this last year. chris says that he will take forward with him the memories of his rowing career at jesus, the moments of elation and deflation, the camaraderie. i’m sure, he writes, that many of these memories will be shared by the alumni community which he now joins, common through the 193 years that the club has existed: “i am excited now to support the future of the club as part of this community, connected to the club no matter where i end up”. many of us have felt as chris feels without being able to find the words chris finds to express it. The michaelmas and lent terms went as normal. The Women’s crews rowed brilliantly in the autumn, W1 winning both university Fours and Fairbairns; and going on to do very well in the lents to reverse last year and bump newnham off the headship, only to be bumped off themselves on the last night by a very fast-starting downing crew. The men’s crews trained and worked hard in both terms and were not rewarded with the results they deserved in the races . . . and then . . . the boathouse was shut, jc, our head coach and boathouse manager, was furloughed, and no-one rowed. in august, the boathouse re-opened, jc returned, and sculling was permitted under controlled conditions. Fours and eights are now permitted by regulations. The term has started in small boats and is progressing to Fours and then to eights, subject to the prevailing coVid-19 regulations. The intention is to hold the Fairbairns but only with cambridge crews. The Trust has adapted its equipment purchases to the circumstances. having earlier in the year bought, second-hand, a coxless double/pair, tub pair and sculls, and funded its customary half share of the costs of a training camp in january – 24 rowers, four coxes,


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three coaches, a week in the sun on beautiful water at amposta, spain – the balance of the costs being borne by the students themselves, we took the opportunity to transform the club’s sculling provision, taking advantage of ewan pearson’s generosity in donating his second sculling boat, and buying new. The club’s sculling fleet is now eight racing, two intermediate and four beginner sculls, so that we are now equipped to have many on the water. our next purchase will be a new Viii for W1, which we hope it will make sense to order in time for next year’s mays. We have been enabled to do this by a significant and most generous donation by mark smith (1981), who was an active cox during his time at jesus and has been a donor to the college for many years; we are very grateful. at the beginning of the year the Trust joined the rest of the jesus community in welcoming the new master, sonita alleyne. The master and her partner james mccarthy have already shown great support of the club, appearing regularly on the bank during races. The master spent an hour with the Trustees at our october meeting, very willing to listen as we explained how the Trust came into being, what it has done and what it will do. We very much appreciate the master’s support, as we have done that of college president professor james clackson, both in the interval following ian White’s departure and since the new master’s arrival: james was unwise enough to reveal on one occasion that he had rowing experience, but at another college . . . in november last year we suffered the very sad loss of michael Waring. michael is mourned throughout the jesus community and across the world of medical research but for the club and the Trust he was special. michael was a dedicated and loyal supporter of the boat club, always down at the river on race days, and at jcbc social occasions, immaculately and stylishly dressed in college blazer and summer cravate, hawaiian shirts and sandals. he was senior Treasurer of the boat club and a Trustee of the jcbc Trust for 26 years from 1993. he chaired the panel interviewing at least the last eight college boatmen. The minutes of the Trustees’ meeting in which michael was appointed to the Trust record that “The Trustees noted and discussed the evident unwillingness of dr michael Waring to take on the job of honorary secretary”: clearly a smart move, and nevertheless the Trustees showed the wisdom to appoint him, which he richly rewarded with his decades of service to the jcbc. he came to embody the spirit of the boat club, always concerned for the welfare of the students, and each winter in recent years inspiring – albeit generating some envy – his fellow Trustees with regular reports (supported by beautiful photographic evidence) on the delights of the new Zealand summer from his sojourns there during the english winter – and his singing stop-offs in the us on the way out and back. We all regret not taking up his offers of trips in his private plane. michael was a wonderful Trustee and friend of the boat club – he is sorely missed. We are delighted to welcome as senior Treasurer of the club and as a Trustee The rev’d james crockford, the college’s dean of chapel. james has already attended many races, and blessed the boats before the lents . . . and has taken up sculling, making, according to jc, good progress. as we continue to look forward to and prepare for the club’s bicentenary in 2027, Trustees were delighted to attend in december the combined Fairbairn dinner and Fortieth anniversary of Women in the jcbc: a wonderful occasion, superbly organised by charlotte jackson, Women’s captain in 2014-2015, presided over by our first woman master and with excellent speeches by women of three different jcbc eras, sally adams, nikki mcallen and poppy hill. Four Women’s eights, one Women’s Four, two Women’s alumni eights and one Four rowed in the Fairbairns – along with six men’s eights, one Four and three men’s alumni eights – and it seemed everyone and more was at the dinner. The fortieth of women coincided with the 90th Fairbairn race, so that in, now, nine years time we will witness the half-century of women in the jcbc and the centenary of the Fairbairns.


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The Trust’s investments have coped well enough given the very bumpy ride caused by the coVid-19 virus this past six months. We are very diversified across asset classes and geographies, through our investments in funds run by ccla and newton, so did not have the roller coaster experiences of the global stock markets. The capital value dropped in the early months and has mostly recovered to pre-covid levels, although things can still get worse as we continue through this crisis. our income has also dropped as companies cut dividends and bond yields continue to fall, and is still below last year, but it is high enough to meet our commitments to the jcbc albeit with a reduced cushion. We continue to meet our core commitments to provide a new Viii every three years and to support training camps. We are very long-term investors as we aim to help funding the jcbc for its whole future existence, matching its rise in costs and our charter. hence we have set “inflation + X” as our only benchmark for capital growth and income, and for at least the last 25 years have met that goal for capital but not always for income; hence the need for more donations. We will soon finish our regular three-year review of strategy and managers, including the value of ‘X’, and are considering adding a weighting in infrastructure funds, as they should provide an enhanced long-term growth and income profile, matching well our liabilities and benchmark. We need to maintain our inward flow of funds for investment for the long term and in that light the Trust was very grateful to receive a legacy of £10,000 in the Will of bryan dixon (1957), who died earlier this year, and we appreciate the contact this has enabled us to have with bryan’s family. We would invite others to think of the Trust in the same way: we can assist with the appropriate legal wording! new members are joining the Friends of the jcbc at a steady pace but we need more, and i would ask those who have contributed, for example by being a member of the Friends, but have allowed their membership to lapse, to resume their membership: it isn’t a huge sum for each member but each contribution is very much valued and together they make a huge difference. only by keeping our funds topped up can we do what the Trust is there to do. membership of the Friends brings a termly email newsletter and other updates, details of social events – such as the annual barbecue at the boathouse on a sunday in may – and free parking in the paddock on mays saturday. Further details about the Trust can be found on www.jcbc.jesus.cam.ac.uk/trust; about the Friends on www.jcbc.jesus.cam.ac.uk/sites/default/files/jcbcFriendsso+ga.pdf; and, for younger supporters, on our new graduate donor scheme on www.jcbc.jesus.cam.ac.uk/sites/default/files/jcbcTrust_graduatedonation.pdf. in any event david reid would be very pleased to hear from you on judgedreid@sky.com despite everything, we continue, and will continue, to need more alumni to help with coaching, at whatever level and for however long, even on an occasional basis: you would be surprised how much even a day’s attendance is appreciated. please give this some thought, and, if and when you can, please contact jonathan conder on boatman@jesus.cam.ac.uk, who will provide any briefing and induction, or alternatively Trustees sheena cassidy hope on sheena.cassidyhope@mishcon.com or matt jones on mattjones@cantab.net. The excellent tradition of alumni and alumnae going rowing the afternoon before the jccs annual dinner in september lapsed this year with the cancellation of the dinner. We hope to resume on saturday 25 september 2021. if you would like to take part next year, please contact adrian greenwood on amgreenwood@tiscali.co.uk or me on dhwootton@gmail.com


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The Trustees and their responsibilities are: chairman Treasurer investments secretary college links The Friends:

Women’s club/ london link Training/coaching/ Quality of rowing boat club strategy/ boatman/boathouse

david Wootton danny White ewan pearson louise couch james crockford richard Tett david reid helen boldon

dhwootton@gmail.com danny.c.white@hotmail.com e.pearson@gpb.eu louisecouch@gmail.com j.crockford@jesus.cam.ac.uk richard.tett@freshfields.com judgedreid@sky.com helenboldon@gmail.com

sheena cassidy hope sheena.cassidyhope@mishcon.com matt jones

mattjones@cantab.net

jon hutton

jon_hutton@hotmail.co.uk

i am very grateful, as i am sure readers will also be, to all my fellow Trustees for all their time and effort: entirely voluntary when they all have jobs and commitments to more than fill their days otherwise. i am hugely appreciative of the excellent leadership of ewan pearson in the management of our investments and of richard Tett across a wide range of subjects, and delighted to welcome danny White as our new Treasurer: he brings new ideas and a new professionalism to the role, and is already making a big difference. We also congratulate this year’s captains: jcbc president and Women’s captain poppy hill and men’s captain chris saner on leadership and perseverance in difficult circumstances. We wish dan cochrane and callie smith, the new president and men’s captain and Women’s captain respectively, and the other officers and committee members, all success in what will be another remarkable year: they will know that there is a huge well of support for them and lots of advice and guidance available to them. We wish the jcbc well. David Wootton, Chairman

JCBC Bicentenary 2027 one year on, and plans for the boat cclub’s 2027 bicentenary continue to develop. You should be hearing much more over the course of the coming year. Thanks to those that have already contributed toward the research for another red book. it’s aim is to take jcbc’s published histories from 1995 to the bicentenary. While many gaps have now been filled, more remain. please take a look at the crew lists in the link below and add or modify as necessary so we can reconstruct the club’s recent history before it is lost altogether. a link is available here: https://bit.ly/2kbfp4m last, if you are not receiving the Trust’s termly email (compiled by richard Tett [1988]) with the rowing reports about the club’s current endeavours, please do sign up to it through the jcbc website. This is also the mailing list that will be used by the bicentenary committee to publish information and details of any events etc. a link to sign up is available here: https://www.jesusboatclub.co.uk/mailing-list Nick Tubbs (2014) *

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Climbing Club With sport climbing set to debut in the 2020 olympics (now sadly delayed) and ‘Free solo’ becoming the first climbing film to win an oscar, it is clear that the sport has been thriving; pleasingly, this is a trend also seen within the jesus college climbing club, despite being in only its second year. one of the delights of sitting on the committee is the interaction with club members, both new and old: while it is a testament to the uniqueness of the sport and the friendliness of the club to see regulars at jesus returning each week, it is equally encouraging to see the growing size and diversity of membership, as the college community begins to learn about climbing’s accessibility. 2019-2020 brought dramatic changes to the operation of the club: not only did we make the significant decision to change venue (rainbow rocket, although a considerable distance further from the city centre, has offered unprecedented options for climbing and training within cambridge), but we finalised new session timings, and even oversaw the development of our brand through the creation of a logo and our first purchase of team kit. it is gratifying to see that these improvements have been met well by the college climbing community. one result of these changes was further integration with cambridge university mountaineering club (cumc), which co-ordinates cuppers. it is a delight for jesus climbing to be considered so dominant by the wider university community that the current cumc president described us as “the orthodox winners during my time at cumc”. The team put in a fantastic performance in michaelmas, which placed us first and let us retain our crown; unfortunately, we were then knocked down to second place by corpus christi in lent term (1669 to 1642 points, the narrowest of margins). special thanks must go to ilya carey, steve Farr, ismaeel Zia, and adam jenkins, who have all consistently helped secure our victories. in easter Term, cuppers was transformed into climbing-related challenges that could be attempted at home (including a Table Traverse, a pistol squat round, various flexibility challenges, and an amusing ‘lock-off ’ challenge where competitors had to eat fruit while hanging one-arm from a pull-up bar). sadly, jesus was again relegated to second place behind murray edwards. i am confident that the team will be eager to lift the trophy again come next year. both the sport and the club have matured over the last few years, and it has been a pleasure to participate and help chaperone the club. it has been a privilege to experience the enthusiasm and passion of members, new and old, and even more gratifying to watch members develop from complete novices into confident climbers. i know that the effort applied by members of the club to both personal training and coaching beginners has established a core unit which will benefit jesus climbing for years to come. Hugo Burgess *

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Cricket Men sadly, with the coincidence of lockdown with easter Term’s cricketing schedule, the jccc are unable to report any activity, beyond a few pre-season socials, in 2019-2020. however, the team is looking forward to a return to the pitch in 2021 under the captaincy of matthew griffiths. Ben Francis


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MCR like all spring and summer sport, mcr cricket has been severely disrupted by the coVid-19 pandemic. having organised a host of fixtures with various touring sides and booked in those all-important cricket teas, i unfortunately had to cancel all fixtures from the start of our season, through until the middle of july. This also meant the cuppers tournament did not go ahead this season. however, the team have been making full use of the outdoor cricket nets, with appropriate safety precautions in place as restrictions slowly started to be lifted there was hope that we might get some matches organised. The england and Wales cricket board (ecb) set out specific precautions which needed to be met, in order to ensure player safety during recreational cricket. unlike the professionals, we can’t all isolate together in a bio-secure bubble! instead, precautions included slip fielders being over 1 metre apart and sanitising the ball and our hands every six overs. With precautions in place we finally got some cricket in mid-july. at this point, the mcr cricket teams scheduled fixtures had finished and instead it’s the long Vacation team which takes to the field. The long Vacation team does include current mcr members but also encompasses alumni and others outside of our graduate community. This team is superbly skippered by assistant graduate Tutor, dr sybil stacpoole. Without sybil’s tireless work we wouldn’t have seen any cricket in college this season. at the time of writing we have played two fixtures; the first against salmagundi gardeners cc and the second against Trojan Wanderers cc. both were closely contested, highly enjoyable and good-spirited matches which ended as draws. You can find full scorecards of all this seasons fixtures at this website: jesuscollegecambridge.play-cricket.com/Matches. i eagerly look forward to the remainder of this seasons fixtures and hope we see the same quality of performance. in a summer which has been severely disrupted and in which we’ve spend sunny sunday afternoons wishing we could play cricket; it is fantastic to be back out on the square. hopefully next season we won’t have to wait so long. Henry Barrow *

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Football Men off the back of relegation from division 1, the 2019-20 season started with a bang for jesus college men’s team. We needed a new look, securing a sponsorship from The gardenia was the only option. With this new aesthetic, the first team started all-guns-blazing 4-4 draw against a strong Trinity hall set the boys running. an undoubtedly young side, our strong intake of Freshers rose to the challenge. The boots of a list of graduated blues players, appeared to be, suitably filled. gone were the days of biweekly 7am training sessions, here was the future; once a week training attended by a maximum of 6 of the starting 11 – this really was division 2. We’d found our level. our ultimate performance in the league was a middling one. some might see that as disappointing. however, as eternal optimists, jcFc see this as a solidification of the foundations of a new future for the college. our cuppers performance showed flashes of brilliance, beating a strong darwin side on penalties but ultimately falling short to later finalists Queens’. losing 3-0 to jesus oxford hurt, but this pain was eclipsed by a thrilling 3-2 victory against jcFc old boys’ – the first time the ‘current’ side has won in living memory. The jesus 2s and 3s added a range of silverware to the cabinet, which never goes amiss. equally as important as our on-the-pitch antics is the fact that jcFc’s social side saw an


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awful lot of inter-year mixing, the spirit of which is epitomised by a full-kit bar crawl around other colleges (drinking optional, kit compulsory) – which is what college sport is all about really. i am extremely proud to have overseen some of these operations yet cannot take credit for any of it. The credit goes to what is inside every single boy who puts on the jcFc shirt – cheers lads, it has been a pleasure. Nick Sweeney

Women 2019-2020 has been an interesting year for the jesus college Women’s Football team! despite our footballing opportunities being sadly cut short at the end of lent term, we have had an excellent year in terms of progress. since many of last year’s players graduated, we began the season with a lot of fresh faces – literally, since most of them were Freshers, but also including some second and third year students who were completely new to the sport! Thanks to hannah sanderson, last year’s beloved Football captain and current eagles captain, we had several training sessions throughout easter and lent which allowed us to develop our skills and fitness. While we didn’t do too well in cuppers and struggled in the league – which i think was due to our busy schedules and difficulty coming to matches – our girls really did themselves proud. everyone improved massively and worked really hard in every game, representing jesus beautifully in their graceful sportsmanship and brave determination to take possession of the ball, no matter how tired or uncertain they were. our highlight, undoubtedly, was the Varsity match against jesus oxf*rd, where we had an amazing turnout and won 11-1! if only we could have pulled that off in every match . . . but winning, in my opinion, isn’t the point. college sports is about having fun, meeting people and learning new skills. our team this year has been so wonderful in this regard, and i am really honoured to have been our captain. Emma Leze *

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Hockey 2020 was a successful year for hockey at jesus with a new influx of freshers doing very well to replace those that had departed last year. They quickly came to be an integral part of the team alongside the returning talent which included ratnayake and stoddart-stones, playing in an incredible fifth season for jesus college hockey club. The men’s college league started off well against cauis, we were 2-0 down at half-time but after a quick re-group and change of tactics we got back into the game with two goals from ratnayake and a third from Francis, a tense few minutes followed until the whistle was blown and jesus had won. The rest of the season had its ups and downs with a draw against johns coming next being one of our better results. This year it was oxford’s turn to make the journey for the annual jesus-jesus Varsity, they had a full team but ours was significantly stronger, leading to a 6-0 victory. unfortunately, the women’s league got off to a bumpy start and then came crashing down due to most colleges not being able to field a full team. many of the jesus women still got to play as part of the university hockey teams. The lack of a women’s league meant they could join the men’s team which then had enough players and often came along with subs. pinto and Yuan were especially reliable playing in almost every match throughout the season.


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Hockey match against Robinson

This mixed team approach gave us a great advantage in mixed cuppers where we cruised through the early rounds. on the second of march we had both the men’s and mixed cuppers semi-finals. despite a few players busy running the cambridge half marathon, we still managed to field a team composed of many of the usual league players as well as a number of blues who had helped us to success in the quarters. First up was mixed at st johns pitches against st johns, a few slip-ups in defence meant they finished on three goals but fortunately we slipped four into their net. minutes later the men’s match commenced with a largely unchanged jesus side against the joint Trinity-Fitzwilliam team. a second high scoring game ended in our favour with a confident 4-2 win. We were into the finals in both tournaments but sadly they were the last matches of the season to be played as coronavirus got in the way. Oscar Bray *

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Mixed Lacrosse We’ve had another great year of jesus mixed lacrosse with some fantastic results and lots of new players joining us. Those who had never played lacrosse before managed to pick it up really quickly, and we were impressed by their progress throughout the season. every weekend match was well fought, and we were delighted with the strong player turnout throughout michaelmas. after having been moved down a league at the end of the previous season, we were thrilled to be moved back up to the first league following the team’s performance over michaelmas term. The team played fantastically at the annual jesus-jesus tournament against jesus college oxford, where we won 5-0. There was an excellent display of stick work from everyone who played, and this showed an early insight to the development of the squad We also had a great social aspect to the sport this year and held events with homerton and girton’s lacrosse clubs, as well as other jesus sports teams. This was a great way for the team to get to know each other better and to recruit more players. We were also invited to have breakfast with the master in the master’s lodge in michaelmas term, which was a very enjoyable experience.


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unfortunately, there was no cuppers tournament this year due to it being rained off. however, we are confident that this would have been a fantastic end to the year and a great opportunity to celebrate the team’s hard work. We have been so happy to captain such a great group who show much potential in their play. however, we are also saddened to have to say goodbye to players that are leaving this year. They have brought so much energy and talent to the team and we will miss them a great deal next year. however, we have no doubt that the next generation of jesus lacrosse will bring the same passion and enthusiasm to the team. We are thrilled to hand over leadership to next year’s captains, Thea shipway and heather jones and we cannot wait to see them bring future success to the team. We wish them the best of luck! Susannah Boyle & Jeremy Pearson *

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Netball Women despite our year panning out much differently to how we’d hoped and planned, the ladies team still saw plenty of successes and promising new players this year. after being demoted to the second ladies league for michaelmas, we won almost every match we played, to be promoted back up into the first league ready for lent. michaelmas also saw the annual jesus-jesus Varsity match, where we played against jesus oxford and continued our winning streak with the final score at 45-9. although we approached lent term ready to solidify our place in the first league, the storms which battered cambridge every weekend meant that we played very few matches. We did have a promising start, beating selwyn 19-14 and Queens 12-7, and narrowly losing to Fitz 15-16 in a tense back and forth game. The plan was for the league to continue into easter term, however this was not able to happen due to the term being moved online. ladies cuppers was scheduled to be played at the end of lent term. We began the day strong, winning every match in our group stage in the morning to progress to the finals in the afternoon, despite limited numbers and the chaos of playing in the midst of a half marathon! sadly the weather once again meant that the afternoon stages had to be postponed, which then never happened due to the pandemic.


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millie Quayle has been a brilliant new addition to the team, both on court and off with her confident, no-nonsense approach to umpiring! We’re sad to be losing some brilliant players as they graduate, so a massive thank you to anna christiansen, lucy Thompson, imy beltrami, lara Tritton, and Zannah lindley. You’ll be missed! although the year saw less netball than we’d hoped, i’ve loved captaining this season and wish the best of luck to libby bryant who takes over next year. Lucy Bell

Mixed last year jesus college mixed netball club finished strong and this year is no exception. in the first few weeks, our club had huge interest from our new Freshers and through them and the continuing commitment of our returning players, the club has shown a lot of growth this year in both numbers and skilled players. being in the top division, we had fierce inter-college competition, but we managed to win almost every match in michaelmas Term, often doubling the score of our opponents. credit for this goes to the incredible shooting-machine duo consisting of luka jovanovic and sam bedell. They hardly ever missed, and if they did, they would always spring up for the rebound to make sure that it was a goal for jesus. our only loss was very narrow against emmanuel but i am still proud of our performance given that a few of our most skilled team members were unable to make it that day. We were very comfortably beating emma in the first two quarters. however, a late arrival from their team, who happened to be double the height and muscle mass of our defenders, meant that they ended up beating us in the final few minutes by one goal, although this was heavily contested as both teams lost count of the final score in the last quarter. in lent term, we went on to win every single one of the matches that we played. however, due to a series of very stormy and rainy weekends, we had to postpone our much-anticipated redemption match against emmanuel. it had been rescheduled for the start of easter Term and we were completely sure it would end in victory this time, as we knew they were a formidable opponent, so we were going to make sure our strongest players were all available. however, due to coVid-19, we were unable to play this match and prove our superiority as the number 1 mixed college netball Team of cambridge university. however, we as a team and as a college know that this is the case and will have


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to wait until next year to officially prove it. The cancellation of easter Term also meant we were unable to play mixed cuppers, which we were very strong contenders to win, as Trinity, who had beaten us in last year’s Final, we had already beaten by a large margin in college leagues. This also meant we were also unable have our celebratory end of season meal as a team. To make up for this, i used the rest of the budget that would have gone towards the meal price, to purchase personalised jesus college netball club water bottles for all of our committed players, as a token of our appreciation for their commitment and excellence all year. it has been an incredibly fun and rewarding year of netball and i could not be prouder of our team. it will be sad to see some of our star players, who have now graduated, leave us next year like sam, lucy Thompson (who deserves a special shoutout for completing a half marathon and then immediately coming back to play c), anna christiansen (who has been one of our most committed and reliable players), david adeboye ( an indispensable defender) and the very talented lara Tritton. however, our remaining players and our talented Freshers will certainly keep our team going strong for next year. our newest captains will be libby bryant (ladies’ captain), millie Quayle (mixed captain) and Thomas hinson (Vice captain) who were chosen for a mixture of their talent and commitment. i am confident they will do an amazing job! Sejal Karmarkar *

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Pool The jesus college pool club had a largely successful 2019/2020 season, albeit with a rebuilding of the team due to the loss of a few fantastic players, including two former Varsity players Konstantyn bichai and Tom Fisher. however, there was a large intake of both recreational and competitive players and three of these novices William ashton, james cain and simon guo were selected for our second team, who played superbly in division 2 of the college league. despite the outbreaks of pandemic, our first team still managed to perform consistently, ranking second in division 1 before the end of lent term. notable results came against magdalene 1s (7-2), Trinity hall 1s (7-2) and captain of jesus 1s howard Yu ranked the first on the hotshots table. in contrast, jesus 2s struggled this season and gave away a few games that we should have won, as we often struggled to field a full team. hopefully, regular training sessions after the pandemic would help the 2s to bounce back and improve. standout players from this year maksym lewyckyj, an experienced player with excellent tactics and solid skills, and William ashton, who had consistent performance were called for the university pool team and played in the east of england pool championships. both often represented university pool team in cambridge area pool league and helped the team to excel in its division. maksym had a notable streak winning 7 games in a row and finished as the second-best player in the university team, ranking only behind the team captain. meanwhile William had a fantastic debut season, establishing himself as a regular in the side. jesus college was also well represented in university snooker, with curtis ho being an invaluable member of the team. at the beginning of the easter holiday, the club purchased a new professional pool table to replace the broken one in the pool room, giving the teams a magnificent place to compete and all college members to have fun. We have further planned to improve the team’s equipment and establish a strong college team going for future years. although it seems unlikely pool will resume in next michaelmas term, we are looking forward to continuing the success and expand the club when it does. Howard Yu and Maksym Lewyckyj


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Rugby after a rebuilding season in 2018/19, 2019/20 marked something of a resurgence for jcruFc. our squad was bolstered by the arrival of a large cohort of talented Freshers, giving us plenty of promise for the year ahead. The opening game was a scrappy but exciting affair vs homerton, with early season disorganisation on display from both sides. however, the game showcased the arrival of jesus’ young, exciting backs unit and concluded with angus mcintosh completing a hat-trick on debut with a last-minute winning try. Following a loss to last year’s cuppers finalists caius, we welcomed a jesus college oxford XV looking to repeat their success of last year in the now annual grudge match. our scrum was boosted by the presence of the experienced oliver exton, who alongside james Wright and charlie mayall in the front row provided the platform for the most controlled and dominant performance i had seen in a jesus shirt to date. jesus college cambridge emerged 15-0 victors in a game that was my personal highlight of the season. michaelmas concluded with a return to league fixtures against old rivals robinson. our form from the previous week continued with a 22-19 win in a strong defensive performance that was expertly controlled by player of the year david holdroyd at fly-half. The rich form extended into lent which saw our biggest victory margin of the season in a 47-10 triumph vs emmanuel. our good results thus far gave jesus the opportunity to gain promotion to division 1 in the final league match. unfortunately, we had our numbers depleted early on when scrum-half omar helmy had to rush hooker james Wright to hospital with a season ending injury, and a joint girton-pembroke team ultimately proved too strong. This disappointment was soon forgotten with the arrival of the much anticipated Wild-dawson memorial match vs jesus old boys. always the toughest match of the year, with several ex-blues returning, the game resulted in a heavy but highly entertaining loss. The evening’s entertainment was the social highlight of the year, capping off a thoroughly enjoyable day. next, we battled both robinson and storm dennis for a place in the cuppers quarter finals and we romped to a 26-5 win in a game where our forwards and half backs mastered the conditions perfectly. however, lent term was taking its toll with several injuries to key players, and the quarter final proved one step too far with league champions Fitzwilliam-sidney emerging comfortable winners. 2019/20 was a relatively strong season with good performances both on and off the field, exemplified by an excellent group of Freshers. credit must also go to david holdroyd, Tom holland, angus mcintosh, james Wright, and james burgess (rugby league) who represented the university in Varsity matches, showing the growing talent in the club. We’re also saying a fond farewell to several final year students who have provided excellent service over many years. i trust us to go on to new heights next season in the capable hands of bo beynon. James Ingham *

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Squash Men coming into the 2019-20 season having lost our top two seeds from the year before, jesus squash was buoyed by the arrival of a strong class of freshers, with great potential for the years to come. most notably ernest lok who slotted straight in at 3rd seed, joining ed hyde, moe Takenoshita, shikhar Kumar, Will Klemperer and myself in the 1st Vi.


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The season started off ferociously with a narrow loss to Queens, boasting four university players, but soon the team found its feet. dispatching churchill, robinson and Trinity on the way, jesus managed a very respectable 5th in the colleges First division – a great building block for the future! in the annual jesus-jesus Varsity match, some measured squash from ed, ernest and i overturned our defeat from last year, and filled us with confidence ahead of our cuppers campaign. Topping our cuppers group with wins against homerton, Wolfson and girton, we were pitted against a very strong emmanuel team in the Quarters. despite losing our first seed ed to injury, the team battled hard but eventually succumbed to an agonising 3-2 defeat. as ever, jesus squash remains an inclusive club for all abilities, and i’m very pleased to see the squash courts regularly filled with new players. ernest lok will take over the captaincy for next season and i’m sure he will be a great influence both on and off the court. Dougie Dolleymore

Women jesus Women’s squash saw a tremendously successful season this year. We only just narrowly missed the cupper’s final, to come an impressive third overall. This is a remarkable achievement given the formidable opponents we faced: clare’s team was made up entirely of university squash players, of which two out of the three were university blues. many thanks to my dedicated players – elizabeth reilly, lucy johnson and rosie collins – who made the time in their busy schedules to train, and represent the college, and to step in for team members last minute when there were injuries. it has been a pleasure to get to know, and play, with such a fantastic group! Moe Takenoshita *

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Table Tennis looking to build on last year’s heart-breaking runners-up finish in cuppers, the college’s first team had a mixed start to the season and only narrowly avoided relegation from the first division of the college league in michaelmas. despite a stronger showing in lent, injuries and the loss of players to other commitments meant that we were unable to finish higher than 4th. We had hoped to rectify this and our loss in last year’s final with a long cuppers campaign. however, after progressing through the first round, the virus struck, and the remainder of the tournament was abandoned, leaving us technically as joint winners. our second team, boosted by a considerable influx of freshers into the team, had a strong season, winning half of the games they played. a particular highlight for them was a 10-0 whitewash of selwyn. Finally, as we look forward to the coming year, it gives me great pleasure to hand over the captaincy to Tim smith and i wish him well. Shikhar Kumar *

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Ultimate Frisbee The short 2019/2020 academic year was one of spectacular improvement for jesus ultimate. in michaelmas, we took on several new players who had never played ultimate before, and we, as captains, were thrilled to watch them improve over the two short terms. michaelmas saw games which allowed us to come together as a team – as seen our victory in our final game of the year against the penguins (a team formed of several colleges together), which demonstrated how much we had all improved in our cohesiveness as a team. one point in particular from michaelmas term showcases the team spirit and camaraderie of the ultimate society at jesus. in our game against the anglia ruskin team (aru), in which we were outnumbered more than two to one, and which we very nearly won (final score 10-11 to them), there was one point in which every single one of our players contributed and touched the disc before we scored a point. in this game, all our new players were tested to their limits and performed brilliantly – in particular emma perfettini, Thomas Freitag, james Whelan-smith, and adric goh. This was a moment which showcases the sense of community in the team, the ability (and willingness) of all to get a little muddy, and to keep going despite being exhausted! From there, we took our improvements in michaelmas to go on to win the majority of our games in lent, earning us a spot in the first division for next season. definitely something of which to be incredibly proud! Thanks to all the amazing and dedicated members of the team who showed unwavering commitment and enthusiasm throughout the year, especially edwin jarratt barnhan, dominic betts and Yi jer loh. We look forward to next year, and wish our new captain, aldric goh, all the best. Peter Ondus and Phoebe McDonnell *

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Volleyball The 2019/2020 season has been very successful for jesus Volleyball, and significant progress has been made towards developing the relatively small and young society with lots of new opportunities. We had a large number of players continuing from last years’ team as well as several new undergraduate and postgraduate students joining. With the new larger team, we were able to host weekly training sessions and develop our technique and positioning, leading us to rank highly in cuppers We started off our year by taking part in jesus Varsity with a match against jesus college, oxford. Tensions were high in the first set with a very close score, but we were able to pull through with a win of 28-26. however, the oxford opposition was strong, and we ended with a 2-1 loss. This first match was a great opportunity for our team in preparation for the cuppers matches. The cuppers season began with a strong start. our new sparkling kit intimidated our opponents and we were able to take away two 3-0 wins against downing and churchill placing us into the finals against girton. They were an incredible team and they pushed us to play our very best and to put our positioning into use. We were able to put up a tough fight, with the scores in each set becoming tighter and tighter. in the end, girton was able to come out with a 3-0 win, positioning us second in Volleyball cuppers. all in all, this has been a strong year for jesus Volleyball and we have been extremely impressed with the amount of improvement the team has displayed throughout the year. special mentions are given to chris green and james ingham for their remarkable


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Jesus and Girton Volleyball teams after the Cuppers final 2020

development throughout the season despite not having played Volleyball before, as well as darcy Winchborne and izyan hay for their consistent performance throughout the season. organising jesus Volleyball this year has been an absolute pleasure and my best wishes go to next year’s committee. Bentley Carr *

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Waterpolo jesus college Water polo unfortunately had the main bulk of its activity cancelled due to coVid-19, thus sadly there was no cuppers this year. We have a joint team with sidney sussex, and i’m especially sad as we had a very strong team heading into cuppers, with a real chance of knocking Queen’s, the reigning champions, off their perch. between us we had two blues, four other blues team players ranging from incoming jesus captain andrew te Water naude to sidney finalists, and a number of swimmers new to the sport but keen to discover its joys. a friendly tournament in michaelmas saw us placed third, but we were a little lacking in numbers. a shame all in all, but i trust captain andrew to take the joint team to ever-closer union and redouble our efforts next year! Lara Tritton


members’ news



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members’ news for 2020 People C E ADAMS (1984) was awarded the companion of the order of st Michael and st george for services to International law and british foreign Policy. P BEASLEY-MURRAY (1963): the 10 october 2020 marks the fiftieth anniversary of his ordination to christian ministry. to mark that anniversary Darton, longman and todd of london are publishing his Fifty Lessons in Ministry: Reflections after Fifty Years in Ministry, which in turn means that he will have written 21 books in the past fifty years. I S BLANEY (2002) was appointed registrar of the Diocese of lincoln in June 2017. He remains a partner at lee bolton Monier-Williams, Deputy registrar in the Dioceses of Hereford and guildford and in the faculty office of the archbishop of canterbury. T H R BRUN (1996) switched careers 10 years ago from international arbitration law to becoming a historical fiction novelist. e transition between these two careers was no small undertaking in itself – involving a 10,000 mile epic solo cycling odyssey from Hong Kong to norfolk! since then he has published two novels in the Wanderer chronicles series and a third volume, A Burning Sea, was released earlier this year. besides writing novels, he ghost-writes memoirs (some private, some for general publication). If any Jesuans have a story they think is worth hearing and want help telling it, please get in touch with him through the Development and alumni relations office. R K BUTLIN (1973) has been made a Distinguished fellow of the european society for evolutionary biology. C J CULLEY (1984) has published a book e Essentials of Financial Modelling, a pocket-sized guide which contains her top tips for working with financial models in the most efficient way possible. P D V DANEEL (2019) recently completed his Mba and has written an article on his experience at Jesus culminating in a match winning century for cambridge in cricket’s Varisty Match. read his story here: https://www.cambridgembastories.com/2020/09/09/my-cambridge-mba-the-last-dance/ T A DARNTON (née Hobbs, 1986) has published her latest book, e Rules, a Ya thriller about a girl on the run from her prepper dad and his strict rules. C P DOBBIN (1970) is currently researching for his PhD at birmingham university on ‘understanding of health in different religions’. H T G DRUMMOND (2008) did a DPhil in Music at Merton college, oxford and has now started a four-year postdoctoral research fellowship at the Katholieke universiteit leuven, where he will be working on plainchant in the low countries. T M GADD (1982) was awarded a PhD by the university of leicester on 24 october 2019, with a thesis in english local History. she is now working part-time as an Honorary Voluntary fellow at leicester on a large civil War Petitions project, whilst continuing to work full-time as a freelance proofreader for academic clients. M HAYES (1976) started training for ministry at Westminster college, cambridge with a view to being ordained as minister at axted united reformed church. I N HENRY (1979) was appointed Visiting Professor at the centre for brexit studies at birmingham city university in June 2019. He continues in his role as Managing Director of autoanalysis.


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M E HILLMAN (1970) retired from the australian foreign service and a subsequent private consultancy practice two years ago and now devotes his time to his farm. T D HUCKLE Qc (1980) bencher of lincoln’s Inn, is now chair of Welsh rowing, and a member of the boards of british rowing and Justice. D J KAUDERS (1964) has published his latest book, e Financial System Limit: Radical thoughts about money, which challenges current financial orthodoxies about how economies should be managed. C P KEARNS (1985) was elected a fellow of e royal society of arts, Manufacturers and commerce for outstanding contributions to art law, Human rights law and legal eory in april 2020. M D KERN (2017) did a second Masters in finance at Imperial college london. With a background in Mechanical engineering and operations Management, his motivation for this Masters was to understand businesses from both the financial and operational perspective. In november 2019, he returned to Munich to work at McKinsey. G C KILLINGWORTH (1968) has been awarded a PhD by birkbeck, london for his thesis in english literature entitled: ‘a “true Homer of Women”? e use of rhetorical figures and structural Paradigms and the Presentation of female characters in the early Prose Works of robert greene’. K J LEACH (1989) has spent the last 20 years working for the fco including postings in Moscow and Japan as well as armenia where she was HM ambassador from 2012-2015. Her most recent role was Deputy Director, constitution and Devolution, in the fco’s europe Directorate in london. T S A MACQUIBAN (1970) is now research Director of the englesea brook chapel and Museum of Methodism. He is President of the Wesley Historical society. He serves on the council of the university of roehampton and is chair of the southlands Methodist trustees. D L MURRAY (1964), former trinidad and West Indies test cricketer, was appointed trinidad & tobago’s High commissioner to Jamaica. C R PALOMBO (1987) is now the chief consulting officer and group Head north america of stage-gate International in addition to also being a Visiting Professor of Innovation at university of strathclyde business school. M D PIERCE (1983) became a fellow of selwyn college, cambridge and was appointed bursar in november 2019. C J PILLING (1984) has been appointed by the secretary of state for Digital, culture, Media and sport as a board Members of uK sport for three years. L W G PUGH (1999) became the first person in history to swim underneath an ice sheet in antarctica. e 1km swim took place in a supraglacial lake, demonstrating the “very rapid changes” caused by climate change. D REES (2016), having spent the last year as assistant organist at Jesus college, has accepted a position as organ scholar at st albans cathedral. C J RODRIGUES cbe (1968) was appointed chairman of the royal ballet school. V F P SEIDEL (1997) reports that to round out his education from his prior focus on engineering and management, after two years of part-time study he completed a postgraduate certificate in Philosophy and ethics from Harvard university extension school, awarded in May 2019.


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N R W SELDEN (1986) is campagna Professor and chair of the Department of neurological surgery at oregon Health & science university. as a senior medical administrator he has been busy conducting various aspects of core training online, preparing to interview and match the next cohort of trainees virtually, conducting certification and accreditation activities remotely, and promulgating information and best practices regarding surgery during coVID for the national community. Professor selden is also secretary of the society of neurological surgeons, Director of the american board of neurological surgery, chair of acgMe Milestones group for neurological surgery, and is a Past-President of the congress of neurological surgeons. K J SHAHEEN (1995) is the Director of oxford based charity Paper boat (https://www.paperboatcharity.org.uk/ ) that helps to set up creative learning spaces for vulnerable children in hard to reach communities in India. e company has recently established a strategic funding partnership with la based asset management company Wilshire skyline (https://www.wilshireskyline.com/) which is run by another Jesuan, A R E T NISSEL (1997). S H SHAHEEN (2004) has been elected a fellow of the royal society of arts. A K SHARMA (2014) is working as an assistant Professor in german linguistics at the Jawaharlal nehru university (Jnu) in new Delhi. He also travelled to the university of Pennsylvania to work as a short-term visiting fellow there in March 2020. D TAYLOR (2008) co-founded edinburgh start-up go-shuffle, a newly launched self-coaching framework that promises to help individuals struggling with the fallout of the coronavirus pandemic. for those interested in learning more, the first part of the go-shuffle framework is being given free of charge, and is available to all at: https://www.go-shuffle.com/free-awareness A S VARMA and A P M WOOD (both 2006) launched Meals for the nHs in March 2020. one hundred volunteers distributed 303,767 meals, feeding around 5,000 nHs front line workers a night covering 146 hospitals across the uK in 101 days. I M WALTERS (1979) was the Programme Manager for solar orbiter, a spacecraft built by esa and nasa to study the sun at very close quarters. He lead the project to design and construct the spacecraft, culminating in the successful launch in february 2020 from cape canaveral. read more here: https://www.jesus.cam.ac.uk/articles/jesuan-leads-designand-construction-solar-orbiter J WARD (2016) was awarded the lord Mayor’s composition Prize for her composition cuts, round, slow-moving. scored for contralto, viola and piano, the work is a setting of the poem A London oroughfare. J WOODHOUSE (2016) has recently self-published three novels with amazon Kindle: Stormweaver, Blizzard Warder and Torch Bearer. e stormweaver chronicles series focuses on the coming-of-age of a young Princess in a land of magic and intrigue, her staunchly loyal protector lorak stormweaver, and the dark forces arrayed against them. S J YOUNG (1970) was elected a fellow of the royal society for his work on pioneering the statistical approach to language processing – namely, treating conversation as a reinforcement learning problem – that made the speech-recognition products in millions of homes a reality. *

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Births Ramsay BOWDEN (2004) and James WARLAND (2003), have a son, alexander Francis Wetherill Warland, born 8 February 2020. James CHERVAK (2003) and his wife jacqueline have a son henry james, born on 13 august 2020 Robert DUNCAN (2007) and his wife elizabeth are pleased to announce the birth of their second son, Finlay isaac Thomas, brother to ewan, born on 19 august 2020. Ken EAMES (1996) and his wife ellen (corpus christi, 2006) are delighted to announce the birth of their son, alexander john leopold, born 4 april 2020. Denise HENSCHEL (2019) and her partner alexis radisoglou have a daughter, clio, born 14 march 2020. Graham SMYE (1992) and his wife elizabeth are delighted to announce the birth of a daughter, phoebe joy, on 25 april 2020, a sister to lydia. Selma WALTHER (nĂŠe Telalagic, 2005) and her husband ansgar, have a son, aidan, born 29 january 2020. *

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Marriages and Civil Partnerships Rachael BASHFORD-ROGERS (2010) married norberto escudero on 23 march 2020 at jesus college chapel. Ian BLANEY (2002) married janja soldo on 9 june 2018 in hornsey parish church, london. John DUDLEY (2015) married elise hickey on 12 july 2019 at jesus college chapel, cambridge. Hannah FENTON (2001) married rupert griffin on 30 april 2019, followed on 4 may by a dedication of marriage in oxford university church of st mary the Virgin and a community celebration at sandy lane Farm, Tiddington. hannah and rupert both change their names to Fenton griffin. Matthew GLEESON (2016) and Penny WIESER (2017) were married on 18 july 2020 in the jesus college chapel. Anna GRUNSEIT (2013) married gwilym blunt on 2 january 2020 at The blue room bondi, sydney, australia. Daniel LEDERMAN (2017) married avigail simmons-rosten on 27 august 2020 at hatfield house. Sheena MORJARIA (2000) was married on 3 august 2019 at Villa di geggiano, siena, italy. James OSBORN (2001) married ailsa prise on 28 september 2019 at Kachette, shoreditch, london. Kristen TREEN (2006) married James PURDON (2012) on 20 February 2020 at glasgow registration office. Catherine STUART (2011) married joseph davies on 7 september 2019 at la mare Wine estate, jersey.


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obituaries Honorary Fellows Professor Philip Warren Anderson was born on 13 december 1923 and died on 29 march 2020 aged 96. a distinguished american theoretical physicist, philip anderson was awarded the nobel prize in physics in 1977 jointly with sir neville mott and john van Fleck for their fundamental theoretical investigations into the electronic structure of magnetic and disordered systems. professor anderson was elected a Fellow of jesus in 1969 while holding a Visiting professorship at the cavendish laboratory. in 1975 he returned to the united states and princeton university. he was elected an honorary Fellow of jesus in 1978. Working on solid materials like glass and crystals he discovered that electrons may be incapable of passing through a disordered metal, because paths cancel as a result of multiple diffraction; in consequence the incident energy of the electron wave is reflected. his prize winning insight significantly deepened understanding of magnetism, superconductivity and the structure of matter. he was an outstanding theorist of condensed-matter, or solid-state, for half a century, a field of physics concerned with the properties of solids and liquids with high densities of atoms that constantly interact. his most influential work concentrated on randomly structured, or “disordered”, materials lacking the crystalline composition of most matter. he focused on the behaviour of electrons within these materials, including semiconductors. a paper he published in 1958 revealed how electrons in disordered materials move freely, or are fixed as if glued, depending on the extent of disorder – a property that became known as “anderson localization”. professor piers coleman, of rutgers university, interviewed at anderson’s death said: “This is foundational physics that completely shook up physics at a time when it was still thought that electrons and waves in general are always de-localized”. he added that anderson localization explains how light is reflected backward in fog and why disordered metals become insulators. anderson collaborated on the magnetic behaviour of spin glasses with renowned physicist professor sir sam edwards of the cavendish (who died in 2015). These are systems in which atoms display features of structure and randomness, suggesting analogies with the variabilities in computers and brain structures, thus providing connections between neuroscience and computer science. Through the sixties and seventies anderson worked on superconductivity, in which certain alloys and metals lose all resistance to electrical currents at temperatures near absolute zero. later he turned to superconductors that operate at higher temperatures – though still frigid – compared with traditional superconductors, resulting in more efficient electrical transmission. The american physicist andrew Zangwill who is writing a biography of anderson says: “he was a brilliant intuitionist” who “gave depth and intellectual coherence to an entire field”. anderson was an advocate for condensed-matter physics and the role of complexity in science. he prompted a lively debate over the issue of radical reductionism in science with an article he contributed to the journal science in 1972 titled More is Different.


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he maintained that strict reductionism has its limitations, pointing to the emergent properties of certain materials, copper, for example: a single atom, he argued, has little charge whereas millions of atoms forming a wire can conduct electricity. born in indianapolis, son of harry Warren anderson and elsie eleanor (osborne), he grew up on a farm in urbana, illinois. his father was a plant scientist at the university of illinois. anderson would say that he was the child of impecunious academics of the mid-West. his first degree at harvard university was interrupted by World War ii when he was assigned to help construct antennas for the us navy. returning to harvard after the war, he completed a doctorate in 1949. he worked at bell Telephone laboratories, murray hill, new jersey, where in 1962 he published a paper demonstrating how photons acquire mass inside a superconductor. in 1964 he was cited by peter higgs in the theory that predicts the existence of an elusive particle endowing fundamental particles with mass. This led to the 2012 discovery of the higgs boson, or “god particle”. Working at the cavendish between 1969-1975, anderson was elected to a fellowship at jesus, until returning to america and the department of physics at princeton university. in 1980 he was elected a foreign member of the royal society, and received the national medal of science in 1982. retiring from the bell labs in 1984, he was elected to a chair at princeton. in 1996 he was named the joseph henry professor physics emeritus. he published a miscellaneous collection of essays in 2011 titled More and Different: Notes from a oughtful Curmudgeon, echoing his earlier article in Science. he was a first-degree master of the board game “go”. he was married joyce gothwaite 1947, and is survived by his wife and a daughter. John Cornwell Jessye Norman, the american operatic soprano, died on 30 september 2019 aged 74. born in the segregated wing of augusta georgia’s city hospital on september 15 1945, ms norman became a world-renowned opera singer, celebrated for her dramatic soprano voice. she was acclaimed not only on the operatic stage, but also as a recitalist and concert singer. her recordings were popular, and she won five grammies, including one for lifetime achievement. she was awarded the Kennedy center honor in 1997, and the national medal of arts in 2009. she performed the works of many composers, including schubert, strauss, Wagner mahler, debussy and berlioz. she commanded a broad range of styles from the baroque to the anarchic music of john cage. she liked to say: “pigeonholes are for pigeons”. in 2003 she formed a partnership with the rachel longstreet Foundation, founding the jessye norman school of arts, a programme for disadvantaged students. she expressed gratitude to the black singers who influenced her, in particular marian anderson, dorothy maynor, and leontyne price. in an interview in 1983, she said: “They have made it possible for me to say, ‘i will sing French opera’, or ‘i will sing german opera’, instead of being told, ‘You will sing porgy and bess’ . . . look, it’s unrealistic to pretend that racial prejudice doesn’t exist. it does! it’s one thing to have a set of laws, and quite another to change the hearts and minds of men.” in her autobiography Up Straight and Sing! (2014), she tells her experiences of instances of racism. “racial barriers in our world are not gone,


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so why can we imagine that racial barriers in classical music and the opera world are gone?” The New Yorker recorded on her death that she was “an object of disbelieving awe – a phenomenon over which singers of the future can wonder and weep. in her prime, she let loose sounds of shimmering magnificence.” Writing in the Guardian, music critic barry millington wrote: “… she had a gloriously rich middle and lower register, which she exploited to great effect in repertoire associated with mezzo-sopranos. her voice type, combining the tessitura of a dramatic or spinto soprano with the timbre of a mezzo, was sometimes referred to as that of a ‘falcon’, named after the famous 19th-century French singer cornélie Falcon.” Writing in the New York Times, the music critic edward rothstein likened her voice to a “grand mansion of sound”. he declared that her singing “has enormous dimensions, reaching backward and upward. it opens onto unexpected vistas. it contains sunlit rooms, narrow passageways, cavernous halls. ms norman is the regal mistress of this domain, with a physical presence suited to her vocal expanse.” jessyse’s mother was an amateur pianist, her father an insurance broker. her love of music began in childhood, listening to opera on the radio. she remembers hearing the africanamerican contralto marian anderson singing brahms’s Alto Rhapsody: “i listened, thinking, ‘but this can’t just be a voice! a voice doesn’t sound this rich and beautiful.’ it was quite a revelation. and i wept, not knowing anything about what it meant. i just thought, ‘it must be terribly important, this music’.” “i remember thinking,” she wrote, “that opera stories were not very different from other stories: a boy meets a girl, they fall in love, they cannot be together for some reason, and most of the time it does not end happily ever after.” she graduated in music at howard university, Washington dc, and went on to further studies at the university of michigan, and the famed music academy peabody institute at johns hopkins university. her career took off when she won the top prize at the munich international music competition in 1968. The following year she made her debut as elisabeth in “Tannhäuser” at the deutsche oper berlin. appearances followed at milan’s Teatro alla scala, london’s royal opera house, and major opera houses across the world. she was a favourite choice for major galas and benefits, at which she invariably wore magnificent dresses. on the 200th anniversary of bastille day she sang La Marseillaise before world leaders at the obelisk on the place de la concorde. she graced the occasion, pacing the base, singing out to all four points of the compass, wearing a billowing hooded tricolor gown by azzedine alaïa. she was the guest singer at the second inaugurations of ronald reagan and bill clinton. on 11 december 2013 she sang Amazing Grace at the memorial service for nelson mandela in Washington dc. in october 1996 she performed in jesus college, chapel in celebration of the 500th anniversary of our foundation. lord renfrew, master of jesus college 1986-1997, writes: “she was a great lady, with a warm heart, who gave us that wonderful concert on 20th october 1996, one of the great highlights of my tenure as master. her connection with the college began in 1989, on the occasion of her honorary doctorate from the university. on these occasions it is usual for a specific college to act as host for the graduand, and i invited her to stay with us at the suggestion of the former master, sir alan cottrell, and to be an honorary Fellow (which the council readily agreed). so she stayed with us on that occasion. i remember that the college choir proposed to me that they should sing for her at breakfast the next morning. she was clearly delighted, and sat on the stairs at the master’s lodge (just outside the lodge dining room) to give them attention. We had a concert in the master’s lodge on that evening with some of the college’s leading musicians, and naturally we hoped that she might give an impromptu contribution. but, as i later realised, she felt that any performance was to be carefully prepared, and she did not sing on that occasion. she kept in touch with jane and me, she had lunch with us in the house of lords on one occasion and


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she kindly invited jane and myself to a concert in london subsequently. “The Quincentenary concert, seven years after her first visit, was a great success. and the printed programme is a wonderful souvenir. The mixed choir began with hadley’s My beloved spake and sumsion’s They that go down to the sea in ships, followed by the amaretti string Quartet, of jesuan students, with rupert luck on violin, playing haydn’s Quartet in F major (op.74, no. 2). Then, without intermission, came jessye norman (accompanied by her usual professional accompanist mark markham). The first item was five songs by richard strauss. The very first of these Zueignung (dedication) was tremendous: i can still hear the echo of the last line of each stanza: ‘habe dank’. The second group of songs were in French: eric satie’s Je te veux, Francis poulenc’s Les Chemins de l’Amour and georges bizet’s Habeñera from carmen. The third group of songs was Three sprituals from the cantata by john carter, of which the third was the Toccata: Ride on, King Jesus, bringing the memorable evening to a suitable conclusion. it was a great triumph, and the Quincentenary was richly celebrated! What an evening!” she is survived by a brother, james norman, and a sister, elaine sturkey. John Cornwell *

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Emeritus Fellows Dr John Adkins was born on 16 april 1934 and died on 17 july 2020. after taking his undergraduate degree at christ’s college cambridge, john first joined jesus as a phd student in 1956. admitted as a Fellow of jesus in 1957, he was appointed a university lecturer in the cavendish laboratory’s low Temperature physics group in 1964, and went on to lead the group from 1982 until his retirement in 1999. Through skillful experimentation john addressed many problems in condensed matter physics, including superconductivity, electronic conduction in disordered systems, quantum mechanical tunnelling and the metal-insulator transition; his contribution to physics was recognised by his election as a Fellow of the institute of physics. john’s heavy involvement in teaching laid the foundations for the success of his book Equilibrium Thermodynamics, which has long been a standard text for undergraduate students. a fine oboe player, john was closely involved in all aspects of music-making during his time in jesus. he was president of the jesus college musical society for 33 years, from 1976 to 2009, during which time his untiring support for student musicians led to many memorable concerts and performances. john collaborated with laurence picken on an article about the physics of sound production and how it relates to various oriental and ancient stringed instruments. john was a keen sportsman, sometimes swimming in the cam before coming into dinner in hall, and playing squash well into his eighth decade. he served as president of jesus between 1982 and 1985, his tenure overlapping with prince edward’s time as an undergraduate. john remained forward-looking all his life. a forceful proponent of the admission of women to college in the 1970s, he was delighted by the election of the first female master in 2019.


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john will be greatly missed by the many students who gained from his superb teaching and unstinting encouragement, and by the Fellows and staff for his lively conversation, sharp intelligence and lasting concern for the welfare of others. a full obituary will be published in next year’s annual report. *

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Professor Michael Waring was born on 8 november 1939 and died on 16 november 2019. michael was a Fellow and emeritus Fellow of jesus, a prominent scientist in the field of cancer, antibiotics, and drug interactions with dna. he was an inspiring teacher, and a keen contributor to many aspects of college life for more than half a century. michael was quietly convivial, regularly attending high Table dinner. he cared deeply for the chapel, organ music and the choirs, often worshiping at evensong. he was Treasurer of the may ball committee for many years, and a keen member of the roosters. an enthusiastic patron of the boat club and all college sports, he instituted in 1990 the annual Waring award “for the undergraduate who contributes most outstandingly to the sporting life of the college”. he served as Fellow librarian; and as Fellows’ steward, he organised feasts with flare. he was a distinctive figure in striped blazer, embroidered shirt, and sandals whatever the weather. he had a specialist knowledge and appreciation of church music. his exploits as a pilot were legendary; often generously, if queasily, shared with favoured students. residents near his second home in new Zealand, where he regularly wintered in later years, were entertained by his aerobatics over their rooftops. he was a companion of the royal aeronautical society and held a commercial pilot’s licence. michael was elected a jesus Fellow in 1965 and emeritus Fellow forty-two years later. he taught medical and veterinary students until weeks before his death, routinely presiding over celebratory dinners with alumni. in 2016 he founded the annual Waring prize for medics who went on to achieve the best results in the Final mb examination part iii. professor sir bruce ponder writes: “as a new undergraduate in 1962, i was in mike’s first supervision group for biochemistry, not in the historic surroundings of F6 with its epic brass rubbings and memories of grand vintages long drunk, the dna helix model, the pages of sacred music on the piano, and photo of michael with the pope: but in a phd student garret in brookside. “it was 5pm; we always began with nescafé and chocolate digestives. The chamomile tea ceremony came much later. and always with clarity and precision of thought, but also gently and with humour, announced with his little clearing of the throat, we were led into biochemistry: not always an easy subject for medics. “but for those who wanted it, there was more . . . in the clarity of his teaching, it was michael’s communication of his enthusiasm for science, and the insights he gave us into what science was, that inspired me and many others. Through him, i first saw how biochemistry could lead to the molecular and cellular biology and genetics that became my medical career.” michael’s contributions in the field of cancer research were important and wide ranging. he sought to identify molecules that interfered with the function of dna by binding to it, with far reaching potential as therapeutic agents through selective action on cancer cells.


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by the same token, through characterising modes of binding he also gained information about the mechanics of the dna molecule. he came up to downing college as a scholar in 1958, obtaining First class honours in Tripos i and Tripos ii. Funded by a mrc research studentship, he worked on his phd (1961-64) in the microbiology unit (mbu) of the department of biochemistry under professor ernest gale Frs. professor dame jean Thomas writes: “as a postdoctoral fellow in the pioneering group of roy britten at the carnegie institute in Washington dc, he discovered a class of highly repeated (non-coding) dna sequences in higher organisms. one class of short repeated sequences (‘microsatellites’), found to differ between individuals, forms the basis of dna fingerprinting methods, now widely used in forensic science. in 1965 he became a university demonstrator in the department of biochemistry, moving to pharmacology as a lecturer two years later, where he remained until he retired as professor of chemotherapy in 2004. “after early work on dna with lionel crawford, michael went on to identify a number of drugs; these included doxorubicin (adriamycin), which is routinely used in therapeutic cocktails to treat many forms of cancer worldwide. all the compounds were subjected to rigorous and extensive study with respect to mode, kinetics and dna sequence-preference of binding; just one, echinomycin, and its derivatives, led to close to fifty publications! “his research on dna-binding drugs benefitted from timely adoption of the latest technologies, to which michael was introduced by various collaborators, and led to further important insights into dna properties. in the early 1980s, michael exploited the new technique of ‘footprinting’, which allows precise identification of the location of binding sites in defined dna sequences and thereby demonstrated the sequence preferences of the various drugs. another identifiable new line of work led michael and his colleagues to use base-substitution technology in a systematic manner to gain important insights into the physical properties of dna, in particular its flexibility. in turn this would lead, in the early 2000s, to the adoption of the new technology of atomic force microscopy (aFm). Thus, four decades after michael first demonstrated the effect of ethidium bromide on the hydrodynamic properties of dna, the aFm studies directly confirmed the accuracy of his initial conclusions.” With ernest gale, michael was co-author of the classic text book The Molecular Basis of Antibiotic Action (2nd edition 1981) as well as several other co-edited works. he co-authored more than 300 scientific papers, and participated on a range of journal editorial boards, research councils and other bodies. he delivered many plenary, guest and named lectures around the world, and held visiting professorships at many universities. he received the degree of doctor of science, in the university of cambridge, in 1975. michael john Waring was born and raised in lancaster, his sister judith was born in 1944. his father was a commercial traveller, his mother a home-maker. he attended the Friends school in the city, until 1958 when came up to downing. he read natural sciences part i, and natural sciences (biochemistry) part ii, and was appointed assistant organist. elected to a fellowship at jesus in 1965, he spent an initial year as Visiting Fellow at the carnegie institution of Washington department of Terrestrial magnetism. he was appointed lecturer in biochemistry, then lecturer in pharmacology, and eventually reader and then professor in chemotherapy. after seven years as a director of biological studies and medicine in the college, he spent his first sabbatical studying organ music at the royal college of church music. he would be active on the subcommittee for the installation of the organs in the chapel; and for many years he was a committed member and supporter of the choir at little st mary’s church in cambridge. in 1973 he married a fellow academic and a son christian was born in 1974. The marriage was dissolved. his parents had emigrated with his sister judith to


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new Zealand in 1972, and michael made a second overwinter home there. he often took the western route, stopping off to sing with american church choirs on the way, and visiting his friend and former jesus Fellow the late professor bernard Towers who had joined the medical school at ucla in 1971. michael eventually purchased a beachfront house at pauanui close to the coromandel national park forty miles from auckland. he was an honorary Visiting consultant, cancer research laboratory, auckland, through the 1990s. his sister judith writes of his english bicycle and the many friends he made. he regularly flew around the islands in his plane ZK-pae. bruce ponder records a somewhat alarming incident as a passenger with michael in new Zealand. They were attempting to land in a rainstorm: “[We] could see nothing at all, certainly not the runway on which we were hoping to land . . . michael said casually – and with less than his usual precision – that because the atmospheric pressure had changed, he thought the altimeter was ‘maybe 150 feet out’.” They landed safely. back on england, in 1989, he was less fortunate when his yellow lotus elan was hit from behind and burst into flames. he landed at the burns unit at stoke mandeville for three months, cared for by some of his past students. of all his contributions to college life, the boat club drew his utmost dedication and support. he was senior Treasurer and a Trustee for twenty-six years from 1993. sir david Wootten writes: “. . . the minutes of the Trustees’ meeting in which michael was appointed to the Trust record that ‘The Trustees noted and discussed the evident unwillingness of dr michael Waring to take on the job of honorary secretary’; clearly a smart move, and nevertheless the Trustees showed the wisdom to appoint him, which he richly rewarded with his decades of service to jcbc. he came to embody the spirit of the boat club, always concerned for the welfare of the students.” michael served as chairman of the Wine committee, organising many tastings for Fellows and students; his tastes extended even to british wines. he liked to say that “jesus dons like their wines well chambered!” sir bruce ponder writes: “i was first aware of [his expertise] when he showed me how to clarify vintage port after decanting, by spinning it in the biochemistry ultracentrifuge.” Well into retirement michael was vigilant in defence of college tradition and standards, apprehensive of what he gently termed the “new-fangled”. until the end he was committed to the biochemistry department, where in 2016 he was appointed an affiliate lecturer. The departmental website recorded: “it was always wonderful to see him at our seminars and discussion groups – usually sitting near the front and in rapt attention. he was always conscientious, committed and a consummate professional, and much admired by both undergraduates and faculty. he was an academic and intellectual role model for us all and will be sorely missed.” michael was diagnosed with lung cancer in late 2019, leading to his death after a short illness. his coffin was carried from the chapel and through the cloisters and the chimney before being driven to his funeral service at little st mary’s, the church he loved and where he sang regularly in the choir until the end of his life. Friends have asked that donations in his memory should be made to cancer research uK, which had helped fund his research down the years. John Cornwell


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Roger Vernon Scruton was born on 27 February 1944 and died of cancer aged 75 on 12 january 2020. roger scruton was one of the college’s most distinguished intellectual figures of the post-war years. philosopher, novelist, composer, musicologist, journalist, lawyer, political thinker, farmer, wine critic, and much more, he was a well-known ‘public intellectual’ whose views were controversial, running contrary to what he saw as dominant liberal-left political and academic opinion. For this he paid a price, was made the object of often vicious and unfounded attacks. only recently he was sacked from the government commission Building Better, Building Beautiful after quotations from an interview with him in the New Statesman deliberately misrepresented what he had said. The interviewer, gloated that he had ‘brought down’ roger scruton; when the interview tapes were published in full, the magazine apologised unreservedly and scruton was reinstated by the government. born in the lincolnshire village of buslingthorpe, he was raised with his two sisters in high Wycombe where he attended the royal grammar school (a state-funded school) from 1954-1961. it was not a happy childhood. his father, from a manchester working-class background, had left school at 14 to work as a labourer; after war service, he followed a training course for ex-servicemen and became a primary school teacher. his dislike of the upper classes was visceral and he resented his son’s grammar school successes as social climbing, a class betrayal; his mother, ‘born and bred in the genteel suburbs of london’, was different in both background and nature. between his parents, there prevailed what roger described as a ‘sort of lawrentian class tension’ and he quickly left home after his cambridge scholarship exams. once accepted at cambridge, his father no longer spoke to him. When in later years roger talked of his life as in three parts, the word for this early part was simply ‘wretched’. despite the tensions it caused at home however, school was a different matter. Though he studied science subjects, he found a circle of friends with whom talking and arguing about the arts proved essential. music in particular was already important in his life; he sang in the school choir and also, unbeknown to his father, in the choir at the local anglican church – further evidence of social climbing. in his early teens, the family inherited an upright piano; roger had some lessons, taught himself to sight-read, and, with a gifted school friend, worked his way through the piano repertoire, entertaining fellow pupils at lunch times with the four-hand version of The Rite of Spring. he came up to cambridge in 1962, where he felt ‘although socially estranged (like virtually every grammar-school boy), spiritually at home’. his scholarship at jesus was for natural sciences but between school and cambridge his passion for literature and the arts had displaced interest in the sciences. after an initial meeting with his Tutor, laurence picken, a meeting he described with much affection in peter glazebrook’s Jesus: e Life of a Cambridge College, he switched to moral sciences (as philosophy was called), graduating in 1965 with a double first. moral sciences at jesus was in the hands of a.c. ewing, nearing retirement and not a stimulating teacher (in later years, however, scruton always cited ewing’s Short Commentary on Kant’s Critique of Pure Reason, 1938, as the best introduction in english). scruton and malcom budd, a year above him, joined forces to teach each other (budd later achieved distinction as ucl’s grote professor of the philosophy of mind and logic). philosophy in cambridge in those days was analytical philosophy, dealing with philosophical problems through analysis of the concepts and language in which they are


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expressed, seeking to display their hidden logical structure or show the misleading forms of ordinary language from which they may arise. it gave scruton an ‘extraordinary education’ that trained him in the art of lucid thinking, implanting the firm sense of the distinction between real and fake thinking that informed his work thereafter. at the same time, its concerns were judged remote from any recognisable human predicament and no more satisfactory for scruton than the natural sciences. What he wanted of philosophy was engagement with the modern world and its existential problems. hence his and others’ ‘disappointment with british philosophers who seem to ignore entirely the thoughts and emotions that cause us to philosophize in the first place’; hence the appeal of the very different continental philosophical tradition. For scruton, philosophy was nothing if not ‘the attempt to find a comprehensive picture of what we are, of where we are and of how we are’. The encounter with philosophers who were also literary figures – sartre, schopenhauer, nietzsche – was fundamental: ‘this is what redeems philosophy that it can translate itself into great literature’. during his time at jesus, scruton published only ‘a little essay in an undergraduate magazine’. The magazine was Circuit, started by jesus students. his contribution was the nietzsche-inspired ‘Theology; The immoral science’, half of a debate with Terry eagleton, a young jesus research Fellow, who countered with the anti-nietzschean ‘dishonest to god’. eagleton was later made an honorary Fellow, a distinction wrongly denied to scruton. in later years, roger and Terry would often be brought together for public discussions; their views and ideas were sharply opposed, but both shared a concern with matters of culture and society, politics and religion, and always argued their differences with great civility. after graduation scruton taught as a lecteur at the collège universitaire in pau, and then lived in rome with a friend and her bohemian hippie circle. if at the time he thought of himself as ‘bohemian’, this roman experience prompted the discovery that he was in fact ‘a normal bourgeois person’: ‘without knowing much about it, i was on the side of order’. The events of may 1968, witnessed at first hand in paris, confirmed his conservativism. When he returned to jesus as a graduate student in 1967 for research on aesthetics, he was also seeking an alternative to the prevailing ‘politics of rebellion’. elected to a research Fellowship at peterhouse in 1969, he gained his phd in 1972, and published his thesis: Art and Imagination: A Study in the Philosophy of Mind, in 1974. in 1973 he married danielle lafitte, a teacher met during his time in pau; they divorced in 1979. in 1971 he took up a lectureship in philosophy at birkbeck college, london where he was subsequently appointed to a readership in 1979 and a professorship of aesthetics in 1985. Thus began the second part of his life, not ‘wretched’ but ‘ill at ease’. birkbeck was strongly left-wing and he stood out as a political pariah. unsure of his future, he read for his bar exams at the inner Temple, passing both parts in 1975 and 1976 and winning Temple prizes. called to the bar in 1978, he never practised, unable to afford pupillage. in 2015 he was elected an honorary bencher of the inn; when he died, the inn’s flag was flown at half-mast in his memory. birkbeck’s practice of teaching in the evenings left the days for writing, beginning what would be his over fifty books, as also for his prolific journalism. The books, too many to list, cover many subjects: aesthetics, animal rights, architecture, desire, beauty, lebanon, human nature, culture, globalisation, terrorism, wine… They include novels and short stories, as well as libretti for three operas and the music for two of them. music indeed was always a source of joy and deep reflection, as exemplified by The Aesthetics of Music (1997), a substantial philosophical account of musical meaning. his conservatism was affirmed in The Meaning of Conservatism (1980), defending Tory values against ‘their betrayal by free marketeers’. From 1982, for almost twenty years,


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he edited the Salisbury Review, championing ‘genuine conservatism’ – not competition but attachment – and the defence of civil society, of ‘a certain way of life’. he favoured brexit and responded to the leave vote with Where We Are, The State of Britain Now (2017), addressing ‘the difficult and troubling question of our national identity.’ he was a constant defender of freedom of speech and the legitimacy of disagreement. civilised debate was his modus vivendi. Writing in the Church Times after roger’s death, his local parish priest described him as a great example of someone with whom you could have radical disagreements ‘and still get along – a skill that has disappeared in the public forum in recent years’. his commitment to unfettered debate and the principles of a free society was nowhere more evident than in his tireless work in czechoslovakia, hungary and poland during the cold War. under the code-name Wiewiórka (polish for squirrel, an allusion to his red hair), he gave clandestine lectures, smuggled in books, helped disssident activists, established various educational trusts. under constant secret police surveillance, he was eventually arrested in 1985 and expelled from czechoslovakia. his experience of the time is captured in his novel Notes from Underground (2014). after the fall of the iron curtain his work was recognised by official honours: the medal for merit (First class) for services to the czech people (1998); the lech-Kaczynski award for intellectual courage, integrity and friendship to poland (2016); the order of merit of the republic of poland (2019); the middle cross of the hungarian order of merit (2019). in 1992 he left birkbeck for a university professorship and a chair of philosophy at boston university. in 1995 he resigned his boston posts and came back to england to live from freelance writing and lecturing. in 2005 he took an appointment as research professor at the institute for the psychological sciences in arlington, Virginia and in 2009 worked at the american enterprise institute in Washington where he wrote Green Philosophy: How to Think Seriously about the Planet (2011). he held numerous Visiting professorships; most recently at oxford, st andrews, and buckingham where he developed an ma in philosophy. in 1993 he purchased sunday hill Farm in the Wiltshire hamlet of garsdon. here he wanted to settle; it was his somewhere, his ‘scrutopia’ as the composer robin holloway called it. For this third part of his life one word sufficed: ‘hunting’. Through hunting he met his second wife, sophie jeffreys, when she came to his help after he was thrown from his horse during a meet of the beaufort hunt. hunting and farming – rural community – gave him a new ease, reflected in the autobiographical underpinning of his later books, notably News from Somewhere: On Settling (2004), full of vignettes of this settled life – neighbours, country occasions, everyday realities. if the feeling is often elegiac, there is no lamenting an idealised past, but rather a clear-sighted appreciation of the values and difficulties of his somewhere community. he and his wife’s consultancy, horsell’s Farm enterprises – involved them in a range of activities relating to conservation, environmental management and the future of the countryside. an annual ‘scrutopia summer school’ is devoted to philosophical issues; participants are promised – characteristically roger – ‘ten days of glorious eccentricity in beautiful countryside’. These sunday hill Farm years saw roger preoccupied with two related concerns: Wagner, religion. While he had always regarded religion as integral to human communities on sociological and anthropological grounds, he was no less clear that science gives the truth of our world, not some theological doctrine; no place is left for any “divine hypothesis” and another way needs be found to resuscitate the religious worldview. in The Face of God (2012) and The Soul of the World (2014), scruton explored god’s place in a disenchanted world, arguing that the sacred and the transcendental are ‘real presences’, essential to human life. Kant, ever central in scruton’s philosophical thinking, ‘showed the limits of human reason, pushed to ‘that place where the empirical gives out and the


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transcendental glimmers’. The glimmering of the transcendental scruton’s three books devoted to key works by Wagner: Death-Devoted Heart: Sex and the Sacred in Wagner’s Tristan and Isolde (2004); e Ring of Truth: e Wisdom of Wagner’s Ring of the Nibelungen (2016); Wagner’s Parsifal: The Music of Redemption (2020; powerful philosophical, musical, and personally felt explorations of his conception of the sacred, his understanding of redemption. scruton’s question is Wagner’s: how to live in right relation with others, even if there is no god to help us. This too is what Wagner explores, and, what scruton shows in these works, above all in his detailed analysis of the music as where indeed the transcendental glimmers. even in the absence of faith, scruton’s religious sensibility was strong. he talked of regaining his religion but ‘at a distance from the old religion’ In Our Church: A Personal History of the Church of England (2012) he provided an account of what the church of england had meant to him. on sundays he regularly played the organ in his local church. he was made Fellow of the royal society of literature in 2003 and Fellow of the british academy in 2008. in 2016, he became sir roger scruton, knighted ‘For services for philosophy, teaching and public education’. on the evening of roger’s death, rabbi lord jonathan sacks, taught by him at cambridge and a long-standing friend, wrote fittingly of him as ‘immense in the scope and depth of his mind . . . a living reminder of what the philosophical mind can be at its most expansive’. he was ‘a gentle man and a gentleman’: someone to whom ‘in human emotional terms’ he owed a great deal. Stephen Heath

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Old Members ALBAN, David Basil (1946) died on 18 september 2019 aged 92. david alban was born on 16 may 1927 in birmingham. educated at denstone college, uttoxeter. he came up in 1946 alongside his brother, bill. he read english and history and was awarded a half-blue for athletics. he graduated ba 1950; ma 1953. after a brief spell at the Foreign office, he went on to pursue a career in teaching and taught for many years at sedbergh school. he married lesley gibson in 1959; they had four sons and a daughter three of whom followed him to jesus college: simon (1980); mark (1985); and mike (1986). *

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AVERY, Robert (1967) died on 10 april 2020 aged 70. robert avery was born on 14 may 1949 in london. educated at leyton county high school, he came up in 1967. he read history, graduating ba 1970; ma 1996. after graduating he joined the anglo-austrian society in 1971 where he arranged educational travel, ending up as assistant secretary. it was at the society that he met jane Fraser who was the concert manager and they married in 1977 in the college chapel. They had two daughters. he and jane went on to found habsburg heritage cultural Tours in 1989 which delighted in providing carefully planned, unpretentious, accompanied holidays to musical events around europe. *

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BENSE, Peter Alexander (1976) died on 27 march 2020 aged 61. peter bense was born on 11 august 1958 in rugby. educated at rugby school, he came up in 1976. he read engineering, graduating ba 1979; ma 1983. he spent his career in the power sector and rose to be director for heat and power at sWeco uK limited. after retiring from sWeco he continued to provide consultancy advice as technical director at padd energy, there he provided financial and technical advice on national and international thermal power projects and district heating networks. he had a lifelong love of sport which he did not take too seriously. his inability to truly shine never stopped him playing or marred his enjoyment and, in the end brought him true happiness, when he met his wife whilst seeking new players for his mixed hockey team. he married clare squibb in 1989. *

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BOWYER Peter Damian (1957) died on 30 december 2019 aged 80. peter bowyer was born on 23 February 1939 in stonyhurst, lancashire, where his father was director of music at stonyhurst college. educated at st benedict’s school, ealing, he came up in 1957 to read French and spanish followed by geography. he graduated ba 1960; ma 1966. he inherited his father's musical gifts and was a keen member of the jesus singers. later he sang with the royal choral society and the london philharmonic choir. six years on from graduation he qualified as a chartered accountant, at the same time contracting a disabling chronic illness. While ill health often prevented him from working, he enjoyed travelling to unusual places abroad and acquired a working knowledge of a number of languages including chinese and japanese. he read voraciously, including all of The Cambridge Ancient History and The Cambridge Medieval History. When on one occasion his canoe sank on the river Wye, it was no surprise that a soggy copy of The Oxford Book of English Verse had to be fished from the waters. his general knowledge was huge and his daughter was known to have made desperate phone calls to him from pub quizzes. he married catherine bell in 1982 and they had a daughter, susannah. *

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BRIDGE, Kieran Arthur George (1986) died on 30 january 2018 aged 58. Kieran bridge was born on 3 january 1960 in cornwall, ontario. he read political science at the university of Victoria, canada, and graduated from the university’s law school winning the gold medal in 1985. in 1986, he came up to continue his legal studies and graduated llm 1987. Whilst at cambridge he was awarded a half-blue for lacrosse. after graduating, he returned to canada and pursued a career as a civil litigator in Vancouver. he took particular pleasure in obtaining redress for his clients against the banking system through class action lawsuits; he was praised by clients for being a principled lawyer more interested in seeing justice done than making a large profit. he was a volunteer with the Wildlife rescue association of british columbia for over 30 years providing them with his legal expertise. in the summer of 2017, he returned to cambridge one last time. he had two daughters, emily and olivia. *

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BUCK, Frederick William (1967) died on 12 February 2018 aged 69. Frederick buck was born on 29 october 1948 in Ypsilanti, michigan. educated at the royal grammar school, colchester, he came up in 1967. he read english, graduating ba 1970; ma 1974. he and his new bride moved to the united states in 1970. he got a ‘temporary’ job delivering mail; he retired from the job more than thirty years later. he had numerous passions including music, poetry, photography and family history.


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he married stephanie chick in 1970; they had three daughters, seven grandchildren and a great-grandson. *

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CAIRNS, David William (1955) died on 23 august 2017 aged 80. david cairns, the younger brother of peter (1947) and james (1950), was born on 12 november 1936 in Watford. educated at bryanston school he came up in 1955 to read natural sciences with the intention of going on to qualify as a doctor. he graduated ba 1958; mb bchir 1961. after qualifying as a doctor he spent a year at st Francis hospital, Katete, Zambia. it was there he met anne miles who had recently arrived after leaving south africa, without delay, following a visit by the apartheid regime’s special branch. on his return to the uK he went on to qualify as a surgeon. he spent most of his career at the south buckinghamshire nhs Trust. on retirement from the trust, he worked in the shetlands and later became surgeon to the navy in gibraltar. he delighted in his ever-growing family and, when visiting them, he loved to bring caterpillars from his home so his grandchildren could watch, with fascination, their emergence into butterflies. he married anne in 1967; they had four children. *

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CLIFFE, Eric Edward (1953) died on 23 june, 2020 aged 87. eric cliffe was born on 3 december 1932 in mottram st andrew in cheshire. educated at The King’s school, macclesfield, he came up in 1953 after national service with the royal artillery. he read natural sciences, graduating ba 1956; ma 1960. after graduating, he undertook a dphil at oxford university and met rosemary morton who was to become his wife and the mother of his two daughters. he pursued a career at The boots company plc where he developed ibuprofen and rose to managing director. he was a fellow of: the royal societies of biology and chemistry; the royal society for the encouragement of arts, manufacturing and commerce; and the institute of directors. he also served on a number of boards in the nottinghamshire area including the board of governors at nottingham Trent university. *

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COATES, John David (1962) died on 26 january 2020 aged 76. john coates was born on 15 september 1943 in east Yorkshire. educated at malet lambert high school, hull, he came up in 1962. he read english, graduating ba 1965; diploma 1966; ma 1969. For two years he taught in colleges in the usa, returning to england in 1968 to study for a phd at exeter university, awarded in 1973. he was offered a lectureship at hull university in 1970, first in the adult education department and later in the english department. he was soon producing critical work and after the success of Chesterton and the Edwardian Cultural Crisis (1984) he was asked to lecture to international audiences. he went on to write a second book about the edwardian writer, G.K. Chesterton as Controversialist, Essayist, Novelist and Critic (2002). he had the ability to treat skilfully and sensitively a range of different writers. in 1994, he published (with bruce Woodcock) Combative Styles: Romantic Writing and Ideology; in 1997 The Day’s Work: Kipling and the Idea of Sacrifice; in 1998 social discontinuity in the Work of elizabeth bowen; in 2011 The Rhetorical Use of Provocation in the Writings of Walter Pater. he also published extensively in critical journals. his expertise was called upon in the discussion on gothic influences in the bbc4 series Pagans and Pilgrims: Britain’s Holiest Places, 2013. he contracted a very rare form of encephalitis in 2013 and although he made a complete recovery it stalked him to the end. he had just completed another book on Kipling when he died suddenly and unexpectedly.


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a modest man who was at the same time flamboyant and very funny, he was also a wonderful whistler. he married carole sandom in 1969; they had one daughter. CORPE, William Frederick (1952) died on 2 February 2020 aged 87. bill corpe was born on 4 april 1932 in Kensal rise. educated at haberdashers’ aske’s school, he came up in 1952, following national service with the army education corps. he read english, graduating ba 1955; ma 1959. after graduating, he was appointed to the english department at Westminster city school, and then dulwich college. as a teacher, he found the need to have a partner for social occasions, and turned to the daughter of his mother's bridesmaid, rita barlette, who taught at a neighbouring school. so they would invite one another to such things as school plays, concerts and dinners. gradually they also started making visits together to the theatre, concerts, museums, exhibitions and the cinema. in 1964, he spent the summer in america on a scholarship and on his return brought rita a brooch. having cooked a meal for her, his very words were, “i think we might as well get married”. They married in july 1966 at st john’s church, Finchingfield, and bought their first house for £2000 in catford. peter was born in october 1967, and in september 1969 bill was appointed head of english at st dunstan’s school, catford. helen was born in november of the same year. in retirement, he moved to dent, with his incredible collection of early pelicans, penguins and puffins, whose ranks had grown on his retirement with the addition of a gift from a former pupil of a copy of the first edition of the first book published by penguin. Following his death his widow received numerous heartfelt tributes from former pupils and colleagues across the world. *

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COUZENS, Julian Peter (1968) died on 2 september 2019 aged 70. julian couzens, the eldest brother of ben (1972) and simon (1978), was born on 7 november 1948 in ruislip. educated at brighton, hove, & sussex grammar school he came up in 1968 to read music, and was organ scholar. he conducted a number of concerts, often featuring early music and conducted monteverdi’s Orfeo in the college chapel. he played in viol consorts and chamber music groups, and played the cello in cambridge university music society First orchestra. he graduated ba 1972; ma 1975. having studied education, he taught in schools in peterborough, blairmore, broadstairs, arle and isleworth. When playing as church organist in bermondsey he met beryl robson and they married in 1979. in 1980 julian was offered the job of parish organist in hansnes, norway, playing the organ in seven of the most northerly churches in norway, each situated on a different island. he travelled long distances between these arctic island churches in his bright red speed boat which he named “risk” in honour of his favourite board game. For many years bbc 1 would broadcast a christmas programme Star Over Bethlehem from a changing selection of seven cathedrals from around the world, but always including “The arctic cathedral” in Tromso. he needed to travel 50 miles southwards from hansnes to Tromso to play the organ for that event. Without bridges between the islands it was a formidable journey in the arctic winter night. *

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CRAWFORD, William Ewart (1958) died on 2 july 2019 the day before his 82nd birthday. bill crawford, the grandson of e grogan (1896), was born on 3 july 1937 in nakuro, Kenya. educated at Trinity college, glenalmond, he came up in 1958 to read modern & medieval languages. he graduated ba 1961; ma 1965. after graduating he emigrated to canada and soon met pat martin, who became his wife. he went on to qualify as an accountant and was a partner with a firm that became ernst & Young. after retiring from


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the partnership he continued working as a tax adviser, at first in barbados, and then back home in Toronto. he and pat had four children and nine grandchildren. his cousin is david slater (1969). *

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CROOKES, Dennis Victor (1950) died on 19 september 2019 aged 88. dennis crookes was born on 18 june 1931 in durban, south africa. educated at michaelhouse school, natal, south africa. he came up in 1950 to read economics and agriculture. he graduated ba 1953; ma 1957. Whilst at cambridge he was awarded a blue for cricket after defeating the oxford Xi whose number included colin cowdry. he spent the long vacations touring europe with his college friends and in the winter he skied with the university ski club. he returned to south africa in 1954. he was for 20 years production director of illovo sugar the largest sugar producer in africa. he served for 25 years as director and chairman of crookes bros ltd, a publicly quoted farming and investment company. he married gillian mildred lister-james in 1956; they had steven, julie and nicky, eight grandchildren and one great-grandchild. *

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DARKE, Stanley (1952) died on 8 may 2020 aged 88. stanley darke was born on 3 september 1931 in the Wirral. educated at dame allan's school, newcastle-on-Tyne, he came up in 1952 following national service partly spent in a bomb making factory. he read natural sciences, graduating ba 1955. Whilst at cambridge he met shirley johnson in a chemistry practical. They married a couple of years after graduating and he followed shirley into teaching after finding that using his skills to circumnavigate international polymer patents left him unfulfilled. he soon progressed to become a science inspector for Kent schools. outside his work he had an adventurous spirit and a love of mountains developed as an evacuee in the lake district; this culminated in joining an expedition to climb mount denali which he almost succeeded in conquering but fell nearly 1000 feet when within sight of the final ridge. as he became less physically fit he continued to challenge himself and even took an a level in archeology in his retirement. he and shirley had two sons. *

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DOTTRIDGE, Timothy John (1967) died on 9 February 2019 aged 70. Tim dottridge was born in london on 4 april 1948 in Wimbledon. educated at cheltenham college he came up to jesus in 1967, following in his father, john's footsteps. he studied economics, graduating ba 1970. after graduating, he worked for the united nations development programme for two years in morocco, where he met his wife, bahija reghai. The couple moved to dakar, senegal, where he started working for canada's international development research centre (idrc) as the assistant director of the africa regional office. by this time he had picked up French and moroccan arabic (along with some italian and german). later in life he added spanish too. in 1976 he returned to britain to study, first for an mphil in agricultural economics at st antony’s, oxford, and then for a doctorate at the school of oriental and african studies (focusing on morocco). From 1981 onwards he worked at idrc's head office in ottawa, initially as a planning and policy officer and eventually as director of special initiatives, where he oversaw idrc's programme of fellowships and awards and its relationship with academics in canada and elsewhere and with the canadian ngo community. he also became idrc’s (unofficial) resident historian. he retired in 2010. he and bahija had three sons, adam, Yacine and shaheen, and one grandson, jamil. *

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DUNCAN, Alasdair (1980) died on 14 june 2019 aged 58. alasdair duncan was born on 29 april 1961 in amersham. educated at The royal grammar school, high Wycombe, he came up in 1980 to read history. he graduated ba 1983; ma 1987. after graduating he trained to be a teacher and taught in Yorkshire, cyprus and the czech republic. he married deborah heslop in 1996; they had a daughter eleanor. *

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EDWARDS, Michael William (1963) died on 8 january 2020 aged 75. mike edwards was born on 23 october 1944 in Wolverhampton. educated at Wolverhampton grammar school, he had already succeeded in life before coming up to cambridge in 1963, because he had persuaded patty beddoe to accompany him to his school ball. he read history, graduating ba 1966; ma 1970. after graduating, he and patty moved to dagenham. he joined Ford motors on its graduate entry scheme in personnel management, which was an interesting choice for the son of a trade union official and would lead to lots of stimulating debates back home in Wolverhampton. soon after joining he witnessed history in the making when the women workers at the plant went on strike over equal pay. after the birth of their son they returned to Wolverhampton and he joined imi plc. he soon rose through the ranks and became head of personnel management for the company. in his later years he was able to develop more fully some of his earlier interests; he undertook an ma in shakespeare and Theatre studies at birmingham university and joined the cromwell association. he married patricia beddoe in 1966; they had a son, adam, and a granddaughter, rosie. *

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ELLIOTT, Denys (1952) died on christmas eve 2019 aged 87. Teddy elliott, the nephew of W. s. gross (1911), K. h. a. gross (1919), K. a. c. gross (1924), was born on 5 october 1932 in london. educated at harrow school, he came up in 1952 after completing his national service with the corps of the royal electrical and mechanical engineers, shortly after his cousin john sutcliffe (1947). he read engineering studies, graduating ba 1955; ma 1959. by his own admission, he had more success in other areas, notably rifle shooting. he was awarded two half-blues, and won the prestigious daily Telegraph challenge cup in 1954 while still dressed in his dinner jacket from the dance the night before. despite, or because of, his best efforts, he gained a special class degree but his first employer was so impressed that he employed him on the spot. he spent most of his career in the then rapidly developing world of thermoplastic systems technology at plascoat international ltd, where he was chairman and managing director. he retired to his farm in West sussex in 1982. he was an active member of The haberdashers’ company, serving as master in 1991-92. he married sally anne isdell-carpenter in 1961; they had one son, rupert (1983), and two daughters, lucy and annabel. his wider family also included charles gross (1961) and michael sutcliffe (1982). *

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ELLIOTT, William James (1959) died on 17 november 2019 aged 80. bill elliott was born on 24 november 1938 in london. educated at university college school, hampstead, he came up in 1959 after national service with the royal signals. he read classics and Theology, graduating ba 1962; ma 1966. Whilst at jesus he rowed in the boat which won the Fairbairn cup in 1959 and came head of the river in lent 1960 and 1961. he went on to study for an ma and then phd at birmingham university in new Testament Textual criticism and to edit a series of books on the gospels. he was


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ordained a minister in the church of england and served at parishes in london, lancashire and hertfordshire. he also served as a hospital chaplain. he married angela mary robinson in 1964; they had two sons. *

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FARQUHARSON, James Ian (1959) died on 12 may 2019 aged 78. james Farquharson was born on 23 august 1940 in london. educated at Wellington college, he came up in 1959 having been sponsored by shell. he read mechanical sciences, graduating ba 1962. he went on to study at insead, and whilst at Fontainebleau he met joanna Tewson who was to become his wife. after completing his studies he joined shell full-time. he left shell to join the management consultancy firm, arthur d little. a few years later he went back to shell, this time in their shipping division which he thoroughly enjoyed, working there until his retirement aged 55. he was kept busy during his retirement by sailing which he loved, travelling and contributing to various charities. he married joanna in 1966; they had a son, a daughter, a grandson and a granddaughter. *

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FARTHING, Thomas William (1945) died on 13 august 2019 aged 91. Tom Farthing was born on 19 december 1927 in middlesbrough. educated at middlesbrough high school he came up in 1945 to read natural sciences and stayed to complete a doctorate in metallurgy. he graduated ba 1948; phd 1954; ma 1954. after leaving cambridge he joined ici metals in birmingham, working predominantly on “new” metals. in 1964 he moved to become research director at the international copper research association (incra) and from there he joined Wolverhampton metal co ltd, as managing director. he then moved to the imi corporation becoming managing director of imi Titanium. he was a visiting professor at the university of leeds; council member of the university of aston; and president of the birmingham metallurgical association. he co-invented the FFc cambridge process, a molten salt electrochemical deoxidation method; one of the ‘Fs’ in the name of the process coming from his surname. he was appointed order of the british empire in 1983 and was a fellow of the royal academy of engineering. he married deirdre moira mcilroy in 1955; they had a son and a daughter. *

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FORDER, Robert Anthony Dunstan (1947) died on 10 january 2020 aged 94. Tony Forder was born on 20 september 1925. educated at st edmund's school, canterbury, he came up in 1947 following service with the army. he read economics, graduating ba 1949. after graduating he joined the stepney pacifist service unit and worked with families experiencing challenging circumstances in the east end. it was there he met his future wife, alma. he moved on from the unit to become a probation officer and then became a lecturer, first at the london school of economics and then in Zambia. Whilst there his first book was published: Social Casework and Administration. he was proud it went into a second edition but never understood why it was translated into japanese. he returned to the uK in 1966 to take up a post at liverpool university and moved to the polytechnic in the city in 1971 to become head of the department of social Work. in retirement he continued to serve as a preacher with the methodist church and became more involved in local ecumenical affairs and community work. he did not drive and travelled everywhere on his bicycle, which he upgraded in his 80s to a tricycle. he married alma mary parker in 1950; they had three sons and three daughters. in 2007, he married his great friend, grace edgar who had been widowed two months after alma’s death. *

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GILLHAM, Adrian Bayley (1966) died on 21 january 2020 aged 71. adrian gillham, the older brother of jeremy (1970), was born on 4 march 1948 in hackney. educated at st edmund’s college, Ware, he came up in 1966. he read medicine, graduating ba 1969; mb bchir 1972; ma 1973. after qualifying as a doctor he moved into general practice before joining the royal army medical corps in 1985. Whilst with the service he specialised in psychiatry and was a consultant at cambridge military hospital, aldershot. he retired with the rank of lieutenant-colonel having commanded a battleshock recovery unit in the first gulf War. in civilian life he worked as a consultant at surrey hampshire borders nhs Trust before moving to The priory hospital, Woking, to take up the role as medical director. outside of work, he took a huge interest in the life of his old school, where he had been head boy; gave his professional advice on priest selection at st john’s seminary, guildford; and was an advocate with the jesuit refugee service at heathrow. he married emma bazalgette in 1974; they had two sons and two daughters. *

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GRACEY, Nigel Gerard Adrian (1950) died on 30 june 2019 aged 88. nigel gracey, the younger brother of lionel (1946) and basil (also 1946), was born on 26 november 1930. educated at harrrow school he came up in 1950 to read history. he changed subjects to natural sciences with a view to going on to qualify as a doctor. he graduated ba 1953; mb bchir 1957. he worked as an assistant general practitioner in his father’s practice for some years before taking early retirement to live in jersey. always a keen golfer, he captained the cambridge university stymies team, and later became an active member of the royal and ancient golf club, winning many trophies there. While at cambridge he developed a keen interest in sports psychology which he later put to good use mentoring many professional golfers. *

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GREENACRE, John Walter (1954) died on 25 september 2019 aged 84. john greenacre was born on 3 december 1934 in putney. educated at michaelhouse, natal, he came up in 1954 to read mathematics. he graduated ba 1957; ma 1961. he subsequently pursued a career in senior school education working at peterhouse school near marondera, Zimbabwe, where he recorded 56 years of service. he taught maths, coached tennis and cricket and helped the school navigate the volatile political waters. he also led safaris to the Kalahari desert and chimanimani national park and was proud of the school's unique safari park with its giraffes, zebras, wildebeests and antelopes. he lived in a small, sparsely furnished bungalow. his extravagance was a glass (or two) of whisky in the evening and an upmarket car – originally an e-Type jaguar – which delighted the boys and proved useful for visiting his durban relations. *

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GRUNDY, David Stanley (1962) died on 9 december 2018 aged 75. david grundy was born on 10 april 1943 in leigh, lancashire. educated at de la salle college, pendleton, he came up in 1962. he read moral sciences graduating ba 1965; ma 1982. he passed the civil service exam in 1966 and had a varied civil service career, the highlights of which, for him, were: being appointed as Tony benn’s assistant private secretary at the ministry of Technology in 1968; working for the Foreign and commonwealth office in preparing britain’s then pacific island colonies, the solomon islands, the gilbert and ellis islands (now Kiribati and Tuvalu) and the new hebrides (now Vanuatu) for independence between 1977 and 1981; and working for the Forestry commission between 1982 and his retirement in 1996, where his last role was as commissioner for administration and Finance. he was appointed cb in 1997.


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in retirement, he was one of the editors of The Birds of Scotland, published by the scottish ornithologists’ club in 2007 and he was a trustee, and vice chair of the conservation committee of the scottish Wildlife Trust. he also became a keen fly-fisherman. he married jenny hall in 1965; they had one son, nick grundy (1985). *

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HARRISSON, Lewis Edwin (1942) died in 2019 aged 94. lewis harrisson was born on 15 june 1924 in birmingham. educated at bishop Vesey’s grammar school, sutton coldfield, he came up in 1942. he read natural sciences, graduating ba 1945; ma 1949. after leaving cambridge he joined the radar research & development establishment as a research assistant working on the design of proximity fuses to destroy the wartime german doodlebugs. From there he went to gec research laboratories during which time he was involved as a volunteer in the work of a boys’ club in the bombed east end of london. he then moved into lecturing, teaching at the university of east africa’s makerere university college, uganda, and was one of the scientists measuring the rate of flow of glaciers in the ruwenzori mountains during the international geophysical year. From there he worked with the school of signals, catterick camp, and Teesside university. he was an open university tutor from its inception until his late 70s. he married sheila greensweig in 1957; they had a son and a daughter. *

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HAYNES, Michael Derek (1977) died on 20 February 2019 aged 59. michael haynes was born on 16 july 1959 in banbury. educated at all saints’ school, bloxham, he came up in 1977 to read music. he graduated ba 1980; ma 1984. after graduating he was responsible for piano teaching at Taunton school, was conductor and musical director of the Taunton operative society and Wayfarers pantomime company and established himself as an accompanist. since moving to gloucestershire he taught music in a number of schools and was head of music at the high school for girls, director of music at Kingswood school, bath, and latterly he was head of academic music and accompaniment at malvern college. he was also an associated board examiner. he valued gentleness and kindness highly and delighted in helping others. he married Tessa in 1988; they had two daughters, sophie and hatty. *

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HOARE, Jan Barron (1949) died on 19 august 2019 aged 89. jan hoare was born on 17 march 1930 in chiswick. educated at latymer upper school, he came up in 1949 to read mathematics. he graduated ba 1952; ma 1956. he went on to obtain a postgraduate certificate in education at the institute of education in london and taught mathematics in secondary schools until 1964, when his interests in the pedagogy of the subject led him to move into teacher training. he was a lecturer and subsequently head of the mathematics department at southlands college of education from 1964 to 1975. When the college then merged into the roehampton institute of higher education he became its first academic registrar, remaining in that post until he took early retirement in 1990. in retirement he worked part time for the nuffield Trust on projects related to the development of the national curriculum in mathematics. his retirement also allowed him to indulge his passion for classical piano music and he was for a number of years secretary to the liszt society. he and his former wife had two children and four grandchildren. *

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HORSLEY, David (1943) died on 8 march 2020 aged 94. david horsley was born on 27 november 1925 in newcastle upon Tyne. educated at sedbergh school, he joined the royal air Force as Flying officer in 1943 and came up in the same year on the raF short course to read history. after the war he returned to the college, this time to read english graduating ba 1950; ma 1953. he went on to join the civil service and rose to be under secretary at the home office. he had a keen interest in geology especially the geology of the lake district; in 2011 the Westmorland geological society published a guide he wrote on the igneous rocks of the area. he was also a recipient of the geological association’s halstead medal for work of outstanding merit, deemed to further the objectives of the association and to promote geology. he married Kathleen Trought in 1951; they had one son and two daughters. *

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JAMES, Kenneth William (1949) died on 23 august 2019 aged 98. Ken james was born on 11 april 1921 in middlesex, shortly before his parents returned to their native home, Wales. educated at barry county school he undertook his first degree at the university of Wales, cardiff. his studies were interrupted by the war; he served in the royal air Force working on radar in the Far east. he came up in 1949 to study for his doctorate. after graduating he joined the royal aircraft establishment, Farnborough, hampshire, in 1952. Following a period at the atomic Weapons research establishment at aldermaston, he moved in 1959 to the central electricity research laboratories where he formed and led the mathematics and control department. after retirement, he was an active cruising sailor and continued his interest in sport, including rowing and regularly attended the henley royal regatta. he married gillian mullins in 1964. *

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LEWIS, David Tudor (1980) died on 9 september 2019 aged 58. dave lewis was born on 14 February 1961 in liverpool. educated at King edward’s school, birmingham, he came up in 1980 to read geography. he graduated ba 1983. he trained to be a minister in the church of england at Trinity college, bristol, and was ordained in 1988. he served as chaplain in stavanger, norway, and in carlisle, guildford, birmingham and leeds dioceses. his final post was as a rector in the diocese of Worcester. The bishop of Worcester, dr john inge, said: “david was an outstanding priest who had won the hearts of all those to whom he ministered in the months since he came to this diocese. his untimely death is a terrible tragedy and he will be greatly missed. Very many people, myself included, had profound affection and respect for him.” *

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LITTLETON, Paul Anthony (1954) died on 19 january 2020 aged 86. paul littleton was born on 12 july 1933 in gloucestershire and was brought up in Flushing, cornwall, where his lifelong love of boats began. educated at Falmouth grammar school, he came up in 1954, following national service. he read law, graduating ba 1957; ma 1962. after graduating he pursued a career in business, rising to become Vice president of sun life of canada. his move to london also saw a move to a new boat club, he joined the london rowing club which was to remain a huge part of his life. at the time it didn’t allow women, so he also joined the south Kensington Young conservatives to find love, and there he met anne pritchard. always the salesman, he had to work hard to win her affections but found an unexpected ally in her boss who advised anne to pick a man who she could laugh with; 56 years of shared joy followed. in 1972 the family moved to


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Weybridge and threw themselves into community life including fundraising for the sam beare hospice which was to go on to provide care for paul in his final days. he married anne in 1964; they had one son and three daughters. *

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LOWE, James Macdonald (1957) died on 1 january 2020 aged 80. jim lowe was born on 8 october 1939 in blackpool. educated at arnold school, blackpool, he came up in 1957. he read geography, graduating ba 1960. after qualifying as an accountant he pursued a career in retail working for makro and Focus. he used his experience as a director to inform his book Retail Giants – Friend or Foe (2012). in his retirement he supported the Kijabe children’s hospital in Kenya’s work helping children with orthopedic disabilities. he married alexandra Thornley in 1960; they had two sons. he and alexandra later divorced. *

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LYON, John Edwin (1953) died on 10 june 2019 aged 86. john lyon was born on 11 February 1933 in sleaford, lincolnshire. educated at lincoln school he came up in 1952 following national service to read modern & medieval languages. he graduated ba 1956; ma 1961. he went on to pursue a career in education, first teaching english in spain and then teaching spanish in england. he was a lecturer and senior lecturer at the university of bristol for thirty years. his published work included The Theatre of Valle-Inclán (1983). he married elizabeth excell in 1970; they had three daughters, two granddaughters and five grandsons. *

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MACKENZIE, Richard Charles (1955) died on 12 september 2019 aged 82. richard mackenzie was born on 27 january 1937 in merthyr Tydfil. educated at bromsgrove school, he came up in 1955 and read law and changed to economics and history. he graduated ba 1958; ma 1962. after graduating he taught at the deerfield academy, massachusetts, and from there went to Woodberry Forest school, Virginia. in 1973 he and his wife, Wendy, returned to cambridgeshire and set up ‘Woodberry-inbritain’ at their large Victorian house near st neots. The programme, for 24 years, hosted fourteen students per term per year who, freed from the constraints of a normal curriculum, would study subjects such as the anatomy of contemporary britain, the political and historical affairs of troubled areas of the world, ecclesiastical architecture and shakespeare. many of the ‘mackenzie alumni’ would look back on this period of their education as the most formative. he married Wendy black in 1964; they had two daughters and a son. *

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MALLINSON, Terence Stuart (1949) died on 11 december 2019 aged 90. Terence mallinson, the younger brother of justin (1941), was born on 9 september 1929 in london. educated in the usa, having been evacuated there during the war, and then at marlborough college, he came up in 1949 after national service. he read economics and law, graduating ba 1952; ma 1959. he dedicated most of his professional life to the family timber company, The mallinson-denny group, managing several manufacturing units before becoming marketing director of the global corporation. The company was bought in 1981 by brooke bond (more famous for tea) and when brooke bond was bought


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in turn by unilever, Terence was part of a very successful management buyout team (in 1985 the largest ever in the uK). he retired in 1991 after the business was acquired first by hillsdown holdings, then Wickes and finally by Travis perkins. Throughout his life he was a passionate advocate of timber. he was the founder of the “carpenters’ awards” (now the “Wood awards”) which champions the use of timber in buildings and furniture. The Wood awards are still hosted by the carpenters’ company and about to celebrate their 50th anniversary. he was a Forestry commissioner and his “Forests Forever” campaign, in conjunction with the Timber Trade Federation, took him all over the world advocating sustainable forestry policies and standards for the worldwide timber trade. he founded the epping Forest centenary Trust, which spawned the Forest education initiative, which in turn supported the creation of many similar Forest Trusts across the uK to encourage the interest of children in forests. he was also chairman of the: Timber research & development association; Timber industry Training board; Timber Trade industry alliance; and building centre group; and president of the: institute of Wood science; institute of carpenters; Timber Trades benevolent society; and Timber Trade Federation. he was appointed commander of the order of the british empire for his services to Forestry in 1995. he had many other interests. For over 60 years he was the chairman of Wadham lodge sports ground Trust, now a thriving centre for soccer excellence in north east london. he also became chairman of the Town and country building society and was an endlessly enthusiastic member and past president of the Knights of the round Table. he married anne butler-Wilson in 1955; they had three sons, lawrence (1975), michael and roland, one daughter, sheila, and 13 grandchildren and two great-grandchildren. *

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MAZUMDAR, Dipak (1950) died on 16 june 2018 aged 85. dipak mazumdar, the son of dwijendra (1927), was born on 21 september 1932 in Kolkata (formerly calcutta). he undertook his first degree at presidency college, calcutta (now the university of Kolkata), before coming up to jesus in 1950. he read economics, graduating ba 1952; phd 1958. he took up a post as a senior lecturer at university college london before moving to the london school of economics and the World bank in 1965. he left the lse in 1977 but remained with the World bank until retiring in 1994. in retirement, he continued his research and published widely. his published work includes The Urban Labor Market & Income Distribution (1981); (jointly) Wages & Employment in Indonesia (1985); Micro-Economic Issues in the Analysis of Labor Markets in Developing Countries (1987); and (jointly) Manufacturing Enterprise in Asia: Size Structure & Economic Growth (2013). he had a deep interest in bengali culture and was a keen supporter of the university of Toronto where he was made an adjunct professor. he married pauline davidson in 1958. *

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MESSHAM, Michael Raymond (1967) died on 31 march 2020 aged 71. michael messham was born on 29 september 1948 in lytham st annes. educated at arnold school, blackpool, he came up in 1967 to read engineering, following his brother david (1963). he read civil engineering in part ii, and graduated in 1970. While at jesus he took part in two college-sponsored overland expeditions to afghanistan and iran. after graduation he joined sir alexander gibb and partners and worked on a variety of projects including the m4, the royal mint and the currency board building in dubai. he took an msc at imperial college, london, after which he specialised in the applications of concrete. as a technical adviser he accompanied the british forces to the persian gulf in the gulf War. he continued to work for a variety of employers and was still working part time for


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aWe when he died. his practical abilities and energy seemed limitless to his friends; almost single-handed he extended his cottage on the edge of the berkshire downs to double its original size. he retained his enthusiasm for travel to the east. his recent visits had been to bangladesh, india and mongolia, and he was planning further trips when he died. he married mary Kinipple in 1975. *

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MITCHELL, David Gordon Bruce (1953) died on 12 may 2020 aged 87. david mitchell was born on 16 july 1932, the son of gordon (1920), in newcastle upon Tyne. educated at the royal grammar school, newcastle, he came up in 1953. he read geography, graduating ba 1956. he pursued a career in human resources for ici. he married phyllis Watts in 1957; they had two sons and two daughters. *

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MOORMAN, Edward (1949) died on 1 september 2019 aged 91. Ted moorman was born on 3 august 1928 in bournemouth. educated at bloxham school, banbury, he came up in 1949 to read mechanical sciences. he graduated ba 1952; ma 1956. soon after graduating he joined The steel nut & joseph hampton ltd, where he rose to be managing director. When the company was purchased by Tomkins plc he became a director of that company too. he was a staunch conservative and served on his local council for more than a quarter of a century, including a year as mayor. Following his death, his fellow councillors paid tribute to his exceptional skills with finance and his commitment to local politics. he and his first wife had two sons and two daughters. he married margaret stott in 1967 and gained a step-son and a step-daughter. *

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MORRIS, Geoffrey Hugh (1954) died on 20 october 2018 aged 82. geoff morris was born on 7 april 1936 in st helens, lancashire. educated at ampleforth college, he came up in 1954. he read law and history, graduating ba 1957. he began his career as a teacher near liverpool and moved into local government in the early 60s. after working in london and West hartlepool, he became an education officer for the city of cambridge in 1966, living there for the rest of his life. he joined cambridgeshire county council's education department in the early 70s and rose to be chief education officer. in that role he pioneered the idea of the local management of schools (lms), which gave them more autonomy and allowed them to control their own budgets. The innovation gave him great satisfaction but he also regretted how lms was later, as he saw it, hijacked by central government as a way of encouraging schools to opt out. at the age of 55 he became a careers counsellor. he finally retired aged 65, after which he enthusiastically pursued his many interests. he married janet duggins in 1962; they had two sons and two daughters. *

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MOULDEN, Jack Leonard (1950) died on 13 december 2019 aged 89. jack moulden was born on 14 april 1930 in enfield. educated at enfield grammar school, after national service with the royal air Force, he came up in 1950 following in the footsteps of his cousin lawrence brampton (1935). he read english, graduating ba 1953; ma 1957. he went on to pursue a career as a teacher and taught at leighton county high school for thirty years.


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he gained three step-children following his first marriage. he married again in 2000; his second wife was ruby hillier. *

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PARSONS, Albert Keith (1947) died on 26 april 2020 aged 91. Keith parsons was born on 30 july 1928 in brighton. educated at hurstpierpoint college, he came up in 1947. he read natural sciences, graduating ba 1950; ma 1954. Whilst at university he joined the cambridge university musical society. music was a major interest throughout his life and it was through it, via birmingham city choir, that he met his future wife, bernadette loftus. he had moved to birmingham to take up a role as a chemist with bakelite. after a promotion, he became the Technical manager of Warerite which necessitated a move to county durham. he spent his whole career at bakelite which was eventually taken over by the swedish company perstorp. after the takeover, he made frequent visits to the swedish factory to integrate the formulae and processes which the two companies had developed independently before the takeover. Following his retirement, he and bernadette returned to birmingham. *

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PASHLEY, William Michael (1971) died on 16 november 2019 aged 67. bill pashley was born on 14 june 1952 in birmingham. educated at King edward Vi grammar school, stratford-upon-avon, he came up in 1971. he read engineering, graduating ba 1974; ma 1983. during one vacation he and a small group of other cambridge students travelled to Turkey in a battered landrover forming bonds of friendship which were to last all his life. after graduating he joined john laing, where he assisted in managing building sites. after laing he joined the family cycle business of W. r. pashley ltd. over the course of his career he moved around the country and each time lived in historic properties which he and his wife lovingly restored, even going to the lengths of venturing into nearby fields to gather cow pats for mixing into the daub he needed to mend the walls of his sixteenth century cottage. he took his passion for old buildings to the next level when he undertook an msc in heritage management at birmingham university. after graduating he joined the national Trust, first as property manager of saltram house then of Wallington hall. in 2002 he moved to be operations manager at Tate st ives; a job he loved so much he stayed for ten years despite suffering from ever worsening symptoms of multiple sclerosis. he married jennifer roberts in 1980. *

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PRESCOTT, Jack Andrew (2013) died on 9 april 2020 aged 31. jack prescott was born on 3 december 1988 in the Wirral, merseyside. educated at dr challoner’s grammar school, he took his first degree at st anne’s college, oxford. he came up in 2013 to study for his doctorate in oncology and cancer, graduating phd 2018. after graduating he joined the babraham institute. he moved to the united states in 2018 and continued his research at columbia university and then Firmenich. sadly, he developed a rare and aggressive liver cancer, angiosarcoma, and died within a few months of diagnosis. in the aftermath of his death his family were showered with calls and cards remembering the happiness he brought to those around him, his constant smile and his love of liverpool Football club. *

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PURSEY, John Walter (1954) died on 1 may 2018 aged 81. john pursey was born on 28 july 1936 in holmer green, buckinghamshire. educated at the royal grammar school, high Wycombe, he came up 1954 to read classics. he graduated ba 1957; ma 1962. he returned to his old school to teach after undertaking his post graduate certificate in education at the university of leeds. From rgs, he went to Queen elizabeth grammar school, blackburn, and then Queen elizabeth grammar school, darlington, where he was the academic counsellor. he married sylvia martin in 1960. he married mary boyd in 1998. he had two sons and a daughter. *

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ROYDS, Barrie (1949) died on 1 july 2019 aged 90. barrie royds was born on 4 may 1929 in rochdale. educated at rochdale municipal high school he came up in 1949, following national service at raF cranwell, to read history. he graduated ba 1952; ma 1956. he spent most of his career working in retail management in southampton and liverpool. prior to his retirement he was employed as a group practice manager in the national health service. *

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SALMON, Michael Alfred (1949) died on 21 june 2019 aged 90. michael salmon was born on 16 march 1929 in london. educated at Wellington college he came up in 1949 following national service. he read economics and english, graduating ba 1952. at college he made many great friends including one, jonathan clarkham (1949), who went on to marry his sister, moira. after graduating he joined the family business of j lyons & co limited. he then moved into stockbroking and was a partner at various firms of stockbrokers. he also sat on nhs boards and was chairman of st john's Wood society and st marylebone almshouses. he married jill Valerie myers in 1955; they had two sons and a daughter. his relatives included sir samuel salmon (1921), sir julian salmon (1921), geoffrey salmon (1925), harry salmon (1958) roger salmon (1963), nicholas salmon (1966) and Vicki salmon (1982). *

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SHIPLEE, William James (1963) died on 5 april 2020 aged 75. bill shiplee was born on 20 september 1944 in bellerby, Yorkshire. educated at birkenhead school, he came up in 1963. reading modern & medieval languages he graduated with ba 1966; ma 1971. he went on to pursue a successful career in shipping and transport, heading up large container transport businesses in the uK and europe. an industry figure, he won a number of accolades, including the Queen’s award for enterprise. he moved to british rail, before its privatisation, playing a pivotal role in the management buy-out of one of its freight businesses. as managing director and then chairman of Freightliner, he helped grow it to be one of the largest freight companies in the uK. even when he retired he continued to be active in the transport industry holding a number of non-executive director roles. he married susan lightfoot in 1969, and after spending more than seven years living in belgium, they returned to the uK and finally settled in cambridge, a short walk from the college. sadly susan passed away in 2000, leaving two children; james and anna. he became a grandfather in 2006 to Fabian, followed by suky, claudia, alice and alexander. in the same year, he was re-acquainted with a childhood girlfriend, iona meek. Together they enjoyed retirement, travelling and spending time with his much loved extended family. *

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SILCOCK, Bryan (1954) died on 10 december 2019 aged 86. bryan silcock was born on 6 september 1933 in liverpool. educated at dartington hall school, he came up in 1954. he read natural sciences, graduating ba 1957. he went on to pursue a career as a science correspondent and worked for The Sunday Times for 34 years. his work saw him report on many ground-breaking scientific achievement including reporting from houston to cover the apollo 11 moon landing in 1969. he will, however, be best remembered professionally for his campaigning journalism to improve care and treatment for those suffering from schizophrenia; a cause particularly close to his heart following the difficulties his son experienced with the illness. To his children he was: the introducer of dickens, ransome and huxley; the scaler of mountains; and the stalwart supporter, no matter how tough things got. he married sheila hough in 1961; they had one son and one daughter. he married mary duddy in 1976 and gained two step-daughters. *

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SIMS, Colin David (1956) died on 23 may 2020 aged 82. colin sims was born on 30 january 1938 in lancashire. educated at epsom college, he came up in 1956, joining his brother john (1955). he read natural sciences with a view to becoming a doctor, he graduated ba 1961; mb bchir 1962. he went on to train at the racliffe infirmary and became a consultant obstetrician at Queen charlotte’s and consultant gynaecologist at chelsea and Westminster hospital. although golf and wine were firm hobbies throughout his life, his love of woodwork and classical music blossomed post retirement. he returned to cambridge near-weekly for sessions at the cambridge Violin makers, producing two cellos, one viola and three violins. he married angela in 1976; they had one daughter. *

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SMITH, John Robert Shelton (1967) died on 18 october 2019 aged 71. john smith was born on 9 september 1948 in baildon near bradford and lived there for most of his life. educated at bradford grammar school, he came up in 1967. he read law, graduating ba 1970; ma 1975. after graduating, he joined his father’s law firm of ralph c Yablon Temple-milnes and carr in bradford, becoming a partner in 1975. in 1991, he and colleagues formed chivers Walsh smith. he retired as senior partner in 2011. he was an active member of bradford grammar school old boys’ association and bradford law society. he loved cars, local archaeology and geology. he had a son, daniel, and daughter, Victoria, from his first marriage, he married beverley in 2003. *

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SMITH, Rodney Boucher (1958) died on 16 august 2019 aged 81. rod smith was born on 8 june 1938 in Kingston upon hull. educated at Woodhouse grove school, bradford, he came up in 1958 following national service with the raF to read english. he graduated ba 1961; ma 1998. he spent most of his career at oakham school where he introduced soccer and transformed the school’s theatre. perhaps his greatest contribution to the school was, however, his ability to help his pupils, particularly those who were struggling, discover their strengths. he married andrea barrett in 1962; they had five children. *

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SUTCLIFFE, John Vernon (1947) died on 29 september 2019 aged 94. john sutcliffe was born on 21 august 1925 in london. educated at marlborough college, following service with royal inniskilling Fusiliers, he came up in 1947. he read mathematics and geography, graduating ba 1950; ma 1954; phd 1957. after graduating he continued his work on hydrology and joined the jonglei investigation Team working for the sudanese government. he then worked for sir alexander gibb & partners and the institute of hydrology before setting up his own consultancy. his published work includes The Hydrology of the Nile (1999). he married margaret Fiona Forbes in 1957; they had two sons including michael (1982) and two daughters. his other jesuan relatives were: William gross (1911); Kenneth gross (1919); Kemlo gross (1924); denys elliott (1952) whose obituary appears above; and charles gross (1961). *

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TAPLEY, David Berwick (1955) died on 29 may 2016 aged 81. david Tapley was born on 30 july 1934 in isleworth. educated at st paul’s school, london, he came up in 1955, following national service with the royal corps of signals. he read english but found after a couple of terms that he would rather pursue a career in business than continue with his academic studies. he went on to set up an insurance brokers. outside of work he was a keen sportsman, a passion that stayed with him throughout his life; his final words were uttered whilst watching a game of cricket and were: ‘there goes another wicket’. he married patricia ann Finney in 1957; they had two sons, simon and michael, and a daughter, julia. *

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TERRY, Peter (1966) died on 23 june 2020 aged 73. peter Terry, the younger brother of john (1961), was born on 25 may 1947 in alvechurch, Worcestershire. educated at The leys school, cambridge, he came up in 1966. he read natural sciences, taking metallurgy at part ii, and graduating ba 1969; ma 1973. after graduating he took jobs in metallurgy at Tube investments and Weldless steel Tubes. Following undertaking an msc at cranfield institute of Technology, he then worked in operational research at players in nottingham, before going into management consultancy with inbucon, and software development with his own business, aragon. he later established a commercial cherry orchard, became involved in property development and was a lloyd’s underwriter. he was a liberal democrat member of bewdley Town council, and held the office of mayor in 1989-90. latterly he developed an interest in spirituality, spending time with shamans in peru, mexico and nigeria in between management consultancy and property development he married ruth Wicks in 1974; they had two sons, nigel and martin. he married jane ratcliffe in august 2012. as well as his brother john, his jesuan relatives included cyril (1919), raymond (1920) and david eric Terry (1950). *

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TORKINGTON, John Stephen (1964) died on 17 april 2020 aged 74. steve Torkington, the younger brother of paul (1961), was born on 2 may 1945 in manchester. educated at William hulme’s grammar school, manchester, he came up in 1964. he read modern and medieval languages, graduating ba 1967; ma 1971. he enjoyed rowing and henley and was awarded a half blue for lacrosse. after graduating he joined international accounting firm arthur andersen becoming a chartered accountant. before moving on with his career, he was a competitor in the 17,000 mile, six month


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atlantic Triangle yacht race. subsequently he became managing director of a specialised building company ‘Weatherwise’ extending the business into europe, canada, and The Far east. The highlight of his career was the contract to construct the roof on the hong Kong exhibition centre and he said, “We were still on the roof, still tightening the bolts while the handover ceremony of The Territory to china was happening down below”. deep sea sailing was his passion and he took crews to The channel islands, mediterranean and caribbean. being rescued from the sea in the mid-atlantic and surviving the disastrous 1979 Fastnet race did not diminish his adventurous spirit. he chose to remain in the manchester/cheshire area throughout his life where he enjoyed spending time with his partner, penny lee, son, patrick, daughter, deborah, five grandchildren and two great grandchildren. *

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TRAILL, Alan Towers (1953) died on 18 april 2020 aged 84. alan Traill was born on 7 may 1935 in barnet. educated at charterhouse, he came up in 1953 to read law, graduating ba 1956; ma 1965. Whilst at college he met his future brother-in-law, ian ball (1952). he went on to pursue a successful career in banking and insurance. beyond the business word he dedicated much time and energy to his two great passions, music and education. he served as lord mayor of london from 1984 to 1985, was the longest serving almoners of christ’s hospital school in recent years, and was a governor and then chair of the Yehudi menuhim school, a governor of Treloar’s school, master of the Worshipful company of musicians and master of the Worshipful company of cutlers. he was knighted in 1984. he married sarah hutt in 1964; they had one son and two grandchildren. *

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TRUELOVE, Alan John (1953) died on 21 january 2019 aged 84. alan Truelove was born on 4 august 1934 in london. educated at the city of london school he came up in 1953 to read mathematics. he graduated ba 1956; ma 1960. after graduation, he married, taught briefly in england, and then moved his family to montreal working there for a short time, and then to syracuse, new York, where he worked for general electric. The family moved again to pacific palisades, california, where he earned a doctorate in statistics at the university of california, los angeles, while working full time at rand corporation, authoring Scheduling of Apollo in-Flight Checkout for the u.s. space program in 1964. The next move was to the Washington, d.c. area, where he taught computer science at the university of the district of columbia and did consulting work. moving to rhode island in 1971, he conducted mathematical research in destroyersubmarine encounters for the office of naval research. after returning to the d.c. area he continued teaching and working in various roles as a computer programming specialist. alan married patricia bain in 1958; they had three children, peter, carol and graham. later he married Virginia heath; they had two children, alison and andrew. he became a widower in 2009. he had 10 grandchildren. *

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TUCKER, David Henry (1957) died on 10 march 2020 aged 84. david Tucker was born on 5 February 1936 in london. educated at alleyn’s school, dulwich, he came up in 1957 following national service in cyprus. he read modern languages for part i and economics for part ii. he graduated ba 1960; ma 1964. after graduating he first qualified as a management accountant, then spent most of his career with urwick orr & partners, an international firm of management consultants, becoming a senior partner. his many assignments took him to the usa, australia and egypt as well as


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most parts of the uK and eire. stopping work in 1988, he and his wife emigrated to their house in France in Tarn-et-garonne; they later moved to indre-et-loire. he married joan bristol in 1960, the year he graduated from cambridge; they had three children. *

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TWIDALE, William (1986) died on 16 june 2020 aged 51. Will Twidale was born on 30 june 1968 in birkenhead. educated at birkenhead school, he came up in 1986. he read law, graduating ba 1989; ma 1993. after graduating he worked for a couple of years at Kleinwort bensen before joining Farrer & co to train as a solicitor. he went on to become a partner at the firm specialising in contentious trust and probate claims. he was also recognised as having expertise in advising both regulatory bodies and individual professionals on regulatory and disciplinary matters. he advised the former financial director of mayflower corporation plc in the first accountancy investigation and discipline board Tribunal where his client was cleared of all charges. in 2009 he moved to boodle hatfield. he moved to bishop & sewell in 2017. he married janine elizabeth Yeomans in 2001; they had two sons. *

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VEEDER, Van Vechten (1967) died on 8 march 2020 aged 71. johnny Veeder was born on 14 december 1948 in london. educated at clifton college, he came up in 1967. he read modern languages and law, graduating ba 1970; ma 1974. he was called to the bar in 1971 and went on to have a distinguished career as an arbitrator and Queen’s counsel. This was not what he had initially intended; at first he wanted to be a diplomat and then after deciding on law he initially planned on making a career at the criminal bar, as he said, ‘i thought i was going to be perry mason’. his colleague, Toby landau Qc, paid tribute to him: ‘johnny is recognised worldwide as one of the most brilliant, visionary and respected counsel, arbitrators, scholars and teachers in the field of international dispute resolution and international law’. he was more than a great colleague, he was also a good friend to many, Toby recalls: ‘through his humour he brought out the very best in everyone else’. he had two children from his first marriage. he married marie lombardi in 1991; they had a daughter. *

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VINSON, Anthony Alan (1961) died on 24 april 2020 aged 76. Tony Vinson was born on 11 november 1943 in Falmouth. educated at Falmouth grammar school, he came up in 1961. he read natural sciences, graduating ba 1964; ma 1968. he went on to pursue a career as a patent researcher working first for bXl plastics in birmingham and then j a Kemp. he loved his work but decided to retire at sixty to pursue his many and varied interests. after his death, his sister received numerous warm tributes from his former colleagues, praising his care, interest and talent; and he was remembered by his jesuan friends as a quiet, gentle and analytical man who had a deep interest in listening to classical music, particularly by less well-known composers. *

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WEATHERHEAD, Brian (1961) died on 17 october 2019 aged 78. brian Weatherhead was born on 6 october 1941 in Wandsworth. educated at battersea grammar school. he came up in 1961 to read natural sciences graduating ba 1964; ma 1968. as a keen member of the university Tiddlywinks club he twice captained its team to


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victories over oxford and london universities. he went on to get his doctorate at the university of birmingham and in 1969 he joined the department of anatomy at King’s college london. in 1971, he returned to birmingham to a post in neuroanatomy and the new field of neuroendocrinology. he was also a tutor with the open university. he and barry everett, his reciprocal best man, compiled teaching material on brain evolution and comparative neuroanatomy for its summer schools. during one summer school he met maureen (mo); they married in 1972. in 1978, he was appointed lecturer, in anatomy at leeds. in 1984, he accepted the chair in anatomy at the university of hong Kong. he retired from the university, in the year of the handover of the former colony, and moved to new Zealand. he and mo separated a few years later. although he didn’t have children he formed close bonds with the children of his friends and had a keen interest in supporting students in their studies. he was also interested in the ecology and conservation of trout in new Zealand and a supporter of the Thomas cawthron charitable Trust. his ashes were scattered in the riwaka river, the fishing river near his home. *

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WIMHURST, Jolyon (1954) died on 19 june 2017 aged 82. jolyon Wimhurst was born on 16 june 1935. educated at Kingswood school, bath, he came up in 1954. he read english, graduating ba 1957; ma 1961. he started his career with the production team of Panorama before moving to Thames Television. his work included This Week (1956), The Shadow Line (1976) and Hail the New Puritan (1987). *

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WONG, Ronald (1960) died on 14 april 2020 aged 79. ronald Wong was born on 5 september in happy Valley, hong Kong. educated at leighton park school, reading, he came up in 1960 to read law and alongside his studies was awarded four half-blues for swimming. he graduated ba 1963; llb 1964; ma 1967; llm 1985. he went on to become a solicitor. he practised law working ‘in-house’ in london, France, australia and hong Kong before retiring to Thailand. he married jacqueline pravaz in 1966; they had a son and two daughters. his partner, for more than a decade, was Tuum singthonghorm. *

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The college has also been informed of the death of M H F PRINCE (1943) on 2 june 2020.


awards & results



aWards & resulTs I Jesus Colleg

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awards 2019-2020 University Prizes, Grants and Scholarships, and External Awards riba east prize (for overall top architecture student) Winifred georgina holgate-pollard memorial prize (for the most outstanding results in architecture part ii) latin prose composition prize (classics ia) latin prose composition prize (classics ib) classics Faculty prize for the best mark in paper e2: greek in the bronze age chemical engineering department prize for excellence in the coursework component of the Tripos chemical engineering department prize for excellence in the coursework component of the Tripos Winifred georgina holgate-pollard memorial prize (for the most outstanding results in history part ii) istvan hont prize for the best dissertation on political thought and intellectual history part ii pharmacology prize for best overall performance part iii richard perham 1st prize 2020 for the biochemistry student(s) ranked highest in the class part iii alkis seraphim memorial Fund prize 2020 for the student(s) with the highest mark in the research project dissertation)

nabil haque nabil haque amelia K Quayle sebastian j Tyrrall henry gale emma Tremellen matthew j mulcahy david c r austen david c r austen lucy e Thompson (joint) anna l christiansen (joint) anna l christiansen (joint)

University Instrumental Awards isabelle T monnickendam (bassoon) harriet patterson (’cello)

College Awards, Elections and Prizes e Gurnee Hart Scholarship 2019-2020 benjamin clingman studying for the mphil degree in american history (from october 2019) e Albert Goh & Elizabeth Coupe Scholarship 2019-2020 Xiang ding studying for the mphil degree in international relations and politics (from october 2019) e Embiricos Trust Scholarship 2019-2020 ayesha r r landon-browne studying for the phd in earth sciences (from january 2020) e Hogwood Scholarship 2019-2020 (AHRC DTP studentship matched funding College contribution for three years) joshua T clayton studying for the phd degree in english (from october 2019) e Nick Mills Memorial Scholarship 2019-2020 lucia rodriguez V studying for the mphil degree in conservation leadership (from october 2019) The John Killen Memorial Scholarship 2019-2020 shoni b lavie-driver studying for the mphil degree in classics (from october 2019)


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The Kenneth Sutherland Memorial Scholarship (2019-2020) jackson W X Wo studying for the phd degree in materials science (from january 2020) The Sheldrick Scholarship (2019-2020) dominic hey studying for the phd degree in chemistry (from january 2020) Postgraduate Scholarship (discretionary extra award) 2019-2020 jonathan d mcallister studying for the phd degree in english (from october 2019) Postgraduate Scholarship (Cambridge Trust UK Masters matched funding College contribution) 2019-2020 sofiya gatens studying for the mphil in sociology (from october 2019) Postgraduate Scholarship (Cambridge Trust UK Masters matched funding College contribution) 2019-2020 ella r r monkcom studying for the mphil in health, medicine and society (from october 2019) Postgraduate Scholarship (Cambridge Trust UK Masters matched funding College contribution) 2019-2020 ella j c duffy studying for the mphil in development studies (from october 2019) Ng Fund 2019-2020 ambroise g h j-m simon, eliza bond Jesuan Welfare Awards 2020 alexander j davies, belinda Fonseka, charlotte l milbank, bobby mugo Organ Scholarship jason richards (2018-2020) Lady Kay Scholarship alastair j m newman (2019-2020) Bernard Mortlock Fund rebecca Wilkinson Zelie Timins Fund rebecca Wilkinson Choral Scholarships roland adams, ella c curry, benedict j gibson, edwin c jarratt barnham, rebecca m Kershaw, jack e lawrence, elizabeth r a nightingale, mary offer, madeleine m h olver, imogen parsley, lucy roberts, Kieran smith, martha j spencer Rawlinson-Hadfield Graduate Choral Scholarship Timothy birkle (chr), collin edouard (W), hannah grigg (cl) Instrumental Exhibitions alice T Y l barbe (piano), rowan Fox (violin), oliver hope (clarinet), rebecca m Kershaw (flute/piccolo), Yuma Kitahara (clarinet), ernest m-h lok (piano), elizabeth r a nightingale (French horn), mary offer (violin and conducting), rebecca revie (flute), lucy roberts (cello), megan robinson (flute and conducting), shamil a shah (oboe), Ze’ev n shirazi (trombone), sebastian j Tyrrall (cello) Edward Daniel Clarke Travel Bursary sebastian j Tyrrall


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James Baddeley Poole Bursaries mojolaoluwa akinyemi, madeleine a lee, harvey V r logan, david pattison Sir Moses and Lady Finley Travel Bursaries Theodor W lundberg, remkes a scheele, daniel j sheridan Jesus College Cambridge Society Travel Bursaries: Fatima eshani, isabella m gee, adam T goldney, robert hudson, hannah johnson, olegs Korolovs, joao e n lanca coelho, louisa snape, sebastian j Tyrrall, james Wright Sir James Knott Bursaries Fadle arouna, jacob dabb, grace storey Rustat Bursaries david c r austen, dominic betts, simon j billett, peter s blandford-baker, daniel p cochrane, alexandra m j Forrester, eleanor j harris, Thomas holland, michael h l miller, rebecca Wilkinson Sir Robbie Jennings Fund eoghan butler, ella j c duffy, jared e perlo, dalia pratali maffei, carlos purves Osborn Maths Study Grant Ze’ev n shirazi Livermore Fund sophie baldwin Douglas Timmins Grants for Sports dustin barter (australian rules Football), james burgess (rugby league), Katherine i cartlidge (ice hockey), rosie j W collins (Taekwon-do, handball), james W m T coxon (cross-country, athletics), james m edgerton (cross-country), sean e F gilmore (hockey), rhys e a goodall (Water polo), Kirsty l hume (hockey), edward r b hyde (cricket, rackets, real Tennis), cara james (athletics), luke mccarron (Triathlon), jeremy m c pearson (mixed lacrosse), olivia m shears (hockey), andrew te Water naude (Water polo), joao a Vicente pinho ribeiro da silva (Volleyball) Exhibitions (awarded in Michaelmas 2019 for 2018-2019 results): nathan dean, William j duggleby, ryan Walker Scholarships for Graduate Students (awarded in Michaelmas 2019 for 2018-2019 results) charlotte e m bagnall, eduin boater latimer, louise e dandy, david de Villiers, jonathan g Feld, conor p W Fenton-garvey, daniel Flenley, samuel j gilbert, Katherine e a grady, eleanor a gratton, rachel l hayes, hannah higgins, eleanor g Kashouris, rupert j c Knight, Vanessa o Knight, albert e Kohn, Yufei li, alice j merryweather, Thomas m o’brien, charles parry, rosa price, isaac j Turner, grace e Whorrall-campbell, rachel j Zink Scholarships Zeeshaan arshad, david c r austen, megan l bailey, shivani bajpai, conrad barclay, Theo W m bearman, isabel e m brooks, priya m n bryant, anna l christiansen, benjamin cline, ariel T cohen, jacob dabb, gwynfor dafydd, emma l drewett, elliot a j ebert, james m edgerton, agnes l s Fung, astrid F l godfrey, alistair golby, joseph g hamilton, nabil haque, curtis s h ho, oliver hope, daniel j hopper, james inkster, ella inwald, angus jackson, cara james, isha janbakhsh, edwin c jarratt barnham, rebecca m Kershaw, Zuzannah Klikowicz, emma loffhagen,


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sofia lyall, luke mccarron, melissa a mcnichol-antwine, patrick j merchant, juraj micko, alexander j minto, matthew j mulcahy, harriet e W pinto, jakub priban, sophia e purkis charters, carlos purves, Finn b r ranson, christian repole, charles r richardson, lucy roberts, elizabeth m robson, sylwia a sajdak, hannah r sanderson, Francisco a d m F setas, shamil a shah, matthew j stafford, oliver stubbs, harry e W sullivan, hong Ye Tan, elizabeth s Tarrant, euan j Tebbutt, lucy e Thompson, mark Turner, david b Vickers, ryan Walker, benedict Willis, joey c W Wong, sechan Yun Prizes Keller

benefactor’s (2004) sir leslie martin (architecture) Farrell (greek studies) carruthers (computer studies part ii) malthus (economics) malthus (human, social & political sciences) samuel Taylor coleridge (english) schiff (history part ii) Kapuvåri (land economy part ia) – 2019 sir harold spencer jones (mathematics part ii) eliot (mml part ii) Waring (Final mb part iii) sheldrick

Frank allhusen (chemistry) educational board prize gilbertson hamilton prize (social and economic history) sir peter gadsden crighton (music) gray reading prizes james hadfield (for contributing most to medical and veterinary studies in the college) margaret mair choral prize Wohl prize (books, travel or study for history) marcus prawer (dramatic criticism essay)

anna l christiansen ben curnow james m edgerton nabil haque angus jackson alexander j minto poh ni m ng lucy e Thompson joey c W Wong To be awarded in the michaelmas Term 2020 nabil haque henry gale juraj micko Francisco a d m F setas shivani bajpai ariel T cohen angus jackson david c r austen nicholas p sweeney hong Ye Tan gwynfor dafydd oliver stubbs ryan Walker chemistry part ii: isha janbakhsh chemistry part iii: james m edgerton james m edgerton agnes l s Fung edward gilford priya m n bryant ngoc long pham sarah bradley chapel: Faridat abdulsalami hall: sebastian j Tyrrall (pre-clinical medicine): jamie brannigan joseph jollans elizabeth r a nightingale susannah adler angus jackson


aWards & resulTs I Jesus College Annual Report 2020

edwin stanley roe (essay on charles dickens) sir denys page award (for classics students to travel to greece) renfrew (for the most significant contribution to the musical life of the college) Thian (essay promoting practice of Veterinary medicine) college prizes: architecture part ia asian & middle eastern studies part ii chemical engineering part i chemical engineering part iia classics part ib economics part i economics part iia education part ib engineering part ia

engineering part ib

english prelims to part i english part i english part ii engineering part iia history part i human, social & political sciences part iia (politics & international relations) human, social & political sciences part iia (politics & sociology) human, social & political sciences part iia (sociology) linguistics part iib management studies manufacturing engineering part iib mathematics part ia mathematics part ib

modern & medieval languages part ia modern & medieval languages part ib

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William j m jones hugo a n burgess sebastian j Tyrrall rebecca m Kershaw pre-clinical: anderson c allcock clinical: lucy johnson Fern acheson christopher d saner matthew j mulcahy mark Turner sebastian j Tyrrall aditya ravindrakumar georgia s benson emma leze angus r mcintosh daniel siromani aldric Z K goh david pattison anya a sims jack e lawrence haowen Yu sarah bradley alexander d haydn-Williams alexandra K Vardill William j m jones jessica a molyneux Finn b r ranson Zuzanna Klikowicz susannah adler benjamin Francis Katherine g heppell emyr c davies benedict j gibson rebecca m Kershaw elizabeth s Tarrant elliot a j ebert christian repole daniel simms izaak m Van dongen douglas p dolleymore james hirst shikhar Kumar Tallulah allen alastair l smith Katy munford Thomas cay


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music part ii

sophia e purkis charters lucy roberts natural sciences part ib (chemistry) daniel p cochrane natural sciences part ib (biological) harry crook Thomas m Freitag (pittsburgh) rebecca revie louisa snape philosophy part ib aurelio petrucci philosophy part ii patrick j merchant psychological & behavioural sciences part ii megan l bailey Theology, religion & philosophy of religion part i holly m F nicholls Theology, religion & philosophy of religion part iia Xin Yue Xie bachelor of Theology for the ministry, First exam eleanor j harris Final Veterinary examination part iii elizabeth m robson

Tripos Results as a result of the coVid-19 lockdown, almost all jesus college undergraduate students went out of residence by 21st march 2020. alternative arrangements were made for non-finalist students to take online assessments, and these students were allowed to proceed to the following year of their course. Those in their final year also sat online assessments, but these students were classed based on their results in these assessments, with the proviso that they not be given a lower class than they achieved in their previous year. This year the college had over 900 students (no two ways of counting them gives the same number). There were approximately 500 undergraduates in residence, 29 of whom came from other countries in europe and 34 from other overseas countries. There were around 150 in each of the first three years and around 40 in the fourth. There were approximately 511 students in the postgraduate community at 1 october 2019 (including clinical medics and vets) of whom 58 phd students completed their courses during the 2019-2020 academic year.

PhDs sohaib abdul rehman, deep super-resolution microscopy: novel developments and optimisations Felix agyemang, dynamic geospatial modelling and simulation of predominantly informal cities: an integrated agent-based and cellular automata model of urban growth anna albiero, novel intracellular signalling regulators of cartilage progenitor cell populations peter baddoo, analytic solutions for flows through cascades david bookless, Why and how should wild nature be preserved? a dialogue between biblical theology and biodiversity conservation paul brooks, regulation of microtubules by patronin within Drosophila dendrites rebecca broome, characterising the role of TeT2 in oestrogen receptor positive breast cancer isabel brĂźggemann, institutional perspectives on social change at the margins rachel bryan, unlived lives in twentieth century narrative: henry james, elizabeth bowen, Kazuo ishiguro elliott bussell, protecting valuable resources using optimal control theory and feed back strategies for plant disease management


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emma clifton, eating behaviour and the aetiology of obesity margaret comer, The heritage of repression: memory, commemoration, and politics in post-soviet russia bethany connolly, synthesis and applications of monolithic metal-organic frameworks Veronica corona, Variational multi-task models for image analysis: applications to magnetic resonance imaging alice darbyshire, design of a multiloop pyroelectric neutron generator control system sarah davidson, defining the pro-tumour impact of the evolving stromal microenvironment sian davies, predicting trajectories of symptom change during and following treatment in adolescents with unipolar major depression sarah davies, Tetrazine-triggered bioorthogonal decaging reactions for prodrug activation joseph davighi, Topological effects in particle physics phenomenology Francesca de domenico, behaviour of accelerating entropy spots john dudley, probabilistic user interface design for virtual and augmented reality applications angelica Federici, convents, clausura and cloisters: female religious patronage in late medieval rome and latium jennifer Fields, Questioning the promotion of friendship in interfaith dialogue: interfaith friendship in light of the emphasis on particularity in scriptural reasoning emma Findlay, high efficiency igbTs through novel three-dimensional modelling and new architectures matthew gleeson, insights into the location, nature and influence of mantle heterogeneity in the galapagos mantle plume Francisco gonzalez, The political economy and institutional foundations of inequality, social mobility and education disparities: essays from the developing south megan griffin-pickering, contributions to the derivation and well-posedness theory of kinetic equations sebastian grossmann, somatic mutation in cancer and healthy human tissue shixiang gu, sample-efficient deep reinforcement learning for continuous control mark haughton, narrativizing difference in earlier bronze age society: a comparative analysis of age and gender ideologies in the burials of ireland and scotland Victoria honour, microstructural evolution of silicate immiscible liquids in solidifying ferrobasalts nicholas hopkinson, The cross-channel interests of the baronage of the pays de caux and cotentin, 1189-1204 Katie howard, When bilingualism meets autism: the perspectives and experiences of children, parents and educational practitioners Thomas hudson, investigating volcanic and glacial processes using microseismicity rachael huntly, defining novel targets and functions of the protein kinase dYrK2 christopher jones, bacterial manipulation of actin dynamics via p21 activated kinases and cofilin evangelos Katafylis, religious intellectual encounters between byzantium and the ottomans in the fourteenth century: the case of gregory palamas cynthia larbey, in the human past, is the perennial consumption of starch a deep or shallow phenomenon? Yisong lin, Tuning strong correlated properties in euTio3 thin films grown by pulsed laser deposition Kim liu, genetic selection of cyclic peptide g-quadruplex ligands laurence lok, imaging innate immune cell behaviour in lymphoid organs


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joanie meharry, politics of the past: archaeology, nationalism and diplomacy in afghanistan (1919-2001) natasha morgan, global alterations of the epigenetic landscape define endometrial receptivity and provide a hallmark for endometriosis barbara mßhlemann, Virus discovery using current and novel methods muhammad arif naveed, reconceptualising the role of schooling in intergenerational social mobility: patterns, perspectives and experiences from rural pakistan sharon neufeld, understanding mental health treatment effectiveness in young people Verena neufeld, accelerating and converging stochastic quantum chemistry esther osorio Whewell, in summaries and diagrams: teaching prayer and poetry in lancelot andrewes and edmund spenser simone parisotto, anisotropic variational models and pdes for inverse imaging problems david pattinson, predicting the antigenic evolution of influenza viruses with application to vaccination strategy rachel porter, designed analogues of the aplyronines for use in antibody-drug conjugates elizabeth read, diffraction and spectroscopy of marine calcite biominerals: insights into structure and geochemistry rozelle robson bosch, a christian ontology of the flesh: word, symbol, performance Taylor saunders-Wood, investigating early lesion formation following papillomavirus infection using a mouse model and cell culture michael schaich, microfluidic transport studies on lipid vesicles Thea schei, The moralisation of eating abhimanyu Kumar sharma, language policies in the european union and india: a comparative study andrew snodgrass, The life of the mind: an intellectual biography of richard hofstadter julian sommerschuh, Whatever happened to respect? Values and change in a southwest ethiopian (aari) community julia spindel, The regulation of uhrF1 during mammalian embryogenesis marie synakewicz, an interdisciplinary study of the mechanical and dynamic properties of a-solenoid repeat proteins eleanor Tew, Forests of the future: ecosystem services in a forest landscape facing significant changes christine Van hooft, nearer to the people: the interaction between decentralisation and the political economy in uganda ralph Weir, metaphysics and the mind-body problem: why the twenty-first century still needs mental substances andhika Feri Wibisono, small modular boiling water reactor combined with external superheaters remo Widmer, crystalline, amorphous, and liquid metal-organic frameworks at non-ambient conditions Yan Wu, mixed selectivity via unsupervised learning in neural networks chaowei Xiao, using big data sets to analyse human behaviour patterns and urban spatial structure – a case study of the spatial-temporal dynamics in shanghai grasilda Zenkeviciute, developing constrained p27 peptides to target the oncogenic e3 ubiquitin ligase scFskp2

SPREG (PhD by Special Regulation) ranjeet jeevan *awards yet to be confirmed


jccs



jccs I Jesus College Annual Report 2020

jesus college cambridge society Committee as of 1 october 2020

Officers 1969 1980 1982 1977 1988 1976 1998

ms s alleYne (President and Chairman)

(sonita)

c i KirKer (Trustee) g r W sears (Trustee) e s morriss (Trustee) j p halseY (Hon. Secretary) m c bienFaiT (Hon. Treasurer) m p haYes (Hon. Dinner Secretary) s r l sTacpoole (College Council Rep.) e Williams (College Council Rep.)

(christopher) (guy) (susanna) (john)

First Elected 2012 2018 2018 2019

(mary)

2018

(mark)

2014

(sybil)

2016

(emily)

2018

(clive) (sophie) (david) (carolina) (anush) (james) (Ken) (Felicity) (nick) (helen) (narveshwar) (richard) (claire) (Tom)

2017-2021 2017-2021 2018-2022 2018-2022 2018-2022 2019-2023 2019-2023 2019-2023 2019-2023 2020-2024 2020-2024 2020-2024 2020-2024 2020-2022

Year Representatives 1987 c j leWis 2001 s l gicK 1969 d h WooTTon 1979 c e gonZaleZ 2001 a r neWman 1996 j hilTon 1996 K T d eames 1999 F a r barraTT 2000 n p h King 2006 h i maduKa 1996 n s sinha 1977 r m allon-smiTh 2011 c l small 1971 T slaTor

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Annual General Meeting 2020 as the annual dinner 2020 was cancelled due to the pandemic, the annual general meeting of the jesus college cambridge society has been rescheduled and will be held online at 2.00pm on saturday 6th march 2021. This meeting will elect the officers and executive committee (see a provisional list on the previous page). The 2019 jccs accounts have been audited and will be presented to the delayed agm. Further information including a link will be circulated to all alumni in december 2020. Donations to the College in 2020 The jccs donated £8,000 to the college in 2020, split between £3,000 to the undergraduate hardship Fund, £3,000 to the graduate hardship Fund and £2,000 to the jcsu. JCCS 2020 Events unfortunately, due to the coVid-19 pandemic we had to suspend all of our activities in 2020, including the spring dinner in london, the bumps lunch in may week; the annual dinner in college and the autumn drinks reception in london. JCCS Executive Committee The executive committee held two meetings electronically in 2020. members of the committee contributed to a gift to Tom slator (1971) who is retiring having served many years as honorary Treasurer. Date of 2021 Annual Dinner and AGM it is hoped to hold the 2021 annual dinner on saturday 25th september 2021 in The Forum hall. The speaker will be adrian greenwood (1970). if conditions allow the dinner to take place, then the 2021 agm will be held on the same date.


college history


Jesuans leaving the College on their way to the Senate House to become BAs/Scholars of the University (General Admission 2013)


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“. . . and scholars . . . ”

some questions of terminology peter glazebrook ew of those who have noticed the formal legal Fdescription of the university: “the chancellor, masters and scholars of the university of cambridge”, have stopped to ask, who were “the scholars” to whom the definition refers? This is a question that must be answered in relation to the university’s statutes and constitution in the middle ages, not to those now in force. present day preoccupations in examining with classing, orders of merit and qualifications are products of the 18th and later centuries and had no place in the university before then. many have probably assumed that “scholars” are the undergraduates of the university, even though they have never assumed that the “scholar” of a college is any undergraduate. This is, however, unlikely to be correct, if only because being an undergraduate is merely the negative status of not being a graduate, while if we wish to confine undergraduates to those who have the intention of becoming graduates in due course, we must know how long they have had this intention and whether it ever lapses. and recourse to determine who are “scholars” in the university to the criteria of matriculation scarcely helps: for similar reasons. matriculation was introduced only in 1540 as a law and order provision, a method of identifying those young people connected to the university and subject to its discipline and its privileges. it required nothing more than an application by the young person, his Tutor or his college, that he should be enrolled in this way and the payment of a fee. There was, until the latter part of the 19th century, no suggestion that there should be any academic requirement for matriculation. in 1571, parliament, in recognising the university’s status as a legal corporation, was necessarily thinking of the mediaval system. under this a university was a place where a body of people came to study and teach to the outer limits of knowledge. There were four faculties: arts, divinity, law and medicine, though only after studying in the arts Faculty was anyone able to go on and study the other subjects. What is

more, the arts course was lengthy. it lasted for 7 years (21 terms). but to begin studying arts (which included rhetoric, logic and philosophy), nothing more was required than to attend lectures and to pay the customary lecturer’s fee. no other qualification was necessary; yet it seemed unreasonable to require someone to wait for 7 years before he knew whether he would, or would not, be recognised as a teacher within the university. The procedure was therefore developed of requiring a person who had attended lectures for 3 years (10 terms) to prove he had done so, paid the fees and taken his due part in the exercises involved. if he satisfied the university officers on these matters he was entitled to attend the lectures of the final 6 terms and offer himself as a teacher in the arts faculty. experience, however, showed that a person who had got as far as studying for 10 terms and survived this preliminary scrutiny of his teaching aptitude, was also suitable for ordination as a priest or for employment as a schoolmaster, and he left the university at this stage. These factors combined to lead people to say that these accredited students were university scholars. The other Faculties were willing to allow them to begin theological, legal or medical studies, so becoming bachelors of divinity, law or medicine. accordingly, those who had successfully completed the first part of the arts course became known as “bachelors of arts” and began on the second. The two terms, “bachelors” and “scholars”, were thus synonymous. in the second half of the 16th century the great wave of fee-paying students that there were in the colleges, who were satisfied by three years of cambridge life and keen to get away, were admitted to full membership of the university as masters of arts (mas) without further tests: the university, anxious to strengthen its position politically and financially, was keen to have them as mas after only nominal further residence. cambridge thus arrived at the framework within which the present detailed regulations about “degrees” and examinations have been fitted.


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moving from university to college statutes we are in an different world. in the days of the earliest colleges (13th to 15th centuries) those who were later recognised as Fellows who were called scholars: to this day the official title of King’s college is “the provost and scholars of ...”. (at christ church, oxford the Fellows are still called students). in 1513-1514 when dr eccleston made the first surviving draft of statutes for jesus college he distinguished between Fellows supported by the revenues of the former nunnery and “scholars” who were priests of the family chantries in the church. college statutes were frequently revised in the 16th century by royal commissioners in order to remove inconsistencies and anomalies in earlier versions about duration of entitlement to support from endowments, rights to participate in college business, duties and titles. at jesus, the principal changes came in 1549 when following the abolition of chantries by parliament in 1546, their

revenues were added to those from the nunnery properties to provide stipends for fellowships, “scholarships” of limited duration giving eligibility to fellowships, were also provided from these enlarged revenues which had previously also supported the choir men and choristers who had taken part in the celebration of the offices by the Fellows (and scholars). Then bequests by doctors reston, andrews and Fuller enabled commissioners to increase in 1559 the number of “fellowships” to 16 and “scholarships” to 15. after that any additional fellowships (there were none until the 19th century) were to be known as bye-fellowships while new scholarships were named after their donor, and might be held along with those funded from the nunnery properties. These differences were reflected in hall. There was a high Table for the master, Fellows (and fellow-commoners), and also a “scholars’ Table”. each was funded from college endowments.


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master, disciplinarian and debt settler robert athol, college archivist i mentioned in the main archives asdepartment review (see pages 68-70), this year has proved difficult and has meant i’ve not been able to undertake the usual research into college history that i would normally have undertaken. however, one of the last collections i catalogued before being furloughed in april was the personal papers of dr William French, master of the college between 1820 and 1849 (pictured right). so here, i’ll look at some of the more interesting items to come out of this collection. William French was born in 1786 to Thomas French, a wealthy yeoman at eye in suffolk. he went up to caius in 1807, graduating ba in 1811 and ma in 1814. in 1811 he was elected Fellow and Tutor of pembroke college, later becoming bursar there, before being elected master of jesus college in 1820 at just 34 years old. in 1821 he married elizabeth maria, daughter of john Wythe of eye, and was made Vice-chancellor. he held this position again in 1834. in addition to college and university positions, French was also presented to the living of moor monkton, Yorkshire in 1827 which is demonstrated in the personal papers through numerous correspondence with individuals in Yorkshire concerning property and events in this parish. it is due to French’s efficient management of assets and property that the college finances greatly improved during the mid 19th century. he also oversaw some of the significant restoration work to the college chapel, himself gifting stained glass for the east window. he died in the master’s lodge on 12 november 1849, aged 63 and was buried at brockdish, norfolk. The following are highlights from the collection (now open to researchers) and show not only the broad spectrum of responsibility he held as head of the college, but also illustrate how he was involved in wider university business. similarly, the insights into his personal life and that of his family demonstrate perfectly some of the issues and events encountered by the middle classes of the early to mid 19th century.

College business as master of the college, one issue French would have had to coordinate was dealing with any debts left by deceased Fellows. in this regard, the death of john jefferson (admitted to jesus in 1808, died aged 36 in 1827) posed a problem. a letter from robert jefferson, john’s brother, to William French, 23rd February 1829 (ref: French/2/1/1829/1) explains he is sorry that it has taken so long for him to settle the bills and debts of his brother, but he had recently been invalided. a bill from the estate of john carter of cambridge, grocer and china-man dated 28th march 1829 (ref: French/2/1/1829/3) and calling in any money owed by those given credit by the business indicates how jefferson, in part, got into debt. on the back of this notice is a list of items and the associated amounts still owed by jefferson (or at least his estate) including sugar, ginger, candles, water and bottle, hearth brush, clay, paper and twine, mop, top, sand and dust, oil all totalling £23 5s 1d and all bought between 1815 and 1816; also listed are cut decanters, wine glasses, corkscrew, beaker, tea, furniture oil, rushlights, sugar, sperm oil, cotton, biscuits, cards, eggs, nuts, coffee, strainer, taper, matches, stick, paper and


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twine, carpet whisk, honey and pot, oil and vial, clay, nutmegs, snuff, a clothes brush, sago which were all on his tutors account. Further items listed include cocoa, salt, soap and sand, water bottle, hearth brush and paper which were bought between 1812 and 1816, so clearly the debts had been accruing for some time. a small receipt signed by elliot smith acknowledges settlement of the total bill for £23 5s 1d. Discipline as a college head, French was ultimately responsible for considering disciplinary action against students. in a letter from T. s. hughes, c.1830 (ref: French/2/1/1830/2), hughes mentions that on doing his rounds he heard the sound of a horn but couldn't work out where it was coming from. on passing the gates of jesus college just after 11pm he observed two undergraduates standing there who, as soon as he passed and proceeded to ask what they thought a convenient distance, began to blow the horn again. They then put the horn down in a corner of the chimney, one ran off down jesus lane and the other went in to college. hughes accosted this student, who gave his name but insisted he wasn't the perpetrator. hughes then said he'd take the

horn to his house where it could be collected by the student who ran off. a ‘townsman’ then visited hughes the following day, claiming he needed the horn as he had borrowed it from the owner, john bridges Kendrick of jesus college (admitted 1826). This man was refused the horn and so when Kendrick himself came to collect it, hughes asked him did he not think it inappropriate to be playing the horn so late and he replied “how did i know it was he that was playing?” after other ‘insolent replies’, hughes said he’d send the horn with a note to French. indeed, hughes also wrote that Kendrick was the same person as the ‘townsman’ and that one of his servants said Kendrick came ‘in disguise without a cap and gown’. other discipline was sought from French in his role as canon at ely cathedral. William henry henslow wrote to the bishop of ely on 18th september 1840 (ref: French/1/1/1840/2) which was in turn forwarded to French. henslow wrote to say that he was feloniously attacked when walking with his 9 year old godson by two men in the company of two women returning to ely from King’s lynn. Their names are alleged to be philip achis (alias dennett) a gardener of the dean and chapter, stephen cowling, a bricklayer,

An example of one of the hundreds of letters in the French personal papers collection


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ann brown, widow of a gardener and sarah onion, all of ely. “The man devil (alias dennett) is an atrocious villain who first threw the other man on me (henslow) and by whom i should have been murdered but for providential interference”. cowling was brought before French and apparently recalled a false account of the event, although no note in the collection mentions what happened to achis or cowling, although some future research in the ely diocesan records in the university library will hopefully shed further light on this. Domestic Life The domestic side to French's life are also represented in his personal papers including a particularly detailed bill and invoice from spode and copeland, porcelain, stone china, earthenware and glass manufactuers, portugal house, lincoln’s inn Fields, london, dated 10th july 1821 (ref: French/1/1/1821/1). in this is listed an ashett dish stone china, 1 fruit centre, 2 cream bowls and stands, 18 teacups and 24 saucers, 18 coffee cups, 1 basin, 4 plates, 48 cut wine glasses, 24 goblets, 4 decanters, 6 finger glasses plain, 18 coolers and 2 caskets (presumably for transporting the whole to cambridge). and what better to pour into some of the wine glasses and goblets but some wine?! a letter from lewis h meryon to French dated 16th august 1848 (ref: French/1/ 1/1848/1) and written from 3 st mary axe suggests French sent instructions to have delivered three dozen wine including one dozen champagne, one dozen sparks hock and one dozen of claret. meryon said he sent the best 1841 claret and that the champagne should be agreeable as it is exactly what was drunk at his sister's wedding in rye, sussex. and once the wine arrived in college, it is possible that it would have been stored in one of the college wine cellars. Wine accounts kept by French (ref: French/2/4) include a basic plan of a wine cellar alongside a note saying that the account was drawn out on 3rd march 1843 and wines listed include claret, sherry, port, burgundy, white hermitage, madeira, champagne, moselle (sparkling), barsac, hock, malmsey and constantia. The accounts also mention that the sherry French brought with him from pembroke was reputedly secreted from cadiz once it was laid siege to by napoleonic forces in 1810.

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Family although French's immediate family would, perhaps, be considered small for the time (he had just two daughters), the extent of his wider family, particularly on his wife’s side, is evidenced through the collection. a letter dated 10 september 1836 (ref: French/1/1/1836/2) from French’s nephew, john Frederick Wythe and written from essex street, london, asks his uncle for financial support for the scheme he and a friend have devised. They want to buy an equal share in a vessel with which to trade on the eastern coast of africa, which he feels would have a good return if entered into immediately. he doesn’t, however, forget to give love to his aunt and cousins. Those cousins and French’s daughters were anna maria French (c. 1824-1866) and mary Valence French (c.1826-1889), both of whom were born in the masters lodge. a letter from William French to Thomas Wythe (ref: French/1/2/2/2/11) written from cambridge 17 december 1834, recounts that his daughter Valance, or ‘little Val’, is recovering from her intermittent fever after taking some medicine and that mrs French was almost in despair at Valence’s illness. ‘little Val’ went on to marry edward Kay (later sir edward and a high court judge), on 2nd april 1850. Following her death, sir edward left £4,500, to perpetuate her memory, to the college for the foundation of several ‘lady Kay’ scholarships in divinity. more about anna and mary French can be found here in the online version of the archive exhibition that took place for ‘the 40th’ celebrations. https://www.jesus.cam.ac.uk/node/9593 Gardens in addition to redesigning the master’s garden and other gardens in college, in his role as Vice-chancellor French also took an interest in the laying out of the gardens of the university observatory. supplying the plants was a mrs s. mackie of lakenham, norfolk and between december 1822 and november 1823, mackie supplied an enormous quantity and variety of plants including the following for the college. 150 evergreen and flowering shrubs, 10 evergreen oaks, 10 laburnums, 10 mountain ash, 40 spruce firs, 10 acacias, 10 pink mezereums (mesereons), 50 rose bushes, 1 kalmia augustifolia, 1 kalmia gluuca, 1 kalmia variegata, 1 rhodora canadensis, 1 azalea viscosa alba, 1 azalea viscosa scaba,


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1 azalea viscosa duplex, 2 azalea pontica, 1 azalea tomentosa, 2 andromeda calyculala, 2 andromeda calesba, 1 vaccinium macrocarpon, 1 vaccinium vitis idaa, 2 vaccinium uliginusum, 1 vaccinium myrtillus, 1 vacillium tenellum, 50 roses in sorts, 12 rhododendron pont, 2 rhododendron maximum, 2 rhododendron pont variegatum, 2 rhododendron roseum, 1 rhododendron catawbiense, 1 rhododendron aralvides, 30 larch firs, 10 birch, 5 weeping birch, 15 silver firs, 20 hornbeams, 10 copper beech, 5 weeping willows, 1 dwarf may duke cherry, 1 dwarf black heart cherry, 1 dwarf elton cherry, 1 dwarf summer nonpariel, 1 dwarf margaret, 1 dwarf nonsuch, 5 rose acacias, 10 green hollies, 5 tree box, 5 arbutus, 5 guelder roses, irish ivy. The purchase of so many plants seems somewhat excessive, however, the dates tie in perfectly with the construction of K staircase which began in 1822 and which was the subject of an ‘archive of the month’ in june 2018. so perhaps following the construction of K staircase, French took the opportunity to redesign the gardens in this part of the college. plants bought for the observatory included 400 evergreen and flowering shrubs, 25 siberian crabs, 200 hornbeams, 25 arbutus, 10 redcedars, 50 tree box, 500 sweet briar, 25 brooms, 25 spruce, 25 larch, 50 silver firs, 100 green hollies, 200 evergreen privets, 50 laurustines, 50 laurels, 20 weeping ash, 10 phillyneas, beech, portugal laurels, evergreen oaks, purple beeches, gooseberries, rough rid champagne. other plants which were ordered but where no garden was specified included 5 stags horn sumacs (sumachs), 100 whin or furze, 8 dwarf cherries (with variety names), 12 dwarf apples (with names), 50 evergreen and flowering shrubs (with variety names), 10 chichester elms and 10 hertford elms.

perhaps because they knew each other beforehand, or perhaps because they became more familiar after French placed so many orders, but mackie addresses one of the letter bills ‘dear friend’. The delivery of the plants, some of which were very large and well developed trees, appears to have been quick, the plants often arriving in cambridge a day or two after dispatch at norwich. These few extracts really are just a small part of a fascinating collection that covers so many other subjects and areas relating to college history and the wider history of cambridge in the early to mid 19th century. if you are interested in reading more, please view the catalogue which is now available at https://collegecollections. jesus.cam.ac.uk/index.php/dr-william-frenchmaster


Over Five Hunded Years of History & Eight Personalities

Jesus College History and Personalities by Peter Glazebrook Emeritus Fellow This fully illustrated 64 page booklet is available for those who want to know something, but not too much, about the College and its more notable members. Copies are only ÂŁ5 ( free P&P in the UK) by emailing development@jesus.cam.ac.uk


THREE GIFT IDEAS TO SUPPORT THE VISUAL ARTS AT JESUS COLLEGE 190

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e Annual Report 2020

The Jesus College Works of Art Committee is proud to offer:

“Art for Tomorrow” A portfolio of 10 original prints specially curated for Jesus College, with works by world-famous artists including Cornelia Parker RA, Jake and Dinos Chapman, Humphrey Ocean RA and Alison Wilding RA. A special price for College members of £3600 inc. VAT for the full portfolio. A limited number of individual prints are also available for sale separately – please contact the Development and Alumni Relations Office for further details.

A limited-edition silk square scarf Designed by Stephen Chambers RA and printed by the Armani silk printers, Maver of Como, featuring the cockerel emblazoned with the College motto and complete with presentation box. £325 inc. VAT

Thirty Years of Contemporary Art: Jesus College, Cambridge 1988-2018 by Jean Bacon and Jim Roseblade This is a richly illustrated photographic memoir of three decades of Sculpture in the Close biennials at Jesus College and the development of the permanent sculpture collection. £12 plus postage and packing available from Jesus College Porters’ lodge, online at www.jesus.cam.ac.uk/chapel-and-choir/choir-shop or from amazon, itunes and major retailers To purchase, please contact the Development and Alumni Relations Office, Jesus College Tel: +44 (0)1223 339301 or E-mail: development@jesus.cam.ac.uk


VISIT OUR ONLINE GIFT SHOP www.jesus.cam.ac.uk/alumni/gift-shop

We are very pleased to be able to offer a wide range of gifts and mementoes including cufflinks, silk ties, silver pins, coasters, tote bags, paper weights, tea towels, prints and books, embossed Moleskine notebooks, cuddly teddy bears, the college flag, and cD recordings of the choirs of Jesus college You can also purchase any of these items by phone on +44 (0) 1223 339301 or by dropping into the Porters’ lodge when you next visit college. Please contact the Development and Alumni Relations Office at development@jesus.cam.ac.uk for information on overseas posting or bulk orders




CARDS AND PRINTS BY NAOMI DAVIES Well known cambridge artist naomi davies (née Williams, 1987) was commissioned to paint pen and watercolours of the college which are available as greetings cards, tea towels and limited edition giclée prints.

available to order from the college website:

www.jesus.cam.ac.uk/alumni/gift-shop more of naomi’s work featuring cambridge and bicycles can be found on her website.


JESUS COLLEGE CAMBRIDGE



Data Protection Statement How we use your personal information is statement explains how Jesus college (“we” and “our”) handles and uses data we collect about alumni (“you” and “your”). In broad terms, we use your data to manage the ongoing relationship between the college and you as part of our lifelong community of scholars, including keeping in touch with you, keeping up to date on your achievements, and engaging with you on how you can continue to contribute to college life and otherwise support the college. We will retain your data indefinitely or until you request us to do otherwise. When changes are made to this statement, we will publish the updated version to our website and notify you by other communications channels as we deem appropriate or necessary. e controller for your personal data is Jesus college, cambridge cb5 8bl. e person responsible for data protection at the time of issue, and the person who is responsible for monitoring compliance with relevant legislation in relation to the protection of personal data, is the bursar, Dr richard anthony (bursar@jesus.cam.ac.uk). e legal basis for processing your personal data is that it is necessary for the purposes of our legitimate interests, where we have concluded that our interests do not impact inappropriately on your fundamental rights and freedoms, except where elsewhere in this statement we have indicated otherwise. You may ask us to explain our rationale at any time.

How your data is used by the College We collect and process your personal data, as specified below, for a number of purposes, including: a.

maintaining a formal record of your academic progress and achievements at the college and the university of cambridge and elsewhere;

b.

retaining a formal record of your career or other life achievements in order to promote and improve the reputation of the college and help you to network with other college members effectively;

c.

engaging you in college and university events that we believe will be of interest to you, including alumni and open events, volunteering opportunities, and other ways you can contribute to the life of the college;

D.

providing you with information about college life and the development of the college, including major initiatives and programmes relating to either the academic endeavour or the provision of services and facilities to members and the wider public;

e.

encouraging you to make a financial contribution to the college and/or the university, and processing any such contributions;

f.

assessing the likelihood that you will, now or in the future, make a financial contribution (gift) to the college;

g.

promoting third party services we believe will be of interest to you:

further details are provided in the annex. If you have concerns or queries about any of these purposes, or how we communicate with you, please contact us at the address given above.


Communications If you are a new contact for our Development and alumni relations office, we will ask you at the outset how you would like to receive news and other communications from us. If you are already receiving such communications, you may change your preferences or ask us to stop sending you news and other communications completely by contacting the Development and alumni relations office (development@jesus.cam.ac.uk). You may request changes at any time.

How we share your personal data We believe that most alumni understand in detail the complex and many interactions of the college with the university of cambridge. Personal data of our members is shared with the university routinely throughout any course of study, and it is our strong preference to continue such collaborative working thereafter. e university and its partners (including the college) have a data sharing agreement to govern the sharing of personal data of alumni and other supporters. is is necessary because they are distinct legal entities. e agreement outlines that, depending on constraints set by you, and which you may change at any time, the university and college may share any of the above categories of personal data with the university, and can be viewed in full (https://www.alumni.cam.ac.uk/data-protection). any transmission of data to or from the university is managed through agreed processes which comply with uK data protection legislation. for clarity, the college has a separate database from the university, but has access to the university’s database: additionally, we maintain other electronic and paper records. e university has its own data protection statement and procedures – see: https://www.alumni.cam.ac.uk/data-protection additionally, we share data on a considered and confidential basis, where appropriate, with: •

cambridge in america (the university’s affiliate alumni office in the us);

selected companies who provide college-branded or college-endorsed products and services, as outlined above;

volunteer partners closely related to us (e.g. college trustees, development board members, alumni group representatives); and

contractors providing services to you on our behalf or services to us (our “data processors”), as outlined above.

We also facilitate communication between individual alumni (of the college or the university), but in doing so we do not release personal contact details without prior permission. any transfers of your data overseas or to international organisations, as set out above, are protected either by an adequacy decision by the european commission or by standard data protection clauses adopted by the european commission (which are available from our Data Protection officer) or, before 25 May 2018, by a self-assessment of adequacy.

Your rights You have the right: to ask us for access to, rectification or erasure of your data; to restrict processing (pending correction or deletion); to object to communications or direct marketing; and to ask for the transfer of your data electronically to a third party (data portability). some of these rights are not automatic, and we reserve the right to discuss with you why we might not comply with a request from you to exercise them. Where you opt out of all future communications or exercise your right to erasure, we will continue to maintain a core set of personal data (name, subject(s), matriculation and graduation details, unique university identification number and date of birth) to ensure we do not contact you inadvertently in


future, while still maintaining our record of your academic achievements. We may also need to retain some financial records about you for statutory purposes (e.g. gift aid, anti-fraud and accounting matters). You retain the right at all times to lodge a complaint about our management of your personal data with the Information commissioner’s office at https://ico.org.uk/concerns/

ANNEx We collect and process your personal data, as specified below, for a number of purposes, including: a.

Maintaining a formal record of your academic progress and achievements of the college and the university of cambridge and elsewhere: We retain personal data (provided by you or by the university of cambridge, or created by us), including: i) your current name and any previous names you have had; ii) unique personal identifiers (e.g. student number, crsID, date of birth, photograph); iii) your current and previous contact details; iv) your application details, our assessment of your application and the details of any offer(s) of study we have made; v) records of your academic provision from the college (including supervisions, college examinations and other academic support); vi) matriculation and graduation details and records of your academic qualifications (including those prior to becoming a member of the college); vii) other details of your academic progress or achievement (e.g. college or university awards or prizes).

b.

retaining a formal record of your academic, career or other life achievements in order to promote and improve the reputation of the college and help you to network with other college members effectively: We retain personal data (provided by you), including: i) details of your achievements since you completed your course(s) of study; ii) membership of college and external clubs and societies (including alumni groups); iii) your previous and current employment status (including retirement), including job title, sector, income and work contact details, dates of employment. When you provide this information, we will assume (unless you notify us otherwise) that we can promote these achievements in our public literature, and can use this information for other purposes outlined in this statement. We may supplement information from other public sources that we consider to be reliable (e.g. your public social media profile(s), Queen’s Honours list, companies House, high profile news reports or articles) and may check their accuracy with you from time to time.

c.

engaging you in college and university events that we believe will be of interest to you, including alumni and open events, volunteering opportunities, and other ways you can contribute to the life of the college: We retain personal data (provided by you or by the university of cambridge, or created by us), including:


i)

known relationships with other members (past or present) of the university of cambridge or any of the colleges;

ii)

your previous attendance at college or university events;

iii)

information about your areas of personal interest;

iv)

personal data relating to your attendance at events and your personal preferences (e.g. dietary or accommodation requirements or requests);

v)

records of any communications (verbal or written) we have had with you, including the purpose and outcome of those communications.

When you provide this information, we will assume (unless you notify us otherwise) that we can use this information for other purposes outlined in this statement. We may supplement information from other public sources that we consider to be reliable (e.g. your public social media profile(s), university publications, high profile news reports or articles) and may check their accuracy with you from time to time. D.

Providing you with information about the development of the college, including major initiatives and programmes relating to either the academic endeavour or the provision of services and facilities to members and the wider public: We retain personal data (provided by you or by the university of cambridge, or created by us), including: i)

any communication preferences confirmed by you;

ii)

ways in which you have supported the college.

by providing us with email addresses and telephone numbers, we have taken this to be consent to use those channels to contact you for this and other purposes outlined in this statement, unless you have expressed your preferred communication channels. When you provide this information, we will assume (unless you notify us otherwise) that we can use this information for other purposes outlined in this statement. e.

encouraging you to make a financial contribution to the college and/or the university, and processing any such contributions: î “e college’s income consists of gifts and benefactions, income derived from prudent investment of any endowment and student fees. We value any financial contribution from our members and, accordingly, retain personal data (provided by you or by the university of cambridge, or created by us), including: i)

the purposes and amounts of any donations or other support previously provided to the university or the college by you;

ii)

the method(s) of payments used and related payment references;

iii)

your bank details (for processing direct debit or other financial transactions);

iv)

your tax status and gift aid declaration.

some of this financial information needs to be retained for statutory purposes for a number of years (e.g. gift aid, anti-fraud and accounting matters). When you provide this information, we will assume (unless you notify us otherwise) that we can use this information for other purposes outlined in this statement. f.

assessing the likelihood that you will, now or in the future, make a financial contribution (gift) to the college:


î “e college undertakes research to determine your capacity to provide financial support. î “is results in us creating and using personal data including: i)

your estimated income or asset worth (where this is not provided by you);

ii)

your potential capacity to make a gift, including our internal classification of you as a major gift prospect which is determined by a combination of your giving history, your attendance at college and university events, and your other interactions with the college since you graduated, including any positive or negative indications from you about your capacity or willingness to give to the college;

iii)

gifts you have made to other charitable organisations.

our research includes incorporating information from public sources that we consider to be reliable (e.g. your public social media profile(s), Queen’s Honours list, companies House, high profile news reports or articles). In using these sources, we have considered the potential intrusion of your privacy. In most cases, our assessment above aims to exclude you from unwelcome or inappropriate approaches so as not to compromise your ongoing relationship with us. g.

Promoting third party services we believe will be of interest to you: We retain personal data (provided by you), including: i)

any preferences to be excluded from such services.

We do not sell your personal data under any circumstances. If you have concerns or queries about any of these purposes, or how we communicate with you, please contact us. https://www.jesus.cam.ac.uk/college/about-us/data-protection



Jesus College Records Update name: ——––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– matriculation year: ——–––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– (new) address: ——–––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– ——––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– ——––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– (new) Telephone no: ——–––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– (new) mobile no: ——––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– (new) e-mail address: ——––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– news: ——––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– ——––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– ——––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– ——––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– ——––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– ——––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– ——–––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

please return to: The development and alumni relations office jesus college cambridge cb5 8bl e-mail: development@jesus.cam.ac.uk



Safe events, post COVID-19 our experienced conference and catering team have listened to your needs, reviewed, and updated our customer journey and safety protocols, to minimise risk so that when the time is right, we can welcome you back. We provide flexible conference spaces with high tech aV facilities as well as outdoor spaces that can be easily adapted to allow for appropriate social distancing. We have successfully applied for the Visitbritain good To go scheme and the aim accreditation which demonstrate that we are adhering to the hospitality and conference industry, government and public health guidance, have carried out our coVid-19 risk assessment and implemented safety measures.

Using technology to support events our aV facilities: • recording, editing and post production service • state of the art aV including wide angle webcams and high speed wi-fi • Virtual conference platform • resident aV technician The state of the art aV equipment at jesus college allows for conferences and meetings to be recorded for live streaming or download. We can help you set up and record virtual meetings for between 10 and 100 delegates to participate in via Zoom, so you can be confident in hosting international conferences from the boardroom chair. For bespoke requests, we are also working with Venue audio Visual to provide clients with a virtual conference platform, recording the conference, offering e-posters and delegate chat rooms. our resident aV technician will work with you to ensure you get the most out of our technology.

The conference and events team is looking forward to discussing your requirements. please get in touch with us via email (conference@jesus.cam.ac.uk) or telephone (01223 760524). You can also visit our website for further information on the conference facilities www.jesus.cam.ac.uk/conferences


designed by nikki Williams, jesus college printed by swan print ltd www.swanprint.co.uk