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Earth Artifact

4 1 2 Modernism


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Post

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eet r t S

Typography

Manifesto

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MODER M

odernism - a term used in the aftermath of the 1st world war and the Russian revolution. A period where the artistic avant-grade dreamed of a new world free from conflict, greed and social inequality. The modernist movement was around from late 19th century to early 20th century, however the term modernism was used in graphic design itself since around the 1925-1930. As time moved on and economic conditions improved designers had to reassess their work, adapting it to mass markets. Initially before this time modernism was only largely experimental but then moved from blue prints to the real world. When it comes to Modernism, in a nutshell it is a time in our history when tradition began to change. Modernism attemtpted to change the outlook on science, art, culture, ethics, philosophy and psychology. It dived in to a world of new and hidden meaning in the human experience and had to evolve new ideas. Modernsim welcomed and believed in myths, ethnic origins and the ‘Grand Theory’, which believed explanations through science, history and culture can explain everything. Modernism had greater faith in social and cultural unity, it also however believed in social class and ethnic/ national values hierarchoes as a

basis for unity. Modernism was a selfcentred movement; it made great self achievment through individualism, and unified identity. It took faith in things like politics, mass culture, consumption and marketing. It was serious about intention and purpose, attempting to embrace totality, and the clear difference between organic and inorganic. It was highly censored in sexual reference, and held a sense of clear generic boundaries and wholeness, immediately found in art but also found within music and literature. Modernism made use of the past by the employment of reprise, incoorporation, rewriting, recapulation, revision and parody. This period was a time when people and family demanded more, they wanted a boost. It took ‘the nuclear family’ as a central unit of social order and a model of the middle class. This is when designers began to understand the media and audience positioning. The idea was that they could heal those hurt from war with new and intruiging concepts of art and design, a dream of banishing all conflict with the use of design. It believed in the idea of ‘depth over surface’, which is having belief in pieces to have further meaning, value and content as to what is immediately seen by the viewer. Gone were the days of hand made products. the demand for design meant products needed to be made at a much quicker rate than ever before. This movement experienced an early industry of technology, this meant the use of technology was one of the main features in advertisements being produced. The designers then of course had to adapt to


RNISM the higher demand, meaning production had to come on a much quicker scale. There were many styles throughout this movement, creating great influence to places like France, Germany and Italy. Style began to become simplstic, there was no finer details, just a focus for its purpose. The theory was that design would automatically look good and appeal to its audience so didnt require the little detailing. This later led to the theory of ‘function over form’ meaning that the objects/pieces function is more important than how it looks. The shapes used in work were simple, straight lines, curves and in some cases simplified geometric shapes were often used to create new layouts and patterns. The amount of colour used was very minimalistic, with only primary colours being used. As a designer in the modernist movement you were most likely to reject the use of decorative motifs and embellishments, and focus rather on the materials and colours used. Another big rejection of the time was the use of ‘nature’ as inspiration, this aspect was heavily used in art nouveau (1880 - 1910). The modernism movement is still well recognised today, aspects of its impact on design are commonly used in 21st century work.

4


Modernism - a term used in the aftermath of the 1st world war and the Russian revolution. A period where the artistic avant-grade dreamed of a new world free from conflict, greed and social inequality. The modernist movement was around from late 19th century to early 20th century, however the term modernism was used in graphic design itself since around the 1925-1930. As time moved on and economic conditions improved designers had to reassess their work, adapting it to mass markets. Initially before this time modernism was only largely experimental but then moved from blue prints to the real world. When it comes to Modernism, in a nutshell it is a time in our history when tradition began to change. Modernism attemtpted to change the outlook on science, art, culture, ethics, philosophy and psychology. It dived in to a world of new and hidden meaning in the human experience and had to evolve new ideas. Modernsim welcomed and believed in myths, ethnic origins and the ‘Grand Theory’, which believed explanations through science, history and culture can explain everything. Modernism had greater faith in social and cultural unity, it also however believed in social class and ethnic/national values hierarchoes as a basis for unity. Modernism was a self-centred movement; it made great self achievment through individualism, and unified identity. It took faith in things like politics, mass culture, consumption and marketing. It was serious about intention and purpose, attempting to embrace totality, and the clear difference between organic and inorganic. It was highly censored in sexual reference, and held a sense of clear generic boundaries and wholeness, immediately found in art but also found within music and literature.

Postmoder


rnism

Modernism made use of the past by the employment of reprise, incoorporation, rewriting, recapulation, revision and parody. This period was a time when people and family demanded more, they wanted a boost. It took ‘the nuclear family’ as a central unit of social order and a model of the middle class. This is when designers began to understand the media and audience positioning. The idea was that they could heal those hurt from war with new and intruiging concepts of art and design, a dream of banishing all conflict with the use of design. It believed in the idea of ‘depth over surface’, which is having belief in pieces to have further meaning, value and content as to what is immediately seen by the viewer. Gone were the days of hand made products. the demand for design meant products needed to be made at a much quicker rate than ever before. This movement experienced an early industry of technology, this meant the use of technology was one of the main features in advertisements being produced. The designers then of course had to adapt to the higher demand, meaning production had to come on a much quicker scale. There were many styles throughout this movement, creating great influence to places like France, Germany and Italy. Style began to become simplstic, there was no finer details, just a focus for its purpose. The theory was that design would automatically look good and appeal to its audience so didnt require the little detailing. This later led to the theory of ‘function over form’ meaning that the objects/pieces function is more important than how it looks. The shapes used in work were simple, straight lines, curves and in some cases simplified geometric shapes were often used to create new layouts and patterns. The amount of colour used was very minimalistic, with only primary colours being used. As a designer in the modernist movement you were most likely to reject the use of decorative motifs and embellishments, and focus rather on the materials and colours used. Another big rejection of the time was the use of ‘nature’ as inspiration, this aspect was heavily used in art nouveau (1880 - 1910). The

modernism movement is still well recognised today, aspects of its impact on design are commonly used in 21st century work.

6


Street


Graphics Street Graphics was a project based on showing the street through our own opinion, views, emotions and perspective. For the Street Graphic project I grasped onto the idea of the street through the mind of someone who has Dementia. I based the final piece of work around my Great Grandma who lives in Leeds and suffers from severe dementia. Dementia is a collection of symptoms including memory loss, personality change, disorientation to time and place and impaired intellectual functions resulting from disease or trauma to the brain. These changes are not part of normal aging and are severe enough to impact daily living, independence, and relationships. The idea behind my project was to express how things can be unclear, blurred and only certain aspects are remembered. Amani Willett and Vaughan Oliver inspired the piece of work to the left. Amani Willett is a photographer who layers up photographs to create a blurred and unclear effect. Vaughan Oliver on the other hand uses shapes and lines to highlight aspects of an image.These two artists were a perfect combination for my idea as it allowed me to create a blurred image with areas highlighted. The image to the left is various photographs, which I took in Leeds city centre, layered and collaged together. I started by layering the photos together on Photoshop; this created a disconnected image that was hard to make out. To create the distressed effect I printed the image various times and collaged it back together. I then went on to adding cut outs of black and white vintage family photos of my Great Grandma and Great Granddad. I did this to show how my Great Grandma only remembers certain parts of her younger days. I included the shapes and lines to highlight the vintage photos so they stood out, I connected the vintage images with lines to show there is a connection.

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T h e Cabinet of Curiosity was a project, which became personal to myself; the brief was to produce a cabinet, which displayed an emotion, hobby or anything we wanted really, the cabinet could be physical or digital. The vintage camera box I used to display my cabinet was passed down to myself. My Great Grandma who had the box bought for her, as a child originally owned the box. The box was used to store her camera, and later on my Granddads toys. I have also used the box to store my jewelry in. The image of my cabinet is two separate images, which I have overlaid on top of one another on Photoshop. The first photograph contains the things my Great Grandma kept in the box and the second image contains what my Granddad kept in the box.

CABINET OF


F CURIOSITY I put the objects inside the box and photographed the separate combinations. I did this so that on Photoshop I could lower the opacity on my Great Grandmas objects and only see them slightly in comparison to my Granddads, I did this to show the history of the box and to also tell a story. It also makes people curious as to why one image is easier to see than the other. To create the original object compositions I gained inspiration from Joseph Cornell. The text overlaid on top of the photographs is a letter, which was, wrote to my Great Grandma by a German man she nursed in the Second World War. I decided to overlay this on the photos as the German man gave the camera box to My Great Grandma on her birthday of 1940. The letter in its self is very curious, as it is hard to read , understandand some parts cant be seen.

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Earth Artifact was a project, which was based on the original Voyager Golden Record. We were briefed to create a modern day version of the Voyager Golden Record, which meant we could basically do anything to represent and portray a message about the globe. I chose to think outside the box and act like the outer earth bodies knew nothing about earth, I chose to go forward with an idea that represented earth in a good way rather than a bad way. I came up with the idea of making a book, which had touch and feel aspects to it. This way the outer earth bodies would learn about earth like a child learns new surroundings and skills. I looked into DK publishing books to look at the kinds of textures and material I could use to show nature and creatures here on earth. I chose images of insects, wildlife and nature to represent earth. I then went to markets and craft shops to collate my materials to make the pages in my book textured and also to bring them to life. I used acetate, fake fur, neoprene, fake grass/leaves, anything I could find really to make the book as realistic as possible and get the message about earth across.

‘Earth Artifact’ 12


MANIF

ESTO

As par t of a t he asked to look ory workshop into w and rev iew the 3 existing m e were origi anifest n m to ge I would os I h al and the t a w n r i i t d e an moder ea fo ave started n day by loo d digitalise m r one in bo come to th version k e Manife t conclu sto for ing at An In yself. I aut h versions o sion th ho f t co G The m anifest rowth by Br mplete tha rs are expre he manifesto at t desig o uc ssing t in 199 ners a heir co the 8, has by Bruce Ma e Mau, on r e nc u, writt to be manife en cre advertising a wasting their ern one of stos I at nd ins s have r the be inspira ead; I tead s kills st a c e work, whic tional fi hould and ea n a h unlike sy to u d it very 19 use or made is put forw some a 64 nde rd for of have re ad. I lik the others, rstand seem version of th a cause. In to e e man the his em which s to be i f otions how he is to I desi e s a t o plea th the poi g and fe numbe nt, aw ners at the ti ding tone, a ere elings r, like me to b s are o in lis paragr f wha e cons king aphed structions ra ted by des cio t they the ign an how ea are a usly ch poin d complicate r than mod ing, this is s ctua im e t d. I lik point t here is is listed and e the rn day versio ilar to that o lly w ft d n really does g an explanati ith each wh esigners of t , highlighting he at on od et that manife sto is v his point ac , which Fin was said into ay haven’t t all ak ro ery rela a that’s w table, a ss. His Ma y I review ny considera en hy I like n t nd I thi e i messa nk Ra ifesto by M d The H ion. ges are t so much. Alt olst dpa ho ichael de and do and D ee n’t com ep they are to ugh his foun rvar and Fa bia pli de av th in life. I feel the cate the simp e point cloth rs of a com n Pfortmuller e le thing e the portray messa pany t ge he i s It w s made fro h is that a t c r s trying m rec eate a p someti ycled to rec s written in mes th eople need i te re e at bec does ause o minding sh ssion, the c 2009 durin ms. one th g o ne per ompan ing do the have to son a w people th y wan esn’t follow, a r t e hard ed to mean t even y person you h though a n , produ ou should be y t h i ng i ave tim y ce you lead yo r own our own a w the passion s possible if es ur own w to suc ay to life, no you ceed. t some ork and thi give p I n t o e k n o w i e else’ The ne s. ma ng in a neg ple back po as xt man a s n it tive sit ifesto i if First th uation. ive s one ings Fi esto I looke w r i tte of the d at w rst. Th Things most f This e man as it s n in recent y First 2 amo i f ear pea est 0 of gra phic d 00” is the de o “First don ks to everyo s, this is beca us n ’t like esigne and v someth e, it is to the use rs, art claration isual p ing the commu organiz n don’ oint, nicator directors Fr ed by t do it. om l s. th Rick P oynor. e British des It was I ca ooking at thes ign wri me to Th version ter lik the co e three manif of the ere was an nclusio e estos’ my ow publish manife origina n t n h ed in 1 s l a m t o t short anife , whi I would 96 moder n versi 4 by Ken Ga ch was me points that w sto to be a l ist of rla ssa on ere pre about cise in design of the manif nd. The man ge. Once es th I if a for ad vertisin nd how the to talks I w esto I went on had written eir ou g to rese deman commu arching my d it in ld display it, nicatio and other h forms n I chos throug have e to d ow of fon a block with h the isp ts increas ye moder ed mo to highlight lines and dif lay n vers ars. The or ferent i ions b st impo the bit design oth sp ginal and c s r t ers ar a I n f t elt we . For m hose t eak e the ori re o use y final ginal v wasted. Afte of how and t d w e o s r h ign I ers ve from 1 h 964, m ion of the m earing a ra ighlighted ca ry different f on inb pital le that it y an tters u ts was c first though ifesto the l ow mask. I si chose ow ts on hard to to mak ng unders fusing to lis were wasn ercase text e take in g ’ tand a nd eve ten to, I al t as harsh on rey as I felt all . How so ever a n hard t er it w chose a te the eye as b his fter re ading x l a a tured b ck. the us s easy on the ey ackdrop so ing a e rath plain er t white backgr han ound.

14


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New Visual Language  

New Visual Language, Hud Graphic, Modernism, Postmodernism, Research

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