Issuu on Google+

Select Work

JESSIE B O OT H MLA I, 2016 Harvard University, Graduate School of Design [e] jbooth296@gmail.com [p] 925.348.3221


RESUMÉ 04 DESIGN 06

SHIFTING HORIZONS, FURNAS LAGOON

16

FISHERMAN’S QUAY, LE HAVRE WATERFRONT

28

UNCANNY URBANISM, JAMAICA BAY

36

GLACIAL PROMENADE, FRANKLIN PARK

RESEARCH 40

44

HAND DRAWING 46

SYNCING EDGE, CAPE COD CANAL CONSTRUCTING DYNAMISM, COASTAL LOUISIANA

PILE PORTRAITS, FORT POINT CHANNEL


J E S S I E B O O T H [e] jbooth296@gmail.com [p] 925.348.3221

EDUCATION HARVARD UNIVERSITY, GRADUATE SCHOOL OF DESIGN, 2013 -2016 Master of Landscape Architecture I UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, BERKELEY, 2005-2009 Bachelor of Science, Conservation and Resource Studies Academic Areas of Interest Ecology, Environmental Justice, Land-Use Planning HARVARD UNIVERSITY, GRADUATE SCHOOL OF DESIGN, SUMMER 2010 Landscape Architecture Career Discovery Program UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS, AMHERST, WINTER 2008 Study Abroad Program in Dakar, Senegal UNIVERSITY OF VIRGINIA, SUMMER 2007 Behavioral Ecology Field Course

PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE HARVARD GRADUATE SCHOOL OF DESIGN, Cambridge, Massachusetts, Spring 2016 Teaching Assistant Poetics of Planting Design course, with instructors Danielle Choi and Kim Mercurio. Provided administrative support and compiled student coursework into comprehensive publication. OFFSHOOTS, Charlestown, Massachusetts, Winter 2016 Intern Conducted site, precedent, and plant research for stormwater infrastructure projects at Boston public schools. Created watershed health diagram and map to contextualize intervention sites for the client and public. COASTAL SUSTAINABILITY STUDIO, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, Louisiana, Summer 2015 Intern Collaborated with engineering, planning, and architecture interns and research fellows to develop project detailing the ecologic and infrastructural future of the Mississippi River Delta. Lead design intern for design and concept development, diagramming, and rendering competition entry.

RESUMÉ

THE TRUST FOR PUBLIC LAND, San Francisco, California, Summer 2014 Intern, Parks for People Team Designed outreach correspondence for team to use in community meetings and events, including historical site research, project timelines, and neighborhood maps. Engaged in design development, community meetings, and construction meetings for two urban parks under redevelopment in San Francisco. Authored and published an article in three local news sources publicizing the redevelopment of a park in San Francisco’s Hunters Point neighborhood. Conducted interviews with engaged stakeholders.

04


PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE continued THE NATURE CONSERVANCY, San Francisco, California, 2010-2013 Philanthropy Operations Manager Managed financial operations for the California Chapter’s philanthropy team including financial reporting to the executive team and board of trustees, pledge management, internal audit reviews, and other departmental donorrelated processes. Gained fluency in current conservation efforts within California by engaging with program staff and attending lectures. LUTSKO ASSOCIATES LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE, Capay Valley, California, Fall 2009 Horticultural Intern Worked with nursery manager to prune, propagate, and care for plant stock, becoming familiar with the firm’s plant palette and gaining intensive horticultural experience. Planted and maintained large areas of the property under the guidance of the nursery manager. GROWING SOLUTIONS RESTORATION EDUCATION INSTITUTE, Santa Barbara, California, Summer 2008 Intern Learned, identified and collected native plant seeds from varied Southern California plant communities. Cared for, propagated, and watered plants at five different nurseries throughout Santa Barbara County. Engaged in restoration efforts on shorebird rookery off coast of Santa Cruz Island.

RECOGNITION & AWARDS

SKILLS GRAPHIC 2D 3D DATA

Adobe Illustrator, Photoshop, After Effects, InDesign AutoCAD Rhino, Vray, Model Building ArcMAP, Microsoft Excel

VOLUNTEER & EXTRACURRICULAR ACTIVITY WOMEN IN DESIGN, 2014-2016 Project Leader Spearheaded effort to collect narratives from GSD alumnae in order to catalog their influence on the design field and within the school. Coordinated and documented interviews with visiting alumnae. HARVARD GSD ASLA CHAPTER, 2015-2016 ALPHA CHI OMEGA, 2008-2009 Philanthropy Chair Designed and implemented campus-wide fashion show to raise money for survivors of domestic violence, increasing funds raised over ten times prior year.

INVITED CONTRIBUTOR Open Letters Publication, 2015 Co-authored piece on resilience in the context of coastal Louisiana for GSD-wide distribution. PENNY WHITE PROJECT FUND GRANTEE Harvard Graduate School of Design, 2015 Awarded funding to undertake coastal disaster resilience research in Japan’s Tohoku region in August, 2015. O’FRIEL JAPAN INITIATIVES GRANTEE Harvard University Asia Center, 2015 Additional award to further research in Tohoku region in August, 2015. SPECIAL MENTION: CONSTRUCTED ECOLOGIES D3 Natural Systems Competition, 2015 Teamwork with Coastal Sustainability Studio interns and research fellows. PLATFORM 7 EXHIBIT AND PUBLICATION Harvard Graduate School of Design, 2014 Core studio work featured in publication as well as exhibition in Gund Hall.

RESUMÉ 05


OPTION STUDIO, FALL 2015 ADVISORS: JOAO NUNES & JOAO GOMES DA SILVA SITE: SAO MIGUEL ISLAND, AZORES, PORTUGAL

SHIFTING HORIZONS

SHIFTING HORIZONS

Exposure and immersion along a trail to the Furnas Lagoon.

06

THE LANDSCAPE of San Miguel Island is defined by the domes, slopes, and craters of its volcanic history. Layers of vegetation, tapestries of land use, and processes of weathering are inscribed upon this spectacular topography. The proposed trail and outlook network defers to the richness of its environment while connecting the upper watershed to the lagoon from an experiential perspective. The orientation of the intervention is defined by the topography, whether it privileges a distant vista or emphasizes the roundness of traversing over a trachyte dome. The path runs through many different conditions, allowing for an experience of extreme exposure, enclosure, and submersion. This intervention traces a watercourse that receives water from one of the largest subbasins in the lagoon’s watershed, creating a large opportunity for improving the water quality in the lagoon The intervention engages

with this issue in the upper watershed through proposing 20 meter vegetated buffers and on the lower caldera through a series of retention and treatment ponds, using plants and gravity to trap nitrogen-transporting sediments before they reach the lagoon. The descent ends in a series of geothermal baths whose cold water will be supplied by the watercourse once water quality has been improved through remediation. The intervention celebrates the rich environment of the Furnas Lagoon by curating views, revealing topography through a wide range of spatial experience, and improving the water quality of the lagoon through remediation. Acknowledging the rich geology, topography, vegetation, and culture of the site, Shifting Horizons seeks to strategically reveal what exists, allowing for a renewed vision of this mesmerizing and layered landscape.


SHIFTING HORIZONS

07


DIAGRAM path logic and landmarks trachyte dome

trachyte y dome trachyte dome

trachyte dome

Dome Lookout

Pico do Ferro rro L Lookout xis (existing)

Dome m Lookout L II

Creek Walk

Valley Lookout o

Orange Garden Waterfall ll Bridge

Fumeroles

Lavaa Field Lav L Lava Field Fi Lookout

Sediment Pools

Creek Walk

Baths

SHIFTING HORIZONS

Jetty

08

ORIENTATION LOGIC

FEATURES

VISTAS

view axis

Outlook

360ยบ view

topography and views

Pool

follows the contour

Waterfall Bridge Creek Walk Staircase

180ยบ view


01 02 03 04

08 07 05

06

09

10

SHIFTING HORIZONS

SITE PLAN 09


SERIAL SECTIONS At the path’s highest point, one emerges from a tunnel of laurel trees, revealing expansive views to the ocean on both sides of the island, heightening the senses of exposure and remoteness of the island.

01

02

03

04

SHIFTING HORIZONS

05

10

06


When the path leads deep into the ravine, one is fully immersed in the atmosphere, vegetation, and topography of the immediate surrounds.

07

08

09

SHIFTING HORIZONS

10

The path ends on a jetty that protrudes into the lagoon. While exposed to the wind and water, one also feels enveloped by the surrounding caldera.

11


WATER QUALITY STRATEGIES

01 UPLAND thicken the riparian buffers with diverse deciduous species including Azorean Holly, Azorean Laurel and PauBranco. Roots will stabilize soil and deciduous leaf litter will support understory growth.

02 CALDERA SLOPE passages over the watercourse double as check dams to allow nutrient rich sediment to fall out of the water column.

The path to the lagoon navigates a 300 meter descent from the plateau at the top of the caldera to the lagoon’s edge. Beginning in former cattle fields, it descends through dense cryptomeria forest before emerging into the floodplain, punctuated by willow and birch. The upper plateau was heavily grazed until recently, leaving behind high amounts of nitrogen and phosphorous. During high rain events, sediment flows to the lagoon increase, bringing large amounts of nutrients and leading to eutrophication in the lagoon,

12 PATH PROFILE hydrology, vegetation, elevation

LAVA FIELD/LAGOON OUTLOOK

CRYPTOMERIA/ LAURISSILVA FOREST thin cryptomeria, inter-plant deciduous species

waterfall

01

creek crossing

WATERSHED OUTLOOK

Three strategies address the nutrient excess in order to improve the health of the lagoon along an altitudinal gradient, acknowledging that much of the contamination can be mitigated in the upper watershed.

FORMER PASTURES maintain through periodic grazing expand vegetated riparian buffer

SHIFTING HORIZONS

creek crossing

03 LAGOON LOWLANDS phosphorous and nitrogendependent aquatic plants are seeded amongst a series of low check dams, slowing and filtering water before it enters the lagoon.

02


WATERSHED OUTLOOK museum board, 12” x 12”

WATERFALL CROSSING museum board, 12” x 12”

watercourse outlet

leisure pools

sediment settling pools

WILLOW AND BIRCH FLOODPLAIN

SHIFTING HORIZONS

waterfall

MIXED WOODLAND

03

13 0M

500 M


PERSPECTIVE hillside outlook

SHIFTING HORIZONS

PERSPECTIVE lowland baths

14


PERSPECTIVE watershed outlook

DETAIL PLAN watershed outlook

DETAIL PLAN lowland baths

The design intent is to orient through strategic incisions, which are evident through their materiality and orthogonal contrast within the landscape, that allow for an unimpeded experience of the landscape. These incisions work with the topography and are emphasized by vegetation.

Geothermal baths are a centerpiece of Azorean culture, and existing local baths draw in tourists and locals alike. A series of basalt baths are proposed, along a gradient of public to private and oriented to maximize views to the lagoon. They will be fed by nearby geothermal vents, and cold water will be supplied by the path’s watercourse when nutrient levels are mitigated. Strategically planted birch and willow trees will lend bathers privacy and atmosphere.

SHIFTING HORIZONS

The upland interventions are primarily constructed from locally available basalt, with limestone accents. The basalt and limestone combination is a traditional material palette for plazas in Portugal, including the Azores. The lowland boardwalk path is designed in wood with basalt as a secondary material.

15


OPTION STUDIO, SPRING 2016 STUDIO ADVISORS: MICHEL DESVIGNE & INESSA HASCH SITE: LE HAVRE, FRANCE

tidal basin

fish market

FISHERMAN’S QUAY Revealing the potential of Le Havre’s local fishing economy as an anchor for public space.

PROJECT TITLE FISHERMAN’S QUAY

THE COASTAL CITY of Le Havre has become compartmentalized, with the downtown core completely detached from what was once a commercially and socially active waterfront. As the greater port of Le Havre expanded in scope and scale in the past two decades, the relatively smaller urban waterfront’s activity has been replaced with vacant lots, a functional barrier between the adjacent urban core and the greater harbor. The proposal aims to reconnect the urban area with the port through fore-fronting the local fishing industry. Currently, fishing operation and markets have been scaled back to one corner of the harbor. The project stretches the domain of commercial fishermen across the entire south-facing harbor, while creating diverse recreational fishing activities along the western edge of the waterfront.

pedestrian passerelle 01 16

Commercial fishing activity is supported through the installation of additional open-air markets, cold storage, mooring, and dock-side fish sales. Recreational fishing is bolstered through the creation of diverse nearshore habitats and pole fishing areas, from deeper water to rip rap tidal areas. The quay interfaces with the harbor via a continuous wooden boardwalk, which provides infrastructure for fishing activities as well as opportunities for public access, observation, and interaction. The quay’s connection to the urban realm is facilitated through a network of trees that run down major boulevards and terminate in treefilled plazas along the quay. Plazas of various size and material are created to host weekly market activities as well as the numerous music, fishing, and other cultural activities of the city.


Study model, bristol.

Fishing activity on the quay, early 1900s.

boat ramp / market vehicle access

dockside fish sales

mooring

FISHERMAN’S PROJECT TITLEQUAY

DETAIL PLAN commercial fishing area

01 17


FISHERMAN’S QUAY

pontoon boat dock

grassy overlook

boat ramp HIGH TIDE

existing revetment LOW TIDE

18

boardwalk material: wood planks

promenade material: concrete


SECTION I

FISHERMAN’S QUAY

plane tree plaza material: platanus x acerifolia decomposed granite

19


01

SE CT

IO

N

III

02

03

FISHERMAN’S QUAY

05

06

The intervention site is the interface between the harbor and an area of the city rebuilt after WWII, an effort led by architect Auguste Perret. The proposal emphasizes connectivity - along the entire quay, and from the waterfront to the adjacent neighborhoods. The waterfront edge is a continuous wooden surface, which turns and scales in response to various uses. The quay is connected to the city by a network of trees lining major thoroughfares, which continue into plazas along the quay.

NI

IO

20

04

CT SE

01 KAYAK LAUNCH 02 PINE PLAZA 03 POLE-FISH DOCKS 04 LAWN 05 HARBOR MASTER 06 FISHING DECK 07 CHARTER MOORING 08 PLANE TREE PLAZA 09 HARBOR CENTER 10 PLACE CARRÉ 11 TIDAL BASIN 12 FISH MARKET 13 VESSEL MOORING

07

08


I NIII ION CTIO SECT SE

13

10

09

12 11

FISHERMAN’S QUAY

21

OVERALL PLAN


Once bisected by a street, the courtyard is claimed for pedestrian use and organized by a grid of honey locusts, chosen for their dappled shade and finely textured canopy. The trees extend down the adjacent Rue de Paris, reinforcing the pedestrian connection between the quay and the cultural district by the Bassin du Commerce.

FISHERMAN’S QUAY

The plaza is an entryway from the urban fabric to the quay. Ground-level building arcades, one of Le Havre’s signature urban elements, are integrated into the public space by expanding their ground material and level out into the plaza.

arcade-level extended 3 m into plaza SECTION II

22

material: decomposed granite, grey iron tree grate


FISHERMAN’S QUAY

DETAIL PLAN Place Carré

23


FISHERMAN’S QUAY

MODEL 48” x 24” chip board, birch plywood

24

A wooden boardwalk wraps the existing revetment allowing for a continuous coastal promenade as well as opportunities for fishing, birdwatching, and observing the harbor’s activity.


SECTION III FISHERMAN’S QUAY DETAIL PLAN Fishing Docks and Lawn 25


FISH SPECIES AND SITE CONDITIONS

ROCKY INTERTIDAL HABITAT [ Rocky Shore Habitat] Velvet Crab L’étrille April - September

Sole La sole All Year

Conger Eel Le congre All Year

Lobster Le homard April - August

PROJECT ELEMENTS

FISHERMAN’S QUAY

POLE[ Pole FISHING DOCK Fishing Dock]

Pouting cod Le tacaud All Year

Velvet Crab L’étrille April - September

Lobster Le homard April - August

European Sea Bass Le bar [ou loup] April - December

Pouting cod Le tacaud All Year

Sole La sole All Year

VEGETATION AND BIKEWAY Tree-lined boulevards and designated bikeways emphasize the connection between the waterfront and city.

26 Conger Eel Le congre

European Sea Bass Le bar [ou loup]


FISH[Fish DOCK + MARKET + Dock Market] King Mackerel Le maquereau February to June

Prawn La crevette

Scallop La coquille

Atlantic Pollock Le lieu jaune All Year

Clam La palourde All Year

Gilt-head (Sea) Bream La daurade royale Summer

Skipjack Tuna La bonite April to November

Smelt L’éperlan All Year Prawn La crevette bouquet All Year

FISH MARKET [ Fish Market ]

Clam La palourde All Year

Scallop coquille All Year

King Mackerel Le maquereau February to June

Smelt L’éperlan All Year

WOODENRipBOARDWALK Rap Revetment facilitates a variety of fishing and recreational opportunities along water’s edge.

Anchored Bulkhead

PILING NETWORK demarcates additions and modifications to the existing shoreline.

FISHERMAN’S QUAY

Atlantic Pollock Le lieu jaune All Year

Gilt-head (Sea) Bream La daurade royale Summer

PLAZAS AND PROMENADE accommodate civic events throughout the year.

27 Skipjack [tuna] La bonite

Anc


CORE STUDIO, SPRING 2015 STUDIO ADVISOR: SERGIO LOPEZ-PINEIRO PARTNER: CLEMENTINE JANG SITE: JAMAICA BAY, NEW YORK

UNCANNY URBANISM A dynamic intertidal settlement system for Jamaica Bay.

UNCANNY URBANISM

UNCANNY a. seeming to have a supernatural character or origin. eerie, mysterious b. being beyond what is normal or expected.

28

THE TERRITORY of Jamaica Bay, New York is a constant hybrid of mud and water, shifting across temporal scales of daily tidal change and longer-term sea level rise. The uncanny arises from the fundamental discrepancy between inhabitation and the estuarine site. Largely, people seek security and permanence in their inhabitation yet Uncanny Urbanism invites the adventurous and the unconventional to inhabit this constantly permutating landscape and engage fully with its changing character.

The settlements seek to express and respond to the challenging living conditions and counterintuitive notion of building in such a vulnerable and mutable landscape. The project proposes a spectrum of housing and infrastructure types, ranging from those that are developed from the bottom up, and others from the top down, that seek to respond to the oscillating conditions. Landscape provides the seed and site for our urbanism, which rests on a system of sediment catchers to facilitate a shallowing and colonization of the land. Building off of existing islands of marsh within the bay, the sediment catchers continue to shallow the water, allowing plants to establish. With this expanded intertidal condition, the boundary between land and water is blurred and diffused.


UNCANNY URBANISM

29


INFRASTRUCTURE

average 4m

17 m

varies

20 m

2m

Sediment Catchers 1. Gabion Structure with biodegradable material (Rock and Shell fill) 2. Concrete with walking system

Pontoon Turntable joint mechanism on each ends for flexibility

Buoy Lights Floating light infrastructure indicating different conditions for maritime and urban activities

Urban Retention Basin Built with coir logs, geotextile to catch urban run off before it reaches the sea

Boardwalk system Raised walkway on the urban waterfront edge

inundation frequency: primarily submerged high and mean tides

inundation frequency: submerged high mean and low tides

50% residential southwest facing buffer for storm surge and wildlife habitat limits further zoning

50% residential although sediment increases, zoning does not change

vacant lots

open space

inward rhizometic growth stage IV

inward rhizometic growth stage V

CONDITIONS

inundation frequency: very rare large storm events

inundation frequency: periodic spring tides

inundation frequency: daily high tide

SEDIMENTATION AND ZONING OVER TIME

15% residential catchment system insttalled

20% residential residential zoning expands as land forms

35% residential sediment landforms become public amenity

INDEXICAL LIGHTING

boat channels

inundation levels

approaching storm

URBAN FABRIC

The infrastructure for these communities is similarly dynamic and responsive, including a system of lights that indicate oncoming storms, vacant lots, and water depths. Zoning for residential, open space, and boat channels shifts with sediment deposition and is delineated by the lighting system.

UNCANNY URBANISM

inward rhizometic growth stage I

inward rhizometic growth stage II

inward rhizometic growth stage III

Stage I

Stage II

Stage III

Stage IV

Stage V

Stage VI

Stage VII

Stage VIII

Grid Parameters

Catchers

Sedimentation

Sedimentation accumulation

Sedimentation accumulation

Sedimentation accumulation

Sedimentation accumulation

Longterm transformation

primary infrastructure growth stage I

secondary outward growth stage II

tertiary outward growth stage III

outward growth stage V

densification stage IV

densification stage V

DENSIFICATION STRATEGY

densification stage I

densification stage II

densification stage III

INFRASTRUCTURE CATALOGUE 1:1000

30

outward growth stage IV


UNCANNY URBANISM

31


BUILDING SPECTRUM

Normative Waterfront Building low flexibility, high density High investment cost

Stilted Boat Hybrid medium flexibility, medium-high density Moderate investment cost

Suspended Structure medium-high flexibility, low density Moderate investment cost

Free Floating Structure high flexibility, low density Low investment cost

Submarine Houseboat Hybrid high flexibility, low density High investment cost

LOW DENSITY HYBRID

Sedimented inundation frequency: very rare large storm events

Buoyant inundation frequency: periodic spring tides

“Sedimentation Burrower” After a long period of sedimentation, people start to occupy hills using accumulated sediment as a source of building material.

“Buoyant Stilty” This type floats during mean-high tide and sits on the fixed stilts during the low tide.

“Rocky Bubble” Collects bigger aggregates from dredging, sometimes used as emergency food bank for the community.

“Modern Log” The best fit for intertidal area, most flexible in terms of the design, stilts and house can separate from each other.

“Treehouse Cell” Hides perfectly in the mounds of vegetation growing wildly out of nutrient rich sendiment hills, inconspicuous in its appearance, like a treehouse.

“Clam Egg” Collects seasonal algae bloom and uses it as an energy source to power the bar opens and closes its top responding to the season.

Suspended inundation frequency: daily high tide

Free Floating inundation frequency: primarily submerged high and mean tides

Submarine inundation frequency: submerged at all tidal conditions

Precedent Teronobu Fujimori “Flying Mudboat”, 2011 Japan

“Free Floating boathouse” They float mostly and freely travel aggregate as a group and disperse far in the water.

Precedent Erik Pirolt “Flying View”, 2011 Norway

“Outdoor Bowl” Open bowl becomes a deck for the living area the drum on the top collects rainwater to grow vegetation and food.

Precedent Teronobu Fujimori “Beetle’s House” Modified, 2010 Japan

“Jellyfish Bloomer” The bottom expands and shrinks depending on the occupancy situation wonderful unit for people who seek most open and transparent lifestyle.

“Trampoline Submarine” This unit is children’s paradise. It’s a fun underwater observatory in a clear bubble.

“Submarine Pills” Their lifestyle mainly revolves underwater totally submerged most of the time.

“Submarine Balls” The bottom lights up to help to navigate underwater perfect fit for a single individual who is tired of the busy New York life and wants to disappear from society.

UNCANNY URBANISM

HIGH DENSITY HYBRID

32

“Woven Views” Offers dynamic views of the waterfront and city stilts extend to the upper levels.

“Pan Opticon Nest” High density living at its finest where you can watch everyone else from within.

Precedent Architectenbureau Marlies Rohmer Floating Houses 2001-2011 Ijburg, Netherlands

“Spirit of Germany” Found artifact that drifted to the shore, turned into a huge artist commune.

“Beijing Rock Villa” Modified with a branching net structure.

“Toy Eyes” Made out of container boxes from industrial site each unit can occupy a signle individual.

“Destruct Architecture” Modified New Museum by Sanaa + VDAB by BOB361 faux building representing famous architecture.

Precedent Norman Foster “Leslie Dan Faculty of Pharmacy” 2006 Toronto, Canada

“Trays” rotating tray floors, their facade is made out of fish nets, concrete stilts are nothing special than other ones.

“The Office” Refurbishing old bridge structure and made into stilts for the office building.

BUILDING CATALOG


SEDIMENTATION MODEL 24”x18” layered bristol

MODEL 36”x24” milled foam, plexi, folded paper, plant material

A series of hybrid housing types are proposed for the low to high density settlement of the marshy islands and bay’s edge. The houses’ unique adaptations to the landscape conditions and various inundation levels acknowledge the creative flexibility necessary to inhabit a changing landscape.

MODEL 12”x8” chip board low density marsh settlement

existing dredged channel

UNCANNY URBANISM

high density boardwalk settlement 33


UNCANNY URBANISM

The rhizomatic nature of the low density settlement responds to the shifting topography generated by the sediment catchers. The pontoon pathways hinge at their nodes and can adjust to optimize their position. Floating homes occupy the deeper outskirts whereas hybrid housing types take to the shallows.

34


High density settlement extends from the inhabited edges of Jamaica Bay along a boardwalk network that terminate in a series of boat launches and lookouts. Strategically located basins treat stormwater runoff and contribute to improving the overall water quality of the bay.

UNCANNY URBANISM 35


CORE STUDIO, SPRING 2014 STUDIO ADVISOR: LUIS CALLEJAS SITE: DORCHESTER, MA

GLACIAL PROMENADE A social anchor with geologic presence for Olmsted’s historic Franklin Park

GLACIAL PROMENADE

THE GREETING Parallel and contiguous Drives, Rides, and Walks, under rows of trees forming a Promenade or Meeting Ground of the Alameda type, half a mile in length. Frederick Law Olmsted General Plan for Franklin Park

36

The proposed promenade reinterprets the central Greeting that was never realized in the built park, taking inspiration from the site’s glacial past. With its expansive grounds and segmented programming, a central social anchor for the park is more necessary today than ever. The Glacial Promenade provides a physical and social anchor for the park, its form and topographic variation facilitating views and activity while referencing glacial landforms of the area. Olmsted’s 1885 vision for Franklin Park was a country park, a place to enjoy and contemplate the ‘natural

scenery’ in a burgeoning urban area. He envisioned the 527-acre park as a minimally programmed and cohesive space. However shortly after its conception, the park was parceled into various specific programs. The proposal replaces the central parking lot with a sinuous pedestrian promenade, ranging from 100-40 feet in width. The shape and width of the path allow for gathering and slowing down, rather than simply moving through. Along this walk, one encounters various spatial and topographic conditions, that serve to emphasize views of the park beyond. The size of the park is both its strength and its weakness, and the intervention seeks to provide moments of orientation for those who seek it. The incision acknowledges the value of the current programmable areas while providing a focal point for another type of passive occupation of the site and opportunities for community programming.


GLACIAL PROMENADE

37


01 GEOLOGICALLY INSPIRED LANDFORMS

02

01 EAST ENTRANCE: kame, irregularly shaped glacial mound 02 AMPHITHEATER: kettle, a depression that forms in an outwash plain 03 PARK LOOKOUT: drumlin, an elongated ridge of glacial sediment

03

The entrance to the promenade is a condensed threshold of landform and trees, obscuring longer views. Once in the space, the path opens up to a wider, plaza like space with views of the entire promenade and the ballfields. An amphitheater marks the center of the path. Finally, one reaches the drumlin landform and overlook. The view from the overlook visually connects the site, and expands beyond the park boundaries by directing views to the Blue Hills Reservation, 6 miles away.

GLACIAL PROMENADE

MODEL 14”x14” bristol

38

DRUMLIN OVERLOOK

AERIAL PERSPECTIVE

EAST ENTRANCE

KAME LANDFORM


AERIAL PERSPECTIVE

DRUMLIN OVERLOOK

SITE SECTION

GLACIAL PROMENADE

PROMENADE AND FIELD

39


CORE STUDIO, FALL 2014 STUDIO ADVISOR: SERGIO LOPEZ-PINEIRO PARTNER: LINH KIM PHAM SITE: CAPE COD CANAL, MA

SYNCING EDGE Transitioning the Cape Cod Canal from a site of control to contingency.

SYNCING EDGE

SYNCING EDGE proposes a series of strategic interventions, harnessing the conditions of the Cape Cod Canal in order to initiate a process of synchronization with current and projective occupations. Specifically, the project leverages tidal flows, sediment accumulation, and the ecologies and related potential economies of the site.

40

The site bisects the base of the Cape Cod peninsula. Before economic and military pressures transformed the site into a canal in 1914, it was the site of two rivers, one running north to Cape Cod Bay and the other south to Buzzard’s Bay. Constructed as a means to avoid the dangerous waters around the end of the cape, expanding ship size and power render the canal functionally obsolete as global economic infrastucture. In light of its increasing economic obsolescence, the project choreographs its transition to a third phase of cultural and ecologic infrastructure. Rather than serving remote and global interests with a singularly focused approach, embodied by its hard edge, we propose a rearticulated edge that invites colonization and use of the waterbody

for the region. Moving away from the image of the hard-edged canal, we remapped the waterbody in terms of water speed, a key condition for rates of sedimentation and erosion, plant migration, and occupancy. We have situated the interventions to register existing conditions and catalyze the occupation of the edge, giving agency to existing ecologies on the site through our intervention.

The Cape Cod Canal is located at the base of the Cape Cod peninsula


DETAIL SECTION sedimentation and plant processes are detailed over time

SYNCING EDGE SITE PLAN mapping of water speed within the canal allows for strategically placed intervention [above] SITE PHOTOS and MODELED SITE PROCESSES

41


PROJECT CONTEXT

SITE TIMELINE

PAST-1914 Two Rivers

1914-TODAY Canal

SYNCING EDGE

Ports along the eastern seaboard that are not being actively retrofitted are becoming economically obsolete as global shipping dimensions increase.

42

FUTURE Cultural&Ecological Waterway


EDGE INTERVENTIONS

INTERTIDAL PIPELINES replenish salinity in coastal marshes in order to buffer future storms.

FLOATING ISLANDS allow for temporal occupation of canal’s edges, for fishermen and recreation.

GROYNES facilitate sediment deposition and beach formation at edges.

PERMEABLE PILE FIELDS lower coastal erosion while facilitating sediment transport.

SYNCING EDGE

CANAL SECTION

43


COMPETITION ENTRY, SUMMER 2015 PROJECT ADVISOR: LIZ WILLIAMS, LSU FACULTY COLLABORATORS: LSU COASTAL SUSTAINABILITY STUDIO AWARD: SPECIAL MENTION: CONSTRUCTED ECOLOGIES, D3 NATURAL SYSTEMS COMPETITION

CONSTRUCTING DYNAMISM CONSTRUCTING DYNAMISM

Infrastructure catalyzing ecologic change in the Mississippi Delta

44

In the context of coastal land-loss and sea-level rise, Constructing Dynamism proposes infrastructure as ecologic agent, facilitating landscape change and human adaptation in the Mississippi Delta. The proposal retrofits the existing Highway 90 corridor as a multipurpose, responsive, cross-delta artery. In order to optimize the distribution of limited coastal resources such as freshwater, sediment, and capital, the project proposes an integrative hydrologic management system which addresses resource management, social support, and economic viability per individual watershed, rather than for the coast as a whole. Currently spanning the several disparate hydrologic basins and a part of the Southeast Louisiana infrastructural

network, Highway 90 is retrofitted and redesigned to function as both a transportation corridor and facilitator of economic and ecological vitality. Within a condition of increasing salinity, the foundation of the structure engages with tidal flux and rising sea levels. In the adjacent and increasingly freshwater basin, the structural intervals facilitate flows and eddies in order to encourage sediment deposition and land building. Rail and road connectors are integrated with distribution networks for freshwater and sediment. Producing a more flexible, diverse, and adaptive coastal region, infrastructure becomes a participatory agent within dynamic environmental and cultural conditions.


[left] Hydrologic basins define new management regimes, coordinating and optimizing a currently fragmented coast.

[above] Student publication I co-authored based on experiences in Louisiana. Defining resilience based on a shrimp fisherman’s perspective.

[below] Effect of redistributing freshwater and sediment in two coastal basins.

CONSTRUCTING DYNAMISM 45


CORE STUDIO, FALL 2013 PETER BEARD DRAWING WORKSHOP PARTNERS: ALTHEA NORTHCROSS, RACHEL SCHNEIDER SITE: FORT POINT CHANNEL, MA

PILE PORTRAITS Profiling a ubiquitous urban material

PILE PORTRAITS

PILE PORTRAITS details the changing face of a material as ubiquitous as it is unseen along the Boston shoreline and under the city’s oldest neighborhoods.

46

Pile-driven foundations were state of the art in the 1800’s, a period of great expansion and land-building in Boston’s history. Trees were sheared of their branches and driven upside-down into the newly dredged land until they reached terra firma. Close hand drawing of the pile profiles reveals not only the imprints and weathering of the pile as material, but also the rings and aberrations from the material’s life as a tree.


PILE PORTRAITS

47


PILE PORTRAITS 48

CROSS SECTION pencil on bristol 15” x 15”


PILE PORTRAITS

49



Jessie Booth, MLA Portfolio 2016