Issuu on Google+

JESSICA HICKS TITLE OF LESSON- Sacred Spaces GRADE LEVEL (S)- High School Studio Art NATIONAL VISUAL ARTS STANDARDSThe Standards ask that students know and be able to do the following by the time they have completed secondary school: -They should be able to communicate at a basic level in the visual arts. This includes knowledge and skills in the use of basic vocabularies, materials, tools, techniques, and intellectual methods of each arts discipline. -They should be able to communicate proficiently in at least one art form, including the ability to define and solve artistic problems with insight, reason, and technical proficiency. -They should be able to develop and present basic analyses of works of art from structural, historical, and cultural perspectives, and from combinations of those perspectives. This includes the ability to understand and evaluate the work in various art disciplines. -They should have an informed acquaintance with exemplary works of art from a variety of cultures and historical periods, and a basic understanding of historic development in the arts disciplines, across the arts as a whole, and within cultures. -They should be able to relate various types of art knowledge and skills within and across the arts disicuplines. This includes mixing and matching competencies and understandings in art-making, history and culture, and analysis in any arts-related project. As a result of developing these capabilities, students can arrive at their own knowledge, beliefs, and values for making personal and artistic decisions. In other terms, they can arrive at a broad-based, well-grounded understanding of the nature, value, and meaning of the arts as a part of their own humanity. SHOW-ME VISUAL ARTS STANDARDSPerformance Standards: Goal 1: Students in Missouri public schools will acquire the knowledge and skills to gather, analyze and apply information and ideas. Students will demonstrate within and integrate across all content areas the ability to 1. develop questions and ideas to initiate and refine research 2. conduct research to answer questions and evaluate information and ideas 3. design and conduct field and laboratory investigations to study nature and society 4. use technological tools and other resources to locate, select and organize information


5. comprehend and evaluate written, visual and oral presentations and works 6. discover and evaluate patterns and relationships in information, ideas and structures 7. evaluate the accuracy of information and the reliability of its sources 8. organize data, information and ideas into useful forms (including charts, graphs, outlines) for analysis or presentation 9. identify, analyze and compare the institutions, traditions and art forms of past and present societies 10. apply acquired information, ideas and skills to different contexts as students, workers, citizens and consumers Goal 2: Students in Missouri public schools will acquire the knowledge and skills to communicate effectively within and beyond the classroom. Students will demonstrate within and integrate across all content areas the ability to 1. plan and make written, oral and visual presentations for a variety of purposes and audiences 2. review and revise communications to improve accuracy and clarity 3. exchange information, questions and ideas while recognizing the perspectives of others 4. present perceptions and ideas regarding works of the arts, humanities and sciences 5. perform or produce works in the fine and practical arts 6. apply communication techniques to the job search and to the workplace 7. use technological tools to exchange information and ideas Goal 3: Students in Missouri public schools will acquire the knowledge and skills to recognize and solve problems. Students will demonstrate within and integrate across all content areas the ability to 1. identify problems and define their scope and elements 2. develop and apply strategies based on ways others have prevented or solved problems 3. develop and apply strategies based on one’s own experience in preventing or solving problems 4. evaluate the processes used in recognizing and solving problems 5. reason inductively from a set of specific facts and deductively from general premises 6. examine problems and proposed solutions from multiple perspectives 7. evaluate the extent to which a strategy addresses the problem 8. assess costs, benefits and other consequences of proposed solutions Goal 4: Students in Missouri public schools will acquire the knowledge and skills to make decisions and act as responsible members of society.


Students will demonstrate within and integrate across all content areas the ability to 1. explain reasoning and identify information used to support decisions 2. understand and apply the rights and responsibilities of citizenship in Missouri and the United States 3. analyze the duties and responsibilities of individuals in societies 4. recognize and practice honesty and integrity in academic work and in the workplace 5. develop, monitor and revise plans of action to meet deadlines and accomplish goals 6. identify tasks that require a coordinated effort and work with others to complete those tasks 7. identify and apply practices that preserve and enhance the safety and health of self and others 8. explore, prepare for and seek educational and job opportunities Knowledge Standards: In Fine Arts, students in Missouri public schools will acquire a solid foundation which includes knowledge of 1. process and techniques for the production, exhibition or performance of one or more of the visual or performed arts 2. the principles and elements of different art forms 3. the vocabulary to explain perceptions about and evaluations of works in dance, music, theater and visual arts 4. interrelationships of visual and performing arts and the relationships of the arts to other disciplines 5. visual and performing arts in historical and cultural contexts GRADE LEVEL EXPECTATIONS: HS LEVEL 2 Strand 1: Product- Performance A. Create a range of 7 smoothly graduated values through varied pressure Blend values/colors to create new values/colors Combine a change in value/color with texture Create a range of 4 graduated values using hatching, cross- hatching, and stippling techniques Use an eraser as a tool to change a value Use blending tools such as stumps and tortillons to modify values Communicate ideas through the creation of a: • portrait • still life • landscape • nonobjective • architecture Create an original functional artwork that expresses a culture Create an original artwork that communicates ideas through the following themes (e.g., cultural identity, social commentary, ceremony/ritual, myth/legend,


reflection/ transparency) Strand 2: Elements and Principles Identify and use hatching, crosshatching, stippling, and calligraphic lines Identify and use complex shapes Identify and use form in- the-round Identify and demonstrate the illusion of complex form in a two- dimensional artwork Identify and create simulated textures from observation Identify and use color theory including color intensity and split- complementary color scheme Identify and use local color Identify and use a range of values to create the illusion of complex forms Identify and use positive and negative space in three- dimensional work Identify and use perspective techniques to create the illusion of space (two-point linear perspective, overlapping, and change of size, detail, placement, value, contrast, color) Use elements to create compositional balance Identify and use emphasis (focal point) through isolation and location Identify and vary elements in the same work to create contrast (e.g., different values and different textures) Identify and use elements to create progressive rhythm Identify and create unity through elements and principles Identify and use realistic figure proportions Strand 3: Artistic Perceptions Discuss how perceptions in art reflect community and/or culture beliefs and values Compare how responses to works of art differ based on whether the viewer is a member of the culture in which the art was created Compare and contrast two artworks: describe artwork analyze the use of elements and principles in the work Interpret the meaning of the work (subject, theme, symbolism, message communicated) Judge the work from various perspectives Showing a real or idealized image of life (Imitationalism) Expressing feelings (Emotionalism/ Expressionism) Emphasis on elements and principles (Formalism) Serving a purpose in the society or culture (Functionalism) Explain how historical events and social ideas are reflected in artworks from selected cultures or historical time periods. Compare and contrast two artworks on: Time Place Artist


Subject matter Theme Characteristics Material/ Technology Ideas and beliefs of culture Function of art in culture/society RATIONALE and GOALS FOR THIS LESSON-Learn about installation in the contemporary art world and connect to influential artists including Wolfgang Laib, Andy Goldsworthy, Christian Boltanski, Damien Hirst, Beryl Korot, Ann Hamilton, John Feodorov, Shahzia Sikander, and James Turrell. -Opportunity to work 3-dimensionally, photographically, and with mixed media -Choose and evaluate subject matter, symbols, and ideas -Relate visual arts to history and cultures through study of created installations, shrines, and sacred spaces -Practice technical drawing skills and create uniquely structured still-lifes ENDURING IDEAS: -Throughout time and across cultures artists/humans have created sacred spaces representing belief and identity. Further exploration/“sub-ideas” are encouraged and can include ritual, repetition, process, contemplation, spirituality, nature, memory, the human condition, life cycles, etc. INVESTIGATIVE ESSENTIAL QUESTIONS – -How do artists visually represent and symbolize their ideas about belief, identity, spirituality, and self-representation? -What is the importance of installation in the modern art world? How are some ideas best represented and discussed through different mediums? How does this contemporary work relate to shrines, altars, and sacred spaces? How do the most successful artists create a unique visual language? -How can artists create unique still-lifes and compositions? What implications do drawing and photographing your own 3-D work create? How can you display these cumulative works together? Why is work in a series important? KNOWLEDGE BASE AND KEY CONCEPTS-How installation and mixed media work connects to contemporary art world and art history through shrines and sacred spaces -How to visually represent and symbolize ideas and self-concept -How 3-Dimensional spacial thinking and planning is developed -How to create and understand still-lifes, composition, and mark making OBJECTIVES-The students will view, react to, and analyze contemporary art and artists and create historical, art historical, and personal connections to shrines and sacred spaces.


-The students will create mini-installations inspired by Andy Goldsworthy and Wolfgang Laib with materials from nature. -The students will view, investigate, and analyze the work of Christian Boltanski and Damien Hirst through images, videos, and news articles. -The students will explore ideas about spirituality and the value of a holistic arts education through David Foster Wallace’s commencement speech “This is Water.” -Students will create their own personal shrines, altars or sacred spaces incorporating at least one element of drawing or painting into their installation. -The students will create interesting and dynamic photographs of their installations. -The students will create a successful and unique graphite still-life drawing of their installation. CONSTRAINTSSpace for installations Objects students might not be able to get a hold of Cameras INTEGRATIVE OPTIONSSocial Studies- Connection to history and religions- cross-culturally English- Writing and literature exploring elements of spirituality and selfexploration Environmental Science- Utilizing objects from nature in work Wood Tech- Students may utilize these skills when constructing shrines OPPORTUNITIES FOR STUDENT RESPONSEVTS of images of artists work Group and Peer Group discussions about a multitude of artists and work introduced through videos, images, and articles Artist Journal responses to Art21 and other art viewing- analysis, important ideas and opinions Final Critique with class Final Exhibition One page portfolio/artist statement LESSON VIGNETTE/SEQUENCEWeek 1- Begin “Research and Inspiration Period” Students will view the “Spirituality” Art21 about Beryl Korot, Ann Hamilton, John Feodorov, Shahzia Sikander, and James Turrell as introduction to unit. Students will glue images from the artists into their Artist Journals and make notes and responses to create meaning and importance about what they are seeing. Class discussion will be integrated as reflection.


*Week 2- Wolfgang Laib, Andy Goldsworthy, and the Natural World Students will view images of various Laib and Goldsworthy installations, watch portions of the Goldsworthy documentary “Rivers and Tides” and a youtube video of Laib’s installation/exhibiton "Without Time - Without Body Without Place" at Sean Kelly Gallery, New York. Students will take a walk to explore surroundings and gather organic material. We will then create mini-installations inspired by natural materials and the aesthetics of Laib and Goldsworthy. Multiple quick still life sketches will be created in Artist Journals to document experience and introduce drawing still-lifes of installations. **Week 3- Christian Boltanski, Damien Hirst, and Discussions on Mortality in the Modern World Students will explore the work of Christian Boltanski through images, books, his MoMA collection, and videos such as “Christian Boltanski at Grand Palais Paris” and segments from “Possible Lives.” Students will view the work of Damien Hirst from the series “In and Out of Love” and his 2012 Tate Modern Retrospective. Students will read The Guardian article from April 18, 2012 “Damien Hirst’s butterflies: distressing but weirdly uplifting” by Patrick Barkham. Students will take notes, cut and paste important images, and analyze and reflect in Artist Journal to create meaning and find inspiration. Week 4- David Foster Wallace, Untraditional Worship, and Brainstorming Together the class will read a commencement speech the contemporary writer David Foster Wallace gave at the Liberal Arts School Kenyon College entitled, “This is Water,” in which he discusses ideas about worship in our society, as well as the importance of an arts education. Students will have a class discussion, take notes, and analyze and reflect in Artist Journals. Students will do a See/Hear/Feel chart about what they imagine their sacred space to be like. Students will begin to brainstorm, do sketches, and come up with ideas for their shrine installations. Begin collecting materials. ***Week 5-6 Constructing Sacred Spaces Students work on constructing their shrines, altars, or sacred spaces. Each student’s installation must include one element of technical drawing or painting.


Intermittent class discussions, one on ones with students, and check points will occur. Week 7-8 The Still Life Students will create high quality photographs of their installations. Students will create unique and dynamic graphite still-life drawings from their installations. ASSESSMENT STRATEGIESAt the end of the unit, students will create a gallery exhibition with an installation of their shrine, photograph, and still-life drawing. AND IT WILL BE AWESOME. Students will be graded on completion of their Artist Journals and reflections. The culminating activity will be the gallery exhibition. Students will map their journey in a one page portfolio, which will include an artist statement to turn in. Rubrics will be presented and students will know what is expected of them. Additionally, students will be informally assessed through classroom conversation, peer interactions, and one on one discussion with teacher. MATERIALS, TEACHING RESOURCES/REFERENCESBooks: “Boltanski”- Christian Boltanski Articles: The Guardian article- April 18, 2012 “Damien Hirst’s butterflies: distressing but weirdly uplifting” by Patrick Barkham. Speeches: “This is Water”- David Foster Wallace Films/Videos: Andy Goldsworthy’s “Rivers and Tides,” Wolfgang Laib’s "Without Time - Without Body - Without Place," and Christian Boltanski’s “Christian Boltanski at Grand Palais Paris” and segments from “Possible Lives.” TEACHER REFLECTION: Students will reflect deeply on contemporary art and create/articulate meaning and understanding in their Artist Journals. Students will engage in powerful discussion and art-making. Students will create interesting installations that demonstrate their conceptual frameworks by exploring shrines, altars, and sacred spaces, as well as spacial relationships and their own identities, selfconcepts, and beliefs. Students will create unique and dynamic still-life drawings of their original work. Students will create high-quality images/photographs of their work. Students will complete a questionnaire/evaluation about unit, how things went, what could make it better.


*LESSON: Wolfgang Laib, Andy Goldsworthy, and the Natural World GRADE LEVEL (S)- High School Studio Art RATIONALE AND GOALS: -Learn about installation in the contemporary art world and connect to influential artists including Wolfgang Laib and Andy Goldsworthy -Choose and evaluate subject matter, symbols, and ideas -Relate visual arts to history and cultures through study of created installations, shrines, and sacred spaces -Practice technical drawing skills -Design and create uniquely structured still-lifes from interesting organic found materials -Explore and contemplate ideas about the natural world, reflection, meditation, temporality, and construction ENDURING BIG IDEA: -Throughout time and across cultures artists/humans have created shrines and sacred spaces representing belief and identity. -Throughout time and across cultures artists/humans have interacted, created relationships with, reflected upon, and created conversations with the natural world, relating to topics such as reflection, fragility, temporality, the sublime, contemplation, meditation, construction, spirituality, struggle, production, and power. ESSENTIAL QUESTIONS: -How do humans relate to nature in our culture and modern society? -How can artists construct sculptures out of objects found in nature? -What does it mean to work with and within the natural elements? What is the importance of working within these elements/what can that communicate? -How does our society and nature interact? How do we interact with nature on a personal level? How can that be explored through art? -How can we visually express life’s temporal nature? How can we visually express and relate ideas about the human experience, disintegration, deterioration and construction? -How can artists create unique still-lifes and compositions? KNOWLEDGE BASE AND KEY CONCEPTS: -How to construct a mini-installation and sculpture in within an environment -How to utilize untraditional mediums -How to think spacially, problem solve, and create an interesting design -How to begin to draw from life -How to create interesting, dynamic compositions and unique still-life drawings -How to find different ways to visually communicate the passage of time OBJECTIVES:


-The students will view, react to, and analyze contemporary art and artists and create historical, art historical, and personal connections to shrines and sacred spaces. -The students will create mini-installations inspired by Andy Goldsworthy and Wolfgang Laib with materials from nature. -The students will create a successful and unique graphite still-life drawings of their installation. -The students will explore cultural and personal relationships to nature and ideas including reflection, fragility, temporality, human fragility, the sublime, contemplation, meditation, construction, spirituality, struggle, production, and power. CONSTRAINTS: -Space for installation -Weather LESSON SEQUENCE: Day 1: Students will view images of various Laib and Goldsworthy installations, watch portions of the Goldsworthy documentary “Rivers and Tides,” and a youtube video of Laib’s installation/exhibition "Without Time - Without Body Without Place" at Sean Kelly Gallery, New York. Students will paste images of Laib and Goldworthy’s work into their artist journals, take notes, and create various reflections relating to the essential questions. A class VTS discussion will take place surrounding one work of art. Day 2: We will take a nature walk. Students will take a walk to explore surrounding environmental areas and gather organic material. We will then, remaining outside, create mini-installations/sculptures inspired by natural materials and the aesthetics of Laib and Goldsworthy. Day 3: Students will create multiple quick still life sketches in Artist Journals to document experience and introduce drawing still-lifes of installations. Students will experiment with different drawing techniques as well as compositions, contrast, and markmaking. After the third day, we will move on to our next lesson section, but the class will return to their installations daily to do quick sketches that document disintegration and deterioration of their installations. ASSESSMENTS/RUBRICSStudents will be informally assessed through class discussion and conversations with teacher. Students will be formally assessed through their work in their artist journals. Students will use their artist journals as a form of sketching, note taking, reflection, and brainstorming. Their reflection grades will be based off completion, as well as depth of thought, effort, and effectiveness. Sketches will


be graded on completion and development/improvement, as well as craftsmanship, technical proficiency, interesting mark making, composition, and contrast, and overall effectiveness.

**LESSON: Christian Boltanski, Damien Hirst, and Discussions on Mortality in the Modern World GRADE LEVEL: High School Studio Art RATIONALE AND GOALS: -Learn about installation in the contemporary art world and connect to the influential artists Christian Boltanski and Damien Hirst. -Explore and reflect on many ideas artists discuss including ritual, repetition, process, fragility, contemplation, mortality, spirituality, nature, memory, the human condition, life cycles, etc. -Relate visual arts to history and cultures through study of created installations, shrines, and sacred spaces ENDURING BIG IDEA: - Throughout time and across cultures artists/humans have created shrines and sacred spaces representing belief and identity. -Throughout time and across cultures artists/humans have interacted, created relationships with, reflected upon, and created conversations with the natural world, relating to topics such as mortality, life cycles, ritual, repetition, reflection, construction, fragility, process, contemplation, spirituality, production, power, contemplation, nature, memory, and the human condition. ESSENTIAL QUESTIONS: -How do artists visually represent and symbolize their ideas about belief, identity, spirituality, and self-representation? -What is the importance of installation in the modern art world? How are some ideas best represented and discussed through different mediums? -How does this contemporary work relate to shrines, altars, and sacred spaces? How do the most successful artists create a unique visual language? -How is the modern art world changing? What is considered art? Are some ideas better represented in non-traditional ways? KNOWLEDGE BASE AND KEY CONCEPTS: -How installation and mixed media work connects to contemporary art world and art history through sacred spaces -How to visually represent and symbolize ideas and self-concept -How 3-Dimensional spacial thinking and planning is developed


OBJECTIVES: -The students will view, react to, and analyze contemporary art and artists and create historical, art historical, and personal connections to shrines and sacred spaces. -The students will view, investigate, and analyze the work of Christian Boltanski and Damien Hirst through images, videos, and news articles -The students will explore cultural and personal relationships to nature and ideas including reflection, fragility, temporality, human fragility, the sublime, contemplation, meditation, construction, spirituality, struggle, production, and power. LESSON VIGNETTE: Day 1: Students will explore the work of Christian Boltanski through images, books, his MoMA collection, and videos such as “Christian Boltanski at Grand Palais Paris” and segments from “Possible Lives.” Day 2: Students will view the work of Damien Hirst from the series “In and Out of Love” and his 2012 Tate Modern Retrospective. Students will read The Guardian article from April 18, 2012 “Damien Hirst’s butterflies: distressing but weirdly uplifting” by Patrick Barkham. For both research days, students will take notes, cut and paste important images, and analyze and reflect in Artist Journal to create meaning and find inspiration. Students will work into their artist journals, take notes, and create various reflections relating to the essential questions. A class VTS discussion will take place surrounding one work of art each day. Students will brainstorm, map, and discuss their own ideas related to mortality and scared spaces. ASSESSMENTS/RUBRICSStudents will be informally assessed through class discussion and conversations with teacher. Students will be formally assessed through their work in their artist journals. Students will use their artist journals as a form of sketching, note taking, reflection, and brainstorming. Their reflection grades will be based off completion, as well as depth of thought, effort, and effectiveness.


***LESSON: Constructing Sacred Spaces GRADE LEVEL: High School Studio Art RATIONALE AND GOALS: -Opportunity to work 3-dimensionally, photographically, and with mixed media -Choose and evaluate subject matter, symbols, and ideas -Relate visual arts to history and cultures through study of created installations, shrines, and sacred spaces -Practice technical drawing skills -Explore and reflect on many ideas artists discuss including ritual, repetition, process, fragility, contemplation, mortality, spirituality, nature, memory, the human condition, life cycles, etc. -Contemplate ideas about the natural world, reflection, meditation, temporality, and construction ENDURING BIG IDEAS: -Throughout time and across cultures artists/humans have created sacred spaces representing belief and identity. Further exploration/“sub-ideas� are encouraged and can include ritual, repetition, process, contemplation, spirituality, nature, memory, the human condition, life cycles, etc. ESSENTIAL QUESTIONS: -How do artists visually represent and symbolize their ideas about belief, identity, spirituality, and self-representation? -What is the importance of installation in the modern art world? How are some ideas best represented and discussed through different mediums? How does this contemporary work relate to shrines, altars, and sacred spaces? How do the most successful artists create a unique visual language? -How does this contemporary work relate to shrines, altars, and sacred spaces? How do the most successful artists create a unique visual language? -How is the modern art world changing? What is considered art? Are some ideas better represented in non-traditional ways? KNOWLEDGE BASE AND KEY CONCEPTS: -How installation and mixed media work connects to contemporary art world and art history through shrines and sacred spaces -How to visually represent and symbolize ideas and self-concept -How 3-Dimensional spacial thinking and planning is developed


OBJECTIVES: -The students will view, react to, and analyze contemporary art and artists and create historical, art historical, and personal connections to shrines and sacred spaces. -Students will create their own personal shrines, altars or sacred spaces incorporating at least one element of drawing or painting into their installation. -The students will explore cultural and personal relationships to nature and ideas including reflection, fragility, temporality, human fragility, the sublime, contemplation, meditation, construction, spirituality, struggle, production, and power. -Students will explore using non-traditional materials to visually represent their ideas about identity, spirituality, collective consciousness, and relations to culture. LESSON SEQUENCE: Week 5-6 Constructing Sacred Spaces Students will spend the first 1-2 days finishing up brainstorming, sketching, developing, and reflecting on their ideas. They will gather necessary materials to construct their sacred space installations. In the following class periods, students work on constructing their shrines, altars, or sacred spaces. Each student’s installation must include one element of technical drawing or painting. Students will learn to think and develop their ideas and designs 3-dimensionally and spatially. Students will learn to combine different medias within one piece. Students will develop their problem solving skills while working within a space and exploring new territories in their work. Intermittent class discussions, one on ones with students, and check points will occur.


TIGER ARTIST LESSON PLAN Tiger Team #2 Members: Christine Cover, Kate Stieren, Elexys Isidore, Jenna Banks, Jessie Hicks TITLE OF LESSON – The Story of Us: Our Big Moments GRADE LEVEL – Ages 7-13 NATIONAL VISUAL STANDARDS They should have an informed acquaintance with exemplary works of art from a variety of cultures and historical periods, and a basic understanding of historical development in the arts disciplines, across the arts as a whole, and within cultures. They should be able to communicate proficiently in at least one art form, including the ability to define and solve artistic problems with insight, reason, and technical proficiency. They should be able to develop and present basic analyses of works of art from structural, historical, and cultural perspectives, and form combinations of those perspectives. This includes the ability to understand and evaluate work in the various arts disciplines. They should be able to relate various types of arts knowledge and skills within and across the arts disciplines. This includes mixing and matching competencies and understandings in art-making, history and culture, and analysis in any arts-related project. SHOW-ME VISUAL ARTS STANDARDS GOAL 1: Students in Missouri public schools will acquire the knowledge and skills to gather, analyze, and apply information and ideas. Students will demonstrate within and integrate across all content areas the ability to: 1. Develop questions and ideas to initiate and refine research 2. Conduct research to answer questions and evaluate information and ideas 3. Comprehend and evaluate written, visual and oral presentations and works 4. Discover and evaluate patterns and relationships in information, ideas and structures 5. Evaluate the accuracy of information and the reliability of its sources 6. Identify, analyze and compare the institutions, traditions and art forms of past and present societies


GOAL 2: Students in Missouri public schools will acquire the knowledge and skills to communicate effectively within and beyond the classroom. Students will demonstrate within and integrate across all content areas the ability to: 1. Review and revise communications to improve accuracy and clarity 2. Exchange information, questions and ideas while recognizing the perspectives of others 3. Present perceptions and ideas regarding works of the arts, humanities and sciences 4. Perform or produce works in the fine and practical arts GOAL 3: Students in Missouri public schools will acquire the knowledge and skills to recognize and solve problems. Students will demonstrate within and integrate across all content areas the ability to: 1. Develop and apply strategies based on one's own experience in preventing or solving problems 2. Evaluate the processes used in recognizing and solving problems 3. Reason inductively from a set of specific facts and deductively from general premises 4. Examine problems and proposed solutions from multiple perspectives 5. Evaluate the extent to which a strategy addresses the problem GOAL 4: Students in Missouri public schools will acquire the knowledge and skills to make decisions and act as responsible members of society. Students will demonstrate within and integrate across all content areas the ability to: 1. Explain reasoning and identify information used to support decisions 2. Understand and apply the rights and responsibilities of citizenship in Missouri and the United States 3. Recognize and practice honesty and integrity in academic work and in the workplace 4. Develop, monitor and revise plans of action to meet deadlines and accomplish goals 5. Identify tasks that require a coordinated effort and work with others to complete those tasks


GRADE LEVEL EXPECTATIONS Strand 1—Investigate the process and techniques for the production, exhibition or performance of one or more visual or performed arts -Understand how artwork can be made -Create a piece of artwork with materials given (watercolor pencils, oil pastels and linseed oil, colored paper) Strand 2—Understand the principles and elements of different art forms -How they can be used to create a theme, emotion, tone, big moment, etc. Strand 3- Analyze Visual arts in historical and cultural contexts -Understand how past events can have an impact on art and can be seen in art work through climactic moments RATIONALE and GOALS FOR THIS LESSONThis lesson is designed for students to recognize and express narratives through visual language. The students will view and analyze artworks, film stills, photographs, and illustrations that represent climactic moments in a narrative and then create their own work expressing a climactic moment in their own lives. ENDURING BIG IDEAA climactic moment in visual storytelling is the big idea in this lesson. Artists' depiction of a climactic moment has been a powerful method of storytelling throughout history and continues to be a powerful visual language today. Students will view, analyze and create images representative of climactic moments. ESSENTIAL QUESTIONSWhat types of stories are there? What do they communicate? What is a climax in a narrative? What is a decisive moment and how is it shown? What is it comprised of? What components make up a successful narrative? How can the perspective change the story? Is art a form of storytelling? What artistic techniques can you use to tell a story? How do artists choose specific moments to tell a story? Can you learn anything about what happened before or after a climactic moment by looking at a single image? KEY CONCEPTS Through this lesson students will learn: What is a Narrative? -The representation in art of an event or story


(Written, verbal – told out loud, images, etc) What components are used to express a narrative in visual art? Content: -Characters -Event/Moment -Tone -Objects -Setting Technique: -Color -Texture -Form What is a climactic Moment? -The point of highest dramatic tension or a major turning point in the action -A defining moment vs. memorable moment Image Literacy: -How to view an image critically, by analyzing and responding Through a visit to the museum of Art & Archaeology, students will examine two works of art: Sacrifice of Isaac – Rembrandt (The Tornado painting) Discussion questions: 1) What is happening in this image? 2) What story do you think is being told? 3) Why did this artist pick this specific moment from the whole story? 4) What do you think happened right before and after this moment? During these discussion students should be gaining information on how to depict a climactic (or big) moment that tells a story. They will look at the content and technique used by the other artists we look at in class before starting on their own work. From the Art production part of the lesson, students will learn: -Elements and principles of art can be used as a tool to communicate a story -Technique, style, and materials can be a tool to communicate a story OBJECTIVES


-Students will examine and analyze artwork (books, movies, photographs, paintings) of various artists, showing different beliefs, histories, and purposes to each individual story -Students will discuss what a decisive moment in a story is, how it is chosen and visually represented, and synthesize the three by applying these ideas to their own life and creating a work of an important moment to them. -Students will consider their own lives (history, family, etc) and choose a moment that has defined them as a person thus far -Students will establish various ways in which to communicate a story through one still image (depicting one moment in a larger story) -Students will play and explore with new exciting materials including watercolor pencils and oil pastels on colored paper LESSON VIGNETTE 9:30 – 9:35 Arriving Activity (LEAD BY ELEXYS) -Students arrive and walk around the room to view illustrations from books we have laid out -Students pick their favorites, share with the class, discuss why 9:35-9:55 Lesson Introduction (LEAD BY ELEXYS) -Student will sit on the floor in front of projector as we discuss the following questions: 1) What is a story? 2) What different types of stories are there? 3) What can stories teach us? 4) Can one image tell a whole story? -Students will look at still images of stories they recognize that depict a big, climactic moment from the story and discuss these questions: (LEAD BY JENNA) 1) What’s going on in this image? 2) Why is this moment important to the story? Why did the artist choose this moment? 3) What does iconic mean? How can we see this in this image?


9:55-10:00 Walk to Museum of Art & Archaeology -Students will pair up with a buddy and share “big moments” from their lives (this will allow students to start brainstorming what they will do for their artwork) 10:00-10:10 Discussion of art (LEAD BY KATE AND CHRISTINE) -Students will be split into two groups and go to one of two paintings to view and analyze the work through these questions: 1. What is happening in this image? 2. What story do you think is being told? 3. Why did this artist pick this specific moment from the whole story? 4. What do you think happened right before and after this moment? 10:10-10:20 Group 1 and Group 2 swap paintings and discuss with same questions (LEAD BY KATE AND CHRISTINE) 10:20-10:25 Walk back to classroom -Students will get back with their buddy and discuss which painting was their favorite and why? 10:25-10:30 Pre-project discussion (LEAD BY JESSIE) -Students will sit at the desks and discuss “What is the difference between a big, defining moment, and a memorable moment?” (So students won’t just draw something memorable, but something defining from their own lives) 10:30-10:40 Project instructions and Demo (LEAD BY JESSIE) -Students will be shown examples of big moments created by team leaders -Students will be told they are to create an image from their life story and pick one climactic, defining moment to depict in a drawing -Students will be shown the materials they are to use for the project as well as a demo of how to use them 10:40-11:40 Work time


11:45-11:55 Clean up

11:55-12:00 Share with the class -Students will volunteer one at a time to share their moment with the class 12:00 Parent pick-up MATERIALS LIST 1. Oil pastels 2. Black and colored paper 3. Watercolor pencils 4. Watercolor paper 5. Bowls for water 6. Linseed oil 7. Paper for sketching 8. Pencils for sketching 9. Nametags 10. Paintbrushes


Tiger Artist Lesson Reflection Jessica Hicks Tiger Team 2 The Story of Us Part 1 (before)  Present a brief description of lesson. For our lesson, students will analyze important moments and narratives told through visual language and apply it their own lives by creating an original art work with watercolor pencils or oil pastels of an important moment in their own life. 

State instructional goal(s) of lesson in behavioral terms. Tell what you expected the students to know and be able to do at the end of the lesson? Students will examine and analyze artwork, discuss what a decisive moment in a story is, how it is chosen and visually represented, and synthesize the three by applying these ideas to their own life and creating s work of an important moment to them.

What did children already know related to your goal(s)? Students can identify important parts of stories, basic drawing skills, willingness to play and explore new mediums

What resources did you use and refer to in planning or during presentation? Museum of Art and Archaeology, pop culture and media, art history

Part II (during)  What did students learn? Provide evidence of student learning. How would you assess them? Students examined, analyzed, and interpreted the Civil War painting and Rembrandt’s Sacrifice of Isaac. They made meaning from the work that was deep and multifaceted. Students learned how to identify decisive moments. Students analytically considered their own lives and decisive moments. Students played with new materials. Students were informally assessed through discussion and observation. 

Did some students have difficulty participating in the activities? If so, what did you do to make it possible for them to participate?


One student was upset having an extremely hard time thinking of a moment to use to create his image. He was supported by multiple teachers in different ways and eventually developed a powerful image about memory and confusion.    

Evaluate student questions/answers/participation o What ideas did the students share during the lesson? Students shared analytical ideas about the images from pop culture and art history that Jenna presented, students dissected the two paintings at MOAA, students shared important moments from their own lives that were extremely significant and thoughtful o Did students share ideas that stretched/challenged their classmates? Yes! During the discussions at the museum, the students scaffolded off each other to get to extremely big ideas about war and battles, important moments, and even god and mortality. o Did student questions display higher level thinking skills? Yes, our students are brilliant and synthesize information very well. They made meaning of it by applying it to their own lives. o Did you evaluate each student’s answer and work in a nonjudgmental manner? Yes, students shared their work and stories with the class. The classroom community had very supportive and open attitudes and everyone appreciated everyone else’s work.

How did you manage/organize the whole-class into discussion, demonstration, studio, closing? We created a safe atmosphere where students felt free to share their ideas and stories with the class. We asked questions often and students always knew what they were supposed to be doing.

Part III (after)  Was/were your instructional goal(s) appropriate? How did you meet the needs of all of your students?


All of our instructional goals were appropriate. Because we had an assortment of ages, different students needed different types of support and oneon-one discussions. 

Were your directions clear?

Students understood the clear directions as they were closely related to everything we did together in class leading up to the project. 

What worked and why?

Our timing was great, everything was on schedule, we were well prepared for the lesson with everything set out and organized before, our discussions were strong, well-developed and effective, our presentation of the project went well, demos went well, supporting students as they worked went well. Things went well because we were well-prepared and organized and our students are amazing. 

What did not work and why?

Our transition and introductions at the beginning of the lesson. Students were still drawing and we forgot to introduce ourselves formally to the class right away. 

Explain any changes you would make with regard to: o procedures you implemented o materials you used o questions you asked o room arrangement o activities you introduced

At the beginning of the lesson, we would make sure students know it is time to put down the markers and begin to learn more about the lesson. I would make sure the linseed oil was accessible before the students even arrive. Already have materials for the demo set out before the lesson beings and we go to the museum. 

Did you model effective verbal and nonverbal communication?

Yes, we had rich discussions with our students. I also non-verbally communicated during the demo, but also utilized thinking aloud techniques so students would be engaged. Part IV Reflection (1 page) It should be clear that much thought was put into these answers!


• • • •

Did you make any “on-the-fly” decisions or changes during the lesson? If so, what were they? Why did these changes seem appropriate? What did you learn from teaching this lesson? What was unexpected or unanticipated? What new “Big Ideas” or epiphanies about teaching did you learn from this experience? What did you learn about yourself, your students, and the curriculum? Our first student showed up about 40 minutes early. That was when our

first on-the-fly decision making occurred. Fortunately, I had been acquainted with Elsa from a camp I used to work with and we decided after looking at the illustrations on the table that it would be fun to just get out markers and draw while waiting for others to arrive. We had fun sitting together, drawing, and talking/getting to know each other as others arrived and joined us in our activity. I think this activity was an asset to our lesson because it made everyone more comfortable together, as well as more safe and open in discussion. Another important and quick decision made was when the tornado painting we were supposed to have a discussion around was not there. Kate decided on the Civil War painting, quickly read over the information as the students examined the piece, and led two great/powerful discussions. During this lesson, I learned how important and meaningful your discussions with your students can be. First, our students worked together to make meaning out of the images we presented. They were analytical, articulate, and eloquent when dissecting images from not only pop culture and the media today, but also art history. They make use of visual cues and prior knowledge, investigate and evaluate what a picture is telling us, what


the artist was communicating. Our students are capable of important deep thinking and communicating their ideas. Not only were class discussions significant, but also the one-on-one conversations I had with different students were open and meaningful. I always treat students with respect and like the interesting individuals they are. It pains me to hear teachers talk down to their students, no matter what age. All of the students’ ideas and lives are important, just like we talked about when introducing the lesson. Since they were treated intelligently and as though they are relevant, they responded in a corresponding manner. They wanted to share their lives and stories with me, all of which were reflective and thoughtful. I think that was the most important part of the lesson for me- seeing students treat their lives and art with importance, while simultaneously sharing and visually synthesizing their ideas.


CURRICULUM DOCUMENTS