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31 days of St Ignatius You are invited to join a series of 31 daily messages exploring Ignatian ways to pray throughout July. Subscribe using the link below to receive your daily email guide to Ignatian prayer this July.

 JesuitsinBritain  JesuitsBritain www.pathwaystogod.org/31-days-st-ignatius

Have you or someone you know considered life as a Jesuit priest or brother?

For more information, visit jesuitvocations.org.uk or contact: Britain: Fr James Conway SJ vocationspromoter @jesuit.org.uk

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The 30th successor of St Ignatius

history and plans of the Holy Name

Fr Arturo Sosa SJ is new Superior General

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Rebuilding

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after Typhoon Issue 87 • Spring

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lives

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Placing refugees at the heart of the Church

for the Faith SJ Scotland’s Martyr St John Ogilvie

Pope Francis in the Holy Land

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Jesuits & Friends turns 100! Looking back over 33 years of Jesuit life

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2  Jesuits & Friends Summer 2018


CONTENTS

From the editor... IN MY EXPERIENCE of the last few years, editing Jesuits & Friends can be quite hard work at times, even if it is rewarding. I wouldn’t, though, usually describe it as fun! This 100th issue has proved something of an exception to that general rule. As the editorial team has pored over the carefullybound back numbers that are kept in the Jesuit province archives, selecting pictures and stories to illustrate the timeline that you’ll find on the centre pages here, memories have been stirred and half-forgotten events recalled. Did he really look like that? What was this all about? Weren’t we all so young? What hasn’t changed over the last thirty-odd years is the aim of the publication. Each of the 100 issues

that has been sent out intend to inform you, our friends, of the work being done by the Jesuits in this country and further afield. That is, after all, only fair. It is only with your support, offered in all sorts of different ways, that we are able to carry out these works. Whether we are looking at responding to natural disasters in some of the poorest parts of the world, passing on the faith creatively to a new generation, campaigning for justice regardless of the personal cost, or outlining the long and exacting process of Jesuit training, the magazine enshrines the conviction that can be traced back to St Ignatius, founder of the Jesuit order: a key signal of the action of God in the world is gratitude towards those who make such action possible.

More than four centuries ago, a 22-year-old Jesuit student wrote from Rome to a friend who had been sent on mission to Naples. Within six months, the writer would be dead, a victim of the plague that he contracted while nursing fellow sufferers. He would later be canonised as St Aloysius Gonzaga. The letter itself though (which you can read on page 11), is filled with gratitude: to the fellow Jesuit he is addressing, to the Provincial who has passed on the news of his friend, and to the God in whose service they are united. My hope is that this 100th edition of Jesuits & Friends likewise provokes gratitude, in all who carry out these works and all who support them, to the God who enables all of this to happen. Paul Nicholson SJ

In this issue... 04 Paul Chitnis and Tony Moreno SJ

15 Laudato si’ inspired a new

06 Three months as a Community

16 Ignatian Spirituality is alive

explain how Ignatian values inform their work for justice

Outreach Officer for JRS have given Nick Hanrahan plenty of food for thought

08 A Jesuit secondary school

in South Sudan is a sanctuary for its pupils and teachers, reports Stephanie Beech

10 Joseph Munitiz SJ opens a door

to the past as he examines a letter written by St Aloysius Gonzaga SJ

12 Celebrate 100 issues of Jesuits & Friends with our timeline

14 Stephanie Beech relives a

10

online venture this Easter, which Dushan Croos SJ introduces and well in Boscombe, as Jane Hellings discovered

18 J ames Potter describes how

14

compassion and love have shaped the life of Wimbledon College this year

20 Praying with the pope: David Stewart SJ

21 Chris Brolly SJ tells us about life as a philosophy student in Paris

12

22 M  oves, appointments and obituaries

dramatic finish to this year’s London Marathon

16 jesuit.org.uk  3


JESUIT MISSIONS  Ignatian Spirituality

Rooted in the loving presence of God How does St Ignatius Loyola’s emphasis on ‘finding God in all things’ inform those who live and work in the Ignatian tradition today? Paul Chitnis and Fr Tony Moreno SJ tell us how God is present in their daily lives

She left everything behind; even her dress had been given to her. Her husband and all of her children had died in the conflict and the famine that accompanied it. And yet she told me that she praised and thanked God for bringing her to safety. When I think of the joy and gratitude of the poorest and most marginalised people I have met in places like El Salvador, South Sudan and Myanmar, it gives me a different perspective on life.

Paul Chitnis is Director of Jesuit Missions How long have you been working with the Jesuits? I started working at Jesuit Missions in 2012 but have been working with Jesuits for several decades in many different capacities. How did the Jesuits play a part in your life before Jesuit Missions? I had Jesuit teachers when I was a pupil at Stonyhurst. I also had the unparalleled experience of undertaking the Spiritual Exercises at St Beuno’s before joining Jesuit Missions. How has Ignatian Spirituality influenced your daily life? I met a woman in South Sudan some years ago who had fled her home. 4  Jesuits & Friends Summer 2018

Do you find it difficult to find time for prayer? Like most people, I find it difficult to eke out the time to pray. But one of the wonderful gifts of Ignatian prayer is that it can be done ‘on the go’ and doesn’t need to take long. Sometimes a prayer may just be a sincere cri de coeur: ‘Oh God, help. I cannot do this alone.’ At Jesuit Missions, we recently undertook a retreat in daily life – how did you benefit from that? It can be slightly scary to be with God (and oneself!) for even a few moments because there is no place to hide. But the chance to come before God as we are for more than a few fleeting, distracted moments is an opportunity to be in the presence of total love and unquestioning forgiveness. What advice do you have for people who are too busy for prayer? If I were advising myself, I would say: consider the things that you do routinely each day without thinking – eating,

searching the internet, exercising. Now consider whether a little time for regular prayer – time with God, sometimes talking, often listening, occasionally ranting – is worth more effort. How have you gained inspiration from those you work with? I am fortunate to lead a small team of young people. Apart from being a delightful bunch, what inspires me most is their commitment and their desire to be of greater service to people in need. How has prayer life changed with your different work roles? Prayer and reading the scriptures can be very context-specific. Our Westernised, rich-world interpretation of the scripture can feel radically different to that of impoverished people living in desperate circumstances. Scripture and prayer can feel a lot more edgy and real when you’re in these situations. l


Ignatian Spirituality  JESUIT MISSIONS

to people who believe that their work is their prayer or that prayer means total disengagement from the world. It fits in well with the belief that God is present in our world and that God can be present in creation and in daily, ordinary life. The examen, for instance, is one legacy that Ignatius bequeathed to the Church. It is a tool for finding God in ordinary life and in all things. Do you find it difficult to find time for prayer in your daily working life? One has to find a sacred time and space. That has been important for me. Without that sacred time and space, then I simply become an activist without depth or without relationship with God. Fr Tony Moreno SJ is the President of the Jesuit Conference of Asia Pacific and former Provincial of the Society of Jesus in the Philippines. He joined the Society of Jesus in 1983 How do you feel that Ignatian Spirituality influences your everyday life? Ignatian Spirituality is helpful for people who are active in daily ministries but who wish to be rooted in the loving presence of God. It is a good antidote

What advice would you give to anyone who says they are too busy for prayer? Find a sacred time and space and stay with the experience of just being there even if nothing happens in prayer. In this moment of silence and quiet, I allow myself to be drawn by God’s loving presence. I can be praying with the sacred scriptures, praying over some concerns or decisions I am about to make, praying over the

concerns of other people. Former Fr General Adolfo Nicolás SJ once said: Try to enjoy silence. If you come to enjoy silence, being alone, then you find out that you are not alone. Then you can begin a conversation. But if you don’t like silence, it will be difficult. What inspiration do you gain from the people who you are working with? Collaboration is another Ignatian value. I certainly draw inspiration from people I work with. Working with others can be a conversion experience. How has your prayer life changed with your different work roles? I cannot say that prayer has dramatically changed me and my ways of doing things. At the very least, I am not conscious that this is what prayer is doing to me. But I think I would not have come this far without prayer. I would have disintegrated a long time ago without prayer. l

FIND OUT MORE Find new ways to pray: Visit pathwaystogod.org to learn more about Ignatian Spirituality

Fr Tony Moreno SJ with members of the Simbahang Lingkod ng Bayan team

jesuit.org.uk  5


JRS  Community outreach

Making friends and telling stories Nick Hanrahan reflects on his first three months as Community Outreach Officer at JRS UK

‘SO WHAT is it that you do?’ is often one of the first things you get asked when meeting someone new. In my first three months in this new role at JRS UK, this question has allowed me to share the excitement that comes with starting a new job, especially one that is a source of such great joy. This joy comes from the fact that the community outreach that is central to my new role gives me the opportunity to go and meet people of different backgrounds and ages, to share the amazing work JRS does and shed some light on why our work is so necessary. In my short time at JRS so far I have had the chance to speak to parishioners at Mass, sixth formers, young adults, and those involved in the promotion of justice and peace, to name a few. The groups have had varying levels of background knowledge, and have engaged with

and been challenged by the topic in different ways.

“Our refugee friends are brothers and sisters with different hopes, passions and personalities.” It is inspiring to see the way so many people have been moved by the situations our refugee friends can be forced into whilst they are striving to be recognised as refugees by the UK government. Seeing sixth formers express their anguish at the fact that the UK is the only country in the EU not to have a limit on the length of time a person can be detained, or talking about what it truly means to accompany refugees with people who want to help those seeking sanctuary

Sixth Form students from Our Lady’s Convent High School, Hackney, show support for an end to indefinite detention (Megan Knowles/JRS UK)

6  Jesuits & Friends Summer 2018

in their local area – such experiences have shown me that enough empathy and compassion exist to dispel the often negative atmosphere that dictates the narrative on refugees. In this atmosphere, myth has often shrouded fact and people who need our help have instead been treated with hostility and suspicion. My work so far has shown me how much hope is to be found in people’s kindness and in their opposition to injustice. Our hope is that through our community outreach work we will be able to raise further awareness of the situation faced by our refugee friends here in the UK, and help us all consider how we are called to respond as followers of Christ. We are encouraged by the global leadership shown by Pope Francis on the issues faced by migrants and refugees, as well as by how the Church and Catholics around the world


© fotosynthesis/JRS UK

Community outreach  JRS

have responded to his call to action. It seems clear from the response to our outreach that the message of Pope Francis and his predecessors, their reiteration of the special concern for migrants and refugees that comes from scripture itself, is being taken seriously by the Catholic community in the UK. However, perhaps the greatest joy that comes with engaging in community outreach is that a crucial part of it has been getting to know our refugee friends. Much of my first three months has been spent playing a hands-on role in our Day Centre on a Thursday and being given the opportunity to visit the detention centres near Heathrow alongside our detention volunteers. This has been an important practicality; how would one be able to talk about the work that JRS does without experience of it? More than that,

though, it has been a wonderful blessing in and of itself. It has served to ground me in the mission and values of JRS. The most important aspect of that mission is accompaniment. Sharing in another’s journey is an honour that we have in our work at JRS. We have the chance to see our friends regularly, to have a chat over lunch, a laugh or, as happens often in my case, to share in the celebration or frustration of Manchester United’s most recent result! It is in trying to learn about the stories of our friends and the reality of their daily lives and struggles that I have begun to form genuine bonds of friendship with them. In beginning to think about how I can best articulate their experiences, I have been given the special gift of encountering them as brothers and sisters with different hopes, passions and personalities.

This, for me, is the greatest privilege of community outreach: having the responsibility of sharing the reality that our friends face in their lives, a reality that unfortunately sees them meet with hardship and hostility on a daily basis. A reality that, despite its difficulties, does not have the power to diminish their spirit and joy. Helping as much as possible to put forward the human reality of the asylum system in the UK is about ensuring that those whom we accompany at JRS are given a voice. l

GET INVOLVED If you’re interested in helping to raise the voice of refugees in the UK, contact Nick to arrange a speaker from JRS to come to speak at your parish, school or youth group: nick.hanrahan@jrs.net jesuit.org.uk  7


JESUIT MISSIONS  South Sudan

Loyola Secondary School: a unique place of learning Stephanie Beech describes how a Jesuit school in one of South Sudan’s most dangerous areas is, with Jesuit Missions’ help, working to form the leaders of tomorrow

SOUTH SUDAN is one of the most challenging countries in which the Jesuits work. Despite gaining independence in 2011, by 2013 a new civil war had broken out between the armed forces and the Nuer militias. In the midst of this situation, Loyola Secondary School in Wau strives to continue providing a stable source of education in one of the country’s main rebel areas. The school was forced to close in 1984, just two years after opening, owing to the outbreak of war, and it was then occupied by the Sudanese army during the years that followed. However, since its reopening in 2008 by the Jesuit province of East Africa, supported by Jesuit Missions, the school has seen a rapid increase in student numbers.

“It is amazing the sacrifice students make, walking two hours to get to classes.” In the last four years alone at least 50,000 people have died in South Sudan and thousands more have been forced to leave their homes and flee their country. Over 19,000 children have been recruited by the militias, and at least one school out of three has been damaged, destroyed, occupied or closed.

Photos: JRS South Sudan

‘The quality of education is an important factor in breaking the cycle of poverty,

and our hope is that the institute will provide South Sudan with leaders, men and women of tomorrow who are committed to serving their people with integrity and justice,’ says Fr Beatus Mauki SJ, headteacher of Loyola Secondary School (LSS).

Many children are forced to look after their younger siblings, depriving them of educational opportunities. In this context, it is more important than ever for LSS to remain strong and present. Fr Mauki SJ says, ‘Loyola Secondary School, which has 580 students, 35 teachers and 6 Jesuits, has managed to create a unique space where young people can coexist peacefully beyond their ethnic differences. The school serves as a sanctuary, bringing students together for studying and learning.’ The political and economic situation, ‘has left many children and young people vulnerable to famine and sickness. Every day students struggle to reach school.’ Over half of the students at LSS live in refugee camps and many of them are orphans. Supported by local charities, the school has begun to offer scholarships to children who are unable to pay their fees. This ensures that more children are able to attend the school and that teachers are paid a substantial wage. They are also providing a nutritious breakfast after it was found that 70% of children were arriving without having eaten. On the right is a letter from one of the teachers at the school. l

FIND OUT MORE Students at Loyola Secondary School in Wau

8  Jesuits & Friends Summer 2018

Read about Jesuit Missions’ work in East Africa at jesuitmissions.org.uk/ work/africa/east-africa/


South Sudan  JESUIT MISSIONS

Loyola Secondary School Wau, South Sudan Dear Friends, Greetings! Our school is located in a region of South Sudan, in a so called ‘rebel’ area which has become a battlefield between government forces and armed opposition. Our region is suffering from so many problems: famine, insecurity, economic hardship, cholera. Many parents prefer to bring their children to our school, as they feel it is the only school that is functioning in the area. Many refugees attend our school; they don’t have tents yet and it is hard for them to study while in the camps. They come to school very tired because they don’t sleep well. It is amazing the sacrifice students make, walking two hours to get to classes. After the renewed clashes between government and armed opposition groups, more civilians were forced to seek protection in the Catholic Church compound in the town, and the UN camp. I heard from the students that many people were killed by soldiers as they went house to house searching for people from other groups. Recent incidents have affected the school greatly. The students feel unsafe, fearing revenge. Some parents do not allow their children to come to school, for fear that someone might kill them. At the school we have tried to engage different agencies to ensure our students’ safety. The UN agency that deals with children’s rights and safety visited the school. Also, the commissioner of the town and the local governor came. They went from class to class encouraging students to continue attending. He promised the students that they will be safe. These visits have given a little bit of renewed confidence to students, parents and teachers. After the clashes our numbers went drastically down, but now we are close to our full capacity again. I am supporting students that have been greatly affected by the war. With those who have lost their loved ones, we try to discuss their situations, and we help them process what has happened to them and to draw strength from each other. One student told me that he saw two bodies near his home and a couple killed by the road as they tried to flee. Others narrated how their neighbours were killed because they belonged to another tribe. I asked one student, ‘Have you ever wondered how all this can happen to you if God is Love?’ Quickly this student replied, ‘The problem is not with God; it is with human beings.’ Such words encourage me; I believe that I am doing a very important mission. For children born in South Sudan, ‘normal’ is living in a world of aggression, violence, razor wire and guns. These children need to be listened to and they need lots of support. We need to help them rediscover our humanity. Your friend from South Sudan Teacher, LSS, Wau

jesuit.org.uk  9


JUBILEE YEAR  St Aloysius Gonzaga SJ

A letter from the past The Holy See has declared a Jubilee Year from 9 March 2018 – 9 March 2019 in honour of St Aloysius Gonzaga, who died at the age of only 23. Joseph Munitiz SJ describes a special link to the young Jesuit

THE JESUIT novitiate in Birmingham, where men from the provinces of Britain, Ireland and the European Low Countries begin their life in the Society of Jesus, is fortunate enough to possess two letters of Jesuit saints: one, a note signed by St Ignatius; and the other, a letter from St Aloysius Gonzaga. The latter has a more elaborate frame and, being treated as a relic, is placed in the chapel. The Aloysius letter is particularly significant as it is complete and reveals much about the writer. It was written while Aloysius was in good health, in December 1590, about six months before his death (from plague, contracted while caring for the sick) on 21 June 1591. The recipient was Anton Francesco Guelfucci, a slightly older fellow student and very close friend. Anton had been sent to Naples for his studies, while Aloysius remained in Rome. The English translation of the letter, which was written originally in Italian, is as follows:

10  Jesuits & Friends Summer 2018


St Aloysius Gonzaga SJ  JUBILEE YEAR

Dearest Brother in Christ, The Peace of Christ! I had resolved not to write to you till first I had had one of your two letters as, on your departure, we had agreed, but on the one side my affection for you and my desire to derive consolation from a conversation with you by letter (since the distance of place does not permit any other sort), and on the other the occasion given me by the trip there of Fr Mancinelli [a Jesuit preacher and mystic], make me fail in my resolve. However, with this I salute you et amplector in Domino [and I hug you in the Lord] with all my affection. God knows the consolation I’ve received on hearing from our Father Provincial himself, the good news he tells me he has heard from you personally, to his own consolation, through your letter. May that same Lord be the one who, in this so precious time which he has granted you for your spiritual profit, fills you completely with his gifts, and may he increase his graces in such a way that may serve not only for profit on your side, but on your return here may be to the help and profit of those who most desire your conversation, and who have most need to be advanced in the spirit, such as I do. In the meanwhile, help me with your prayers, and by commending me to those of Fr Pescatore [Aloysius’s former novice master], something I desire very very much. I do not cease trying with my poor strength to commend you to the same Lord. May His Divine Majesty be pleased that we help one another together in his holy service. So, to finish, I commend myself iterum atque iterum [again and again] to you, and I beseech you to commend me to the said Fr Pescatore and to Father Muzio de Angelis [a professor in Naples]. From Rome, on the 12th of December, 1590. Your Brother et Servus in Christo,

Luigi Gonzaga Fr Mario Fuccioli [the province treasurer] sends his greetings, and says that he has received one of your letters, and that, if there is anything that crops up, you can rely on his help, and the same say I for whatever I can.

This letter is important for several reasons. It is itself a relic, as one can be certain that a canonised saint dipped pen in ink to write it. It is also a piece of first-class historical evidence, a text securely dated to a precise date, December 1590. But, above all, it is a form of contact that allows one to become acquainted with St Aloysius himself.

“May His Divine Majesty be pleased that we help one another together in his holy service.” Here are words Aloysius chose to send, written in his own distinctive handwriting. They reveal a young man of deep affection. Aloysius had originally intended to write only occasionally to Anton, but he breaks with his resolve. There is personal affection and obvious delight in the company of a close friend, but at the same time there is an openness, a generosity, a willingness to share with others. Aloysius is not seeking any exclusive friendship; all are to profit from the growth ‘in the spirit’ that Guelfucci can bring them. These are truly ‘friends in the Lord’. In his biography of St Aloysius, Fr Martindale records how, when Aloysius came to die, Guelfucci sat by his side, read to him, and prayed with him. l

Who was St Aloysius Gonzaga? Aloysius Gonzaga (1568-1591) was the eldest child of a powerful Italian family, and it was expected that he would join the military and would one day inherit his father’s title. When Aloysius was taken ill as a young boy he spent much time in prayer and reflection, and it was then that he first felt called to the priesthood.

His vocation displeased his family, and he resisted their attempts to persuade him to become a secular priest in order to join the Jesuits, renouncing all of his inheritance. Aloysius was studying theology in Rome when a plague broke out in 1591 and, although still afflicted with his own ill health, he volunteered to help care for the sick. He contracted the disease himself, and died aged

only 23. He was canonised in 1726, and is patron saint of students and AIDS patients. In a letter for the Jubilee Year, Father General Arturo Sosa SJ described Gonzaga (and St Stanislaus Kostka, in whose honour the Jubilee is also celebrated) as a model of counter-cultural witness to the gospel. Find out more at jesuit.org. uk/jubilee-st-aloysius-gonzaga

jesuit.org.uk  11


JESUITS & FRIENDS 100  Looking back

Jesuits & Friends is 100!

A faith that does

justice

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The editorial team celebrate 100 issues of Jesuits & Friends, and want to thank our readers and partners for making it all possible!

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THE FIRST TEN issues of Jesuits & Friends featured on their covers the Peters Map, highlighting the areas of the world in which Jesuits were active. This signified to our early readers that this was to be a magazine with a global outlook, covering the work in which the Jesuits in Britain and their partners were invested at home and overseas, and the history of a Society that had made an impact all over the world. As then-Provincial Fr George Earle SJ said in his introduction to the first issue: ‘We want to tell the largest possible number of friends about the great variety of Jesuit activities, all of which have a single aim and a single spirit: Thy Kingdom come on earth as it is in heaven.’ While the map was certainly symbolic, it offered limited options for an attractive magazine cover! And so subsequent issues featured, on each cover, powerful images that collectively communicate this vision, as you can see on this page and on the front of this 100th issue. To select highlights from 100 issues of Jesuits & Friends was no easy task. It is a source of consolation to see how often, over 33 years, the magazine has had the opportunity to celebrate some truly remarkable work undertaken by the Society of Jesus and those with whom we work. Jesuits have been at the forefront of promoting social justice, in their work with and for migrants and refugees, for example, or in calling for policy change. The communities of Jesuit schools and parishes have provided endless examples of new and creative ways to witness to the gospel. We can see, too, how often and how effectively Jesuit Missions has made a difference to those whose lives have been upturned by war or 12  Jesuits & Friends Summer 2018

natural disasters, particularly through emergency appeals in recent years. And while we have had occasion to mention Jesuit interactions with some well-known faces over the years, it is the many ways in which your support has enabled Jesuits and their co-workers to help those whom the world so often forgets that fill the pages of this magazine.

“It’s a source of consolation to see how often the magazine has celebrated some truly remarkable work.” A review of our history also gives us pause as we notice moments of sorrow. While we recognise and welcome compassionate responses to suffering, we also lament the destructive forces of nature and humankind that render these responses necessary. As we read about fires and typhoons, civil wars and political unrest, we take the troubles that we read about in Jesuits & Friends into our prayer, and in doing so we join a global community in praying for our world. The pope invites us, as we follow his monthly prayer intentions, into this community. In each magazine, too, and particularly in this 100th issue, we ask you to join us in remembering those we have lost and to give thanks for the ways in which they have touched our lives. Another striking feature of this survey of our archive is a sense of flux. We conclude each magazine by listing the

members of the Province who are being missioned to new works, communities or even countries – people and projects are always on the move! Our 100 issues reflect the changes that have taken place over the last 33 years not only for the Jesuits in Britain and their work, but also in the wider Society of Jesus, the Church and our global community. No matter how many differences we notice, however, Jesuits & Friends is proud to record the many ways in which a faith that does justice manifests itself in a changing world. It is with much gratitude to everyone who has contributed to this magazine, and to the activities recorded in its pages, that we invite you to join us in tracing the path that Jesuits & Friends has taken over its 100 issues. l

FIND OUT MORE To revisit some of these stories in full go to the online version of Jesuits & Friends www.jesuit.org.uk/summer2018-issue-100 and follow the links.

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JESUITS & FRIENDS 100  Timeline

Timeline  JESUITS & FRIENDS 100

Issue 13

Issue 21

Issue 52

Issue 54

Issue 87

Regional Superior Malcolm Rodrigues SJ is arrested in Guyana

Queen Elizabeth II visits Westwood Cheshire Home in Harare

Remembering the North Korean football team’s stay at Loyola Hall for the 1966 World Cup

Cover image of Fr Richard Strickland SJ, who guarded the property of ex-Jesuits during the Suppression of the Society

Jesuit Missions launch an emergency appeal for the victims of Typhoon Haiyan

Issue 95 Fr Arturo Sosa SJ elected as Superior General at GC36

FREE: please take a copy

A faith that does justice

Issue 2

Issue 23

Issue 54

Issue 68

Fr Anthony Lawn SJ describes his experience as an adviser to – and actor in! – The Mission

Fr Philip Gwashero SJ accompanies an 8-week-old baby from London to Harare

Issue celebrating the 200th anniversary of the Restoration of the English Province

Death of Tony Montfort, former Director of Jesuit Missions

Issue 15 Provincial Fr Michael Campbell-Johnston SJ pays tribute to the six Jesuits murdered in El Salvador along with their housekeeper and her daughter

Issue 7 Fr James Hanvey SJ calls for a Christian response to AIDS

Year 1985 Editor Issue 1 2

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Scotland’s Martyr for the Faith Celebrating St John Ogilvie SJ 1579 – 1615

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The early days of Catholic television in Guyana

Contribution of the Church to the new South Africa

The beginning of JRS UK

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uk Issue 90 • Spring 2015 • jesuitsandfriends.org.

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Richard Wren SJ 3

& friends

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Br Ken Vance SJ reveals the secret recipe for Menchikov!

Jesuit day of prayer and action for Make Poverty History

150 years of the Jesuits in Guyana

Jesuits respond to the earthquake in Haiti

400th anniversary of the martyrdom of St John Ogilvie SJ

2002

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2011 Tim Curtis SJ

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Issue 69

A report on the work of JRS in Bosnia & Croatia

Fr Adolfo Nicolás SJ elected as Superior General at GC35

Issue 17 Queen Elizabeth II visits Stonyhurst

34th General Congregation of the Society of Jesus

Issue 11

Issue 18

Issue 25

The first Jesuits & Friends cover photo, of one of six newlyordained Jesuits – current Editor, Fr Paul Nicholson SJ

Fr Edmund Ryden SJ describes his first year of priesthood in China

Fr Michael Barnes SJ meets the Dalai Lama in London

Jesuits & Friends Summer 2018

Cambodia’s new Jesuit martyr: Richie Fernando

Issue 37 First Jesuit Missions team run the London Marathon

2014

Dushan Croos SJ

Jesuits behind the scenes with Mother Teresa

Sacred Heart church in Guyana destroyed by fire

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Paul Nicholson SJ

 eorge Earle SJ G 1981–1987

Jesuits are responding to Laudato si’ by taking responsibility for our world

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Provincial

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Changing the conversation about refugees

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2013

Issue 85 Special edition to celebrate the election of the first Jesuit pope, Pope Francis

 ichael CampbellM Johnston SJ 1987–1993 J ames Crampsey SJ 1993–1999  avid Smolira SJ D 1999–2005

Jeffrey Bruno – Aleteia

The Princess Royal visits Heythrop

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2012

Jesuits in Nepal respond on a ‘day of doom’ when an earthquake struck the country

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 ichael Holman SJ M 2005–2011

Issue 97 100th anniversary of the birth of Blessed Oscar Romero

 ermot Preston SJ D 2011–2017  amian Howard SJ D 2017–present

jesuit.org.uk  13


JESUIT MISSIONS  Marathon

Men and women running for others A famous Ignatian principle was put into action on the final stretch of the London Marathon this year – Stephanie Beech relives the drama!

THE JESUIT ethos of ‘men and women for others’ brought two strangers together in a dramatic end to the London Marathon. Chris Lane, a parishioner of Corpus Christi in Boscombe who was running for Jesuit Missions, had overcome exhaustion in the early stages of the marathon, but with a mile to go was on the verge of collapse. Help was at hand from two nearby runners, one of whom happened to be a teacher at Stonyhurst!

At the 13-mile mark on Tower Bridge, Chris crashed and had to visit the hospital tent where a doctor examined his blood pressure, glucose and heart rate. They gave him permission to continue the race. At 18 miles, he was really struggling and visited another hospital tent. Here the nurses advised him to stop but, with so many other casualties to attend to, he stubbornly decided to continue, the pain increasing with every step.

a Maltese Jesuit running in a Womble suit; a sister of the Congregation of Jesus who ran dressed as a nun to raise awareness for Vocations Sunday; a team of ten from Mount St Mary’s Jesuit school; five couples (three of whom ran together); and two members of the Jesuits & Friends editorial group – Jesuit Missions’ Richard Greenwood and Jesuits in Britain staff member Jane Hellings. Congratulations to all of the team! l

Gemma Cornwall, an economics teacher who was running for Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation as a Type 1 diabetic herself, saw Chris in his Jesuit Missions vest as he was struggling up the home straight. Putting his arm around her she, and runner Chris Gosling, carried him over the finish line.

He says, ‘With 1.5 miles to go, a man came up on the side to which I was leaning and asked me my name. He replied that he was also called Chris. Then a young woman came up and grabbed my other side.’

You can still support the 2018 London Marathon runners with a donation: visit jesuitmissions.org.uk/takeaction/london-marathon

‘Very kindly, and sacrificing much deserved time, together they carried me home up the Mall. After crying and praying to Jesus to help me for the last six miles (which drew strange looks from spectators and marshals) it was good to finish. I was proud to run for Jesuit Missions, especially because I had bumped into Fr Gerard Chaisson, a priest from Canada running for Jesuit Missions, at the start, where we prayed together, and I received a blessing.’

Are you inspired to run the London Marathon? You can now sign up to run for Jesuit Missions in 2019! Visit jesuitmissions.org.uk to register your interest.

Chris had started the race determined to come close to his 2017 Manchester marathon ‘miracle’ time of 4 hours 22 minutes. This was without having factored in the intense heat of the day. In his own words: ‘The weather was hot at 10am, hotter still at 10.30am and then madly hot at noon, followed by manically hot at 2pm onwards!’ 14  Jesuits & Friends Summer 2018

Chris Gosling, Chris Lane and Gemma Cornwall.

Incredibly Chris was back teaching the next morning and says, ‘I cannot promise not to do one again, but next time there is no need to chase another personal best!’ Jesuit Missions had a team of 29 runners amongst the 40,000 who completed the London Marathon on Sunday 22 April. They included

© Marathon Foto

‘When I saw the Jesuit Missions vest I couldn’t just run past, and so I put being a woman for others into action! He did so well in the end after struggling for so long,’ Gemma said, after managing to track Chris down via Facebook. ‘It just seemed a remarkable coincidence that I, a teacher from a Jesuit school, happened to be in the right place to help a member of a Jesuit parish.’

FIND OUT MORE


New Creation  EVANGELISATION

New Creation – an online retreat for Eastertide Dushan Croos SJ describes a pioneering new retreat to share the pope’s call to care for our common home

IN HIS ENCYCLICAL Laudato si’ Pope Francis has called all Christians, but particularly young adults, to an ecological conversion, reconciling our relationships with God, our neighbour and the created world. Listening to God in prayer is an obvious starting point for any new Jesuit venture. So, in response to the pope’s invitation, two Jesuits living in the St Ignatius parish in Stamford Hill, north London, planned an innovative online retreat focused on this ecological conversion. They invited young people to pray with a daily podcast throughout the Easter season, taking up one of the key themes of Laudato si’, ‘care for our common home’, as this appears in scripture. They were then able to share their experience of prayer online with others making the retreat. The opportunity to blog on video commentaries on the encyclical was also made available. Finally, meetings of groups of retreatants who lived near each other were planned. These were to consider how this ‘care for our common home’ might become more of a reality in their own part of the city, in the context of Jesus’s resurrection message calling his followers to work with him in inaugurating a new creation. Although this full programme would only be available to those living around Stamford Hill, the initial podcasts were made more widely accessible on the Pathways to God website. It was recognised from the outset that this was an ambitious and novel programme, combining podcasts, blogging, online videos, and meetings

New Creation an Easter retreat

“By developing our individual, God-given capacities, an ecological conversion can inspire us to greater creativity and enthusiasm in resolving the world’s problems and in offering ourselves to God.” of small groups. Take-up among the local young people was initially smaller than had been hoped for – in the future, it could perhaps be good to do more work in getting to know them better first. This meant that it became possible to open the retreat to a wider range (of age and geography) than originally planned. If listening to God in prayer was the aim of this retreat, this is a message that applies as much to those offering the retreat as to those making it. During Eastertime, the Church listens, in the Acts of the Apostles, to the attempts of the first Christians to share the bewildering Good News of Christ’s

Pope Francis, Laudato si’, para 220 Resurrection. There are some false starts, leading Peter, Paul and the other apostles to adapt the presentation of their message. We live now at a time when the Church is exploring new ways to present its Good News. Only by exploring and searching for different ways to plant the good seed in the rich soil can we ensure that it has time to take root, sprout, leaf and bear its fruit. That’s not a bad conclusion to draw from the experience of a pioneering ecological retreat. l

FIND OUT MORE Visit www.pathwaystogod.org/myprayer-life/new-creation-retreat jesuit.org.uk  15


PARISHES  Boscombe

First communicants with catechists Sr Melita and Sr Janet of the Handmaids of the Sacred Heart of Jesus

With the Spirit and with fire Jane Hellings meets those leading a thriving parish where young and old follow the Ignatian pathway to God

WITH BAPTISMS occurring almost weekly it is perhaps no surprise that the Easter season at Corpus Christi parish in Boscombe saw a record 81 young hearts meet Christ in the sacrament of the Eucharist. Numbers for First Reconciliation and First Holy Communion programmes were up 25% on last year. Parish priest Fr Adrian Howell SJ puts the increase down to the popular family Sunday service which draws in people from across parish boundaries, as well as the proximity of the church to the Corpus Christi primary school, for whom Fr Adrian says Mass every week. 16  Jesuits & Friends Summer 2018

‘The vibrancy of our sacramental programmes is boosted by the continuing influx of devout Polish

“We respond to our ever-changing needs and resources with confidence in the Holy Spirit to provide!” families, who have been a great gift to our parish,’ observed Fr Adrian. ‘We also have a friendly and flourishing toddler group.’

Engagement with the life of the church continues with older families: 25 young people from the parish worked with a strong team of leaders and volunteers to prepare and receive the sacrament of confirmation in Portsmouth Cathedral in May. A continued connection with St Peter’s Secondary school, where Fr Adrian regularly says early morning Mass for staff and pupils, is essential and vibrant. Fr Adrian paid tribute to the team who help to prepare young people for all the sacraments: ‘We have a handful of heroic catechists, including the


Boscombe  PARISHES

Handmaids of the Sacred Heart sisters, and parent helpers enlisted each year. We respond to our ever-changing needs and resources with confidence in the Holy Spirit to provide!’

guides was launched, led by Fr Tony Horan SJ of the Corpus Christi Jesuit Community. This ended with a Week of Guided Prayer.

Amidst this busy catechetical programme (six RCIA candidates were received at the Easter vigil), continuing formation for adults is not neglected.

“The Spirit is empowering the people of the coast to make hearts burn with love.”

For those who want to put their faith into action in service of the poor, Churches Together in Boscombe group, The Boscombe Angels, organise volunteer teams to tackle the effects of poverty, substance abuse and rough sleeping. The SVP group cares for those in need in the parish as well as collecting parish donations for the local food bank. The ‘Vinnies’ group made up 228 food parcels for families in the local area at Christmas.

One of those from this Hearts on Fire group is already giving the full Spiritual Exercises in daily life. Two others are assisting on the training course in Ignatian Spirituality, so that in the future they can give it independently. ‘The course was a wonderful opportunity to learn about discernment in my own life. I learnt so much and it has helped me to develop my spiritual life and brought me closer to God. The sharing groups were a fantastic support’, one trainee commented. Another simply said: ‘It has changed my life.’

Corpus Christi parish has built enthusiastically and joyfully upon the Hearts on Fire mission which took place over eight days in July 2015, with a follow-up weekend in October 2016. At this time a year-long course training six local people to become prayer

Boscombe has for many years been a thriving centre for the Christian Life Community. There are now four flourishing CLCs plus a more recent

community in neighbouring Poole, and two local CLC members have recently taken on national leadership roles. Fr Tony observed, ‘For St Ignatius the purpose of growing closer to God through prayer is to enable us to see clearly how God wants us to serve others and to respond to His call. However, we can always do more to deepen our faith.’ Recently the Hearts on Fire group met with the Jesuits in Britain spirituality outreach team and felt encouraged and supported in their discernment as to how they can build on their already strong foundations to develop as a centre of Ignatian Spirituality in the south. Fr Tony concludes: ‘Stay alert and watchful and you will see what the Spirit is empowering the people of the coast to do to make hearts burn with love.’ l

FIND OUT MORE About the Christian Life Community www.pathwaystogod.org/org/ christian-life-community

First communicants at Our Lady’s grotto, Corpus Christi Boscombe

jesuit.org.uk  17


JESUIT PUPIL PROFILE  Wimbledon College

Compassionate and Loving at Wimbledon College School chaplain James Potter describes how the students and staff of Wimbledon College have been engaging with the Jesuit Pupil Profile virtues of love and compassion during the school year

Lent with the Lord Through Lent we inevitably had a particular accent on the sacrificial nature of loving, which also permeates through our school prayer: ‘To give and not to count the cost’. Our approach to growing in compassion has been very much guided by Pope Francis and his focus on compassion as being moved by the suffering of others, but importantly being moved into action. During Lent as a community we always try to turn our fasting into some positive benefit for those most in need in our world. This Lent we supported CAFOD in their “Give it up” campaign, giving the students the opportunity to learn about the lives and stories of those CAFOD works with, and turn their fasting into seeds, toilets, bees and water, to make a real, sustainable difference in their lives.

Students were also loving and compassionate in a more contemplative way during Lent, taking part in the 24 hours for the Lord initiative of Pope Francis, giving up time in their breaks to come and spend some time in prayer in front of the Blessed Sacrament, holding those struggling and suffering in their prayers.

“The Head Master had the longest queue and a large crowd gathered just to witness the spectacle.” In the spirit of Jesus’s example of servant leadership at the Last Supper, our chaplain and senior leadership team took to the playgrounds armed with shoe polish and brushes to shine

Students presenting at the launch of Merton Citizens

18  Jesuits & Friends Summer 2018

shoes on Maundy Thursday. The students were very taken by the opportunity – and, we hope, by its symbolism – and queued in great numbers to have their shoes polished (some seemingly for the first time!). The Head Master, unsurprisingly, had the longest queue, as well as a large crowd gathered just to witness the spectacle.

Walking with refugees Our Lower Grammar (Yr 9) students on their Easter retreat days have been imaginatively placing themselves in the shoes of refugees through our refugee simulation, which sees them take on roles in an imaginary family in a war-torn country. They have to role-play difficult and emotive decisions as they embark on their dangerous and unpredictable journey as refugees. They face many challenges and set-backs

Refugee walk


Wimbledon College  JESUIT PUPIL PROFILE

Whole school photo

along the way, all taken from real life stories, and discover many of the perils of travelling on foot, by boat, or by road. At the end students share their experiences of the journeys with the other student family groups, where they are shocked to learn the real life stories behind their often traumatic and heart-breaking journeys.

A mission for mental health Over the last couple of years the College has launched its “Healthy Minds” programme to help promote positive mental health. This has involved students’ conferences, a mental health awareness month, fundraising for a local teenage mental health charity, and this year a focus on supporting staff mental health. Our mental health mission, based on a compassionate cura personalis, has taken on an even broader form this year as Wimbledon College has been excited to help found a new Citizens UK group in our own neighbourhood. This has been a profoundly moving and empowering way for our students to listen to the difficulties in the lives of others and be active participants in bringing about change. During a listening campaign held last year we heard many moving stories of young people’s struggles with mental health from across the borough. A dedicated group of Wimbledon College students, along with students from a local Church of England Academy and other Citizens member groups, have worked hard to champion

“Our students have been active participants in bringing about change.” the call for improved mental health services for young people. This resulted in our students speaking at the Merton Citizens founding assembly in front of over 300 local citizens, and with the leaders of our local political parties, the Chair of the Clinical Commissioning Group, and the Chair and Director of our local NHS Mental Health Care Trust. They moved the whole room with their stories and gained backing from all the key political decision makers for our proposals for change.

First Give A new venture for Wimbledon College has seen us team up with First Give, a philanthropy project that engages students in identifying social needs in their local area, researching local charities, creating presentations about them and engaging in some creative social action to support that charity. Seven teams will then go through to the school final where First Give will award the best team £1,000 for a charity of their choice. We see this as an exciting new way to develop their leadership skills as agents of change, moved by compassion for those around them.

of our reflection on the Jesuit Pupil Profile virtues and spurred on by the new vision for Jesuit Education articulated in the documents from the Rio de Janeiro international Jesuit Education Conference in 2017. This is particularly important for us as an all-boys school. We have used our partnership with the Ursuline High School for girls to bring students together to understand the lived experiences of both male and female students, and how issues of gender inequality and stereotyping have been negatively affecting everyone. These forums have helped hearts and minds to be moved with compassion and love and a desire to change the world. l

FIND OUT MORE For more about the Jesuit Pupil Profile, go to jesuitinstitute.org/ Pages/JesuitPupilProfile.htm For more about Wimbledon College, go to wimbledoncollege.org.uk

Gender equality Gender equality has been an emerging theme for us this year, coming out jesuit.org.uk  19


PRAYING WITH THE POPE

The Pope’s Prayer Network

PRAYER THEMES FOR THE MONTHS AHEAD JUNE: Social Networks That social networks may work towards that inclusiveness which respects others for their differences. JULY: Priests and their Pastoral Ministry That priests, who experience fatigue and loneliness in their pastoral work, may find help and comfort in their intimacy with the Lord and in their friendship with their brother priests. AUGUST: The Treasure of Families That any far-reaching decisions of economists and politicians may protect the family as one of the treasures of humanity. SEPTEMBER: Young People in Africa That young people in Africa may have access to education and work in their own countries. OCTOBER: The Mission of Religious That consecrated religious men and women may bestir themselves, and be present among the poor, the marginalised, and those who have no voice.

20  Jesuits & Friends Summer 2018

all of humanity. Others are more connected with the Church’s evangelising mission, given to every baptised person. This summer’s intentions include prayers for priestly ministry and for consecrated religious as well as for justice in social networks, the value of family life, and development in Africa. All of the intentions are to be shared with all of the faithful so that, in Pope Francis’ own words, communion may increase. Everyone has the opportunity to unite with the Holy Father in praying for these intentions each day in each month. They are the pope’s intentions but he earnestly asks us that they become ours too. The monthly prayer intention is always a global call to transform our prayer into ‘concrete gestures’ of service. It is a monthly action plan mobilising us to work together to build a more human and caring world. When we make our Morning Offering prayer, we are committing ourselves to do our best to make the intention a reality in our world. Uniting our offering of each new day to the pope’s monthly intention is a declaration that we will make his concern ours, in the context of the whole Church, the entire people of God. The prayer of intercession matters for the Church’s mission. We should not be thinking of ourselves as somehow praying to change God’s mind. We should see this as changing our own minds or, better still, our own hearts! It is fundamental to Christian spirituality that we become more fully ourselves, the kind of people we were made to be, only to the extent that we forget ourselves and look to others. Our prayer will stir us up to concrete

© L’Osservatore Romano

IN THIS SUMMER edition of Jesuits & Friends, we have an impressive array of the Holy Father’s concerns for the world and our mission in it. Some of these challenges are universal: they reflect matters that are serious for

action. St Ignatius of Loyola learned this and teaches us in the Spiritual Exercises that ‘Love shows itself more in actions than in words.’ l

FIND OUT MORE A Morning Offering prayer is proposed each day, on our popular app and website www.clicktopray.org. Others may prefer to use one of the more traditional versions such as that given below. The pope’s intention for each month can be found on www.popesglobalprayer.net and, presented by the Holy Father in person, on www.thepopevideo.org

A version of the traditional Morning Offering: O Jesus, through the Immaculate Heart of Mary, I offer you my prayers, works, joys, sufferings of this day, in union with the Holy Sacrifice of the Mass throughout the world. I offer them for all the intentions of your Sacred Heart: the salvation of souls, the reparation for sin, the reunion of all Christians; I offer them for the intentions of our bishops and of all members of the Apostleship of Prayer, and in particular for the intention recommended by the Holy Father this month.

© L’Osservatore Romano

David Stewart SJ helps us link our own prayers to Pope Francis’ personal prayer intentions


Philosophy  VOCATIONS

A new way of proceeding Christopher Brolly SJ is increasingly finding that his philosophy studies in Paris are guided by a sense of mission, which leads him to see life from a new perspective

I MADE FIRST Vows in the Society of Jesus on 2 September 2017. Two days later I arrived in Paris for the next stage of my formation: philosophy studies. I found myself beginning these studies alongside Jesuits from a variety of countries and contexts: three Frenchmen, two Indians, two Jesuits from the Rwanda-Burundi province and Jacques St Laurent SJ, a fellow co-novice and Englishman.

I am also benefiting from a new ‘way of proceeding’ in the studies themselves. Right from the first days of the academic year our teachers encouraged us to adopt an ‘Ignatian’ way of studying. That is to say they encourage us to spend time each week revisiting our notes, spending time ‘just thinking’ and compiling the questions or subjects that have intrigued us and flow

Our studies take place at Centre Sèvres, a Jesuit philosophy and theology faculty in central Paris, which also welcomes members of other religious orders and congregations as well as local lay people. Here there is a ‘way of proceeding’, a way of doing things, very different to my previous university experiences, especially in the sense of community that exists between us. For example, as well as our usual daily Mass, each month there is a student-run Mass, followed by a shared lunch. This not only deepens friendships but also underlines the spiritual dimension of our studies and the faith that has brought us together from around the world.

“Rather than detach me from reality, my studies have helped me find an intensity and depth in it.” from this period of reflection. In doing this, we are trying to be attentive to the calls of the Holy Spirit that exist during our studies. This is perhaps not only typically ‘Ignatian’, but also steeped in French academic tradition: Henri Bergson once stated that, ‘Philosophy is about posing a problem rather than resolving it. To pose a problem is already the beginning of its resolution…’

Christopher Brolly SJ (top right) with his fellow students

To give an example, I recently handed in my first essay on the ‘problem’ of death. Having studied certain works of Plato, I posed the question: what is it about this life that allows Socrates to face his own death full of confidence? Of course I didn’t resolve the question of how to face up to our own mortality, but the journey of studying it led me to a deepened perspective that will hopefully allow me to serve others better in my future ministry, accompanying them at difficult moments in life. As a Jesuit, that’s where I find meaning and motivation in studying: putting it to the service of the Church, enabling me to serve others better. The philosophy stage of our formation is a potentially difficult one as academia is seemingly a little detached from the activity of the ‘real world’, especially after already having spent two years of intensive discernment in the nourishing yet isolated context of the novitiate. However, up until now, I am fortunate to have found great meaning in this new set of studies, rather than finding them a frustration as I perhaps feared I might. Rather than detach me from reality, they have helped me find an intensity and depth in it, an invitation to study life from a philosophical perspective. As it should, studying as a ‘religious’ feels very different. Already I feel that my work is better guided by a sense of mission: I try to see what paths of study God is inviting me to pursue and to explore creatively, thus continuing the process of formation and conversion that He has started in me. l

FIND OUT MORE To find out more about life as a Jesuit, visit jesuit.org.uk/vocations jesuit.org.uk  21


MOVES AND OBITUARIES

On the move

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22  Jesuits & Friends Summer 2018

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Finally, Tom McGuinness, who has in recent years been working at the Manresa Spirituality Centre in Dublin,

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This summer sees a number of changes of parish priests. Peter Randall will take over from Stephen Patterson at St Wilfrid’s, Preston. Stephen will then enjoy a short break before he is re-assigned. Andrew CameronMowat is moving from the Immaculate Conception church at Farm Street in central London to become parish priest at St Ignatius, Stamford Hill. Dominic Robinson will take over at Farm Street. David Smolira, who is currently in charge at Stamford Hill, is to replace Simon Bishop (who has now settled in as novice-master in Birmingham) as a Provincial’s Delegate, co-ordinating work in spirituality and lay formation. Meanwhile William Pearsall will swap places with Peter Scally. William is to be the new parish priest at the Sacred Heart church in Edinburgh, while Peter will become the university chaplain in Manchester.

move of 100 yards, however, as the tertianship and the spirituality centre share the same grounds. l

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Anthony Paul Appu, a member of the Anhara Province of India, has been working in St Anselm’s parish in Southall since he was ordained priest last summer. He will shortly return to his own province. His place in Southall will be taken by another Indian Jesuit, George Stephen Thayriam, who is just completing his theology studies at Heythrop, and has belonged to the Hurtado community in Wapping.

has been appointed as one of the two tertian-masters of the European tertianship. This will only involve a

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SEVERAL MOVES have been announced by Fr Provincial since the Spring edition of Jesuits & Friends. Starting in the south, Gerry Hughes has moved from Oxford to join the Corpus Christi community in Boscombe, while David Gornall and Paddy Connors have left that community to go to St Wilfrid’s in Preston. James Campbell has also left Campion Hall to travel to Nairobi to take up a new post at Hekima College teaching canon law. James Crampsey is a new member of the community at the Holy Name in Manchester, having moved down from Edinburgh.

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MOVES AND OBITUARIES

Obituaries Fr Robert Murray SJ Robert was born on 8 June 1925 in Peking (now Beijing), China, where his parents were working as Protestant lay missionaries. The grandson of Sir James Murray (the founder of the Oxford English Dictionary), his mother died when he was five years old and his father re-married. After the family returned to England in 1934 he was educated at Eltham College and then at Taunton School after the College was evacuated there in 1939. Towards the end of the Second World War, he studied Persian for a year at SOAS with a view to war service, but then went on to take a degree in Greats at Oxford, during which time he was received into the Roman Catholic Church. This conversion is said to be partly due

to his friendship with the Tolkien family. Robert had the responsibility of proofreading drafts and manuscripts of The Lord of the Rings. Robert entered the Society in 1949 at Roehampton and took his First Vows two years later. Following the usual studies of philosophy and theology at Heythrop in Oxfordshire, and then teaching at St Ignatius College in Stamford Hill, he was ordained in 1959. After his fourth year of theology, and tertianship in Munster, Germany, he gained a doctorate in patristic and biblical theology at the Gregorian in Rome, specialising in Syriac. Then in 1963, he returned to teach at Heythrop, where he was to spend the rest of his working life. He was one of those who moved to London in 1970 to re-establish the College as part of the University of London. He was editor of The Heythrop Journal from 1971-1983.

Robert was able to read twelve languages, including Aramaic, Hebrew, Syriac and Persian. In 1971, he gave two lectures in Romania at the invitation of the Orthodox Patriarch and in 1984, after a seminar in Hong Kong, he was able to re-visit mainland China for the first time in over 50 years. He was awarded a Senior Research Fellowship by Heythrop in 1993 and an honorary Doctorate of Letters in 2004. In 1992, his book The Cosmic Covenant: Biblical Themes of Justice, Peace and the Integrity of Creation was published. In 1999 Robert retired from Heythrop but continued as a writer and as a member of the Jesuit China Service. In 2004, his book Symbols of Church and Kingdom: a Study in Early Syriac Tradition was published. He moved to Boscombe in 2010, where he lived until his death. l

Brother James (Jim) Spence SJ Jim died peacefully on Wednesday 4 April 2018 in the Cardiac Care Unit of the Queen Elizabeth University Hospital in Glasgow. He was 77 years old, and had been a Jesuit for 57 years. Jim was born on 22 January 1941 in Glasgow. He attended St Mary’s Junior Secondary School in the city, and then worked in a tailoring factory. In January 1960, he joined the Society as a postulant at the novitiate in Roehampton, and took his First Vows there as a brother on St Ignatius Day in 1962. After two years at Heythrop in Oxfordshire, he spent the years between 1964 and 1969 in nursing training, based at Harlaxton, Glasgow, and Campion Hall, and specialising

in geriatric medicine. Next came four years as an infirmarian at St Beuno’s, with a break for tertianship at Corby Hall in Sunderland in 1972-3. Jim took his Final Vows in Glasgow on the feast of Candlemas in 1974. After a short spell nursing in Preston, he returned to Scotland in 1977, where he was to be based for the rest of his life. Between 1979 and 1992, Jim worked as a health visitor in Glasgow, with a sabbatical in Milltown Park, Dublin in 1986. From 1993, he spent two years as Director of a ‘House of Hospitality’ in Kilwinning, followed by two more based in Edinburgh as Jesuit health co-ordinator for Scotland. At the end of the 1990s he did more study, including counselling training and a BSc in health studies, and having returned to Glasgow, in the early years of the new millennium was a member of the Children’s Panel of the Scottish Executive. From 2008, he was also doing retreat work through

the Ignatian Spirituality Centre in Glasgow. Up to the time of his death, he had been working as Minister and guest-master at the St Aloysius community house in Glasgow. l PLEASE PRAY for those who have died recently. May they rest in peace.

• Mrs S Carnell • Mr Bryan Clarke • Mr V Classick • Mrs Mary Crosby • Mrs C R Dupuis • Mr A Fine • Mrs Kathleen Friel • Ms Mary Jackson • Ms Mary Kelly • Mr Aloysius Marsden • Ms Margaret McGonigle • Mr J J McGrory • Mrs Mary Miller • Mr E Stevens

jesuit.org.uk  23


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A faith that does justice

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