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A I R ‘ 13 ‘ 1

Western gateway design project jessica wang |

538218 | studio 5 | ABPL30048

| weave 1


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‘by design computation is still only seen many as just a tool and a remote from the real business of creative design ’ 1 Frazer, John

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part a. the case for innovation 1.0 introduction 1.1 architecture as discourse 1.2 computational architecture 1.3 parametric modelling 1.4 algorithmic explorations 1.5 conclusioin 1.6 learning outcomes part b. cut case study 2.0 design focus 2.1 beginning with sectioning 2.2 case study 2.0 2.3 technique development 2.4 prototypes 2.5 technique proposal 2.6 algorthmic explorations 2.7 conclusion | learning outcomes part c. expression of interest 3.0 design concept 3.1 tectonic elements 3.2 final model 3.3 algorthmic explorations 3.4 conclusion | learning outcomes references.

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Contents

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ONE

the case for innovation 7


About Me

Hi.

My name is Jessica. I am 20 years old and am a third year achitecture student. I was born in Auckland, New Zealand and three years ago my growing desire to branch out independently and to expand my ideas on the world led me to leave my home and attend the University of Melbourne. It was here that I was captivated by the citys diversity in art and design therefore my aspirations have never wavered in any direction apart from design thus after two years studying architecture I am confident that this is something I want to experience and further embrace.

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Digital Design Experience

Virtual Envronments ‘10. Throughout my two years of studying architecture, technology soley enhanced my designs that often were derived through the concept of computerization whereby my designs were form driven. The computer was utilized as a tool to communicate and present my projects using Autocad, Sketchup, Adobe Suite and Rhino. However they were not used as a tool for generating my designs as the term ‘computation’ would suggest whereby the computer is used as a base tool. Therefore this design process has not yet been adopted in my designs. I have very limited knowledge on digital architecture however Virtual Environments ‘10 initiated my exploration with the technique of computerization. The project was centred on a headpiece that was digitalized and unfolded to allow it to be fabricated out on paper. This digital technology provided flexibility and convenience. Taking inspiration from the urban city and the patterns that they form the project explored the idea of volume and space. I believe that understanding the process in computerization has produced fundamental digital skills and thinking that can thus be applied and further extended when exploring the process of computation. Both these processes are relevant when designing a form for Wyndham City as they together bring possibilities and restrictions that can ultimately push the boundaries when concepualizing form and space.

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‘ a building is a product of a single mind....’

‘ understanding architecture as art is dominant’

Williams, Richard (2005)

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Architecture as a ‘discourse’

A disourse.

is a discussion centred around the term architecture and the role that the digital world has on it. As Wiilliams (2005) suggests architecture should be viewed in context and thought as a form of art, symbolic realm and spatial experience2. It is important to consider architecture more than its basic function and aesthetics but as a contribution to societal, cultural and political needs much like a painter inspired by surrounding experience and life. Therefore architecture involves multiple dimensions in its form as well as its meanings. Hence there are multiple possibilities of what architecture is/can be. This discourse will never stop and will take many different forms often a zeitgeist of ideas which can

be seen developing throughout periods of time. I believe that today we are experiencing a newer, more organic and fluid style in architecture due to the opportunities given in many parametric and computer aided design. I believe for one to truly understand what architecture is, one has to fully comprehend the architects intents as well as their own.This must be achieved for the Wyndham project whereby architecture must be as much ‘philosophical, social or professional realm as it is a material one’3 (Williams 2005). Ultimately architecture contributes to a visual culture and represents the evolution of design ideas.

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Celebrated architecture ‘Darkness rather than the light, below ground rather than above -- the Chichu Art Museum is the most direct expression of this feeling rooted deep inside me.’ 4

Ando, Tadao

chichu art museum | Tadao Ando |Japan | 2004 Located on Naoshima, this museum incorperates architecture, sculpture, installation and painting much like what Williams emphasized suggesting architecture as being a ‘piece of art’. Built into the hill and lit soley on natural light, the ever changing light changes the appearance and mood of the different spaces. I like how he combines his soft clean minimal aesthetic with sharp and dynamic lighting. Thus creating a combination of both warmth and coolness in his spaces. Ando tries to achieve a spatial purity much like his influence the Pantheon in Rome. His forms underground were expressed freely without the constraints of axes or directions as he believes below ground were free of limitations. Thus he embraced dynamic geometrical primal forms. His design clearly demonstrates Japanese and religious values focusing on Zen and creating what he says a ‘haiku effect’. This clearly supports the discourse of Mies sugessting that ‘less is more’. This supports modern values whereby the attention of the building

facade in the past has been given to the ‘tectonic’ or the structure of the building. This truth has been exposed and it is clearly evident in the naked design exposing iron, glass, wood and concrete with casting marks reduced to the very limit. What I love about Ando’s designs is his way to make us experience beauty, nature and spirit through his architecture. His building combines both function and encaptures emotion through his minimal spaces using the light as a guide for guests. It is such a powerful design that strives for this seach of light within simple geometrical forms. Ando agrees with architecture as a visual culture stating that ‘to change the dwelling is to change the city and to reform society’5 thus contributing to the identity of that place. It is clear that Ando’s design explored new ways in experiencing and creating space and therefore is still today being used to exhibit powerful works of Claude Monet, Walter De Maria and James Turrell.

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‘Her obsession with shadow and ambiguity is deeply rooted in

Islamic architectural tradition, while its fluid, open nature is a politically charged riposte to increasingly fortifed and undemocratic modern urban landscapes’ 6

Kropovinskiy A.S.(2010)

the guangzhou opera house | Zaha Hadidguangzhou | 2010 is a freestanding concrete auditorium set in exposed granite and glass clad steel frame that is said to be inspired by the pebbles in Pearl River and Guangzhou’s sister city, Sydney’s Opera House. However what differs to Sydney’s design is the enhanced use of parametric design and construction technology that enabled this organic and unique structure to be built. The design also follows Williams thoughts on architecture as being a form of art, symbol and spaital experience: each space provides drama and theatre as well as openess through his minimal, fluid and very white interiors. What I love about this design is the attention she gives to the flow of the building. The spaces are connected through the use of esclators, paths and spiraling ramps that ties various spaces together in order to emphasize the opera house and its surroundings as part of the public realm where everyone has a sense of belonging to the structure- not just opera fans. The site of Hadid’s design is significant to the disourse as it is part of a

duo of buildings; the Guandong Museum, in order to transform an industrial and rather featureless park into an architectural monument contributing to the city’s visual culture. And this clearly worked as it transformed Guangzhous rather dim and boring environment to a more dynamic and magnificent one. This is a clear example of the possibilities of future forms and what architecture can be. Hadid is clearly challenged due to construction problems in this modern period as she pushes construction methods to the very limit in quest for a new kind of architecture. Today it is evident that this new complex architecture has not been fully successful with the opera house having many problems such as cracks in ceilings and walls. Therefore it is important that the complexity of the design is taken into consideration from the beginning of the process and holistacally. However I am confident that the opera house willl forever be a symbolic monument in China’s history.

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‘The

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innovative structure (research pavilion) demonstrates the latest developments in materialoriented computational design, simulation, and production processes in architecture. The result is a bending-active structure made entirely of extremely thin, elastically-bent plywood strips’ 7

Material computes. Achim Menges (2012) 17


Today’s architecture has been designed in a way that only a few were able to anticipate a decade ago. The advancemnt of computer aided design and manufaction has just recently become mainstream and is still yet to be explored futher to ultimately understand fully the capabilities of conputational architecture.

Therefore this evolution of design from rational design processes (comperterization) to intuitive digitalized designs has become the spirit of times tied to the evolution of mechanization. As Kolarevic (2003) states this manifestation is ‘a logical and iinevitable product of digital zeitgeist transfomring culture, society and economies on a global However without the past events scale’8 that challenged traditional practices in design and construction, The computer provides many computer aided design would not benefits in the architectural design have been anticipated so soon. process. They not only offer speed The dramatic change from a rational and precision when drawing and thought process in design following modelling but allows the architect Louis Sullivans ‘form follows funtion’ to test and open new territories for was challenged fully in the avant- exploration. New shapes and forms garde period where the fascination can be created by concepts such of curvilinear and organic forms as toplogical space, isomorphic emerged. This evolution of design surfaces, dynamic spaces, was further embraced by futurism parametric design and genetic whereby the artist Sant’Elia’s algorthm. 9 Thus highlycomplex, drawings trampled down all curvilienar forms and sudden tradition in order to determine new interest in ‘blobby’ architecture forms, new lines, new harmony arose. The exploration of parametric and to to be constructed with all curves and digital modelling the resources of technology and softwares opened a universe of science often depicting architecture mathematical complex forms that as a machine. And it was not until before were difficult to conceive, Le Corbusiers ‘free plan’ and ‘free develop, represent and let alone facade’ that allowed elements manufacture. The computer has of variable curvature to emerge. also the ability to uncover potential

materials and thus opening a largely uncharted field of possibilities for the way the built environment in the 21st century is conveived and produced such as Menges Research pavilion (figs.9|11) whereby the physical behaviours and material characteristics directly drove the computational generated form. (fig.10) shows the testing of the elastic bending behavior of birch plywood strips manufactured robotically as planar elements and subsequently connected so that elastically bent and tensioned regions alternate along their length. Oxman (2010) claims that modern design culture is experiencing a shift to a material aware design.10 Her designs are developed through material-based approach in computationally enabled formgeneration. Therefore digital architecture has allowed for this new search for new tectonics, a move towards topological transformations to ultimately a more organic, materialised and amoebic designs. This is a new approach to form finding. In form-generation. Therefore digital architecture has allowed for this new search for new tectonics, a move towards topological transformations to

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Computational architecture ultimately a more organic, materialised and amoebic designs. This is a new approach to form finding. In addition this has enable material science to evolve to ultimately create new desired aesthetics and spatial effects such as respones to external and internal stimulis such as respones to light, heat- an architecture that reacts to different environmental climates. In regards to the changes in the design and construction industries, computational design has enabled us to integrate ever more multifaceted and complex design information while the industrial logics of con- ventional building construction are eroding rapidly in computer-controlled manufacturing and fabrication 11 .Today we are seeing the convergence of computation and materialisation emerging thus bringing the design and construction closer together more than ever. As Branko (2003) further emphaises that the ‘design information IS the construction information.’ 12 I believe that this design process goes withwhat Yehuda (2004) who argues that computers have allowed more

people to become involved in the design process. However today I can see the designer more and more involved in the design, fabrication, production and construction process. This shift from making the form to finding the form has ultimately caused the architect to become fully involved in the the whole design and building industry. From computational design, engineering, materialisation and manufacturing. Branko (2003)reinfoces this ‘the digital model becomes the single source of design and production information that is generated, controlled and managed by the designer’. 13 I think this is a positive change as this intergration has ultimately bought new ways of thinking of architecture and its place in the building industry. Gropius’s view, architecture should be a true reflection to human civilisation and spirit of modern times. I absolutely agree and I feel that digital architecture is a true reflection of the digital age. However I feel that this style has not yet been fully successful as I believe that it still is yet to achieve an equilibrium between us and

the computer. Yehuda (2004) reinforces this belief stating that computers have superb rationality and search abilities however ‘if we mix this with us humans creativity and intuition we can then fully solve complex design problems’ 14. Digtial design has enabled an architecture beyond the abilities of tradition architecture and with programs like Rhino and Grasshopper, computer modelling will be more accesible and continue to be used by designers. Ultimately leading us in a discourse about the possibilities of modern architecutre.

‘Comparing the generative

computational design process with the FEM simulation and the exact measurement of the geometry that the material computed on site demonstrates that the suggested integration of design computation and materialization is a feasible proposition.’ 15 Achim Menges (2012)

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Parametric design has always been around and according to Aish and Woodbury (2010) is ‘not new: building components have been adapted to context for centuries’ 16. However today parametric design has evolved referring more specifically to computer aided design and computing. Today this can be seen as a new style after modernism often referred as ‘parametricism’ by Schumacher (2010). Woodbury emphasizes the importance of this technology stating that computers are the new tool ‘to make design’ 17. Defining this term has often been difficult; some even deliberately ignoring this term such as Leach. Yet others like Kolarevic (2003) describes parametrics as ‘a range of possibilities replacing the process with variable, singularity and multiplicity’ 18. It allows us not to design a specific shape of a building but in fact a set of principles encoded as a sequence of parametric equations thus enabling us to explore an infinite possibilities. Therefore this strength lies in its

contrast from traditional design processes. As Woodbury (2010) reinforces no longer do we add and erase using pencil and paper to come to straightfoward emulations but in fact now we are able to ‘add, erase, relate and repair’ 19. This is in fact very true as what traditional design lacked was its ability for later change in the project as it would take large amounts of work in order to conform to these little or large detailed changes. Therefore in making these large details to small details the designer is able to explore ideas reducing the tedium of rework. This ability to change details so efficiently and precise is also influenced by us knowing the implication of these changes. Parametric design also enables us to think holistacally and multidisciplinary as we concentrate on the details such as materials and structural details in the predesign that thus makes it easier to determine our shape or form of the design and later change at the end of the process. ‘Requires the designer to take one step back from

the direct activity of design and focus on the logic that binds the design together’ 20. Such as working with specific patterns or forms that would allow the best and most efficient transfer of loads e.g. the German Pavilion (Achim Menges). Therefore the geometry of parametric design is treated intuitavely requiring exploratory play especially at the early stages to create new languages and styles of design; ultimately creating a mathematically defined organic and dynamic form that would not be reachable otherwise. However some consider parametric design less flexible depending on the initial parameters as the design is trapped within the set rules. Thus trying to incorporate a design that sits outside the set of parameters would be hard to include and thus ultimately will be avoided. Therefore major changes are often difficult to adopt later in the design process. Woodbury reinforces this stating ‘that decisions that should be changed can take too

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Parametric modelling as a ‘discourse’

work to change...these can limit exploration and effectively restrict design’ 21. Seeing changes is also a limitation when it comes to parametric design said by Davis in the lecture. It is too easy to keep adding nodes and thus later becomes too difficult to explain or to resume work on it after an inevitable interruption therefore making it hard for the designer to see changes. Therefore Woodbury (2010) recommends using a divide-and-conquer strategy to organize the design into parts with links from part to part creating this data flow. Difficulty also arises when wanting to share and reuse parametric modelling as other designers are unable to understand the process and original ideas and intentions behind the model created by the initial designer. Today we are seeing two mediums for modelling; conventional and parametric designs that equally produce well acclaimed architecture. I find that engaging in both processes much like Zaha Hadid

can in addition produce magnificent architecture as form is driven first and then are refined and explored further through materials and space in parametric techniques. However as we move towards the future, I believe parametric design will become ever more mainstream as we become more driven to aesthetic, efficient and materialistic design.

‘the style war has begun’ 22 Schumacher (2010)

the designer establishes the relationships by which parts connect, builds up a design using these relationships and edits the relationships by observing and selecting from the results produced’ 23

Woodury, Robert (2010)

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German Pavilion for the 11th Prague Quadrennial | Achim Menges | 2007 is clear example of parametric design whereby the design was determined by the material system. Elastic strings were utilized that could modulate levels of transparency, exposure and enclosure as well as manipulating visual and physical connectiviy. Therefore the design was fitted in the constraints of materialisation through iterative digital and physical tests. Menges (2007) ‘tests the relation between the intensification and filtering of ciruculatory and visual conditions and various geometric parameters’ 24. For example the density and orientation of the parameters were dependent on the definition of base curves and the increment of material ruling interpretations. Thus creating a powerful performance-driven environment whereby the pavilion deliverately confuses the relationships between space, time and the convergence of protagonist and playgoer. I found it interesting that the stucture purposely exposes or veils us as we try to navigate through the stucture creating this mysterious flickering silhouette through the pavilion. Structural capacity was also an important aspect of the system thus the articulation of the base curve was explored in many ways to find the best course for all the forces of the individual strings to ultimately create a balanced state in the overall design. The pavilion experience is further embraced through animated light sources and topological undulations therefore the spatial experience for every visitor will be different and becomes a part of the habitation. Therefore this pavilion has become a symbol of contemporary approaches to design of spatial and scenic elements that ultimately creates a theatrical event. Thus this pavilion is showcased in one of the most important theatre festivals of the world and today forms part of the permanent collection of the Centre Pompidou Paris. 22


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P _ wall | Matsys | 2009 Part of the series in 2006 the newer P wall is an evolution of his earlier works exploring self-organisation of material under force and the relationships between architecture, engineering, biology and computation. Elastic nylon fabric and wooden dowels were utilized as formwork, with the weight of liquid plaster slurry used to produce a visual and acoustic effect causing the fabric to sag, expand and wrinkle. The differentiated patterns are a evident of parametric design whereby a cloud of points is generated creating patterns based on grayscale values and then are used to mark the positions of dowels which are constrained to the elasticity in the fabric formwork. Plaster is then poured to the mould creating a wall that is reactive to various gravitational conditions. Ultimately creating a dynmaic and powerful structure in such a static form. This was highly influenced by Antoni Gaudi and Miguel Fisac both whom explored cast materials to create unique, sensual quirky patterns. This ‘blobby’ design is so weird and dynamic that it forces visitors to touch and feel creating this sensual experience. Contrasting to traditional flat and smooth gallery walls, it is for this reason that this extraordinary gallery wall is so well acclaimed.

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Matsys Mantashell (2013) The design and construction of the wooden gridshell is very similar to one I explored in the algorithm weekly challenges and thus found this particular design interesting. This gridshell only used straight wooden members that bent along the geodesic lines on a relaxed surface. The goal of this was to increase fabrication speed while decreasing material wastage. Therefore using parametic modelling allowed this to be achieved efficiently and precisely. Parametric modelling allowed more material feedback and analysis. Firstly the computer enabled the exploration the strength of the material, testing the timbers maximum bending radius. Secondly testing the member length exceeding the availabe timber members in order to iluminate the need for splicing members together. Lastly enabling a double edge beam to increase the overall stiffness of the beam. Ulitmately parametric design assured that the surface curvature was producible and accurate at full scale. Thus allowing a smooth workflow

that integrated geomety, structure and material performance. This idea of ‘smooth’ is emphasized in the Mantashell as the continuing curves cause all timber members to be jointed at a particular point. Thus expressing a soft and interdependent form. This pavilion clearly serves of how relatively simples elements-panels of timber can be used to create complex and intricate forms through the use of algorthmic input and computer aided design. The modular construction enables this design to decrease material wastage as the design is readily divided into modular components ready for construction. Thus creating a sustainable and efficient overall structure. The structure also can be changed or altered easily through its digital form thus as a result this design can suit any environment becoming a collective part of the site rather than an externally designed structure placed upon a site. It is this unity that the project Wyndham City will want to achieve.

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fractal tetrahedra. This defination enabled me to transform polygons into fractal elements to ultimately create very dynamic and recursive geometry. I found this particularly interesting because in contrast to the organic ‘blobby’ architecture that many digital technology enables, this function creates rather blocky and angular forms.

to select from the results produced. This process also allowed using the second half of the definition (the recursive subdivision) to operate on any input polysurface that I chose. Therefore we can produce different fractal geometries. This can be further enhanced using the mirror on rhino or modifying the initial function to create other really interesting forms.

The process involved a basic tetrahedra utilizing expressions to then produce possible forms. Thus giving an explosion of different shapes from one given algorithm that I’m able to test and see quickly and efficienty. And then consequently I am able

I can see through my personal experimentations how quick, efficient and how much control parametric design has over pen and paper. Therefore allowing our mind to extend further and seeing the possibilities of forms we normally wouldn’t be able to think of.

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Algorithmic explorations

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Conclusion

Today architects approach to design must reflect the economic, political and social culture. We as designers are constantly moving towards the use of technology as we capture the zeitgeist of this fast pace advancing technological world. Therefore ‘parametricism’ will be the exciting driving tool for Wyndham City’s modern design proposal.

to maximise limitless possibilities and innovation that will help us deliver an overall holistic, efficient and sustainable design. It will act as a ‘piece of art’ contributing to the visual culture of Wyndham City. An artwork for people to recognise Wyndham City locally and internationally.

I strongly believe that by doing this, Wyndham will Examining chosen precedents and their design be seen as a leading city of digital architecture. It processes provided us the right understanding and will symbolise Wyndhams move towards the future knowledge for achieving the brief and expectations and its appreciation for the new digital age -of this competition. Our approach will be interdisciplinary and computational as we are able the information age.

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Experience so far

The Case for Innovation has given me a deeper understanding in the direction of the discourse within architecture. I feel at this point my understanding on the practice of architectural computing has evolved immensly and has led me to appreciate the potential and limitless possibilities that paremetric theory has for designers. I have a sense that this path is inevitable and we will certainly be seeing this as something BIG in the coming future. I do certainly need to embrace this new era of design and find it exciting and dynamic however, at times I feel that this design process can be unnecessary and often too forced upon built environments. Often too complex and ‘messy’ for my liking as I have always been drawn to simple and minimal architecture. However I find it positive that we as humans are being tested and challenged by this new technology in order to push

our imaginations and our skills. However the outcome of this has created a new stylistic language that I don’t think we neccesarliy need particularly this ‘blobby’ architecture. We as architects should simply work with whats best with a project instead of worrying about conforming to a new compex style. A langauge of complexity that can sometimes be hard to understand or grasp and ultimately can hinder the functional performace and can sometimes be distressing to look and appreciate. But my appreciation in parametric design lies with its control and precision; enabling iterations and coordinated feedback and its ability to test different outcomes so freely and so intuitively. Therefore I feel that in some situations this technology can be fully enhanced. However we should not constrain ourselves to one style yet.

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notes. 1 Menges, A. 2011,’Computation Design Thinking’ (London, Mixed sources), p 145 2 Williams, R. 2005. Architecture and visual Culture, (Edinburgh, Ediburgh University Press), p 102 3 Williams, R. 2005. Architecture and visual Culture, (Edinburgh, Ediburgh University Press), p 102 4 Tadao, A. 2010, ‘Chichu Art Museum’ http://openbuildings.com/buildings/chichu-art-museumprofile-2447> {accessed 16 March 2013} 5 Tadao, A. 2010, ‘Chichu Art Museum’ http://openbuildings.com/buildings/chichu-art-museumprofile-2447> {accessed 16 March 2013} 6 Kropovinskiy. A. S, 2011, ‘МОЛОДА МИСТЕЦЬКА НАУКА УКРАЇНИ’ ( N/A, 2010) p. 120-122 7Menges, A, ‘Material Computation’ (London: Wiley Academy,2012) < http://www.achimmenges. net/?p=5079>{accessed 16 March 2013} 8 Kolarevic, B, ‘Architecture in the Digital Age: Design and Manufacturing’ (New York; London: Spon Press, 2003), p. 3 - 28. 9 Kolarevic, B, ‘Architecture in the Digital Age: Design and Manufacturing’ (New York; London: Spon Press, 2003), p. 3 - 28. 10 Oxman, N, 2010, ‘Material-based Design Computation’. < http://dspace.mit.edu/ handle/1721.1/59192> {accessed 30 March 2013} 11 Menges, A, ‘Material Computation’ (London: Wiley Academy,2012) < http://www.achimmenges. net/?p=5079>{accessed 16 March 2013} 12 Kolarevic, B, ‘Architecture in the Digital Age: Design and Manufacturing’ (New York; London: Spon Press, 2003), p. 3 - 28.

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13 Kolarevic, B, ‘Architecture in the Digital Age: Design and Manufacturing’ (New York; London: Spon Press, 2003), p. 3 - 28. 14 Kalay,Y. 2004 ‘Architecture’s New Media : Principles, Theories, and Methods of Computer-Aided Design’ (Cambridge, Mass.: MIT Press, 2004), p. 5 - 25 15 Menges, A, ‘Material Computation’ (London: Wiley Academy,2012) < http://www.achimmenges. net/?p=5079>{accessed 16 March 2013} 16 Woodbury, R. 2010. ‘Elements of Parametric Design’ (London: Routledge) p. 7-48 17 Woodbury, R. 2010. ‘Elements of Parametric Design’ (London: Routledge) p. 7-48 18 Kolarevic, B, ‘Architecture in the Digital Age: Design and Manufacturing’ (New York; London: Spon Press, 2003), p. 3 - 28. 19 Woodbury, R. 2010. ‘Elements of Parametric Design’ (London: Routledge) p. 7-48 20 Woodbury, R. 2010. ‘Elements of Parametric Design’ (London: Routledge) p. 7-48 21 Woodbury, R. 2010. ‘Elements of Parametric Design’ (London: Routledge) p. 7-48 22 Schumacher, P. 2010, ‘Patrick Schumacher on parametricism: Let the Style wars begin’ Architects’ Journal <http://www.architenctjournal.co.uk/2011-stirling-prize/patrick-schumacheronparametricism=et=thestyle-war-begin> {accessed 29 March 2013} 23 Woodbury, R. 2010. ‘Elements of Parametric Design’ (London: Routledge) p. 7-48 24 Menges, A, ‘Material Computation’ (London: Wiley Academy,2012) < http://www.achimmenges. net/?p=5079>{accessed 16 March 2013}

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images. 1 Tadao Ando, 2004, ‘Chichu Art Museum’, in open buildings, < http://openbuildings.com/buildings/ chichu-art-museum-profile-2447> {accessed 16 March 2013} 2 Tadao Ando, 2004, ‘Chichu Art Museum’, in open buildings, < http://openbuildings.com/buildings/ chichu-art-museum-profile-2447> {accessed 16 March 2013} 3 Tadao Ando, 2004, ‘Chichu Art Museum’, in open buildings, < http://openbuildings.com/buildings/ chichu-art-museum-profile-2447> {accessed 16 March 2013} 4 Tadao Ando, 2004, ‘Chichu Art Museum’, in open buildings, < http://openbuildings.com/buildings/ chichu-art-museum-profile-2447> {accessed 16 March 2013} 5 Zaha Hadid architects, 2010, ‘Guangzhou Opera House’, < http://www.zaha-hadid.com/architecture/guangzhou-opera-house/> {accessed 16 March 2013} 6Zaha Hadid architects, 2010, ‘Guangzhou Opera House’, < http://www.zaha-hadid.com/architecture/guangzhou-opera-house/> {accessed 16 March 2013} 7 Zaha Hadid architects, 2010, ‘Guangzhou Opera House’, < http://www.zaha-hadid.com/architecture/guangzhou-opera-house/> {accessed 16 March 2013} 8 Zaha Hadid architects, 2010, ‘Guangzhou Opera House’, < http://www.zaha-hadid.com/architecture/guangzhou-opera-house/> {accessed 16 March 2013}

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9 Achim Menges , 2010, ‘Research Pavilion’, 2010, < http://www.achimmenges.net/?p=4443> {accessed 24 March 2013} 10 Achim Menges , 2010, ‘Research Pavilion’, 2010, < http://www.achimmenges.net/?p=4443> {accessed 24 March 2013} 11 Achim Menges , 2010, ‘Research Pavilion’, 2010, < http://www.achimmenges.net/?p=4443> {accessed 24 March 2013} 12 Achim Menges , 2010, ‘Research Pavilion’, 2010, < http://www.achimmenges.net/?p=4443> {accessed 24 March 2013} 13 Achim Menges, 2007, ‘German Pavilion’, < http://www.achimmenges.net/?p=4450 > {accessed 31 March 2013} 14 Matsys Designs, 2009, ‘P Wall’, < http://matsysdesign.com/> {accessed 31 March 2013} 15 Matsys Designs, 2013, ‘Mantashell’, < http://matsysdesign.com/> {accessed 31 March 2013}

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Design focus Sectioning has been a concept much explored in the architecture discourse. As Iwamoto suggests it ‘has a long history in the construction industry...commonly used in airplane and shipbuilding..’1 With the aid of digital design, sectioning has been further enhanced and is particularly intriguing in parametric design. This technique has been previously adopted by the man himself Le Corbusier evident in his roofing in the Ronchamp Chapel. Rather than constructing the surface itself, sectioning allowed a series of profiles and edges that follow the lines of surface geometry thus allowing the production of both a dynamic surface and strong structure for the roof. Fundamentally sectioning nvolves the derivation of series of profiles from surface geometry.

Sectioning is a substrate for the application of a surface material and the achievement of a smooth finished form’2

As postmodernism emerged, digital technology and thought has alllowed sectioning to show its true character in design; its organic and sculptural characteristics. ‘Zero’ and ‘The Cave’ utilizes the individual planar components to ultimately give a sense of unity expressing a sense of strength yet qualities of lightness, softness, dynamism, elements of texture and play of light. Both precendents allowed surfaces to undulate around focal points such as columns, windows, sprinkler system and exit signs. ‘Zero’ utilizes plywood ribs to engage rather than ignore these services and thus creating this effect ‘shrink wrap’. No two pieces are the same and the thicknesses and spacing between the ribs alll vary causing a rhythm of compression and relaese. In the processs of concealing the services sectioning provides an aesthetic to the eye as well as acoustic benefits mitigating sound. Ultimately sectioning gives a space an idenity. A style that is very in you face architecture that eargarly calls out for attention and never lets guests forget where they are. It is theatrical, dynamic, exciting and engaging in an intimiate experience for one. Fundamentally this eye-catching 20 and initimate experience is what must be engaged with the Wyndham gateway project.

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‘at once obscuring and exaggerating the

infrastructure, creating motion, and introducing a topography and texture to an otherwise featureless space’ 18 3

Broome, Beth (2009)

The Wyndham city seeks to ‘enhance the physical environment through introduction of the visual arts.’ My group and I truly believe that sectioning has the potential to do so and thus through exploration with material, patterning and structure we will approach the design innovatviely to bring longetivity in its appeal and an ongoing interest to the Western Interchange. It will promote an ongoing discourse by illustrating radical new ways in determining space, material and construction with the use of digital technology. The gateway will mark a period of technological understanding and advancement that will reflect a strong understanding of natural systems and construction methods. Ultimately we will aim to establish an iconic symbol that acknowledges the need to look beyond appearances.

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matrices attempting to manipulate the original definition.

early explorations show basic modifications of levels in order to determine each component. Later explorations moves away from the early definition and surfaces are manipulated through Introduction of curves and straight lines. Thus creating different forms of different densities. Contoruing is then explored. 40


Beginning with sectioning

Having formed a group, we all shared similar interest in sectioning as an approach due to its minimal yet dynamic qualities. Thus we looked at the Banq Restaurant in Boston and individually at inspiring precedents such as ‘the Cave’ and ‘Zero’. The organic and dynamic form created by sectioning through a combination of lightweight materials were definetely in the realms of what we wanted to achieve with our design project.

this particularly intriguing. As Woodbury and Burrow highlight the benefits of this approach is its ability to lengthen the design exploration phase before arriving at the final outcome. Thus many forms and structures were created yet also modified and added to created more complex and interesting forms. Also relating to Kaley, digital design also gave us the ability to evaluate its performance and its limitations before progressing further.Thus leaving more time for exploration and testing for different forms which is precisley what this Therefore our exploration initally started from unpicking case study involves. and learning the Banq grasshopper definition. Our initial steps fundamentally included a surface and an Similarly to Banq, contouring and the attractor point intersecting curve that plugs into prep frames and further extended my explorations in the potential forms prep planes that ultimately is extruded. Thus creating and patterns. I found that adding contouring created a differinng rhythmic patterns.The forms created smoother yet more dynamic to the form. We as a group from this Banq definition were fluid and organic-like envisioned an effect like contouring as it had sensual giviing off glimpses of blobitecture that I personally qualities and could play with rhythm as one drives didn’t appreciate. However testing different surfaces through. We envirsioned elements of compression, and numbers of intersecting curves, Grasshopper tension and differing perception combined with the ultimately transformed the rather blobby form into play of light and shadow that ulitmately can create a more rigid, dynamic and fan-like form. Often a very intimate journey for one. Therefore we can having planes layered or intersecting one another ulitmately transform a rather autonomous activiy into a creating qualities of depth and perception, I found rich and memorable visual experience.

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Case study 2.0 digital weave

Generating a component within Grasshopper

Generating a component within Grasshopper

helicoid

diagrid

helicoid

u=6 f = 10 v = 8 u=6 f = 10 vr == 810 9 rt ==10 Digial Weave | Lisa Iwamoto | 2004 s = t = 92

extrude

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Designed for a Museum of Modern Art in San Francisco completed in five weeks, the project was built from a kit of components such that the intricate detail becomes a whole. The series of woven ribs riveted together constructed from translucent corrugated plastic uses digital fabrication due to its precise qualities. The structure operates interestingly due to its compressible nature creating a unique and interactive experience. Like our design process the structure is a testament to smaller-scale experimentation and the testing grounds for buildings to come.

Also instead ofextrude riveting as a jointing mechanism, extrudediagram illustrates a folding and our parametric interlocking system. We found this particularly interesting as this traditional handcraft was explored in a contemporary vehicle. The idea of traditional art of weaving collaborating with digital parametricism was worth further exploration.

Therefore through exploring the digital weave our group drifted away from sectioning and onto the idea of weaving concentrating especially at the diagrid as a source driving force for our design. Ultimately this Therefore in re-creating this we took a method of a soft yet intricate nature in weaving was something we helicoid with a diagrid panel applied and then extruded want to explore more evident in the following pages it to re-create a similar effect. We successfully 44 | 45 technique development. What is illustrated achieved a weaving effect that the original project is the diagrid as the fundamental component being u = 10 u=7 f = 10 explored. further enhanced this explored through different surfaces and points u = 10 Yet our re-creation u=7 f = 10 v=7 weaving component as we were able to apply more especially at the Lunchbox components such as the v=7 r=8 r = of 8 panels emphasizing the twisting effect as strips helicoid, conoid e.t.c. t=7 t = 7 wellsas = 2the weaving component in the structure. Generating a component within Grasshopper

s=2

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Our exploration consisted of the diagrid experimented in different surfaces and forms using the Lunchbox Plug-in 1

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Luminous Lace. Merging worlds Anouk Haegens Design Academy|Netherlands | 2011 Loop. pH | Hackney, UK | 2012 In Haegens Merging worlds, materiality is paramount. Traditional refinement of knotting is expressed in innovative materials and in harsh construction. Thus two worlds merge. Cotton knots flow into concrete, cast aluminum is knotted and paper yarns meet smooth viscose. Story is articulated through the combination of these materials, colors and patterns generating a new outlook on traditional craft. What interest me was its ability to play on conventional handcraft using new modern materials and explore its reaction to other states such as liquid or solid. Her work is very expressional and drives for new radical ways of thinking about material.

Ceremonial lace was the inspiration for this umbrella like illuminated form. The woven like wires interlock one another creating varying sized openings and densities at certain points. Therefore creating a flexible, highly patterned and lightweight structure. Light installation enhanced this lace pattern creating differing light and shadows for the public below. Again the the play of traditional weaving in more contemporary materials further enhances the delicacy and beauty that weaving has.

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23

22 Casalgrande Ceramic Cloud. Kengo Kuma | Casalgrande, Italy | 2010

Dig. Daniel Arsham | New York | 2011

Situated in a public space presenting itself as â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;gateway to eastâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; it provides a similar expression for the gateway project. The experimentation of ceramic and metal as a structural form explores a textural and 3 dimensional forms in space with the play of light (natural and artificial) and water. The use of depth with the woven-like panels create varying perception as one moves from one place to another ultimately expressing a dynamic architectural object. What is most interesting is the collaboration with water to further reinforce light, shadow and reflection.

Arshams playful and rough installation explores architecture of excavation emphasizing the idea of depth in a solid volume. Utilizing EPS foam, hammers, picks and chisels he uses constructional methods to create a peculiar yet powerful sculptural cavern. The cave acts as a space symbolizing the juxtaposition between the precision of an architectural plan and the looseness of the unknown exploring primitive and contemporary architecture. It is all aspiring and eyecatching.

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weave | point attractor, kagome weave, knit diamond grid u=5 v=3 interconnect pipe

diagrid 1,2 u=7 v=3 interconnect

diagrid u=7 v=3 interconnect

2 surfaces diagrid 1 u=7 v=3 diagrid 2 u=3 v=1

3 surfaces diagrid 1 u=7 v=3 diagrid 2 u=7 v=3 diagrid u=3 v=3 interconnect

3 surfaces diagrid diagrid 1,2 u=7 v=3 interconnect

3 surfaces diagrid 1 u=5 v=2 diagrid 2 u=2 v=3 diagrid u=5 v=1 interconnect

helicoid surface divide rectangular panels polygons explode points items move weave offset loft

helicoid surface divide diagrid panels polygons explode points items move weave offset loft

conoid surface divide diagrid panels polygons explode points items move weave offset loft

conoid surface divide rectangular panels polygons explode points items move weave offset loft

conoid surface divide daigrd panels polygons explode points items move weave offset loft mobius surface divide rectangular panels polygons explode points items move weave offset loft mobius surface divide rectangular panels polygons explode points items move weave offset loft

helicoid surface diamond grid u: 8 extrude f: 4 integer, division, surface morph rows & columns: 3

helicoid surface integer, division, rows & columns: 3 surface morph, join, rebuild curve pipe diamond grid u: 5 extrude f: 3

helicoid surface integer, division, rows & columns: 3 surface morph, join, rebuild curve pipe diamond grid u: 5

helicoid surface integer, division, rows & columns: 3 surface morph, join, rebuild curve diamond grid u: 5 extrude f: 2

surface integer, division, rows & columns: 3 surface morph, join, rebuild curve diamond grid u: 3 extrude f: 3

surface integer, division, rows & columns: 3 surface morph, join, rebuild curve diamond grid u: 3 extrude f: 3

surface integer, division, rows & columns: 3 surface morph, join, rebuild curve diamond grid u: 3 extrude f: 3

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curve1,curve2 divide: n = 35 series 0: s = 0, n = 2, c = 35 series 1: s = 1, n = 2, c = 35 series 2: s = 2, n = 2, c = 35 item 1: i = series2, item2: i = series1 – line item 2: i = series1, item3: i = series0 – line item 4: i = series0, item5: i = series1 – line item 5: i = series1, item6: i = series2 – line join extrude z: f = 10 curve1 ,curve2 divide: n = 54 series 0: s = 0, n = 2, c = 54 series 1: s = 1, n = 2, c = 54 series 2: s = 2, n = 2, c = 54 item 1: i = series2, item2: i = series1 – line item 2: i = series1, item3: i = series0 – line item 4: i = series0, item5: i = series1 – line item 5: i = series1, item6: i = series2 – line join extrude z: f = 10 curve1 ,curve2 divide: n = 54 series 0: s = 0, n = 2, c = 54 series 1: s = 1, n = 2, c = 54 series 2: s = 2, n = 2, c = 54 item 1: i = series2, item2: i = series1 – line item 2: i = series1, item3: i = series0 – line item 4: i = series0, item5: i = series1 – line item 5: i = series1, item6: i = series2 – line join extrude z: f = 10 curve1 ,curve2 divide: n = 54 series 0: s = 0, n = 2, c = 54 series 1: s = 1, n = 2, c = 54 series 2: s = 2, n = 2, c = 54 item 1: i = series2, item2: i = series1 – line item 2: i = series1, item3: i = series0 – line item 4: i = series0, item5: i = series1 – line item 5: i = series1, item6: i = series2 – line join extrude z: f = 10

curve1 ,curve2 divide: n = 76 series 0: s = 0, n = 2, c = 76 series 1: s = 1, n = 2, c = 76 series 2: s = 2, n = 2, c = 76 item 1: i = series2, item2: i = series1 – line item 2: i = series1, item3: i = series0 – line item 4: i = series0, item5: i = series1 – line item 5: i = series1, item6: i = series2 – line join extrude x: f = 3 y: f = 18 z: f = 50

curve 0 ,curve1, curve 2 divide: n = 36 series 0: s = 0, n = 3.0, c = 36 series 1: s = 1, n = 3.0, c = 36 series 2: s = 2, n = 3.0, c = 36 item 1: i = series2, item2: i = series1 – line item 2: i = series1, item3: i = series0 – line item 4: i = series0, item5: i = series1 – line item 5: i = series1, item6: i = series2 – line item 7: i = series2, item 8: i = series1 – line item 8: i = series1, item 9: i = series0– line join extrude

depth | diagrid, gills surface explode contours | n=xunit | n=yunit items distance offsets |p=yzplane | p=xyplane curve shift loft

surface explode contours | n=xunit | n=yunit items distance offsets |p=yzplane | p=xyplane curve shift loft surface explode contours | n=xunit | n=yunit items distance offsets |p=yzplane | p=xyplane curve shift loft

parabaloid surface explode contours | n=xunit | n=xunit items distance offsets |p=yzplane | p=xyplane curve shift loft

parabaloid surface explode contours | n=xunit | n=yunit items distance offsets |p=yzplane | p=xyplane curve shift loft

conoid surface explode contours | n=xunit | n=yunit items distance offsets |p=yzplane | p=xyplane curve shift loft

helicoid surface explode contours | n=xunit | n=yunit items distance offsets |p=yzplane | p=xyplane curve shift loft

surface diamond grid u: 10 v: 46 extrude (lines) x: 0 y: 0 z: 4

surface diamond grid u: 10 v: x: 1 y: 4 z: 1 extrude (lines & nodes)

surface diamond grid u: 4 v: x: 0 y: 7 z: 5 extrude (lines)

surface diamond grid u: 4 v: x: 0 y: 7 z: 5 curve extrude (lines)

surface diamond grid u: 4 v: x: 0 y: 6 z: 5 curve extrude (lines)

surface diamond grid u: 4 v: x: 0 y: 7 z: 5

surface diamond grid u: 4 v: x: 0 y: 7 z: 5 curve extrude (lines)

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Prototypes

Each of our explorations illustrated on pages 48| 49 have been explored in our prototypes for fabrication. An eclectic mix of materials was used | paper, thread and corrugated cardboard. Each with distinct qualities they all enhanced the traditional craft of weaving in a contemporary way. The use of corrugated cardboard was interesting as it expressed the techniques of weaving delicately in two ways. Paper was used to emphasize interlocking yet also provided freedom for movement. Thread was explored using specific points in order to create space. Its ability to create sparse and dense geometry ulitmately influenced the form.

We found interlocking to be most interesting and therefore explored it in a larger scale taking inspiration from the grasshopper definition, the kagome weave. Its ability to create depth as well as light and shadow emphasizes thie craft of weaving. Almost abstracting the technique of weaving we are able to create a structure that incorporates, interlocking, folding and weaving; all handcrafted whilst using parametric modelling as the tool.

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Depth was also explored in the same ways as the weave. We wanted to try achieve depth in different ways, much like the forms created in the matrix pages 48|49. We looked at materials plastic, paper and balsa. The use of plastic bag had had rather weightless quailities. Its lightness and almost fluid or gas like characteristics, conveyed the feeling of depth. Semi-opaque plastic which was much stronger and firmer was used to show depth by layering and bending offsetting strips much like the gill definition in grasshopper. Paper also shared flexible like quailites and its ability to layer on top of one another. In all explorations light and shadow further reinforced the depth like characteristic. Lastly, balsa being the least malleable material was able to convey depth differently. Using its rigid qualities, we were able to imitate weaving and create a strong form that changes in perception.

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Through thorough understanding and exploration of material, precedents and form, the proposed gateway is inspired by current computational approaches in design that can be crafted to evolve beyond conventional application and become something that acknowledges the need to look beyond the veneer of appearances.

relate a designâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s physical properties to its presentation, weaving and architecture share qualities that are worthy of further exploration. With the union of a time-honoured craft and contemporary practice new ideas and thus innovation naturally follow.

The implementation of parametric software has made way for the development of these ideas. Deferral in In the search for a way to approach this project the design process, as discussed by Woodbury and with new eyes, digitally generated design becomes Burrow, highlights the benefits of this approach with incorporated with the traditional art of weaving. its ability to lengthen the design exploration phase Reflecting the nature of the craft, architects must before arriving at the final outcome. This is illustrated also interweave a wide range of knowledge in order in the matrix on pages 48|49 as we explored different to achieve a work of value. In their common goal to methods of weaving and depth.

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Technique proposal

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Taking the diagrid as a simple framework, the use of parametric software has allowed its design potential to be pushed and discover unexpected outcomes. With these explorations, certain qualities began to emerge which would inform the realisation of our conceptual ideas. These qualities include depth, lightweightness, movement, variation, density and perception. Depth in both forms of the word is considered as an extension of weaving. Its physical sense is explored with the play of density and configuration of individual elements which come together to materialise the whole. Experientially, it will encourage inquisition and a detached contemplation of the synthesis between

density

perception

light, material and space. Thus the integration of material and geometry will act as a performing ornament. Ultimately, the recontexualisation of a traditional craft and quality of depth engrained in the design evokes intrigue in the viewer, and instils a need for contemplation to understand its underlying ideas and configuration leading to a rethinking about architecture - contemplation beyond first glance. Therefore by attempting to combine technology with a traditional craft, an interesting icon is created that ulitmately ties strongly to both to the architecture discourse and Wynham region.

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Algortihmic sketches

Manipulating the original banq definition, further exploration occured. Utilizing watercolour splash by Trevor Waugh as a new image sampler input, it was set to saturation. It created dynamic and a moving form. Baking of the curves then

mirroring, rotating, offsetting and then extrusion of several curves ultimately extended the definition to create an exciting new form resembling slightly to a loosened weave.

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Conclusion My group and I shared very similar ideas when discussing the Gateway Project from the very beginning. Interested in sectioning initially we realised the form to be rather limiting and constraining, thus the idea of a digital weave was bought to light. It was at this point where we really explored the possibilities of digital technology. We found the weave to contain diverse quailiies as well as a strong base for vast exploration. Being in a group enhanced our exploration and ultimately we created a mix of eclectic ideas and results. Such as the exploration of different types of weaving from series of lines and points, kagome weave and the knit. With more and more experience in

Grasshopper and Rhino, our project gained strength. Ultimately guiding us to look at the traditional craft of weaving and its many qualities with the aid of digital practices. Using conventional techniques in a new and exciting contemporary medium to engage and enrich with ongoing interest.

The mid semester presentation was paramount in the technique-development of our design. Having explored materiality and many forms, the fundamental idea behind our propsoal was rather ambigious. Weaving needed further research and experimentation, It was suggested that our concept should enforce a story along the gateway. Further exploration of patterning, density and material was needed. Another important suggestion in enhancing a story in our design was to look upon traditional weaving forms and vernacular techniques. Here one of the critics suggested artists from Ruth Asawa, Maryann Pau and Mette Thomsen. Asawa | image 27 that I found particularly intersting as

she incoporated traditional craft media and techniques in a very playful and artistic way. She expereiments with cheap, readily available materials such as leaves, paper and wire without destroying its true characteristics.Pau also uses the traditional craft for art. She allows weaving to inspire conversations for growing a community and activate cultural connections in a urban context. Utilizing local Pacific Island weaving techniques, she is able to inspire. Therefore we would like take our project from being a technical achievement to a cultural and architectural success to ulitmately capture an aspiration feeling and instil ongoing interest for local and the greater community of Wyndham.

Through case study 1.0 and 2.0 and our further experimentation we have illustrated that we have understood the flow of information in Grasshopper, reverse engineer and explore materiality through prototrying to thus move towards the final stage in creating our own models within Grasshoper to be built.

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notes. 1 Iwamoto, L. Digital Fabrications: Architectural and Material Techniques, (Princeton Architectural Press: New York, 2009),p.17 2 Iwamoto, L. Digital Fabrications: Architectural and Material Techniques, (Princeton Architectural Press: New York, 2009),p.17 3 Beth Broome, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Banqâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;, in archirecord.com < http://archrecord.construction.com//subscription/ LoginSubscribe.aspx?cid=/projects/bts/archives/restaurants/09_banq/default.asp> {accessed 5 June 2013}

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images. 16 Le Corbusier, 1954, ‘Ronchamp Chapel’, < http://www.galinsky.com/buildings/ronchamp/ronchamp1l.jpg> {accessed 13 May 2013} 17 Koichi Takada, 2010, ‘The Cave’, in the contemporist < http://www.contemporist. com/2010/04/06/the-cave-restaurant-by-koichi-takada-architects/> {accessed 13 May 2013} 18 Matsys, 2010, ‘Zero’, in matsys design < http://matsysdesign.com/2010/02/28/zerofold-screen/> {accessed 5 May 2013} 19 Iwamoto, Lisa. 2005. Digital Fabrication , (New York: Princeton Architectrual Press,2005 ) 20 Anouk Haegens, 2011, ‘Merging Worlds’, < http://anoukhaegens.nl/?p=79> {accessed 25 May 2013} 21 Loop. pH, 2012, ‘Luminous Lace’, in deezen.com , < http://www.dezeen.com/2012/03/23/designed-in-hackney-luminous-lace-by-loop-ph/> {accessed 20 May 2013} 22 Kengo Kuma, 2010, ‘Casalgrande Ceramic Cloud’, in archidaily.com, < http://www.archdaily. com/199164/casalgrande-old-house-kengo-kuma-associates/> {accessed 20 May 2013} 23 Daniel Arsham,2011, ‘Dig’, in snakatecture.com < http://www.snarkitecture.com/projects/dig/> {accessed 20 May 2013} 24 Ruth Asawa, 2011, < http://www.ruthasawa.com/> {accessed 13 May 2013}

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Based on the feedback, our group decided to explore different materials using influences of vernacular and traditional weaving techniques. Collaborating with an eclectic mix of materials; paper was the most interesting. Paper often having soft and flexible characteristics could then be twisted and knotted to ultimately hold strong and a rather textural qualities.Macrame has been so widely practice that its origins are unclear and thus evokes diverse meanings across the spectrum of the world. Thus what evolved was a paper weave focused on the practice of knotting made entirey by hand. We found this to have a delicate yet a beautiful

nature that expressed the intricate craftsmanship in traditional weaving. It was this technique that drove our design thought. Creating a substantial amount of these paper weaves ultimately created a bundle of reed like quality that reinforced the complexity yet textual qualities of a weave. Therefore we wanted to return to traditional craft of weaving with its unique qualities and add it with a modern twist, utilizing paper as well as integrate the traditional craft with contemporary digital practice.

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Based upon the concept of weaving, a parametrically were chosen in diagrams page 66|. They illustrated driven framework is explored that would ultimately conventional weaving patterns that could then be collaborate with our handmade knotted paper. layered anditem interwoven into one another to ultimately line create a very decorative, artistic and complex item Influenced by the traditional loom taken from many framework between lines A,B,C,D. line cultures and putting it into a parametrically driven item framework allowed us to experiment differentseries forms This definition will be the foundation for our structural item divide and patternslinebefore coming to a final decision. A framework in our design. Inspired by traditional craft line series loom usually involving sets of threads interlaced with and nature,itemit returns to culture whilst integrating one another allowed us explore interlacing qualities with principles of computation. It islinea true performing series in parametric design. Creating a set of lines and ornament; one item that integrates pattern, material and dividing the lines into series of points would then be structure with performance. We wanted to return connected together with lines consisting of different to ornamentation and its social functions that had item line patterns. Similarly to a loom, the set of lines and been lost in modernsim and integrate it with the series item points would be the device that holds the warp structure in a contemporary setting. An artwork divide line threads in place. This definition allowed us series to play where ornament and structure are inseperable. item with the amount of lines and points that ultimately line series affected the complexity and pattern of the weave. Therefore this item parametric performing framework will Adding more series and items to the definition made become the underlying foundation for our gateway the system and weave more complex. These rules project. item series line

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The parametric driven framework enabled both flexibility and control when testing out different sets of designs illustrated in the matrix page 69 |.Reinforcing Woodbury parametric modelling now ‘adds, erase, relates and repairs’ with qualities of ‘reliability, speed and clarity’ 1. Thus allowed us to experiment multiple forms. Exploring multiple designs in the early design processes as well as bringing in other professions such as envrionmental and structural engineers, contractorers and consultants into our design will ulitmately bring a higher quality design outcome. In addition design performance willl be achieved. Using digital programing allowed us to optimise passive performance taking in consideration of shading, solar, and ventilation. Digital programming also has the potential to embed material and structural optimisation. However most importantly parametric design allowed construction process to be more efficient. As Kolarevic mentioned, the design information is the construction information and parametric tools allows this easy construction. Our design process included fabrication and assembly information providing the coordinates of each point as well as the exact lengths of each line from the points. This is evident on pages 70 |71. Thus with such accuracy and efficiency, material wastage is minimised during production and construction.

What we explored in the matrix was different set of lines and its ability to create sparse and dense qualities as well as to disperse evenly on a line or be pulled towards a single point. The ability to change and control these points and lines were quick and easy using parametric tools that was all controlled by the designer, us. We also found the effects of layering and adjusting the height of lines can extend the structure and further create a dynamic yet complex physical structure. Ultimately we decided on one that encompasses all patterns and one that stays true to traditional weaving. Parametric tools enabled us to come to this conclusion and most importantly enabled our digital model to become the ‘single source of design and production information’ evident in pages 70|71. Therefore this process structural framework parametric becomes the fundamental foundation for our hand weaving and knotting to weave and grow along. item

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Line 1 Divide Item | series s=0 n=2 Item | series s=0 n=2 Line Line2 Divide Item i=20 Item i=8 Line Line3 divide Item |series s=0 n=2 Item | series s=15 n=1 Line Line4 Divide Item |series s=0 n=2 Item |series s=0 n=1 Line Join

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Line 1 Divide Item | series s=0 n=1 Item | series s=0 n=4 Item i=0 Line Line2 Divide Item | series s=0 n=1 Item | series s=0 n=1 Item | series s=1 n=2 Line Line3 Divide Item i=0 Item |series s=0 n=1 Item |series s=1 n=2 Line Line4 Divide Item |series s=0 n=1 Item |series s=0 n=4 Line Join

Line 1 Divide Item | series s=1 n=1 Item | series s=8 n=1 Item | series s=5 n=1 Line Line2 Divide Item | series s=1 n=1 Item | series s=1 n=2 Item | series s=0 n=1 Item i=15 Line Line3 Divide Item i=0 Item i=0 Item |series s=1 n=2 Line Line4 Divide Item |series s=0 n=1 Line Join

Line 1 Divide Item | series s=0 n=3 Item | series s=2 n=3 Line Line2 Divide Item | series s=0 n=1 Item | series s=1 n=1 Line Line3 Divide Item |series s=1 n=1 Item |series s=0 n=1 Item |series s=1 n=2 Item |series s=0 n=2 Line Line4 Divide Item |series s=0 n=3 Item |series s=2 n=3 Item |series s=0 n=2 Item |series s=0 n=2 Item | series s=2 n=2 Line Join

Line 1 Divide Item | series s=0 n=1 Item | series s=0 n=4 Item i=0 Line Line2 Divide Item | series s=0 n=1 Item | series s=0 n=1 Item | series s=1 n=2 Line Line3 Divide Item i=0 Item |series s=0 n=1 Item |series s=1 n=2 Line Line4 Divide Item |series s=0 n=1 Item |series s=0 n=4 Line Join

69


production data {880.0, 1053.273897, 88.0} {830.098445, 1016.136134, 88.0} {780.196889, 978.998372, 88.0} {730.295334, 941.860609, 88.0} {680.393778, 904.722847, 88.0} {630.492223, 867.585084, 88.0} {580.590667, 830.447321, 88.0} {530.689112, 793.309559, 88.0} {530.689112, 793.309559, 88.0} {430.886001, 719.034034, 88.0} {380.984446, 681.896271, 88.0} {331.08289, 644.758508, 88.0} {846.732296, 1028.515388, 88.0} {796.830741, 991.377626, 88.0} {746.929186, 954.239863, 88.0} {697.02763, 917.102101, 88.0} {647.126075, 879.964338, 88.0} {597.224519, 842.826576, 88.0} {547.322964, 805.688813, 88.0} {497.421408, 768.55105, 88.0} {447.519853, 731.413288, 88.0} {397.618298, 694.275525, 88.0} {347.716742, 657.137763, 88.0} {297.815187, 620.0, 88.0} {307.0, 1134.0, 65.0} {302.085714, 1123.457143, 65.0} {297.171429, 1112.914286, 65.0} {292.257143, 1102.371429, 65.0} {287.342857, 1091.828571, 65.0} {282.428571, 1081.285714, 65.0} {277.514286, 1070.742857, 65.0} {272.6, 1060.2, 65.0} {267.685714, 1049.657143, 65.0} {262.771429, 1039.114286, 65.0} {257.857143, 1028.571429, 65.0} {252.942857, 1018.028571, 65.0} {248.028571, 1007.485714, 65.0} {243.114286, 996.942857, 65.0} {238.2, 986.4, 65.0} {233.285714, 975.857143, 65.0} {228.371429, 965.314286, 65.0} {223.457143, 954.771429, 65.0}

{218.542857, 944.228571, 65.0} {213.628571, 933.685714, 65.0} {208.714286, 923.142857, 65.0} {203.8, 912.6, 65.0} {198.885714, 902.057143, 65.0} {193.971429, 891.514286, 65.0} {189.057143, 880.971429, 65.0} {184.142857, 870.428571, 65.0} {179.228571, 859.885714, 65.0} {174.314286, 849.342857, 65.0} {169.4, 838.8, 65.0} {164.485714, 828.257143, 65.0} {159.571429, 817.714286, 65.0} {154.657143, 807.171429, 65.0} {149.742857, 796.628571, 65.0} {144.828571, 786.085714, 65.0} {139.914286, 775.542857, 65.0} {731.028571, 1043.457143, 16.0} {720.057143, 1031.914286, 16.0} {709.085714, 1020.371429, 16.0} {698.114286, 1008.828571, 16.0} {687.142857, 997.285714, 16.0} {676.171429, 985.742857, 16.0} {665.2, 974.2, 16.0} {654.228571, 962.657143, 16.0} {643.257143, 951.114286, 16.0} {632.285714, 939.571429, 16.0} {621.314286, 928.028571, 16.0} {610.342857, 916.485714, 16.0} {599.371429, 904.942857, 16.0} {588.4, 893.4, 16.0} {577.428571, 881.857143, 16.0} {566.457143, 870.314286, 16.0} {555.485714, 858.771429, 16.0} {544.514286, 847.228571, 16.0} {533.542857, 835.685714, 16.0} {522.571429, 824.142857, 16.0} {511.6, 812.6, 16.0} {500.628571, 801.057143, 16.0} {489.657143, 789.514286, 16.0} {478.685714, 777.971429, 16.0} {467.714286, 766.428571, 16.0} {456.742857, 754.885714, 16.0}

{445.771429, 743.342857, 16.0} {434.8, 731.8, 16.0} {423.828571, 720.257143, 16.0} {412.857143, 708.714286, 16.0} {401.885714, 697.171429, 16.0} {390.914286, 685.628571, 16.0} {379.942857, 674.085714, 16.0} {368.971429, 662.542857, 16.0} {358.0, 651.0, 16.0} {307.0, 1134.0, 65.0} {297.171429, 1112.914286, 65.0} {287.342857, 1091.828571, 65.0} {277.514286, 1070.742857, 65.0} {267.685714, 1049.657143, 65.0} {257.857143, 1028.571429, 65.0} {248.028571, 1007.485714, 65.0} {238.2, 986.4, 65.0} {228.371429, 965.314286, 65.0} {218.542857, 944.228571, 65.0} {208.714286, 923.142857, 65.0} {198.885714, 902.057143, 65.0} {189.057143, 880.971429, 65.0} {179.228571, 859.885714, 65.0} {169.4, 838.8, 65.0} {159.571429, 817.714286, 65.0} {149.742857, 796.628571, 65.0} {139.914286, 775.542857, 65.0} {307.0, 1134.0, 65.0} {302.085714, 1123.457143, 65.0} {297.171429, 1112.914286, 65.0} {292.257143, 1102.371429, 65.0} {287.342857, 1091.828571, 65.0} {282.428571, 1081.285714, 65.0} {277.514286, 1070.742857, 65.0} {272.6, 1060.2, 65.0} {267.685714, 1049.657143, 65.0} {262.771429, 1039.114286, 65.0} {257.857143, 1028.571429, 65.0} {252.942857, 1018.028571, 65.0} {248.028571, 1007.485714, 65.0} {243.114286, 996.942857, 65.0} {238.2, 986.4, 65.0}

{233.285714, 975.857143, 65.0} {228.371429, 965.314286, 65.0} {223.457143, 954.771429, 65.0} {218.542857, 944.228571, 65.0} {213.628571, 933.685714, 65.0} {208.714286, 923.142857, 65.0} {203.8, 912.6, 65.0} {198.885714, 902.057143, 65.0} {193.971429, 891.514286, 65.0} {189.057143, 880.971429, 65.0} {184.142857, 870.428571, 65.0} {179.228571, 859.885714, 65.0} {174.314286, 849.342857, 65.0} {169.4, 838.8, 65.0} {164.485714, 828.257143, 65.0} {159.571429, 817.714286, 65.0} {154.657143, 807.171429, 65.0} {149.742857, 796.628571, 65.0} {144.828571, 786.085714, 65.0} {139.914286, 775.542857, 65.0} {297.171429, 1112.914286, 65.0} {287.342857, 1091.828571, 65.0} {277.514286, 1070.742857, 65.0} {267.685714, 1049.657143, 65.0} {257.857143, 1028.571429, 65.0} {248.028571, 1007.485714, 65.0} {238.2, 986.4, 65.0} {228.371429, 965.314286, 65.0} {218.542857, 944.228571, 65.0} {208.714286, 923.142857, 65.0} {198.885714, 902.057143, 65.0} {189.057143, 880.971429, 65.0} {179.228571, 859.885714, 65.0} {169.4, 838.8, 65.0} {159.571429, 817.714286, 65.0} {149.742857, 796.628571, 65.0} {139.914286, 775.542857, 65.0} {22.724959, 824.833813, 16.0} {302.085714, 1123.457143, 65.0} {297.171429, 1112.914286, 65.0} {292.257143, 1102.371429, 65.0} {287.342857, 1091.828571, 65.0}

{282.428571, 1081.285714, 65.0} {277.514286, 1070.742857, 65.0} {272.6, 1060.2, 65.0} {267.685714, 1049.657143, 65.0} {262.771429, 1039.114286, 65.0} {257.857143, 1028.571429, 65.0} {252.942857, 1018.028571, 65.0} {257.857143, 1028.571429, 65.0} {252.942857, 1018.028571, 65.0} {248.028571, 1007.485714, 65.0} {243.114286, 996.942857, 65.0} {238.2, 986.4, 65.0} {233.285714, 975.857143, 65.0} {228.371429, 965.314286, 65.0} {223.457143, 954.771429, 65.0} {218.542857, 944.228571, 65.0} {213.628571, 933.685714, 65.0} {208.714286, 923.142857, 65.0} {203.8, 912.6, 65.0} {198.885714, 902.057143, 65.0} {193.971429, 891.514286, 65.0} {189.057143, 880.971429, 65.0} {184.142857, 870.428571, 65.0} {179.228571, 859.885714, 65.0} {174.314286, 849.342857, 65.0} {169.4, 838.8, 65.0} {164.485714, 828.257143, 65.0} {159.571429, 817.714286, 65.0} {154.657143, 807.171429, 65.0} {149.742857, 796.628571, 65.0} {144.828571, 786.085714, 65.0} {139.914286, 775.542857, 65.0} {135.0, 765.0, 65.0} {297.171429, 1112.914286, 65.0} {287.342857, 1091.828571, 65.0} {277.514286, 1070.742857, 65.0} {267.685714, 1049.657143, 65.0} {257.857143, 1028.571429, 65.0} {248.028571, 1007.485714, 65.0} {238.2, 986.4, 65.0} {228.371429, 965.314286, 65.0} {218.542857, 944.228571, 65.0} {208.714286, 923.142857, 65.0}

70


{198.885714, 902.057143, 65.0} {189.057143, 880.971429, 65.0} {179.228571, 859.885714, 65.0} {169.4, 838.8, 65.0} {159.571429, 817.714286, 65.0} {149.742857, 796.628571, 65.0} {139.914286, 775.542857, 65.0} {115.373569, 1180.0, 16.0} {109.923651, 1159.107871, 16.0} {104.473733, 1138.215743, 16.0} {99.023814, 1117.323614, 16.0} {93.573896, 1096.431485, 16.0} {88.123978, 1075.539357, 16.0} {82.67406, 1054.647228, 16.0} {77.224142, 1033.755099, 16.0} {71.774223, 1012.862971, 16.0} {66.324305, 991.970842, 16.0} {60.874387, 971.078713, 16.0} {55.424469, 950.186585, 16.0} {49.97455, 929.294456, 16.0} {44.524632, 908.402327, 16.0} {39.074714, 887.510199, 16.0} {33.624796, 866.61807, 16.0} {28.174877, 845.725941, 16.0} {22.724959, 824.833813, 16.0} {115.373569, 1180.0, 16.0} {107.198692, 1148.661807, 16.0} {99.023814, 1117.323614, 16.0} {90.848937, 1085.985421, 16.0} {82.67406, 1054.647228, 16.0} {74.499182, 1023.309035, 16.0} {66.324305, 991.970842, 16.0} {58.149428, 960.632649, 16.0} {49.97455, 929.294456, 16.0} {41.799673, 897.956263, 16.0} {33.624796, 866.61807, 16.0} {25.449918, 835.279877, 16.0} {112.64861, 1169.553936, 16.0} {107.198692, 1148.661807, 16.0} {101.748774, 1127.769678, 16.0} {96.298855, 1106.87755, 16.0}

{90.848937, 1085.985421, 16.0} {85.399019, 1065.093292, 16.0} {79.949101, 1044.201164, 16.0} {74.499182, 1023.309035, 16.0} {69.049264, 1002.416906, 16.0} {63.599346, 981.524778, 16.0} {58.149428, 960.632649, 16.0} {52.699509, 939.74052, 16.0} {47.249591, 918.848392, 16.0} {41.799673, 897.956263, 16.0} {36.349755, 877.064134, 16.0} {30.899836, 856.172006, 16.0} {25.449918, 835.279877, 16.0} {20.0, 814.387748, 16.0} {109.923651, 1159.107871, 16.0} {104.473733, 1138.215743, 16.0} {99.023814, 1117.323614, 16.0} {93.573896, 1096.431485, 16.0} {88.123978, 1075.539357, 16.0} {82.67406, 1054.647228, 16.0} {77.224142, 1033.755099, 16.0} {71.774223, 1012.862971, 16.0} {66.324305, 991.970842, 16.0} {60.874387, 971.078713, 16.0} {55.424469, 950.186585, 16.0} {49.97455, 929.294456, 16.0} {44.524632, 908.402327, 16.0} {39.074714, 887.510199, 16.0} {33.624796, 866.61807, 16.0} {28.174877, 845.725941, 16.0} {22.724959, 824.833813, 16.0} {109.923651, 1159.107871, 16.0} {101.748774, 1127.769678, 16.0} {93.573896, 1096.431485, 16.0} {85.399019, 1065.093292, 16.0} {77.224142, 1033.755099, 16.0} {69.049264, 1002.416906, 16.0} {60.874387, 971.078713, 16.0} {52.699509, 939.74052, 16.0} {44.524632, 908.402327, 16.0} {36.349755, 877.064134, 16.0} {28.174877, 845.725941, 16.0}

co-ordinates of points

199.142463 195.1485 191.171582 187.212794 183.273313 179.35441 175.457464 171.583971 167.735556 163.913985 160.12118 156.359235 152.630431 148.937258 145.282433 141.668924 138.099975 203.562141 199.420475 195.289342 191.169423 187.061459 182.966257 178.884691 174.817718 170.7663 166.731817 162.715276 158.718126 154.741869 150.788159 146.858816 142.955849 139.08148 135.238166 201.145519 197.143415 193.157844 189.18985 185.240563 181.311206 177.403102

173.517687 169.656522 165.821298 162.01386 158.236212 154.49054 150.779227 147.104873 143.470318 143.470318 136.333305 201.490032 197.353551 193.227936 189.113898 185.01221 180.923711 176.849318 172.790026 168.746926 164.721211 160.714186 156.727286 152.762086 148.82032 144.903902 141.014942 137.155777 137.155777 439.081968 433.352429 427.634257 421.927916 416.233892 410.552698 404.884873 399.230986 393.59164 387.967467 382.359137 376.767357 371.192877

365.636486 360.099023 354.581373 349.084477 343.609331 338.15699 332.728577 327.325282 321.948368 316.599181 311.27915 305.989796 300.732736 295.509696 290.32251 285.173136 280.063659 274.996303 269.973439 264.997599 260.07148 439.081968 433.352429 427.634257 421.927916 416.233892 410.552698 404.884873 399.230986 393.59164 387.967467 382.359137 376.767357 371.192877 365.636486 360.099023 354.581373 349.084477 343.609331 338.15699 332.728577 327.325282 321.948368

316.599181 311.27915 305.989796 300.732736 295.509696 290.32251 285.173136 280.063659 274.996303 269.973439 264.997599 260.07148 255.197962 778.393913 738.465373 698.795128 659.429796 620.427419 581.860989 543.823261 506.433381 469.846041 434.26413 399.956085 367.279057 780.642308 740.364296 700.303984 660.500985 581.877836 543.199964 505.074338 467.636049 431.064221 395.599232 361.566928 751.748214 711.987172 672.51438 633.383731 594.662771

lengths of lines

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14 Billions | Tomas Saraceno | Stockholm . 2010 is an exemplary example of the amalgamation between digital techniques and analogue craft. With an eclectic mix of discplines from scientists, artist to architects, an accurate and innvotive installation emerged taken from mother nature ; a spiders web. Through the use of digital scripts the team was able to obtain precise measurements between strands and three-dimensioanl coordinates of each connection. Thread by thread 70,000 knots were made by hand in accordance with the data accompanied by a map of plotted points.The collaboration of handcraft with digital technology is a concept we want to transcend onto our project. One that uses expertises across the realm using both traditional and digital contruction processes to ultimately create alternate ways of being and inhabiting space. Saraceno captures the imagination and creates a spectacular installation reflecting both materiality and an artists experimental ethos.

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26

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Robotic Spider Weave | Mediated Matter Group | MIT Media Lab . 2012 Similarly collaborating with a variety of disciplines, the cocoon-like woven structure created by a robotic spider was a radical way to create space. Using its surroundings, the robotic machine was pulled towards certain points of the framework and weaved around them like a spider creating a web structure. The use of tensile materials and the use of the robot expresses new ways in which materials can create space. Eventually the system will become autonomous and be able to naturally sense the surrounding environment to thus create its own unique and unpredictable space. Within structural and environmental parameters and the innovation of digital design and robotic machines one has the ability to create structures efficiently and accurately without the aid of humans. This concept derived by Mediate Matter Group is something we can forsee in our own design approach. Utilizing robotic machines and its ability to use data retrieved from digital programs such as Grasshopper can ultimately form our digital woven framework on site or possibly other potential typologies. Robotic machines has the ability use the data and weave quickly and accurately without disrupting traffic or surrounding landscape or ecology of Wyndham. Therefore this construction methond can further provide a long-lasting interest and contribution to the discourse in Wyndham and global scale.

75


The woven framework is informed by the Wyndham site specifically its contours. The structure is to be apart of the landscape of Wyndham and immersed in the nearby mound. Therefore our site was the driving force in our design. The diagram to our righ page 77| illustrates our process. Firstly contour lines were chosen that would act as the boundaries for our set of lines A, B, C, D. Thus series of lines with different patterns are created from sets of lines A-B, A-D, B-C. Therefore as one approaches the installation, one becomes fully immersed within the weave and landscape as one and eventually will open out into the light view of Wyndham as the weave become less dense. Thus adding an element of surprise.

be exposed to a collection of roots and greenery-- a cave-like forest. Incoporating nature into our design helps combat carbon dioxide emissions on highway as well as provide an intimate interaction with nature for one on the highway. A point on the highway that becomes soothing and relaxing place for the mind and the eyes. Together the roots and plants will eventually weave and intertwine with the macrome handcraft and digital woven framework to ultimately create a holistic form that changes in time and season.

In time knots and plants will eventually wear out and fall honouring the time and effort of making them as well as serving a memory during its growth. Similarly to the Shinto belief of death and renewal of nature and The mound symbolically acts as the point of growth the impermanence of all things it symbolizes a way of for our paper macrome weave and eventually plants. passing building techniques from one generation to the Our decision to collaborate nature into our design next. The re-creation and re-planting of the handmade emphasizes our idea of growth and its relationship knots and seedlings will be a thought to preserve with the surrouding landscape. Seeds inplanted in the the techniques as well as to remain in living memory. paper knots will grow and eventually burst with greenery Therefore the processes of decay and re-creation at the right season. The plants will naturally follow the enhances the concept of change and tradition in our macrome paper weaves from the mound and grow to design. ultimately become part of the landscape. The plants will become a threshold between our site and our Therefore our design inherents qualities of temporality parametric driven structure. Root systems will gradually and ephermerality that will enhance the means to grow and seep through underneath the structure. instil ongoing interest among the local and greater Therefore as cars pass through the gateway one will community.

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to Wyndham

site is established

line A-B establish set of criss-cross lines

contours are chosen

line A,B,C,D are introduced

line B-C introduces straight series of lines

line A-D establishes straight series of lines

line A,B,C,D explore different arrangements & height

the woven framework is accomplished

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light and shadow exploration

78


process of growth and ephemerality

79


80


The time lapse illustrated on the previous pages 78 | 79 shows the process of construction of the paper knots woven by robotic machines and the growth of plants that naturally follows. The dynamic light and shadows that will fall during day and night is also illustrated and is further captured in the video. When deciding on materials; steel was obvious for the beams and columns as well as for the digital weave using steel suspension ropes. Most importantly we wanted to continue to collaborate with paper and maintain the qualities that we initailly found interesting. Most importantly its ability and nature to decay. Therefore when fabricating our digital form, card and fishing line were used to represent those materials. Using the

data retrieved from our parametric design, holes were punched at the right distances from one another to allow the fishing line to be woven back and forth from one another. Therefore material wastage and mistakes was minimised. What we found difficult was that the line had to be in constant tension and thus required constant pulling. Therefore columns made from card were not rigid enough for the required tension and thus the fishing line sagged. This would ulitmately affect how the handcrafted paper knots would look. We possibly set ourselves with too many points and set of lines that made the fabrication process rather long. However, what was achieved was still a loom-like structure using parametric practices as a vehicle.

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82


83


84


85


86


Our project presentation revealed many strengths and faults. Our story collaborating both analogue and digital that drove our design was well praised. Yet it was our model and choice of materials that let us down. The use of paper was questioned with its practicablity as well as its ability to last. Also the time and energy wasted to weave the paper knots one by one by robotic machines was mentioned. Though what was mentioned can be argued true, paper was an important element that expressed the idea of ephermarilty and decay as well as portraying its delicate and textual qualities. However paper could be a representation for many other mediums such as fabric, plastic or string. All three have the ability to incoporate traditional handcraft

as well as have the ability to weather and decay as time and seasons go by. String was explored illustrated below. Another problem was our choice of materials for the model that hindered our design. The fishing line used was quite heavy and lacked tension that ultimately afftected our loom-like framework. Experimentation with thread or some sort of lighter material would have been preferable in order to achieve a more dynamic weave like structure. Therefore with more thought and experimentation with materiality, our design could be expressed better and pushed further.

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88


Algortihmic sketches

In Part C, my algorithmic explorations consist of emphasizing the patterns created from Grasshopper. further experimentation with the fields to design a new The technique of a weave (one layer layering on top of contemporary weave like structure. one another) became more obvious. However these would be more difficult to fabricate as we would need The explorations illustrated utilized the same to take into account the intersection or interlocking Grasshopper definition that included a set of lines, of the extruded lines. These algorithmic explorations points and items that were eventually joined. However rejects the delicacy and lightness that the original form manipulation was performed in the placement of the had.Therefore we decided to continue using the lines lines as well the points. We also explored when different without extrusion as they suited the model aesthetically series of lines were extruded in different directions | x, and conveyed the idea of a weave more powerfully. y, z. Extrusion gave the form more depth as well as

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Learning Objectives

Parametrc modelling has allowed me to deepen my thinking of materiality, space, production and construction. Inititally preconceiving digital architecture as being harsh, blobby and often tasteless. I have quickly seen the potentials that the parametric design has. Its is a tool to create, manipulate and design quickly and efficiently. Yet most importantly it has the ability to generate ideas or designs that I would have never thought to be possible. What is paramount is the return to construction rather than the plan of buildings. They are able to hand us accurate and precise data of our design from every measurement, every distance and every angle making construction and fabrication accurate and efficient whilst minimising material wastage. Kaley reinforces this stating they are a superb analytical engines that follow a line of reasoning to its logical conclusion. They break and push boundaries revealing new opportunities to ultimately produce and construct complex forms. However as rational and logical parametric design I believe that I have achieved all eight learning objectives of the coursework. 1 | I have learnt skills to interogate the project brief and develop a persuaive argument that achieves innovation, discourse and ongoing interest for Wyndham City. 2| We were able to generate a variety of design possibiles through parametric modeeling engaging in the discourse intellectually and theoretically. 3| we developed skills in various three dimensioanl media in order to fabricate 4| I have understood the relationship between architecture and air. I believe we have incorporated the environmental surroundings and site to produced a performing design. 5| I believe we were successful in presenting

is (discussed in chaper one) â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;computers are totally incapable of making up new insturctions; lacking creativity and intuitionâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;. Therefore our collaboration of traditional craft with digital practices has allowed us to find a equilibrium between the two and produce a design that requires both rational and creative abilities to solve a design. We found that our creative abilities is paramount in the design process as it gave us the ability to further enhance the digital woven framework. This collaboration between the two created a strong final design that respected both traditional and contemporary forms of design and construction. We created a structure that went against my initial prejudices on parametric design and we ended up creating a rather delicate and minimal design incorporating both traditional and contemporary practices. I have learnt to appreciate parametnc design and found it as useful tool design. Yet there is much more to explore and I am excited to see what else it has to offer. our design with visual and text by identifying our key elements that will instil ongoing interest and excitement for the city of Wyndham 6| I have learnt to critically analyse work by looking upon precedents and theorists and documenting them in the journal. It has allowed us to design with more freedom and as a guide. 7| We have developed fundamental understandings of computational geometry, data and types of programming. They have allowed more efficiency and freedom in comparison to conventional design processes. 8| I have gained a repertoire of computation techniques using Rhno, Grasshopper and various plug-ins that are evident in my technique developments. I have ultimately engaged myself in self-directed learning. 90


Conclusion

The digital and the analogue are brought together at the threshold of Wyndham capturing a transient moment and creating an experiential memory that goes beyond first glance. The traditional weave taken into a contemporary medium utlizing digital practice has created radical new ways of thinking about materiality, production, construction and space.

engage with the public and generate discourse in the architecture world. Our woven structure has been designed with the site. As it emerges from the ground, the structure has the ability to be noticed afar and receive changing views as one drives by.

We believe that this project will also provide a means to instil ongoing interest as time and seasons evolve. Collaborating with an eclectic mix of disciplines as well It will establish itself together with Wyndham as part of as robotic machines, nature and traditional handcraft the endless discovery of design and advancement of our design is an exciting and unique design that will architectural discourse.

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notes. 1 Woodbury, R. 2010. ‘Elements of Parametric Design’ (London: Routledge) p. 7-48

images. 25 Tomas Saraceno, 2010, ‘14 Billion’, in coolhunting.com < http://www.coolhunting.com/culture/14billion.php> {accessed 30 May 2013} 24 Mediate Matter Group MIT, 2012, ‘Robotic Spider Weave, < http://www.pcadvisor.co.uk/videos/3354159/video-robotic-spider-weaves-web-at-mit-media-lab/> (accessed 20 May 2013)

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Ando, T. ‘Chichu Art Museum’, (N/A) <http://www.hatjecantz.de/leseproben/377571460x_06.pdf> Iwamoto, L. Digital Fabrications: Architectural and Material Techniques, (Princeton Architectural Press: New York, 2009),p.17 Kaley, Y, ‘Architecture’s New Media : Principles, Theories, and Methods of Computer-Aided Design’ (Cambridge, Mass.: MIT Press, 2004), pp. 5 - 25 Kolarevic, B, ‘Architecture in the Digital Age: Design and Manufacturing’ (New York; London: Spon Press, 2003), pp. 3 - 28. Kropovinskiy. A. S, ‘МОЛОДА МИСТЕЦЬКА НАУКА УКРАЇНИ’ ( N/A, 2010) pp. 120-122 Lynn, G, ‘Why Tectonics is Square and Topology is Groovy’, in Fold, Bodies and Blobs: Collected Essays ed. by Greg Lynn (Bruxelles: La Lettre volée,1998), pp. 169-182.

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References

Menges, A, ‘Material Computation’ (London: Wiley Academy,2012) < http://www.achimmenges. net/?p=5079> Oxman, N, ‘Material-based Design Computation’. Ph.D. thesis, MIT (2010) < http://dspace.mit.edu/ handle/1721.1/59192> Fuyurama, M, ‘Tadoa Ando’ (Japan, N/A, 2006) pp. 10 Schumacher, P, ‘Let the Style Wars Begin’ (London: EMAP Publishing, 2010) < http://www.architectsjournal.co.uk/the-critics/patrik-schumacher-on-parametricism-let-the-style-wars-begin/5217211. article> Schumacher, P, ‘Introduction : Architecture as Autopoietic System’, in The Autopoiesis of Architecture (Chichester: J. Wiley, 2011), pp. 1 - 28. Williams, R, ‘Architecture and Visual Culture’, in Exploring Visual Culture : Definitions, Concepts, Contexts, ed. by Matthew Rampley (Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 2005), pp. 102 - 116.

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jessica wang |

538218 | studio 5 | ABPL30048

| weave 96


Studio Air Journal