Issuu on Google+

The Bestseller

A bird’s-eye view of the Bible

The Bestseller

A bird’s-eye view of the Bible

A MULTIPLY ‘Let’s talk’ Booklet for those wanting to experience living Christianity

cover.p65

3

4/6/2010, 1:51 PM


The Bestseller

Bestseller1.p65

1

3/18/2010, 12:28 PM


Bestseller1.p65

2

3/18/2010, 12:28 PM


The Bestseller A bird’s eye view of the Bible

A MULTIPLY ‘Let’s Talk ’ Booklet for those wanting to experience living Christianity

Bestseller1.p65

3

3/18/2010, 12:28 PM


All scripture is inspired by God and profitable for teaching, for reproof, for correction and for training in righteousness, that the men of God may be complete, equipped for every good work. 2 Timothy 3:16-17

First published 1994 as Bible Summary Revised and reset 2000 ISBN 1 900878 11 9 Published by Multiply Publications, Jesus Fellowship Central Offices, Nether Heyford, Northampton NN7 3LB Š 2000 Jesus Fellowship Church. All rights reserved. Not to be reproduced, copied or transmitted in any form without written permission. Biblical quotations are from the Revised Standard Version Š 1952 and 1971 Division of Christian Education of the National Council of the Churches of Christ, USA.

Bestseller1.p65

4

3/18/2010, 12:28 PM


Old Testament

Contents

Bestseller1.p65

5

Genesis .................................................................................. 3 Exodus ................................................................................... 4 Leviticus ................................................................................ 5 Numbers ............................................................................... 6 Deuteronomy .................................................................... 7 Joshua .................................................................................... 8 Judges .................................................................................... 9 Ruth ...................................................................................... 10 1 Samuel ........................................................................... 11 2 Samuel ........................................................................... 12 1 Kings ............................................................................... 13 2 Kings ............................................................................... 14 1 Chronicles .................................................................... 15 2 Chronicles .................................................................... 16 Ezra ........................................................................................ 17 Nehemiah ......................................................................... 18 Esther ................................................................................... 19 Job .......................................................................................... 20 Psalms ................................................................................. 21 Proverbs ............................................................................ 22 Ecclesiastes & Song of Solomon .................... 23 Isaiah ................................................................................... 24 Jeremiah & Lamentations .................................... 25 Ezekiel ................................................................................. 26 Daniel & Hosea ............................................................ 27 Joel & Amos .................................................................... 28 Obadiah & Jonah ........................................................ 29 Micah & Nahum .......................................................... 30 Habakkuk & Zephaniah ........................................ 31 Haggai & Zechariah .................................................. 32 Malachi ............................................................................... 33

3/18/2010, 12:28 PM


New Testament Bestseller1.p65

6

Matthew ............................................................................ 35 Mark ..................................................................................... 36 Luke ...................................................................................... 37 John ...................................................................................... 38 Acts ........................................................................................ 39 Romans .............................................................................. 40 1 Corinthians ................................................................. 41 2 Corinthians ................................................................. 42 Galatians ........................................................................... 43 Ephesians ......................................................................... 44 Philippians ...................................................................... 45 Colossians ........................................................................ 46 1 & 2 Thessalonians ............................................... 47 1 & 2 Timothy .............................................................. 48 Titus & Philemon ....................................................... 49 Hebrews ............................................................................ 50 James ................................................................................... 51 1 Peter ................................................................................. 52 2 Peter ................................................................................. 53 1 John ................................................................................. 54 2 John & 3 John ......................................................... 55 Jude ....................................................................................... 56 Revelation ........................................................................ 57

3/18/2010, 12:28 PM


Introduction

Yes, the Bible is the world’s all-time best-seller. It has been translated into most of the world’s languages. Yet, unlike most other best-sellers, it often gathers dust on the shelf ! Research by the Scripture Union at the end of the twentieth century showed that fewer Christians read the bible regularly than at any point during that century, and a large proportion of 15’s - 25’s hardly read it at all! These days we can’t say it’s too hard to read, because there are excellent modern versions available. It probably has more to do with the fact that the Bible isn’t just one book - it’s a library! There’s history, law, poetry, biography, romance and adventure. But where do you start? Where do you look? You need to have a ‘balanced diet’ in what you read. There is danger in only learning a few ‘favourite’ verses or sticking to ‘easy’ books. We need the wider picture, or we will get things out of context. This booklet is designed to help by giving an overview of the Bible with a brief summary and outline of each of its 66 books.

Bestseller1.p65

7

3/18/2010, 12:28 PM


Old Testament Bestseller1.p65

8

3/18/2010, 12:28 PM


Genesis OVERVIEW

KEY POINTS

How it all began Genesis shows us our origins: how God created man, how man sinned, and how God planned a way of restoration. We are introduced to various ‘patriachs’, key ‘father-figures’ in the history of God’s people. From them we learn a lot about faith, about overcoming trials, and about walking with God. We also find the first instances of God’s covenants with man: His gracious pledge to be faithful to His people if they will truly follow Him.

SOUNDBITE

1. The beginnings of mankind’s relationship with God as CREATOR • The creation of the Universe out of nothing (ch.1-2) • Adam’s and Eve’s sin against God and their exclusion from the garden of Eden, this is known as the FALL of man (ch.3) • Cain’s murder of his brother Abel and the descendants of Adam up to Noah (ch.4) • God’s judgment on mankind through the flood (ch.6-7) • The faith and obedience of Noah and his deliverance through the Ark (ch.6-10) • The tower of Babel and God confusing man through the different languages (ch.11) 2. The relationship of God’s chosen people with Him as LORD • God calling Abraham, and his faith in God’s promises to him (ch.12) • The covenant of circumcision (ch.17) • Abraham’s two sons, Ishmael and Isaac - the son of the flesh and the son of the promise (ch.16, 21) • Abraham’s obedience in preparing to sacrifice Isaac (ch.22) • Isaac and his twin sons, Esau and Jacob - the rejected son and the chosen son (ch.25) • Jacob’s escape to his relatives and the twelve sons born to him (ch.27-30) • Jacob’s all-night wrestling session with God when his name was changed to ISRAEL (ch.32) • Joseph’s special gifts and his sale into slavery by his jealous brothers (ch.37) • Joseph’s favour with the authorities in Egypt and his rise to becoming Prime Minister (ch.39) • The salvation of Egypt and the surrounding lands from famine through the wisdom and administration of Joseph (ch.41-45) • Jacob and his family move to Egypt (ch.46) • Jacob prophesies concerning each of the heads of the tribes of Israel (ch.49) • Jacob and Joseph die in Egypt (ch.50)

“In the beginning God created the heavens and the earth”

Genesis 1:1

The Bestseller Page 3

Bestseller1.p65

9

3/18/2010, 12:28 PM


Exodus OVERVIEW

KEY POINTS

Promised land or bust! Exodus is the story of God’s deliverance of His chosen people from oppression. It is rich in ‘types and figures’. These are physical events and things which demonstrate a future spiritual truth in Christ. So Egypt is a type of the world, and the deliverance of Israel from Egypt shows that Christ will deliver His church from the power of the world. Exodus is also the book of redemption. It shows how God will redeem His people from sin through the sacrifice of His only Son - the Lamb of God that takes away the sin of the world.

1. The Oppression • Israel’s harsh sufferings under the Egyptian rulers (ch.1) • The preparation of Moses to be the prophet to lead Israel (ch.2-6) 2. The Deliverance • The ten plagues on Egypt and the introduction of the Passover (ch.7-12) • Leaving Egypt through the Red Sea and the Egyptians’ drowning (ch.13-15) 3. The Trials • Manna from heaven and the water from the rock (ch.16-17) • Pastoral advice to Moses from his father-in-law, Jethro (ch.18) 4. The Law • Receiving the 10 commandments at Mount Sinai (ch.19-20) • The chief social and moral laws governing the people of God (ch.21-23) • Israel’s acceptance and the revelation of the Tabernacle of worship (ch.24-27) • The revelations of the priesthood and Aaron’s family chosen (ch.28-29) • Regulations for worship and the gifted builders of the Tabernacle (ch.30-31) • The sin of the Golden Calf and the judgment on the people (ch.32) • The Law and the covenant renewed as Moses is with God on Sinai (ch.33-34) 5. The Worship • The offerings for the Tabernacle and its construction (ch.35-39) • The Tabernacle set up and the Glory of the Lord filling it (ch.40)

SOUNDBITE

“The Lord is my strength and my song, and He has become my salvation”

The Bestseller Page 4

Bestseller1.p65

10

3/18/2010, 12:28 PM

Exodus 15:2


Leviticus OVERVIEW

KEY POINTS

Priestly ministry This deep book describes in detail the responsibilities of the priests of the tribe of Levi. It is in fact one of the most important books in the Bible. Many people skip over Leviticus when reading the Bible but the Holy Spirit gives great insight to its truths. It shows through types and figures the way of access to God. We must see how the things revealed in this book work out through free grace in our lives.

1. Access through sacrifice • The Burnt Offering (ch.1) • The Grain Offering (ch.2) • The Peace Offering (ch.3) • The Sin Offering (ch.4) • The Trespass Offering (ch.5) • The rules governing offerings (ch.6-7) 2. Access through priesthood • The priests anointed for ministry (ch.8-9) • Judgment on unholiness in priests (ch.10) 3. Access through purity • Clean and unclean foods (ch.11) • Post-natal purity (ch.12) • Dealing with leprosy (ch.13-14) • Bodily purity (ch.15) 4. Access through Atonement • The scapegoat - sin’s atonement and removal (ch.16) • The blood of atonement (ch.17) 5. Access through holiness • Sexual morality (ch.18) • Social morality (ch.19) • The penalty for unholiness (ch.20) • Holy standards for priests (ch.21-22) 6. Access through worship • Special feast days (ch.23) • Continuous worship (ch.24) 7. Access through consecration • The Sabbath year, the Jubilee year and justice for all (ch.25) • The blessing on obedience and punishment of disobedience (ch.26) • Vows and promises (ch.27)

SOUNDBITE

“I the Lord am holy, and have separated you from the people, that you should be Mine”

Leviticus 20:26

The Bestseller Page 5

Bestseller1.p65

11

3/18/2010, 12:28 PM


Numbers OVERVIEW

KEY POINTS

Lessons in the desert This book would appear to be dominated by the census in which the people of Israel were numbered. In fact most of it deals with very important incidents in the wilderness journeyings. And some of them are referred to in the New Testament revelation of Jesus and the apostles.

1. Numbering and arranging the people • The first census of Israel (ch.1) • Arranging Israel by armies (ch.2) • Duties of the Levites and priests (ch.3-4) • Restitution and unfaithfulness (ch.5) • The Nazirite (ch.6) • Tribal leaders make offerings for the Tabernacle (ch.7) • Dedication of the Levites (ch.8) • The second Passover (ch.9) • The silver trumpets (ch.10) 2. A complaining and unworthy people • Complainings begin (ch.11) • Aaron and Miriam oppose Moses (ch.12) • The spies sent into Canaan (ch.13) • The people refuse to enter Canaan and are judged (ch.14) 3. A rebellious people • Additional laws (ch.15) • Korah’s rebellion and Aaron’s rod that budded (ch.16-17) • Priestly duties (ch.18-19) • Moses sins in getting water from the rock (ch.20) 4. An aimless wandering people • The bronze serpent of healing (ch.21) • Balak and Balaam the prophets (ch.22-24) • Phinehas turns back God’s wrath (ch.25) • The second census (ch.26) • Laws of inheritance, offerings and vows (ch.27-30) • Victory and settling beyond the Jordan (ch.31-32) 5. Plans for a future people • A review of the wanderings (ch.33) • Future boundaries and special cities in Canaan (ch.34-35) • Female inheritance (ch.36)

SOUNDBITE

“The glory of the Lord appeared at the tent of meeting Numbers 14:10 to all the people of Israel”

The Bestseller Page 6

Bestseller1.p65

12

3/18/2010, 12:28 PM


Deuteronomy OVERVIEW

KEY POINTS

Obey and Live ‘Deuteronomy’ means ‘saying things twice.’ Much of the book repeats the wilderness events and the Law given through Moses. However, there is important interpretation of these events and a heart-felt reflection upon them. But most important is the way in which the book looks forward to living in the Promised Land. And especially the way in which God’s Law will be put into practice once they have entered the Land. It is basically written as a narrative - Moses exhorting the people to be true to the Lord.

1. Moses summarises the wanderings • Israel refuses to enter the Land (ch.1) • Wandering in the desert (ch.2) • Enemy kings defeated (ch.2-3) • Moses exhorts them to obedience (ch.4) 2. Moses repeats the Law • The Ten Commandments reviewed (ch.5) • The greatest commandment of all (ch.6) • A special people for the Lord (ch.7-8) • Israel’s rebellion and the new tablets of stone (ch.9-10) • The importance of love and obedience towards God (ch.11) • Holy worship (ch.12) • False prophets (ch.13) • Various laws (ch.14-17) • The great Prophet to come (ch.18) • Various laws (ch.17-26) 3. Moses prepares the people for Canaan • The Laws to be written on stones (ch.27) • The curses of Mount Ebal (ch.27) • The blessings on obedience (ch.28) • The curses on disobedience (ch.28) • Renewing the Covenant (ch.29) • Choosing life or death (ch.30) • Joshua to lead Israel (ch.31) • The Song of Moses (ch.32) • Moses blesses Israel (ch.33) • Moses dies overlooking the Land (ch.34)

SOUNDBITE

“Serve the Lord your God with all your heart and with all your soul”

Deuteronomy 10:12

The Bestseller Page 7

Bestseller1.p65

13

3/18/2010, 12:28 PM


Joshua OVERVIEW

KEY POINTS

Leading in conquest Joshua had been close to Moses throughout the wilderness wanderings. He was one of the two spies out of the twelve who recommended that the Land of Canaan be entered immediately. The book describes how they conquered the land under Joshua’s leadership and then divided it up between the twelve tribes. This book teaches us many principles of spiritual battle. The greatest significance is of Jesus leading His Church into victory (Joshua is the Hebrew word for Jesus). The Promised Land represents the Kingdom of God. The book shows that in Christ we can conquer every opposition. It also strongly shows us that we must be a pure-hearted people who are true to the covenant to take the full victory.

SOUNDBITE

1. Crossing the Jordan • Joshua commissioned by the Lord (ch.1) • The spies and Rahab (ch.2) • Crossing the Jordan (ch.3) • The twelve memorial stones (ch.4) • The great circumcision (ch.5) 2. Conquering the Land • Jericho defeated (ch.6) • The sin of Achan (ch.7) • Ai defeated (ch.8) • Tricked by the Gibeonites (ch.9) • The sun stands still for a day (ch.10) • Conquering South and North (ch.10-12) 3. Carving up the territory • Land divided by lot (ch.13-19) • The cities of refuge (ch.20) • The cities of the Levites (ch.21) • The tribes beyond the Jordan return home after the conquest (ch.22) 4. Covenant with the people • Joshua exhorts the people (ch.23) • The covenant at Shechem (ch.24) • Joshua dies (ch.24)

“Be strong and of good courage!”

Joshua 1:6

The Bestseller Page 8

Bestseller1.p65

14

3/18/2010, 12:28 PM


Judges OVERVIEW

KEY POINTS

Rulers who saved Israel The history covered by the book of Judges runs from the death of Joshua until the time of Eli and Samuel. It contains accounts of the deeds of thirteen judges who delivered Israel. They were raised up by God during the times when the twelve tribes were disorganised. At the end of this period, Israel was more joined together and able to be ruled by a single king for the first time. It is significant to see how God anointed different men and women to deliver Israel from their enemies. The mark of the judges was not their personal holiness or balanced character, but the way God was able to take hold of them and use them.

1. Summary of the conquests • Successes and failures (ch.1) • Joshua’s death and Israel’s failure (ch.2) 2. The rule of the Judges • Othniel Caleb’s son-in-law (ch.3) • Ehud the left-handed man (ch.3) • Shamgar and the ox goad (ch.3) • Deborah the prophetess (ch.4) • Barak the general (ch.4) • The song of victory (ch.5) • Gideon the mighty man of valour (ch.6-8) • Gideon’s army of three hundred (ch.7) • Gideon’s revenge (ch.8) • Gideon’s son Abimelech (ch.9) • Tola of Shamir (ch.10) • Jair and his thirty sons (ch.10) • Jephthah the bandit (ch.11-12) • Ibzan of Bethlehem (ch.12) • Elon the Zebulunite (ch.12) • Abdon of Pirathon (ch.12) • Samson the Nazirite (ch.13-16) • Samson’s birth (ch.13) • Samson’s wife (ch.14) • Samson defeats the Philistines (ch.15) • Samson and Delilah (ch.16) 3. Israel without a leader • Micah’s carved image (ch.17) • The children of Dan set up the carved image (ch.18) • The Levite and his concubine (ch.19) • Civil war with Benjamin (ch.20) • The men of Benjamin obtain wives (ch.21)

SOUNDBITE

“I have opened my mouth to the Lord, and cannot take back my vow”

Judges 11:35

The Bestseller Page 9

Bestseller1.p65

15

3/18/2010, 12:28 PM


Ruth OVERVIEW

KEY POINTS

Loyalty The story of Ruth is the account of how God developed the line of descent of Jesus the Messiah. Ruth was a woman of Moab whom God providentially drew into the people of Israel. She displayed an uncommon devotion to her mother-in-law, Naomi, and was rewarded by becoming the great grandmother of King David. In the story, Naomi’s husband took his family to Moab to avoid the famine in Israel. His sons married two Moabite women but then the husband and both sons died. Naomi decided to return to her home country and suggested that her daughters-in-law stayed in Moab. It was here that Ruth demonstrated her deep loyalty and love.

SOUNDBITE

1. Ruth’s devotion • Ruth refuses to leave Naomi (ch.1) • Naomi returns to Israel with Ruth (ch.1) 2. Ruth’s providential opportunity • Ruth finds that she is gleaning in a field belonging to Boaz (ch.2) • Naomi’s relative Boaz meets Ruth (ch.2) • Ruth’s diligence is rewarded (ch.2) 3. Ruth’s obedience • Naomi suggests how Ruth may talk privately to Boaz (ch.3) • Ruth uncovers his feet to wake him up (ch.3) • Ruth requests him to consider marrying her - “cover me!” (ch.3) • Boaz determines to be upright and give first choice to a closer relative (ch.3) 4. Ruth’s marriage • The relative declines to redeem the inheritance and marry Ruth (ch.4) • Ruth lives in Bethlehem with Boaz and bears a son (ch.4)

“Your people shall be my people, and your God my God”

Ruth 1:16

The Bestseller Page 10

Bestseller1.p65

16

3/18/2010, 12:28 PM


1 Samuel OVERVIEW

KEY POINTS

Kingmaker Samuel was the last of the judges who ruled Israel. He was also the first of the prophets who helped the kings to rule. Under the rule of the judges, God’s authority was exercised by men and women inspired by the Spirit - this we call theocracy.When the people cried out for a king to rule over them, God was displeased but gave them their desire. So Israel became ruled by a monarchy and men who did not know the Spirit or heart of God were able to rule and this displeased God.

1. Samuel becomes a prophet • Samuel’s birth and dedication (ch.1) • Samuel helps Eli the priest (ch.2) • God speaks to Samuel (ch.3) • The Philistines and the Ark (ch.4-6) • Samuel the judge of Israel (ch.7-8) 2. Samuel anoints Saul as king • Saul is chosen as king (ch.9) • Saul’s choice as king is proven (ch.10-11) • Samuel ceases to judge Israel (ch.12) • Saul becomes irresponsible (ch.13-14) • Saul is rejected as king (ch.15) 3. Samuel anoints David to be king • David is chosen, not his brothers (ch.16) • David defeats Goliath (ch.17) • Saul becomes jealous of David (ch.18) • Saul persecutes David (ch.19) • David and Jonathan (ch.20) • David flees from Saul (ch.21) • David’s four hundred men (ch.22) • David in the wilderness (ch.23) • David refuses to kill Saul (ch.24) 4. Samuel dies and Saul is dishonoured • David and Nabal’s wife (ch.25) • David spares Saul again (ch.26) • David settles with the Philistines (ch.27) • Saul consults a medium (ch.28) • David is saved from fighting Israel (ch.29) • David’s troubles in Ziklag (ch.30) • Saul and his sons die in battle (ch.31)

SOUNDBITE

“There is none holy like the Lord, there is no rock like our God”

1 Samuel 2:2

The Bestseller Page 11

Bestseller1.p65

17

3/18/2010, 12:28 PM


2 Samuel OVERVIEW

KEY POINTS

David the King This book describes how David ascends to the throne during a time of social instability. It portrays David as a very successful king and leader but as one who has obvious human weaknesses. David’s reign as king is viewed as the greatest time in the history of Israel. He was very diligent in bringing to Israel the need to worship and serve the Lord. He was a first class military leader and won stability for his kingdom through his conquests. But his weakness as a man sowed the seeds which led to the kingdom eventually dividing into two.

1. David as king of Judah • David’s lament (ch.1) • David anointed as King of Judah (ch.2) • General Joab murders his rival (ch.3) • Saul’s son is murdered (ch.4) 2. David as king of Israel and Judah • David anointed as King over Israel (ch.5) • The Ark brought to Jerusalem (ch.6) • The covenant of Messiah (ch.7) • David’s empire and administration (ch.8) • David and Mephibosheth (ch.9) • The Ammonites insult Israel (ch.10) • David’s sin against Uriah (ch.11) • Nathan rebukes David for his sin (ch.12) • Troubles in David’s family begin (ch.13-14) 3. David as king in exile • Absalom’s treason against David (ch.15) • Ahithophel’s advice to Absalom (ch.16) • Hushai betters Ahithophel (ch.17) • Absalom is killed in battle (ch.18) 4. David as king in Jerusalem • David reconciles his people (ch.19) • Sheba’s rebellion is quelled (ch.20) • David lifts a curse (ch.21) • David’s psalm of deliverance (ch.22) • David’s mighty men (ch.23) • David’s sinful census (ch.24)

SOUNDBITE

“David danced before the Lord with all his might”

2 Samuel 6:14

The Bestseller Page 12

Bestseller1.p65

18

3/18/2010, 12:28 PM


1 Kings OVERVIEW

KEY POINTS

The kingdom divides After the death of King David, Solomon’s reign enabled the kingdom to become great. He built the first Temple and dedicated it to the worship of God. After his death the kingdom was divided. Kings ruled over Judah in Jerusalem and over Israel in Samaria.

1. The reign of Solomon • Solomon establishes himself (ch.1-4) • Solomon builds the Temple (ch.5-7) • The Temple is dedicated (ch.8-9) • The Queen of Sheba visits (ch.10) • Solomon backslides (ch.11) 2. The kingdoms of Judah and Israel • Rehoboam king of Judah (ch.12) • Jereboam’s sinful rule in Israel (ch.12-14) • Abijam and Asa of Judah(ch.15) • Nadab, Baasha Elah, Zimri, Omri and Ahab of Israel (ch.15-16) 3. Elijah the prophet • Elijah’s victory (ch.17-18) • God prepares Elijah (ch.19) • Ahab’s foolishness in victory (ch.20) • Naboth is murdered by Jezebel (ch.21) • Ahab dies, Ahaziah rules (ch.22) • Jehoshaphat of Judah (ch.22)

SOUNDBITE

“The glory of the Lord filled the house of the Lord”

1 Kings 8:11

The Bestseller Page 13

Bestseller1.p65

19

3/18/2010, 12:28 PM


2 Kings OVERVIEW

KEY POINTS

The kingdoms collapse The sorry story continues of ungodly kings, sleaze and corruption in high places. There is a clear message in this book. God still controls human affairs. When the leaders of God’s people honour Him and keep His commands, they prosper and know His hand at work. But if they rebel, He judges them; and if they will not repent, disaster strikes.

1. Elisha the prophet • God judges Ahaziah (ch.1) • Elijah ascends to heaven (ch.2) • Jehoram of Israel (ch.3) • Elisha’s miracles (ch.4-7) • Jehoram and Ahaziah of Judah (ch.8) • Jehu of Israel (ch.9-10) • Athaliah and Joash of Judah (ch.11-12) • Jehoahaz and Jehoash of Israel (ch.13) 2. Israel is captured by Assyria • Amaziah of Judah; Jereboam II (ch.14) • Azariah (Uzziah) of Judah (ch.15) • Zechariah, Shallum, Menahem, Pekahiah, and Pekah of Israel (ch.15) • Jotham and Ahaz of Judah (ch.15-16) • Assyria defeats Hoshea of Israel (ch.17) 3. Judah is captured by Babylon • King Hezekiah and Isaiah (ch.18-20) • Manasseh and Amon (ch.21) • Josiah and Temple worship (ch.22-23) • Jehoahaz, Jehoiakim, Jehoiachin, Zedekiah and the exile to Babylon (ch.24-25)

SOUNDBITE

“O Lord, I pray thee, open this man’s eyes that he may see!”

The Bestseller Page 14

Bestseller1.p65

20

3/18/2010, 12:28 PM

2 Kings 6:17


1 Chronicles OVERVIEW

KEY POINTS

David the spiritual king

1. Genealogies of Israel • Adam’s family to Saul’s family (ch.1-9) • The end of King Saul (ch.10)

Chronicles was originally one book. In it, the writer emphasises God at work in the sad history of His chosen people. The coming of the Messiah is seen in Chronicles. The books emphasise how God blessed those kings of Judah who were faithful to tahe covenant. The kings of Israel are not mentioned because the ten tribes of Israel were viewed as moving out of the will of God.

2. The reign of David • King David and his army (ch.11-12) • Uzzah dies touching the ark (ch.13) • David defeats the Philistines (ch.14) • The ark brought to Jerusalem (ch.15-16) • David desires to build a Temple (ch.17) • David’s further conquests (ch.18-20) • David’s sinful census (ch.21) • David prepares for the Temple (ch.22-27) • David instructs Solomon (ch.28-29)

SOUNDBITE

“Seek the Lord and His strength. Seek His presence continually!”

1 Chronicles 16:11

The Bestseller Page 15

Bestseller1.p65

21

3/18/2010, 12:28 PM


2 Chronicles OVERVIEW

KEY POINTS

Kings of Judah We are presented with a sequence of very human kings, some doing their best for God, others turning their back on Him. Through it all we see how important to God is His chosen people on earth. However far they stray, He remembers they are the spiritual heritage of David, and preserves them. That is why the book does not end with the bitter shame of exile, but with the permission to return and rebuild.

SOUNDBITE

1. The reign of Solomon • Solomon’s wisdom (ch.1) • Solomon builds the Temple (ch.2-4) • The Temple is commissioned (ch.5-7) • Solomon’s successful reign (ch.8-9) 2. The Kingdom of Judah • Rehoboam and the revolt(ch.10-12) • Abijah wars with Jereboam (ch.13) • Asa’s reforms (ch.14-16) • Jehoshaphat finds blessings (ch.17-20) • Jehoram is judged (ch.21) • The evils of Ahaziah and Athaliah (ch.22) • Joash succeeds and fails (ch.23-24) • Amaziah defeated by Israel (ch.25) • Uzziah’s success and pride (ch.26) • Jotham the builder (ch.27) • Ahaz backslides (ch.28) • Hezekiah restores worship (ch.29-32) • Manasseh repents, Amon sins (ch.33) • Josiah and the Book of the Law (ch.34-35) • Jehoahaz, Jehoiakim, Jehoiachin, Zedekiah and the fall of Jerusalem (ch.36)

“The Lord is good; His steadfast love endures for ever”

2 Chronicles 5:13

The Bestseller Page 16

Bestseller1.p65

22

3/18/2010, 12:28 PM


Ezra OVERVIEW

KEY POINTS

Building prophetically The book of Ezra describes how God’s prophetic word through Jeremiah was restored. He prophesied that the captivity would last 70 years. As this period of time approached its end, the empire of Babylon was overthrown by Cyrus King of Persia. Cyrus was inspired by the Lord to have the Temple in Jerusalem rebuilt. He allowed any of the exiles who wished to return to Jerusalem. The work of rebuilding the Temple stopped through opposition. But under the revival prophesying of Haggai and Zechariah the work restarted and was completed. After a gap of 60 years, King Artaxerxes sent Ezra the priest to teach the people and enforce the Law. Throughout this book there are helpful lessons to learn for restoring the heart of the Church.

SOUNDBITE

1. Return of the exiles • Cyrus invites the exiles to rebuild the Temple at Jerusalem (ch.1) • Census of those who returned (ch.2) 2. The Temple rebuilding begins • Worship in Jerusalem is restored (ch.3) • The Temple rebuilding stops through opposition (ch.4) 3. The Temple rebuilding is completed • The prophets encourage the building work to restart (ch.5) • The completed Temple is dedicated (ch.6) 4. The mission of Ezra • Ezra arrives in Jerusalem (ch.7) • The journey which they made (ch.8) • Ezra deals with mixed marriages (ch.9-10)

“All the people shouted with a great shout because the foundation of the house of the Lord was laid”

Ezra 3:11

The Bestseller Page 17

Bestseller1.p65

23

3/18/2010, 12:28 PM


Nehemiah OVERVIEW

KEY POINTS

Building administratively About 12 years after Ezra had returned to Jerusalem to teach the Law, Nehemiah arrived there. He had asked the King of Persia to let him organise the rebuilding of the walls of Jerusalem. Nehemiah was a wise administrator and motivator. He enabled the walls to be rebuilt despite hostile opposition. He also motivated a spirit of unity amongst the exiles. At a great revival meeting he had Ezra read out the Law to the people. There was a real repentance and a remaking of the covenant. Where Ezra majors on restoring the temple, Nehemiah concentrates on the city walls, which speak to us of the need to renew the whole of Zion, and to keep her identity strong

SOUNDBITE

1. Nehemiah as governor of Jerusalem • Nehemiah grieves over his people (ch.1) • The King sends Nehemiah to Jerusalem to organise the building work (ch.2) 2. Rebuilding the wall of Jerusalem • Rebuilding the wall of Jerusalem (ch.3) • Building and defending the wall (ch.4) • Nehemiah deals with oppression (ch.5) • The wall is completed (ch.6) 3. The people make covenant • Census of the captives who returned to Jerusalem (ch.7) • Ezra reads the Law (ch.8) • The people repent (ch.9) • The covenant is sealed (ch.10) 4. Nehemiah’s reforms • Where the people lived (ch.11) • The wall is dedicated (ch.12) • Nehemiah purifies the people (ch.12)

“This day is holy to the Lord your God; do not mourn or weep”

The Bestseller Page 18

Bestseller1.p65

24

3/18/2010, 12:28 PM

Nehemiah 8:9


Esther OVERVIEW

KEY POINTS 1. Esther becomes Queen • Queen Vashti loses her throne (ch.1) • Esther wins the beauty contest (ch.2)

Overcoming through risk The story of this book takes place in the time when the Jews were scattered throughout Persia. The Prime Minister planned to destroy all the Jews throughout the empire on a single day. But unknown to him Queen Esther was a Jewess. She took a great personal risk and showed the king what an evil man his Prime Minister was. Esther’s cousin Mordecai became Prime Minister in his place and enabled the Jews to prevent the planned massacre. Although God is not mentioned once in the book it is clear that His providential power is evident in all that happens.

SOUNDBITE

2. Haman plots to kill the Jews • Haman plans genocide (ch.3) • Mordecai asks Esther to help (ch.4) 3. Esther upstages Haman • Esther risks death to trap Haman (ch.5) • Haman is humbled by the king (ch.6) • Haman is executed (ch.7) 4. Mordecai becomes Prime Minister • Esther risks death again to ask the king for his help (ch.8) • The Jews destroy their enemies (ch.9) • Mordecai’s achievements (ch.10)

“The Jews had light and gladness and joy and honour”

Esther 8:16

The Bestseller Page 19

Bestseller1.p65

25

3/18/2010, 12:28 PM


Job OVERVIEW

KEY POINTS

Finding faith in suffering The main theme of this book is the power of faith in God. Much of what is in the book is about the difficulties of suffering. But this is because human suffering is probably the greatest challenge to faith. The book concludes with Job realising that faith gives him inward answers to his problems even though he cannot give reasons for his sufferings. The pattern of the book is based on conversations between Job and his friends. At first, three friends try to make out that he is being punished by his sufferings. Job rejects this. Then a younger friend says that God is disciplining him in love to prevent him from sinning any more. Job also rejects this. Finally, God demonstrates His divine wisdom and power to Job. In this Job sees that his faith in God is greater than all his problems and that God must have answers even though Job is not able to understand them.

SOUNDBITE

1. Everything goes wrong for Job • Job’s property and family are lost (ch.1) • Satan attacks Job’s health (ch.2) • Job regrets the day of his birth (ch.3) 2. Job’s three friends speak to him • Eliphaz: Job is punished for sin (ch.5-6) • Job: I suffer for no reason (ch.6-7) • Bildad: Job ought to repent (ch.8) • Job: Why are there no answers? (ch.9-10) • Zophar: Job must repent (ch.11) • Job: I am despondent (ch.12-14) • Eliphaz: Job is foolish (ch.15) • Job: You are heartless friends (ch.16-17) • Bildad: The wicked are punished (ch.18) • Job: My Redeemer lives (ch.19) • Zophar: The nature of the wicked (ch.20) • Job: The real state of the wicked (ch.21) • Eliphaz: Job is wicked (ch.22) • Job: God judges righteously (ch.23-24) • Bildad: No man is righteous (ch.25) • Job: His final defence of himself (ch.26-31) 3. Elihu contradicts them all • Elihu: They are all wrong (ch.32-33) • Elihu: God is just and good (ch.34-37) 4. God reveals His omnipotence • The Lord speaks to Job (ch.38-40) • Job responds and is challenged (ch.40-41) • Job repents and is blessed (ch.42)

“The Spirit of God has made me, and the breath of the Almighty gives me life”

The Bestseller Page 20

Bestseller1.p65

26

3/18/2010, 12:28 PM

Job 33:4


Psalms OVERVIEW

KEY POINTS

Expressing the soul to God The Psalms are the songs and hymns of the OldTestament.They are poetry without rhyme. Some no doubt were composed spontaneously. David wrote 73, Asaph 12, the Sons of Korah 11, Solomon 2, and Moses and Ethan 1 each. The authors of the other 50 are not mentioned making 150 in total. Although Psalms is divided into five books, the reason is obscure.

Many of the Psalms have themes in common and these categories are inspiring: • Psalms of the righteous (1, 15, 101, 112 and 133) • The royal psalms (2, 21, 45, 72, 110 and 132) • Psalms of repentance (32, 38, 51, 130 and 143) • Psalms of vindication (35, 55, 58, 69, 101 and 137) • Historical psalms (78, 81, 105 and 106) • Psalms of revelation (19 and 119) The Messianic psalms Many psalms are Messianic applying directly to Christ even when the psalmist writes about himself. This is where David’s ministry as a prophet and psalmist mingled together. The Messianic psalms are Psalms 2, 8, 16, 22, 40, 41, 45, 68, 69, 89, 102, 109, 110 and 118 • • • • •

SOUNDBITE

Some predict (Psalms 2, 45 and 110) Show His sufferings (Psalm 22) Speak of His sacrifice (Psalm 40) Declare His resurrection (Psalm 16) Show how He fulfils the covenant which God made with David (Psalm 89)

“O Lord, our Lord, how majestic is Thy name in all the earth”

Psalm 8:1

The Bestseller Page 21

Bestseller1.p65

27

3/18/2010, 12:28 PM


Proverbs OVERVIEW

KEY POINTS

God’s wisdom in life The style of this book was a common one in ancient times - wise sayings about important things in life. But Proverbs is God-centered and encourages holiness. Other wisdom encouraged morality and the way to get the best out of life. But Proverbs is based on the principle: the fear of the Lord is the beginning of wisdom! There are a number of contributors to the book, the most important of whom was Solomon the King. He received a gift of wisdom from God and its power is seen in this book. Jesus was fond of quoting from Proverbs and in some ways His parables are similar in style to the teaching of Proverbs. There are eight sections to the book:

SOUNDBITE

1. The fear of the Lord • Introduction to Proverbs (ch.1) 2. Twenty lessons on wisdom • Avoid evil company (ch.1:8-19) • Wisdom is refused (ch.1:20-33) • The reward of wisdom (ch.2:1-22) • Wisdom for youth (ch.3:1-12) • Wisdom is better than riches (ch.3:13-18) • Grace through wisdom (ch.3:19-26) • Love your neighbour (ch.3:27-35) • Wisdom - a friend for life (ch.4:1-13) • The two paths (ch.4:14-19) • Wisdom in the will (ch.4:20-27) • The ruin of adultery (ch.5:1-14) • Be faithful in marriage (ch.5:15-23) • The danger of securities (ch.6:1-5) • The folly of laziness (ch.6:6-11) • The fruits of wickedness (ch.6:12-19) • Immorality destroys (ch.6:20-7:5) • The crafty seductress (ch.7:6-27) • Wisdom is from God (ch.8:1-36) • The wise become wiser (ch.9:1-12) • The fool is ensnared (ch.9:13-18) 3. The wise sayings of Solomon • Various maxims (ch.10:1-22:16) 4. Sayings of the wise men • Various maxims (ch.22:17-24:34) 5. More of Solomon’s wisdom • Various maxims (ch.25-29) 6. The wisdom of Agur • Various maxims (ch.30) 7. Wisdom to King Lemuel • Wisdom to kings (ch.31:1-9) 8. In praise of a good wife • An anonymous acrostic poem (ch.31:10-31)

“The name of the Lord is a strong tower; the righteous man runs into it and is safe”

The Bestseller Page 22

Bestseller1.p65

28

3/18/2010, 12:28 PM

Proverbs 18:10


Ecclesiastes & Song of Solomon OVERVIEW

KEY POINTS

ECCLESIASTES

The true meaning of life The theme of this book is that worldliness is empty - all is vanity. Life carries no meaning when lived for self. Only faith gives meaning to our lives and makes us different from other humans and indeed animals! We must live our lives for God - fear God and keep His commandments - for one day we shall stand before Him in the Judgment.

SOUNDBITE

“Remember your creator in the days of your youth”

OVERVIEW

Ecclesiastes 12:1

KEY POINTS

SONG OF SOLOMON

Loving Christ This is basically a poem about human love, at times vey physical. But revealed in it is the beauty of loving Jesus, the King of kings above everything else. And especially it is an expression of celibate love - He is altogether lovely! The form of the book is one of poetic conversations between the King (the Beloved) and the Shulamite who was a country maiden. Others also speak but they can only easily be identified by looking at the Hebrew grammar. These others are - the daughters of Jerusalem, the Shulamite’s brothers, the Beloved and His friends, and a relative of the Shulamite.

SOUNDBITE

EC ECCC LE LESS IASTE IASTESS • The vanity of life (ch.1) • The vanity of pleasure (ch.2) • A time for everything (ch.3) • The vanity of selfish work (ch.4) • The vanity of honour (ch.5-6) • The value of wisdom (ch.7) • Affliction and death come to both the good and the bad (ch.8-9) • The fool will fail (ch.9-11) • Seek God in your youth (ch.12)

SO NG O O LO M O N SON OFF SSO • The banquet of love (ch.1-2) • The Beloved’s request (ch.2) • The Shulamite’s dream (ch.3) • The Beloved’s procession (ch.3) • The Beloved’s praise (ch.4) • A second dream (ch.5) • The Shulamite’s beauty (ch.6-7) • Unquenchable love (ch.8)

“Tell me, you whom my soul loves, where you pasture your flock”

Song of Solomon 1:7

The Bestseller Page 23

Bestseller1.p65

29

3/18/2010, 12:28 PM


Isaiah OVERVIEW

KEY POINTS

Zion shall be glorious Isaiah prophesied for about 40 years. He spoke of the future captivity of the people of Judah at Babylon. But he also prophesied of the future glory of Zion. He had a wide ranging ministry to the kings of his day, to the nations of his day and to the future revelation of Jesus as Messiah in New Testament times. The heart of the man is often revealed as he agonises over what God shows him.

1. Rebuke and promise • The rebellion of Judah (ch.1) • The future house of God (ch.2-4) • The vineyard with wild grapes (ch.5) • Isaiah called as a prophet (ch.6) 2. The coming of Emmanuel • Isaiah speaks to king Ahaz (ch.7) • Assyria will invade (ch.8) • The government of the Son (ch.9-10) • The reign of Jesse’s root (ch.11-12) 3. Judgment on the nations • Babylon and Philistia (ch.13-14) • Moab (ch.1516) • Syria and Israel (ch.17) • Ethiopia (ch.18) • Egypt (ch.19-20) • Babylon, Edom and Arabia (ch.21) • Jerusalem (ch.22) • Tyre (ch.23) 4. General judgment and salvation • Judgment on the earth (ch.24) • Praise for salvation (ch.25-26) • Israel restored (ch.27) • Judgment on scoffers (ch.28-29) • Do not trust in man (ch.30-31) • The reign of righteousness (ch.32-33) • Vengeance and glory (ch.34-35) 5. Prophecies to Hezekiah • Deliverance for Judah (ch.36-39) 6. The God of comfort • Peace to Zion (ch.40-41) • The suffering servant (ch.42-44) • Cyrus used by God (ch.45-48) 7. Messiah’s triumph • Light to the Gentiles (ch.49-52) • Man of sorrows (ch.53) • Blessings to God’s people (ch.54-56) • Backsliding healed (ch.57) 8. The future Kingdom • Finding a true heart (ch.58-59) • Zion prospers (ch.60-62) • God’s mercy on penitence (ch.63-64) • Spiritual Israel restored (ch.65-66)

SOUNDBITE

“Arise, shine, for your light has come!”

Isaiah 60:1

The Bestseller Page 24

Bestseller1.p65

30

3/18/2010, 12:28 PM


Jeremiah & Lamentations OVERVIEW

KEY POINTS

JEREMIAH

Anguish of the watchman Jeremiah prophesied for 40 years in the time leading up to the captivity of Judah in Babylon. He spoke of Judah’s unfaithfulness to God. He had influence in the royal courts and tried to prevent the people being destroyed. He was called to suffer for his ministry. He also prophesied God’s word to the nations.

OVERVIEW LAMENTATIONS

Grief over judgment Jeremiah opens his heart to mourn over God’s judgment on His people. This little book is a moving demonstration of the heart of a prophet - not lecturing but longing; desiring God’s glory in Zion:

J E R E M IA H IAH 1. Judah’s sin • Jeremiah called to be a prophet (ch.1) • Judah’s adultery (ch.2-4) • Imminent Northern invasion (ch.5-6) • Perpetual backsliding (ch.7-10) • Judah’s broken covenant (ch.11-13) 2. Judah will be judged • Unrelenting judgment (ch.14-16) • Jeremiah is celibate (ch.16-17) • The potter and the flask (ch.1819) • Words to the rulers (ch.20-22) • Seventy years captivity (ch.23-25) 3. A restored people of God • Jeremiah risks his life (ch.26) • Dealing with the false prophets (ch.27-28) • Letter to the captives (ch.29) • A restored nation (ch.30-31) • Assurance of restoration (ch.32-33) 4. God’s watchman • Releasing Hebrew slaves (ch.34) • The Rechabites obey (ch.35) • The scroll and imprisonment (ch.3638) • Jerusalem falls (ch.39) • Gedaliah the governor (ch.40-41) • No escape in Egypt (ch.42-45) 5. Prophet to the nations • Judgment on the nations of Egypt, Philistia and Moab (ch.46-48) • Judgment on Ammon, Edom, Damascus, Kedar and Hazor (ch.49) • Judgment on Babylon (ch.50-51) • Exiled to Babylon (ch.52)

KEY POINTS L A M E NT ATI ONS NTA TIO • The afflictions of Jerusalem (ch.1) • God’s anger on Jerusalem (ch.2) • Anguish and hope (ch.3) • Zion is devoured (ch.4) • A prayer for restoration (ch.5)

SOUNDBITE

“Return, faithless Israel, says the Lord, for I am merciful”

SOUNDBITE

“The holy stones lie scattered at the head of every street”

Jeremiah 3:11

Lamentations 4:1

The Bestseller Page 25

Bestseller1.p65

31

3/18/2010, 12:28 PM


Ezekiel OVERVIEW

KEY POINTS

Rebellion and restoration Ezekiel was one of the exiles in Babylon when he began to prophesy. He spoke to his fellow-captives and to those still remaining in Judah. He prophesied the destruction of the city of Jerusalem and spoke of the restoration of God’s people to come. His prophecies are characterised by his unusual prophetic demonstrations and mysterious visions.

SOUNDBITE

1. Rebellious Israel • The four living creatures (ch.1) • Ezekiel is a watchman (ch.2-3) • The siege of Jerusalem (ch.4) • Judgment for rebellion (ch.5) • Judgment on idolatry (ch.6) • Imminent disaster (ch.7) • Temple abominations (ch.8) • Slaughter in the city (ch.9) • The glory departs (ch.10) • False rulers (ch.11) • Demonstrating the captivity (ch.12) • False prophets (ch.13) • Idols in the heart (ch.14) • Parables of doom (ch.15-19) • The abominations of Israel (ch.20) • Symbols of doom (ch.21-23) • Ezekiel’s wife dies (ch.24) 2. Judgment on the nations • Against Ammon, Moab, Edom and Philistia (ch.25) • Against Tyre (ch.26-28) • Against Egypt (ch.29-32) 3. God’s Kingdom will flourish • The watchman speaks (ch.33) • Selfish shepherds of Israel (ch.34) • Judgment on Mount Seir (ch.35) • Israel will be renewed (ch.36) • Dry bones become an army (ch.37) • Israel’s enemies destroyed (ch.38-39) • Vision of the Temple (ch.40-42) • God’s glory enters the Temple (ch.43) • Worship in the Temple (ch.44-46) • The river of Life (ch.47) • Dividing the restored land (ch.48)

“O dry bones, hear the word of the Lord!”

The Bestseller Page 26

Bestseller1.p65

32

3/18/2010, 12:28 PM

Ezekiel 37:4


Daniel & Hosea OVERVIEW

KEY POINTS

DANIEL

God’s power in history Daniel was one of the captives in Babylon. His book tells of the exploits of faith of himself and other captives who are true to their faith in God. It tells of God’s authority over kings and rulers. Finally, there are visions of the five future kingdoms in world history - the Babylonian Empire, the Persian Empire, the Greek Empire of Alexander the Great, the Roman Empire, and greatest of all the Kingdom of God under the rulership of Christ the King of kings.

SOUNDBITE

2. Visions of future kingdoms • The four beasts (ch.7) • The ram and the goat (ch.8) • Prophecy of seventy weeks (ch.9) • The glorious Man (ch.10) • The warring kings (ch.11) • Prophecy of the end (ch.12)

“Daniel resolved that he would not defile himself”

OVERVIEW

Daniel 1:8

KEY POINTS

HOSEA

Unfaithfulness and God’s love Hosea writes as a prophet with an enormous heart. The Lord tells him to marry a prostitute who proves unfaithful to him. He forgives her and takes her back. The message of his personal generosity shows the grace which God extends to those who repent. He exhorts Israel to return to a loving God and be healed.

SOUNDBITE

DA N I E L 1. Captives in Babylon • Young men obey God (ch.1) • Nebuchadnezzar’s dream (ch.2) • The fiery furnace (ch.3) • Nebuchadnezzar is humbled (ch.4) • Writing on the wall (ch.5) • Daniel saved from the lions (ch.6)

H O S EA 1. Hosea’s marriage • Hosea’s family (ch.1) • Israel is unfaithful to God (ch.2) • Hosea forgives his wayward wife (ch.3) 2. The challenge to Israel • Idolatrous Israel (ch.4) • Judgment on Israel and Judah (ch.5) • The need to repent (ch.6-7) • Israel’s backsliding (ch.8) • Judgment on sin (ch.9) • Captivity will follow sin (ch.10) • God’s loves Israel (ch.11) • Judah’s sin (ch.12) • Judgment without mercy (ch.13) • Israel finally restored (ch.14)

“Come, let us return to the Lord”

Hosea 6:1

The Bestseller Page 27

Bestseller1.p65

33

3/18/2010, 12:28 PM


Joel & Amos OVERVIEW

KEY POINTS

JOEL

The Day of the Lord Following a locust invasion of Judah, Joel prophesied of the meaning of this for God’s people. There will be a Day of the Lord when His judgment will prevail over sin. The people seemed to repent and the promise of the Holy Spirit is given. But the Day of Judgment is also for the whole earth and of this Joel speaks too:

SOUNDBITE

JOE L • The ravages of the locusts (ch.1:1-12) • The land in mourning (ch.1:13-20) • The Day of the Lord (ch.2:1-11) • Repentance and refreshment (ch.2:12-27) • The Spirit is poured out (ch.2:28-32) • God judges the nations (ch.3:1-17) • God blesses Zion (ch.3:18-21)

“Your sons and daughters shall prophesy”

OVERVIEW

Joel 2:28

KEY POINTS

AMOS

A cry for justice Amos was a farmer whom the Lord called as a prophet to Israel. He never forgot his humble origins but still spoke with great authority. He challenged respectable religion and showed how unjust Israel was. Without repentance there would be judgment. Only with real repentance could “David’s Kingdom” be established.

AMOS 1. Judgment on the nations • God judges from Zion (ch.1) • Judgment on Judah and Israel (ch.2) 2. Judgment on Israel • The prophet’s authority (ch.3-4) • Israel would not be corrected (ch.4:6-13) • Call to repentance (ch.5:1-15) • The Day of the Lord (ch.5:16-27) • Zion is warned (ch.6) • Visions of judgment (ch.7:1-9) • Amos is opposed (ch.7:10-17) • The vision of summer fruit (ch.8) • The destruction of Israel (ch.9:1-10) 3. The tabernacle of David • Israel will be restored (ch.9:11-15)

SOUNDBITE

“They shall rebuild the ruined cities and inhabit them”

Amos 9:14

The Bestseller Page 28

Bestseller1.p65

34

3/18/2010, 12:28 PM


Obadiah & Jonah OVERVIEW

KEY POINTS

OBADIAH

O BA D IA H IAH • Judgment is coming to Edom (vv.1-9) • Edom was violent to Israel (vv.10-16) • Deliverance to Mount Zion (vv.17-21)

Judgment on the oppressor This prophecy uses the conflict between Edom and Israel to show the purposes of God. Edom was the kingdom which came from Esau the brother of Jacob (Israel). Edom helped in the destruction of Israel and they themselves would be judged by the God of retribution. Finally, Israel will triumph.

SOUNDBITE

“The kingdom shall be the Lord’s”

OVERVIEW

KEY POINTS

JONAH

Repentance and grace In this well known story, the prophet Jonah is given a commission which he does not want. After running away from God’s call he is delivered to his destination in the belly of the fish. His message of the destruction of Nineveh is heeded by the population. When they repent the judgment is stopped and Jonah sulks. Although God’s prophet is unforgiving, God is full of grace.

SOUNDBITE

Obadiah :21

J O NA H NAH • Jonah disobeys his call (ch.1) • Jonah prays and is delivered (ch.2) • The people of Nineveh repent (ch.3) • Jonah’s anger and God’s kindness (ch.4)

“When my soul fainted within me, I remembered the Lord”

Jonah 2:7

The Bestseller Page 29

Bestseller1.p65

35

3/18/2010, 12:28 PM


Micah & Nahum OVERVIEW

KEY POINTS

MICAH

True worship Micah begins by prophesying of the judgment on Israel and Judah. But he moves on to describe a remnant returning to Zion. He pleads for true religion free from wickedness and oppression. He intercedes for the Lord to shepherd His people as of old.

SOUNDBITE

M ICAH 1. Judgment on the people • Impending judgment (ch.1) • Evil-doers and lying prophets (ch.2) • Wicked rulers (ch.3) 2. Future redemption • The Lord triumphs in Zion (ch.4) • Messiah is coming (ch.5:1-5) • Enemies are judged (ch.5:6-15) 3. Who is like unto the Lord? • God pleads with Israel (ch.6:1-8) • Injustice is punished (ch.6:9-16) • Sorrow over sin (ch.7:1-7) • Confession of sin (ch.7:8-13) • God forgives (ch.7:14-20)

“Rejoice not over me, O my enemy; when I fall, I shall rise”

OVERVIEW

Micah 7:8

KEY POINTS

NAHUM

NA HUM NAH • God’s justice and wrath (ch.1) • Nineveh will be destroyed (ch.2) • A nation destroyed (ch.3)

A jealous and avenging God Nahum prophesied during the time that Judah was being oppressed by Assyria. God’s people were compromising their faith and trusting in alliances with other nations. This book has two themes - Nineveh (capital of Assyria) will fall; and God will preserve His people. It is a call back to faith in God to trust Him who preserves His own people and who judges their adversaries.

SOUNDBITE

“The mountains quake before Him, the hills melt!”

Nahum 1:5

The Bestseller Page 30

Bestseller1.p65

36

3/18/2010, 12:28 PM


Habakkuk & Zephaniah OVERVIEW

KEY POINTS

HABAKKUK

Judgment and faith Habakkuk prophesied in the time of Jeremiah. He was distressed by the backsliding of Judah and wondered why God seemed to do nothing about it. God promises to judge Judah through the Chaldeans (Babylonians). But Habakkuk wonders why God uses a wicked nation to punish one who is more righteous. As the prophet ponders he hears God’s answer - “the righteous shall live by his faith”. Thus Habakkuk looks through a door of revelation on which the whole of the New Testament stands - salvation by grace through faith.

SOUNDBITE

“The Lord is in His holy temple: let all the earth keep silence”

OVERVIEW

Habakkuk 2:20

KEY POINTS

ZEPHANIAH

Judgment and a remnant Zephaniah was yet another prophet who warned of God’s impending judgment on a complacent Judah - ‘the men who are thickening upon their lees’. But the prophet also spoke of the return of a worshipping remnant ‘The Lord your God is in your midst… He will rejoice over you with singing’.

SOUNDBITE

HA BA K K U K HAB 1. God’s judgment on Judah • Judah’s depravity (ch.1:1-4) • Judgment from Chaldea (ch.1:5-11) • Why use the wicked to judge (ch.1:12-17) 2. The sovereign Lord rules • The righteous preserved (ch.2:1-4) • The Chaldeans are doomed (ch.2:5-20) 3. The prophet’s prayer • “Work again as of old!” (ch.3:1-16) • “I will rejoice in the Lord!” (ch.3:17-19)

Z E P HA N IA H HAN IAH 1. God’s judgment to come • The Day of the Lord (ch.1:1-9) • A Day of woe (ch1:10-18) • A call to repent (ch.2:1-3) 2. God judges the nations • Destruction of Philistia (ch.2:4-7) • Moab and Ammon destroyed (ch.2:8-11) • Ethiopia and Assyria too (ch2:12-15) • Jerusalem is corrupt (ch.3:1-7) 3. The rejoicing remnant • A faithful remnant (ch.3:8-20)

“The Lord your God is in your midst, a warrior who gives victory”

Zephaniah 3:17

The Bestseller Page 31

Bestseller1.p65

37

3/18/2010, 12:28 PM


Haggai & Zechariah OVERVIEW

KEY POINTS

HAGGAI

Building and blessing When Darius the Persian defeated the Babylonian Empire, he encouraged the Jews to return to their homeland. So the work of rebuilding theTemple in Jerusalem began, but ground to a halt for 16 years. Haggai then prophesied to the people that their motives were wrong.They were feeling economic hardship and said they would wait until things improved before they began to build again. But Haggai showed that their hardship was God’s judgment on their unwillingness to press on with the work through trial.When they began to build again they would know his economic blessing.

OVERVIEW

SOUNDBITE “Consider how you have fared” Haggai 1:7

KEY POINTS

ZECHARIAH

The Kingdom established Zechariah wrote at the same time as Haggai. He too exhorted the people to rebuild the Temple. But his prophecy also details the conquests of the future Kingdom of God. It is a powerful mixture of visions and predictions.

SOUNDBITE

HAG GA HAGGA GAII 1. Economic judgment • Call to the rulers and people (ch.1:1-6) • Reason for judgment (ch.1:7-11) 2. The people respond • A people’s movement (ch.1:12-15) 3. Message of encouragement • The glory of God’s house (ch.2:1-9) • Defilement and blessing (ch.2:10-19) • Zerubbabel - Messiah pledged (ch.2:20-23)

Z E C HA R IA H HAR IAH 1. Visions of God’s purposes •Vision of the horses (ch.1:1-17) •Vision of the horns (ch.1:18-21) •Vision of the measuring line (ch.2) •Vision of the High Priest (ch.3) •Vision of the Lampstand (ch.4) •Vision of the flying scroll (ch.5:1-4) •Vision of the basket & woman (ch.5:5-11) •Vision of the four chariots (ch.6) 2. Prophetic message to the people •Obedience better than fasting (ch.7) •Jerusalem - Zion restored (ch.8) 3. The future Kingdom •The coming King (ch.9) •The people restored (ch.10) •Prophecy of the shepherds (ch.11) •Mourning for the pierced One (ch.12) •The Shepherd Saviour (ch.13) •The Day of the Lord (ch.14)

“Not by might, nor by power, but by My Spirit, says the Lord”

Zechariah 4:6

The Bestseller Page 32

Bestseller1.p65

38

3/18/2010, 12:28 PM


Malachi OVERVIEW

KEY POINTS

Messenger of the covenant Malachi was the last of the Old Testament prophets. He wrote after the people had returned from exile to the land of Israel and may have been a contemporary of Nehemiah. He shows graphically the corruption of backslidden religion. He uncovers the hypocrisy of the selfish heart. He rebukes the halfhearted obedience to God’s commands. But in all this God still moves sovereignly to fulfil His purposes. The Day of the Lord is at hand.

SOUNDBITE

1. Fickle Israel • God loves Israel (ch.1:1-5) • Unacceptable sacrifices (ch.1:6-14) • Corrupt priests (ch.2:1-9) • Idolatry and divorce (ch.2:10-17) 2. The coming messenger • Judgment and purifying (ch.3:1-7) • Robbing God (ch.3:8-15) • A book of remembrance (ch.3:16-18) • The great Day of the Lord (ch.4)

“The Lord whom you seek will suddenly come to His temple”

Malachi 3:1

The Bestseller Page 33

Bestseller1.p65

39

3/18/2010, 12:28 PM


New Testament Bestseller1.p65

40

3/18/2010, 12:28 PM


Matthew OVERVIEW

KEY POINTS

The suffering Messiah Traditionally, the apostle Matthew is thought to have written this Gospel. He is very careful to link all he writes with Old Testament scripture. This is because those who were expecting Messiah to come were looking for someone to throw off the Roman rule. A suffering Servant who would be crucified was hard to swallow. Much of Matthew is devoted to the teachings of Jesus about the Kingdom of Heaven - Messiah’s Kingdom is a spiritual one now. When He comes again He will be ruler of the whole earth spiritually and physically.

1. Birth and baptism • Genealogy and birth of Jesus (ch.1) • Escape and home in Nazareth (ch.2) • Baptism and temptation (ch.3-4) 2. The Kingdom of righteousness • Sermon on the Mount (ch.5-7) • Healings and miracles (ch.8) • Forgiveness of sins (ch.9) 3. Proclaiming the Kingdom • The twelve sent out (ch.10) • John the Baptist enquires (ch.11) • The Sabbath and the Spirit (ch.12) 4. The mystery of the Kingdom • Kingdom parables (ch.13) • John the Baptist beheaded (ch.14) • Jesus and the multitudes (ch.15) 5. Kingdom opposition • Jesus predicts His death (ch.16) • The transfiguration (ch.17) • Brotherhood teachings (ch.18) • Marriage and celibacy (ch.19) • The servant of all (ch.20) 6. The future Kingdom • Jesus cleanses the Temple (ch.21) • Jesus silences the teachers (ch.22) • Religious hypocrisy (ch.23) • The end of the age (ch.24) • The great Judge (ch.25) 7. The suffering Messiah • Passover and arrest (ch.26) • The King on a cross (ch.27) • Resurrection authority (ch.28)

SOUNDBITE

“Love your enemies, and pray for those who persecute you”

Matthew 5:44

The Bestseller Page 35

Bestseller1.p65

41

3/18/2010, 12:28 PM


Mark OVERVIEW

KEY POINTS

Jesus Christ the Son of God This Gospel is attributed to Mark the cousin of Barnabas and close friend of Peter. It is action packed with frequent use of the word “immediately”! It emphasises the powerful works of Jesus rather than His teachings. Consequently, it does not have so much quoted from the Old Testament. It is vivid in detail and description of events and probably had a non-Jewish audience in mind. Jesus is portrayed without doubt as the powerful Son of God. Through His death and resurrection He prepared His followers to spread the good news effectively.

SOUNDBITE

1. His ministry begins • His baptism and first disciples (ch.1:1-20) • His fame in Galilee (ch.1:21-45) • Forgiveness and fasting (ch.2) 2. Controversy begins • Healing on the Sabbath (ch.3:1-12) • The twelve apostles (ch.3:13-35) • Parables and their purpose (ch.4) 3. Visiting the districts • Demoniac healed (ch.5) • Unbelief at Nazareth (ch.6) • Defiled from within (ch.7) 4. Jesus is the Christ • Peter confesses Jesus (ch.8) • Jesus predicts His death again (ch.9) • Humility (ch.10) 5. Passover week • Jesus enters Jerusalem (ch.11) • The common people hear Him (ch.12) • Coming of the Son of Man (ch.13) • Bethany and Gethsemane (ch.14) • Crucifixion (ch.15) • Resurrection and commission (ch.14)

“Go into all the world and preach the gospel to the whole creation”

Mark 16:15

The Bestseller Page 36

Bestseller1.p65

42

3/18/2010, 12:28 PM


Luke OVERVIEW

KEY POINTS

The divine Saviour Almost certainly written by Luke the doctor who travelled with Paul. This well researched writing contains both teachings and miraculous signs of Jesus and is the longest Gospel. It is a balanced account of the life of Jesus written for an important person called Theophilus. Of all the Gospels, the human side of Jesus comes through most clearly in Luke.

1. Preparation for his ministry • Christ’s birth announced (ch.1) • Jesus’ birth and childhood (ch.2) • John the Baptist (ch.3) • Ministry in the Spirit’s power (ch.4) 2. Ministry in Galilee • The disciples called (ch.5) • Lord of the Sabbath (ch.6:1-19) • The blessings and woes (ch.6:20-49) • Powerful signs (ch.7) • Teaching in parables (ch.8:1-21) • Lord of life and death (ch.8:22-56) • Sending out the twelve (ch.9:1-17) • Take up the cross (ch.9:18-62) 3. Journey to Jerusalem • Seventy sent out before Him (ch.10:1-24) • Service and worship (ch.10:25-42) • Spiritual power (ch.11:1-28) • Hypocrisy denounced (ch.11:29-54) • Treasures of the Kingdom (ch.12) • The narrow way (ch.13) • Leaving all to follow Christ (ch.14) • Lost sheep, lost coin, lost son (ch.15) • God and mammon (ch.16) • Faith and duty (ch.17:1-19) • The coming of the Kingdom (ch.17:20-37) • Humility and reward (ch.18) 4. His ministry fulfilled • Saving the lost (ch.19:1-27) • Weeping over Jerusalem (ch.19:28-48) • The authority of Jesus (ch.20) • Watch and pray (ch.21) • The Lord’s Supper (ch.22:1-46) • Betrayal and arrest (ch.22:47-71) • Pilate, Herod and Calvary (ch.23) • Risen and ascended (ch.24)

SOUNDBITE

“Whoever of you does not renounce all that he has, cannot be My disciple”

Luke 14:33

The Bestseller Page 37

Bestseller1.p65

43

3/18/2010, 12:28 PM


John OVERVIEW

KEY POINTS

The Word made flesh

1. The revealed Word • The Word becomes flesh (ch.1:1-18) • John’s disciples follow Jesus (ch.1:19-51)

This was almost certainly written by John the beloved disciple. It is full of eyewitness accounts and intimate details. It contains events from only 20 days of the three year ministry of Jesus. Eight signs or miracles are included which verify the claim of Jesus to be the Messiah - the great I AM. Like none of the other Gospels, it reveals Jesus in a particularly majestic way. But in it all His resolute humanity is revealed as He pursues His calling to do the works His Father is doing.

2. The first signs • Water to wine at Canaan (ch.2:1-12) • Cleansing the Temple (ch.2:13-25) • The new birth (ch.3) • Jesus in Samaria (ch.4:1-42) • Healing at a distance (ch.4:43-54) 3. The feast of the Passover • Lame man healed (ch.5:1-15) • Son of God and Son of Man (ch.5:16-47) • Feeding the five thousand (ch.6:1-14) • Walking on water (ch.6:15-21) • The Bread of Life (ch.6:22-71) 4. The feast of Tabernacles • Promise of the Holy Spirit (ch.7) • An adulteress is saved (ch.8:1-11) • The Light of the world (ch.8:12-59) • Blind man healed (ch.9) 5. The feast of Dedication • The good Shepherd (ch.10) • Lazarus raised from the dead (ch.11) • Entry to Jerusalem (ch.12) 6. The Last Supper • The new commandment (ch.13) • The Holy Spirit will be sent (ch.14) • The vine and the branches (ch.15) • Sorrow turned to joy (ch.16) • Jesus prays to the Father (ch.17) • Arrested and tried (ch.18) • Crucified and buried (ch.19) 7. The Resurrection ministry • The empty tomb (ch.20:1-18) • The apostles commissioned (ch.20:19-31) • Peter restored (ch.21:1-19) • Jesus did many other things (ch.21:20-25)

SOUNDBITE

“I am the way, and the truth, and the life; no-one comes to the Father but by Me”

The Bestseller Page 38

Bestseller1.p65

44

3/18/2010, 12:28 PM

John 14:6


Acts OVERVIEW

KEY POINTS

Spreading the Kingdom This is another book written for Theophilus and is the sequel to Luke’s Gospel. It demonstrates how effectively the baptism of the Holy Spirit empowered the church to build the Kingdom. It explains how the Christian faith spread out from Jerusalem to Rome. This is a thrilling, inspiring and encouraging story which shows what can be achieved through men and women of faith.

1. The coming of the Spirit • The Lord ascends to Heaven (ch.1) • The Holy Spirit comes in power (ch.2:1-13) • Peter’s Pentecostal preaching (ch.2:14-39) 2. Peter leads the church in Jerusalem • A Community church (ch.2:40-47) • Healing and salvation (ch.3) • Arrest and persecution (ch.4:1-31) • Community and corruption (ch.4:32-5:11) • Power and persecution (ch.5:12-42) • Stephen the powerful servant (ch.6) • Stephen the preaching martyr (ch.7) 3. Persecution and spread • Philip spreads the gospel (ch.8) • The persecuting Saul is saved (ch.9:1-30) • The church is multiplied (ch.9:31-43) • The Spirit comes to Gentiles (ch.10) • Peter defends God’s work (ch.11:1-18) • Christians in Antioch (ch.11:19-30) • Herod’s persecution and death (ch.12) 4. Paul’s first apostolic mission • Barnabas and Paul sent out (ch.13:1-12) • Galatian blessing and conflict (ch.13:13-52) • Stoning and strengthening (ch.14) • The Jerusalem council (ch.15:1-35) 5. Paul’s second apostolic mission • Overland to Galatia again (ch.15:36-16:10) • Call to Macedonia (ch.16:11-40) • Loved and opposed in Greece (ch.17) • An open door in Corinth (ch.18:1-22) 6. Paul’s third apostolic mission • Galatia for the third time (ch.18:23-28) • Revolution in Ephesus (ch.19) • Journeys in Greece and Asia (ch.20) • Warnings as Paul returns (ch.21:116) 7. Paul’s imprisonment: Jerusalem to Rome • Arrest in the Temple (ch.21:17-22:29) • Plot to kill Paul (ch.22:30-23:35) • Paul’s defence to Felix (ch.24) • Paul appeals to Caesar (ch.25) • Paul’s testimony (ch.26) • The voyage to Rome (ch.27) • Paul’s ministry in Rome (ch.28)

SOUNDBITE

“You shall receive power when the Holy Spirit has come upon you”

Acts 1:8

The Bestseller Page 39

Bestseller1.p65

45

3/18/2010, 12:28 PM


Romans OVERVIEW

KEY POINTS

Justification by faith One of the most important books in the Bible. It draws together the Old Testament revelation to show God’s purposes in the Gospel. It proves that access to God is through faith alone: neither the inheritance of being a Jew, nor abundance of works is sufficient. This letter reveals Paul as a man of spiritual and scriptural logic. It also reveals his heart of longing for his own Jewish people. And finally it shows his heart of love for the church in the numerous personal greetings he sends.

SOUNDBITE

1. The need for the Gospel • Paul’s love for the Romans (ch.1:1-17) • God’s wrath on sinful men (ch.1:18-32) • God judges righteously (ch.2:1-16) • Circumcision of the heart (ch.2:17-29) • All have sinned (ch.3:1-20) 2. Justification and Abraham • Righteousness through faith (ch.3:21-31) • Abraham justified (ch.4:1-12) • Imputed righteousness (ch.4:13-25) 3. Living in spiritual power • Peace with God (ch.5:1-11) • Death in Adam, life in Christ (ch.5:12-21) • Baptism into life (ch.6:1-14) • Slaves of righteousness (ch.6:15-23) • Sin and the Law (ch.7:1-12) • Defeat under the Law (ch.7:13-25) • Victory in the Spirit (ch.8:1-17) • God’s ever present love (ch.8:18-39) 4. God’s promises and election • Israel’s rejection (ch.9:1-13) • God’s justice and faith (ch.9:14-33) • Israel needs the Gospel (ch.10:1-13) • Israel rejects the Gospel (ch.10:14-21) • Israel’s remnant (ch.11:1-10) • Israel’s salvation (ch.11:11-36) 5. Living as a Christian • Living sacrifices (ch.12:1-8) • Christian behaviour (ch.12:9-21) • Submit to government (ch.13:1-7) • Love and light (ch.13:8-14) • Loving one another (ch.14) • Glorifying God together (ch.15:1-13) • Paul’s travelling plans (ch.15:14-33) • Concluding greetings (ch.16)

“Since we are justified by faith, we have peace with God through our Lord Jesus Christ”

The Bestseller Page 40

Bestseller1.p65

46

3/18/2010, 12:28 PM

Romans 5:1


1 Corinthians OVERVIEW

KEY POINTS

Love for a new church In this long letter the apostle Paul deals with many issues facing a growing church. Some were problems of sin and immaturity which had been reported to him. Others were his response to a letter which the church had written to him. In both, the apostle displays his enormous love and patience for this church which he had birthed during his second apostolic journey. And as a consequence we are the richer for the panorama of teaching it contains.

SOUNDBITE

1. Dealing with immaturity • The Corinthians’ richness (ch.1:1-9) • Avoid factions (ch.1:10-17) • The word of the cross (ch.1:18-2:5) • Spiritual wisdom (ch.2:6-16) • God gives the increase (ch.3) • Fools for Christ’s sake (ch.4:1-13) • A father in Christ (ch.4:14-21) 2. Dealing with immorality • Church discipline (ch.5:1-8) • Immorality is serious (ch.5:9-13) • Do not sue the brethren (ch.6:1-11) • The body is a temple (ch.6:12-20) 3. Answering their letter • Principles of marriage (ch.7:1-16) • Principles of celibacy (ch.7:17-40) • Stumbling your brother (ch.8) • The working apostle (ch.9:1-18) • The winning apostle (ch.9:19-27) • Temptation (ch.10:1-13) • Avoid idolatry (ch.10:14-11:1) • Headship in the church (ch.11:2-16) • The Lord’s Supper (ch.11:17-34) 4. Spiritual gifts and love • Nine spiritual gifts (ch.12:1-11) • The members of the Body (ch.12:12-31) • Love is the greatest (ch.13) • Spiritual gifts in meetings (ch.14:1-25) • Order in meetings (ch.14:26-40) 5. The importance of the resurrection • The Risen Christ (ch.15:1-19) • Death will be destroyed (ch.15:20-34) • The resurrection body (ch.15:35-58) • Paul’s plans (ch.16:1-12) • Solemn exhortations (ch.16:13-24)

“Love is patient and kind; it is not jealous or boastful”

1 Corinthians 13:4

The Bestseller Page 41

Bestseller1.p65

47

3/18/2010, 12:28 PM


2 Corinthians OVERVIEW

KEY POINTS

Spiritual fatherhood The more one reads this letter, the less difficult it becomes. And, in the end there is the reward of understanding what it is like to be a spiritual father. The apostle Paul bares his heart in this letter like he does in no other. It spells out his love relationship with the Corinthians in both affection and rebuke. We also learn many of the details of Paul’s own life - its struggles and its joys. It is an enduring lesson to us all of the price we must pay to be builders of Christ’s church.

1. Paul’s love for the Corinthians • Paul’s suffering (ch.1:1-14) • Paul - a man of his word (ch.1:15-2:2) • Forgiveness for the repentant (ch.2:3-11) • Triumph and fragrance (ch.2:12-3:3) • The Spirit and the veil (ch.3:4-18) 2. The reality of apostolic ministry • Servants for Jesus’ sake (ch.4:1-6) • Cast down but encouraged (ch.4:7-18) • Walking by faith (ch.5:1-11) • Ambassadors for Christ (ch.5:12-21) • Blameless ministry (ch.6:1-10) 3. The responsibilities of a church • Separation (ch.6:11-7:1) • The Corinthians’ repentance (ch.7:2-16) • Generous giving (ch.8:1-15) • Giving to the Judean church (ch.8:16-9:5) • A cheerful giver (ch.9:6-15) 4. The seal of Paul’s apostleship • Spiritual warfare (ch.10:1-6) • Paul’s authority (ch.10:7-18) • False apostles (ch.11:1-15) • Paul’s sufferings (ch.11:16-33) • Boasting and buffeting (ch.12:1-13) • Paul’s love for them (ch.12:14-21) • Weakness and power (ch.13)

SOUNDBITE

“If anyone is in Christ, he is a new creation”

2 Corinthians 5:17

The Bestseller Page 42

Bestseller1.p65

48

3/18/2010, 12:28 PM


Galatians OVERVIEW

KEY POINTS

Backsliding under law Galatia was a large area in present dayTurkey which Paul visited during his first apostolic mission. Unfortunately, the churches had been visited after Paul had left by Jewish false teachers. They were very persuasive men who did a character assassination on Paul. They made out that he did not preach a true Gospel. If his Gospel was true, they taught, he would have taught them to practise circumcision and keep the law. In this letter Paul laces into the Galatians for their lack of loyalty to him as their spiritual father. He also laces into the false teachers “I wish those who unsettle you would mutilate themselves!” as a derisive comment on their circumcision doctrine. Although this is not a problem today, we learn from this letter the foundation for salvation of faith in Christ. But the principle that legalism does not promote spiritual life is relevant to today - Christ has set us free, not to indulge the flesh or love the world, but to bear spiritual fruit!

SOUNDBITE

1. Paul’s genuine Gospel • Paul’s greeting (ch.1:1-5) • Divine revelation of the Gospel (ch.1:6-17) • Paul’s credentials (ch.1:18-2:10) • Salvation by faith alone (ch.2:11-21) 2. Faith and law • Justification by faith (ch.3:1-9) • The curse of being under law (ch.3:10-14) • The law was our tutor (ch.3:15-25) • Sons and heirs of God (ch.3:26-4:7) • The Galatians’ backslidings (ch.4:8-20) • Children of free Jerusalem (ch.4:21-31) 3. Freedom in Christ • Faith working through love (ch.5:1-6) • Love fulfils the law (ch.5:7-15) • Flesh and Spirit (ch.5:16-26) • Brotherly love (ch.6:1-10) • Glory in the Cross (ch.6:11-18)

“Those who belong to Christ Jesus have crucified the flesh with its passions and desires”

Galations 5:24

The Bestseller Page 43

Bestseller1.p65

49

3/18/2010, 12:28 PM


Ephesians OVERVIEW

KEY POINTS

Glory in the Church Most of Paul’s letters are written to correct problems in the churches. This one is more a general exhortation. It contains much revelation about God’s redemptive plan. Although Paul is locked in prison he writes with the inspiration of a man living in Heaven. He is elated as he writes of the riches of grace and of God’s glory given to the saints. He is thrilled as he reflects on the one new man that Christ creates from divided peoples. And he is overwhelmed by the grace which chose him to preach the Gospel of God’s unsearchable riches in Christ. This letter also deals with the ministry life of the church. It gives the principles of holy living. It has an unusual section on the significance of marriage. And finally, it deals with the principles of spiritual warfare. A unique letter and one treasured by bible lovers as a voyage of discovery into the deep things of God.

SOUNDBITE

1. The plan of redemption • Redemption through His blood (ch.1:1-14) • Prayer for spiritual wisdom (ch.1:15-23) 2. Creating a glorious church • Saved by grace through faith (ch.2:1-10) • One new man (ch.2:11-18) • Built together in the Spirit (ch.2:19-22) • The Gentiles included (ch.3:1-7) • Revealing the mystery (ch.3:8-13) • Strengthened with might (ch.3:14-21) 3. Living as Christians • Unity in the Spirit (ch.4:1-6) • The Body’s working (ch.4:7-16) • Putting on new life (ch.4:17-24) • Walking in holiness (ch.4:25-32) • Walking in love (ch.5:1-7) • Walking in light (ch.5:8-14) • Walking in wisdom (ch.5:15-21) • Marriage in Christ (ch.5:22-33) • Family in Christ (ch.6:1-4) • Slaves and masters (ch.6:5-9) 4. Standing in victory • The whole armour of God (ch.6:10-20) • A loving farewell (ch.6:21-24)

“God has made Him (Jesus) head over all things for the church, which is His body”

Ephesians 1:22,23

The Bestseller Page 44

Bestseller1.p65

50

3/18/2010, 12:28 PM


Philippians OVERVIEW

KEY POINTS

Living for Christ This is one of Paul’s most personal letters. It is written from prison to a church he considers to be his real friends. It contain various exhortations to rejoice in all situations. The apostle is clearly doing that in his own imprisonment. Paul is showing the way to live fully for Christ - in sufferings and joys, in serving and persecution, in sickness and health, in abundance and want. In this letter, Paul does not go into much doctrinal truth. The two exceptions are remarkable in their revelations. Firstly, there is the passage on the way Christ humbled Himself totally. Secondly, there is the way Paul had to count all his old life as rubbish in order to gain Christ. Two amazing revelations that we too must follow to live for Christ.

SOUNDBITE

1. Christ is proclaimed • Paul’s greeting (ch.1:1-2) • His prayer for the church (ch.1:3-11) • His chains further the gospel (ch.1:12-18) • To live is Christ (ch.1:19-26) • Fearless testimony (ch.1:27-30) 2. Humility and Kingdom commitment • Esteeming others (ch.2:1-4) • Christ humbled Himself (ch.2:5-11) • Shining as lights (ch.2:12-18) • Timothy’s proven character (ch.2:19-24) • Epaphroditus’ commitment (ch.2:25-30) 3. The marks of maturity • No confidence in the flesh (ch.3:1-11) • The upward call of God (ch.3:12-16) • Enemies of the cross (ch.3:17-4:1) 4. Paul’s appreciation • Rejoice in the Lord (ch.4:2-7) • Christian meditation (ch.4:8-9) • The Philippians’ gift (ch.4:10-20) • Greetings (ch.4:21-23)

“I yearn for you all with the affection of Christ Jesus”

Philippians 1:8

The Bestseller Page 45

Bestseller1.p65

51

3/18/2010, 12:28 PM


Colossians OVERVIEW

KEY POINTS

Holding fast to Christ This was a corrective letter and also a general letter to be passed on to other churches. The Christians here were falling into rites, ceremonies and the worship of angels. Paul writes, not as a father, but as an overseer, an apostle of truth. His argument is that Christ, “the image of the invisible God” is greater than the things they consider important. They must worship Christ and not rituals and rigours which are of no value. The letter is characterised by the deep revelation of Christ’s divinity. It also makes very clear the fact that true Christianity has nothing to do with religious observances. It is life for Christ, with Christ in His body, the Church, and in Christ - our position of spiritual power. The general exhortations in the letter parallel those found in Ephesians. They deal with the basics of Christian living. In conclusion there are numerous greetings. And also Paul has to delegate the responsibility for helping the church to others because he himself is incarcerated in prison.

SOUNDBITE

1. The pre-eminence of Christ • Greetings (ch.1:1-2) • His prayers and their faith (ch.1:3-8) • The greatness of Christ (ch.1:9-18) • Reconciled in Christ (ch.1:19-23) • The hope of glory (ch.1:24-29) 2. False teaching • Philosophy and empty deceit (ch.2:1-10) • Legalism (ch.2:11-23) 3. Christian living • Hidden with Christ (ch.3:1-11) • The new man (ch.3:12-17) • Hearty doing (ch.3:18-4:6) 4. Exhortations • Various instructions (ch.4:7-15) • Farewell and signature (ch.4:16-18)

“You were buried with Him in baptism, in which you were also raised with Him”

Colossians 2:12

The Bestseller Page 46

Bestseller1.p65

52

3/18/2010, 12:28 PM


1 & 2 Thessalonians OVERVIEW

KEY POINTS

1 THESSALONIANS

Brotherly love This is one of Paul’s earliest letters. It was written to the church sometime after he had been forced to leave the city through persecution. It has two notable thrusts: the apostle’s love for this young church, and the tenderness with which he won them to Christ; and the way in which the church had themselves learned the importance of brotherly love. It also has significant passages on sanctification and holiness, and the second coming of the Lord.

SOUNDBITE

2. Living an orderly life • Holy living (ch.4:1-8) • Brotherly living (ch.4:9-12) • The Second Coming (ch.4:13-18) • Prepared sons of light (ch.5:1-11) 3. Exhortations • Be at peace (ch.5:12-22) • A blessing (ch.5:23-28)

“May the God of peace Himself sanctify you wholly”

OVERVIEW

1 Thessalonians 5:23

KEY POINTS

2 THESSALONIANS

Correcting disorder This letter was written shortly after the first one to bring correction. False teaching, perhaps by letter, had sowed disarray in the minds of this church. Paul emphasised again that the Second Coming had not yet occurred. They should press on with life and the work of the Lord, and not be distracted.

SOUNDBITE

1 TH NS THEE S SA SALLO N IA IAN 1. Paul’s love for this church • Greetings (ch.1:1) • The Thessalonians’ example (ch.1:2-10) • Apostolic ministry (ch.2:1-12) • Their response (ch.2:13-16) • Paul’s longing for them (ch.2:17-3:5) • Encouragement and prayer (ch.3:6-13)

2 TH NS THEE S SA SALLO N IA IAN 1. Reiterating the truth • Greeting (ch.1:2) • God’s vengeance (ch.1:3-12) • The man of lawlessness (ch.2:1-12) 2. Sanctified living • Hold the traditions (ch.2:13-17) • The Lord is faithful (ch.3:1-5) • Do not be idle (ch.3:6-15) • Farewell (ch.3:16-18)

“May the Lord direct your hearts to the love of God 2 Thessalonians 3:5 and to the steadfastness of Christ” The Bestseller Page 47

Bestseller1.p65

53

3/18/2010, 12:28 PM


1 & 2 Timothy OVERVIEW

KEY POINTS

1 TIMOTHY

Principles of leadership This is a very full letter from Paul to his spiritual son,Timothy. It deals with many issues of the church then, and now. Paul is quite unapologetic about the way he lays the responsibilities of church leadership on Timothy. Paul is in a most business-like fashion tackling the problems of building the church.

SOUNDBITE

2. Qualifications of leadership • Qualifications of elders (ch.3:1-7) • Qualifications of deacons (ch.3:8-13) • The mystery of godliness (ch.3:1416) • Doctrines of demons (ch.4:1-5) • Training in godliness (ch.4:6-10) • Be an example (ch.4:11-16) 3. Matters of church life • How to treat the brethren (ch.5:1-2) • Dealing with widows (ch.5:3-16) • Dealing with elders (ch.5:17-25) • Servants and Masters (ch.6:1-2) • The love of money (ch.6:3-10) • Commandments to keep (ch.6:11-21)

“Fight the good fight of the faith”

OVERVIEW

1 Timothy 6:12

KEY POINTS

2 TIMOTHY

Paternal exhortations This is Paul’s final letter. It was written from prison when he was awaiting execution. It has three themes. Paul’s love for his spiritual son Timothy comes over continually. His urgency for the work of the church continues to burden him. And, in a moving way, he conveys a sense of being alone in his imprisonment, but yet his expectation of imminent glory - the crown of righteousness.

SOUNDBITE

1 TI MOTHY TIM 1. The charge of leadership • Greeting (ch.1:1-2) • Pure doctrine (ch.1:3-11) • The foremost of sinners (ch.1:12-17) • The good fight (ch.1:18-20) • Prayer for all kinds of men (ch.2:1-7) • Men and women in church (ch.2:8-15)

2 TI MOTHY TIM 1. Timothy’s faith • Paul’s love for Timothy (ch.1:1-7) • Paul’s sufferings (ch.1:8-12) • A good soldier of Christ (ch.1:13-2:13) 2. The man of God • A pure heart (ch.2:14-26) • Self-loving men (ch.3:1-9) • The holy Scriptures (ch.3:10-17) • Fulfil your ministry (ch.4:1-5) 3. The heavenly kingdom • His departure is at hand (ch.4:6-16) • Strengthened by the Lord (ch.4:17-22)

“All who desire to live a godly life in Christ Jesus will be persecuted”

2 Timothy 3:12

The Bestseller Page 48

Bestseller1.p65

54

3/18/2010, 12:28 PM


Titus & Philemon OVERVIEW

KEY POINTS

TITUS

Christian responsibility This is a short, sharp letter toTitus from Paul. Paul considers him a son in the faith and so addresses him with frank bluntness. He had been left in Crete to bring stability to a weak and erring church. Paul seems to feel he is not fulfilling his ministry as he should. This letter has two significant passages, one on the grace of God, and the other dealing with regeneration.

SOUNDBITE

2. Christian living • Sound relationships (ch.2:1-10) • Saving grace (ch.2:11-15) • Saved into good works (ch.3:1-8) • Dealing with divisive persons (ch.3:9-11) • Directions and farewell (ch.3:12-15)

“They profess to know God, but they deny Him by their deeds”

OVERVIEW

Titus 1:16

KEY POINTS

PHILEMON

Paul’s heart Undoubtedly one of Paul’s most moving letters. It was written to a personal friend called Philemon. As was the practice in those days, Philemon had slaves, and one called Onesimus had run away.While on the run he had been converted under Paul’s ministry. Paul now sends him back to his master with this letter. It shows Paul at his most loving and compelling. From it we see how deeply he had experienced the love of God and how naturally that love flowed from him.

SOUNDBITE

TITU TITUSS 1. Qualities of leadership • Greeting (ch.1:1-4) • The qualifications of elders (ch.1:5-9) • The need for rebuke (ch.1:10-16)

P H I LE MON LEM • Greeting (vv. 1-3) • Philemon’s faith (vv. 4-7) • A runaway returning (vv. 8-16) • Philemon’s debt to Paul (vv. 17-22) • Farewell (vv. 23-25)

“The grace of the Lord Jesus Christ be with your spirit”

Philemon :25

The Bestseller Page 49

Bestseller1.p65

55

3/18/2010, 12:28 PM


Hebrews OVERVIEW

KEY POINTS

The New Covenant This is probably the most unusual NewTestament letter. It is also deliberately anonymous. It has been attributed to Paul because of the reference to Timothy in it. But its style of writing is totally unlike Paul. The best suggestion of authorship has been Apollos who was powerful in the Scriptures (Acts 18:24). The point of the letter is to establish beyond any doubt that Christ is the Son of God who brings in the New Covenant.The Old Covenant has passed away and is now obsolete. The New Covenant fulfils all the requirements of the Old in a better and more perfect way. But faith was necessary for both Covenants as the impressive chapter on the heroes of faith demonstrates.

1. The greatness of Christ • Heir of all things (ch.1:1-4) • Greater than angels (ch.1:5-14) • Made lower than angels (ch.2:1-9) • Bringing sons to glory (ch.2:10-18) • The faithful Son (ch.3:1-6) • The need for faithfulness (ch.3:7-15) • Entering His rest (ch.3:16-4:10) • The word of God (ch.4:11-13) 2. The priesthood of Christ • Christ our High Priest (ch.4:14-5:4) • A priest for ever (ch.5:5-11) • Going on to perfection (ch.5:12-6:8) • God’s blessing (ch.6:9-20) • Melchizedek (ch.7:1-10) • A new priesthood (ch.7:11-28) 3. The New Covenant in Christ • A new priestly service (ch.8:1-6) • A New Covenant (ch.8:7-13) • Limitations on earth (ch.9:1-10) • The blood of Jesus (ch.9:11-28) • The Law was a shadow (ch.10:1-10) • One sufficient sacrifice (ch.10:11-18) 4. Faith in action • A true heart (ch.10:19-39) • The examples of faith (ch.11:1-40) • God’s discipline (ch.12:1-11) • Avoid backsliding (ch.12:12-29) • Christian principles (ch.13:1-17) • Prayer and blessing (ch.13:18-25)

SOUNDBITE

“Let us run with perseverence the race that is set before us, looking to Jesus”

Hebrews 12:1,2

The Bestseller Page 50

Bestseller1.p65

56

3/18/2010, 12:28 PM


James OVERVIEW

KEY POINTS

Practical faith The writer of this letter is acknowledged to be James, the half-brother of Jesus, and leader of the Jerusalem church after Pentecost. He wrote this as a general letter to Christians. It is a letter of clear instructions with 54 commands in it. It has a no-nonsense style of confident authority. It is also repetitive in the way it returns to a theme from another angle. The major teachings it covers are: enduring under trial, faith and receiving from God, rich and poor in the church, righteous living, doing and not hearing only, and self-control. The illustrations used are unforgettable. And the letter never fails to bring conviction to the reader with an open heart and mind.

SOUNDBITE

• • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Greetings (ch.1:1) The double-minded (ch.1:2-8) The blessing of lowliness (ch.1:9-11) Temptation and sin (ch.1:12-20) Doers of the word (ch.1:21-27) The sin of partiality (ch.2:1-13) Dead faith (ch.2:14-26) Controlling the tongue (ch.3:1-12) Wisdom from above (ch.3:13-18) God resists the proud (ch.4:1-10) Judging and boasting (ch.4:11-17) Judgment of the rich (ch.5:1-6) Suffering and patience (ch.5:7-12) The prayer of faith (ch.5:13-20)

“Be doers of the word, not hearers only, deceiving yourselves”

James 1:22

The Bestseller Page 51

Bestseller1.p65

57

3/18/2010, 12:28 PM


1 Peter OVERVIEW

KEY POINTS

Live true to Jesus This general letter to Christians was written by the apostle Peter. An outbreak of persecution under the Emperor Nero was imminent and he was preparing them to face such a trial. Peter deals beautifully with the basic hope of the Christian - being chosen, cleansed, sanctified, and living in expectancy of eternal life. There is a strong emphasis on holiness, both for the individual and for us being a holy people set apart for God. Peter also emphasises humility of heart and mind. This is especially true in the way we should honour authorities even if they persecute us. Peter encourages the Christians to build up brotherhood relationships of genuine love - “hold unfailing your love for one another”.

SOUNDBITE

1. Our responsibilities to God • A powerful greeting (ch.1:1-2) • The inheritance in heaven (ch.1:3-12) • Be holy (ch.1:13-21) • Born again (ch.1:22-2:3) • A chosen generation (ch.2:4-10) 2. Our responsibilities to men • Honourable conduct (ch.2:11-12) • Submit to authorities (ch.2:13-17) • Suffering patiently (ch.2:18-25) • Wives submit to husbands (ch.3:1-6) • Husbands be considerate (ch.3:7) • Return evil with blessing (ch.3:8-12) • A defence for our hope (ch.3:13-17) • Suffering like Christ did (ch.3:18-4:6) 3. Our responsibilities to one another • Minister to one another (ch.4:7-11) • Reproach for Christ (ch.4:12-19) • Elders as examples (ch.5:1-4) • Resist the devil (ch.5:5-11) • The kiss of love (ch.5:12-14)

“Like living stones, be yourselves built into a spiritual house, to be a holy priesthood”

The Bestseller Page 52

Bestseller1.p65

58

3/18/2010, 12:28 PM

1 Peter 2:5


2 Peter OVERVIEW

KEY POINTS

Triumph over falsehood This second letter was written to bring home the seriousness of believing lies. As Paul had to counter false teaching and also the apostle John, so did Peter. He was burdened that men would dupe the church into believing their own human words and ignore the revealed word of God. The letter emphasises the importance of judging teachers by their fruitfulness in life. Their words may sound good or attractive, but they lead to fruitlessness and destruction. In view of the judgment of the world which is to come, we should be people of seriousness and commitment who hasten the Lord’s return.

SOUNDBITE

1. Uncovering the false • Divine power (ch.1:1-4) • Adding and diligence (ch.1:5-11) • Peter’s imminent decease (ch.1:12-15) • The sure prophetic word (ch.1:16-21) • False teachers (ch.2:1-3) • Punishment for false teachers (ch.2:4-11) • Depraved false teachers (ch.2:12-17) • Entangled in the world again (ch.2:18-22) 2. Avoiding the false • The Lord is not slack (ch.3:1-9) • New heavens and new earth (ch.3:10-13) • Paul’s scriptures (ch.3:14-16) • Grow in grace (ch.3:17-18)

“His divine power has granted to us all things that pertain to life and godliness”

2 Peter 1:3

The Bestseller Page 53

Bestseller1.p65

59

3/18/2010, 12:28 PM


1 John OVERVIEW

KEY POINTS

Proofs of sonship Like the Gospel which he wrote, John’s first letter has an original style. John was well on in years when he wrote the letter. It has a solid style of authority and a bold aggressive statement of truth. John was seeking to deal with the false teachings which were creating problems in the church. One such teaching ran along these lines - because faith is in the heart, it doesn’t matter what you do with your body; you can abuse it with religious rigours or indulge it in sin. John sets out to destroy the root of these ideas which proved so attractive to the weak. Most notable are his references to walking in the light, righteousness, the new birth, false spirits, and the supreme importance of loving the brethren.

SOUNDBITE

1. The openness of fellowship • The Word of life (ch.1:1-4) • Walking in the light (ch.1:5-2:2) • Walking as He walked (ch.2:3-11) • Men of God (ch.2:12-14) • Do not love the world (ch.2:15-17) • Antichrist (ch.2:18-23) • The anointing (ch.2:24-27) 2. The test of righteousness • Purifying hope (ch.2:28-3:3) • Sin is of the devil (ch.3:4-9) • Passed from death to life (ch.3:10-15) • Practical love (ch.3:16-23) 3. The proof of sonship • Test the spirits (ch.3:24-4:6) • God is love (ch.4:7-11) • Perfect love (ch.4:12-19) • Keeping His commandments (ch.4:20-5:5) • The three witnesses (ch.5:6-13) • Confidence in prayer (ch.5:14-17) • We are of God (ch.5:18-21)

“If anyone does sin, we have an advocate with the Father: Jesus Christ the righteous”

The Bestseller Page 54

Bestseller1.p65

60

3/18/2010, 12:28 PM

1 John 2:1


2 John & 3 John OVERVIEW

KEY POINTS

2 JOHN

Discernment This short letter appears to be written to a Christian lady to warn her about giving hospitality to false teachers. Many people think it may have been written to a church under persecution and using the title “lady” as a cover.

OVERVIEW

KEY POINTS

3 JOHN

Hospitality This final short letter of John was to a Christian brother called Gaius. He encourages him in his ministry of hospitality. He also mentions a troublesome leader that he intends to deal with.

SOUNDBITE

2 JJO OH N • Greeting from John (vv. 1-3) • Love one another (vv. 4-6) • Antichrist deceivers (vv. 7-11) • Farewell (vv. 12-13)

3 JJO OH N • A healthy greeting (vv. 1-4) • Generous Gaius (vv. 5-8) • Dominant Diotrephes (vv. 9-12) • Farewell (vv. 13-14)

“Look to yourselves, that you may not lose what you have worked for, but may win a full reward”

2 John :8

The Bestseller Page 55

Bestseller1.p65

61

3/18/2010, 12:28 PM


Jude OVERVIEW

KEY POINTS

Contending for the faith Jude was brother of James and so half-brother of Jesus. He finds it necessary to join all the others in defending the true faith against the inroads of false teaching. He seeks to uncover the real, evil-natured hearts of the men who travel around teaching false things. He shows how they cheapen the grace of God and are men who are anti-authority in manner and spirit. He finishes with a prayer of powerful blessing and praise.

SOUNDBITE

• Greeting (vv. 1-2) • Perverting the grace of God (vv. 3-4) • Greed and rebellion (vv. 5-11) • The nether gloom of darkness (vv. 12-15) • Divisive persons (vv. 16-19) • Build yourselves up (vv. 20-23) • Doxology (vv. 24-25)

“But you, beloved, build yourselves up in your most holy faith; pray in the Holy Spirit”

The Bestseller Page 56

Bestseller1.p65

62

3/18/2010, 12:28 PM

Jude :20


Revelation OVERVIEW

KEY POINTS

The triumph of God This amazing book was written by John the apostle who was exiled on the island of Patmos. It is a book of symbols or wisdom pictures which convey to us encouragement and faith. Following seven letters to churches in Asia, John enters heaven in the Spirit and sees the unravelling of God’s will. Revelation must be understood as speaking of the present age - the age of the Kingdom. It begins as Jesus ascends into heaven and opens the seals of the scroll. It concludes with the vision of the New Earth and the future glory. The main visions are divided into four sections. Each one begins with trouble and ends with triumph corresponding to the Lord’s Second Coming. It is recurring, comprehensive, glorious victory.

SOUNDBITE

1. Christ and the churches • Vision of the Son of Man (ch.1) • The loveless church (ch.2:1-7) • The persecuted church (ch.2:8-11) • The compromising church (ch.2:12-17) • The corrupt church (ch.2:18-29) • The dead church (ch.3:1-6) • The faithful church (ch.3:7-13) • The lukewarm church (ch.3:14-22) 2. The vision of the seals • Heaven’s throne (ch.4) • The Lamb opens the seals (ch.5) • Vision of the horses (ch.6) • Multitude from the tribulation (ch.7) 3. The vision of the trumpets • Judgment of the trumpets (ch.8) • Judgment of plagues (ch.9) • The scroll and the little book (ch.10) • The two witnesses overcome (ch.11) 4. Vision of the dragon and beasts • Satan thrown out of Heaven (ch.12) • The two beasts (ch.13) • The Lamb and the 144,000 (ch.14) • The Song of Moses (ch.15) 5. Vision of the bowls and Babylon • The earth judged and shaken (ch.16) • The woman and the beast (ch.17) • The fall of Babylon the world (ch.18) • King of kings, Lord of lords (ch.19) • The throne of judgment (ch.20) 6. The glory of eternity • The New Jerusalem (ch.21) • The Spirit and the Bride (ch.22)

“Holy, holy, holy, is the Lord God Almighty, who was, and is, and is to come!”

Revelation 4:8

The Bestseller Page 57

Bestseller1.p65

63

3/18/2010, 12:28 PM


Bestseller1.p65

64

3/18/2010, 12:28 PM


bestseller_web