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HARVARD GSD M.ARCH I HERRINGBONE MODULAR SUMMIT ARRIVAL

GSD SPRING 2019 // ADVISOR : GEORGE LIAROPOLOUS-LEGENDRE

GSD FALL 2019 // ADVISOR : ROBIN WINOGROND

LEARN, PERFORM, LIVE, WORK FILM STUDIO

PARENTING VILLAGE GENERIC SPECIFIC JUMP-CUT

GSD CORE 3 FALL 2017 // ADVISOR : BELINDA TATO

GSD CORE 2 SPRING 2017 // ADVISOR : ZEINA KOREITEM GSD CORE 2 SPRING 2017 // ADVISOR : ZEINA KOREITEM GSD CORE 1 FALL 2016 // ADVISOR : ANDREW HOLDER

GSD CORE 1 FALL 2016 // ADVISOR : ANDREW HOLDER

HIDDEN ROOM

GSD CORE 1 FALL 2016 // ADVISOR : ANDREW HOLDER

YALE B.A. ARCHITECTURE ISLAND CEMETERY

SPRING 2015 // ADVISORS : STEVEN HARRIS, MARTA CALDIERA

GASTRONOMY SPACE ZONGZI BENTO

SPRING 2014 // ADVISORS : JOYCE HSIANG, SUNIL BALD

SPRING 2014 // ADVISORS : JOYCE HSIANG, SUNIL BALD

HEXAGON HOUSE

FALL 2013 // ADVISORS : BIMAL MENDIS, KATHERINE DAVIES

ANALYTIC MODELS

SPRING 2013 // ADVISOR : EMMANUEL PETIT

OTHER WORK APICELLA + BUNTON DND FELLOWSHIP UTILE

2014-2016 // APICELLA + BUNTON ARCHITECTS, NEW HAVEN

SUMMER 2017 // DEPARTMENT OF NEIGHBORHOOD DEVELOPMENT, BOSTON

MAY 2018 - NOV 2018 // UTILE ARCHITECTURE & PLANNING, BOSTON

ARTWORK

2009-2017


MODULAR HERRINGBONE GSD SPRING 2019 ADVISOR : GEORGE LIAROPOLOUS-LEGENDRE

This project utilizes off site manufacturing to meet the challenges of a complex site in Edinburgh, a sloped, enclosed courtyard along the Royal Mile which is surrounded by historic buildings. The only way to access the site or bring in construction materials is through an archway, which dictates the constraints for bringing in volumetric modules. The volumes are constructed of cross laminated timber, and are systematized so that each tube module can be broken down into smaller cubes. The project’s site strategy draws an “X” through the courtyard; one diagonal is a 7-story bar building of apartments, and the other diagonal axis has a 3-story row of townhouses. The main diagonal bar of the building hovers over the public pathway through the site. The massing of the building utilizes volumetric modules arranged like bricks in a herringbone pattern, which scatters the orientation of the building surface and allows each inhabitant a sense of privacy. The bar building uses the herringbone in plan to create apartment units, while the townhouses herringbone sectionally so that one floor is rotated 90 degrees from the other.


SUMMIT ARRIVAL GSD FALL 2020 ADVISOR : ROBIN WINOGROND

This project reimagines the summit of Hoher Kasten to highlight the tension in the interface between built and natural forms. Hoher Kasten is currently accessible by cable car, and the summit is occupied by various structures and platforms. My project builds on the enchantment of the cable car entry sequence; visitors float through the air in the cable car, burrow through a dark tunnel, and emerge out of the earth in a glass box of sky. The pavilion’s spiral stair is light and floating in contrast to the dark mass of the bedrock, and echoes the tectonics of anchoring and suspension which are found elsewhere on the site. Visitors walk upwards along this curve towards three exits at different levels that connect to the irregular topography of the summit. The building includes a buried wing with a cafeteria and restrooms, and the roof serves as a viewing platform for the Rhine. The construction and materiality of this pavilion dramatize the acts of excavation, levelling, anchoring, infill, and other scars of construction which mold the summit.


DIDACTIC PERIMETER VS PATHS SPROUTING FROM CENTER

SINGLE ENTRY VS MULTIPLE THRESHOLDS

PLINTH AT ONE LEVEL VS CONNECTING AT MANY LEVELS


EXISTING SITE


LEARN, PERFORM, LIVE, WORK GSD CORE 3 FALL 2017 ADVISOR : BELINDA TATO

This performing arts center is sited on an air rights parcel above the I-90 highway in Boston, creating a new vertical campus and theater for the Berklee College of Music and Boston Lyric Opera. The building’s program organization and structural strategy divides the building into four quadrants, with each quadrant possessing its own logic for how people interact with each other and navigate the space. Structurally, these four quadrants are supported by two cores on either end which contain vertical circulation and mechanicals. There is a large truss bridging between the two, and cantilevered trusses enclosing the two auditorium quadrants.Two quadrants are enclosed trapezoidal volumes, one for the large auditorium and one for the smaller performance spaces. Facing Mass Ave and nearest to the entrance, there is a quadrant for public/private interactions, where a continuous ramping system weaves between spaces for public gathering and rehearsal/performer’s spaces. The fourth quadrant contains user/user interactions, with an interior street connecting three blocks for administration, classrooms, and residences. A continuous route weaves through the four quadrants, allowing people in the building to experience different choreographies of their interactions with each other and creating a microcosm of diverse affects.


FILM STUDIO GSD CORE 2 SPRING 2017 ADVISOR : ZEINA KOREITEM

Located by Boston Harbor in the Seaport District, this film studio campus creates a linearly connected series of sheds containing studio space, actors’ areas, production offices, common recreational space, and workshops. Trucks and parking circulate on the outer side of the campus, while the buildings surround an interior courtyard for gatherings and community. The film studio utilizes the figure of an early Christian basilica’s masonry wall, and snakes this wall around the building to reparse the sheds into different relationships with the building’s sidedness and program. The wall at times thickens to accommodate interior tunnels and stairways, which allows for circulation between two sheds that is separate from both.


Support spaces are located above the studios, or in cantilevered sheds between two studios. This anticipates the need for resilience due to sea level rise, placing the more finished, permanent spaces are above flood level, while the ground floor contains unfinished spaces like the studios and storage. While the studios have no apertures in order to remain dark, the cantilevered spaces are have a glass curtain wall and exposed truss structures.


PARENTING VILLAGE GSD CORE 2 SPRING 2017 ADVISOR : ZEINA KOREITEM

Sited in downtown Boston just south of the Common, the parenting village is a social club where parents can bring their children to play under the loose oversight of other parents, as a more informal alternative to daycare. The parenting village operates as an urban transplant of the suburban model where parents share their time and resources and children have more freedom to explore and create their own forms of play. The building creates two distinct spatial and circulatory modes: the adult program, and a continuous tunnel of children’s play spaces which loops around the building and intersects at moments with adult space. While the adult circulation is defined by orthogonality and rational space planning, the children’s play spaces consist of platonic forms at various scales and elevations, alternately hidden in poche or revealed as floating geometries.


GENERIC SPECIFIC GSD CORE 1 FALL 2016 ADVISOR : ANDREW HOLDER

This building is a cricket club designed utilizing a fragment extracted from a Baroque church and placed within a nine square grid. The cornice figure in the church Sant’ Andrea della Valle was selected for the interesting way that it negotiates the transition between nave and transept as well as its reparsing of the Latin inscription on the cornice line of the church. This figure was abstracted as a foam model, then used to generate the structure by scaling the figure to building height and placing it in the four corners of a nine square grid. This creates productive spaces of interstitial overlap between figures, as well numerous symmetries in both plan and section, which were adjusted to accommodate the cricket club program. Just as the cornice figure reparses the Latin phrase, the figure in my project analogously reparses and is reparsed by program.


This axonometric diagram demonstrates how spaces were created from the interstitial space between colliding figures. The building’s many symmetries in plan and section provided opportunities for creating different adjustments, or reparsings, of geometric motifs. The first floor of the building includes public spaces, such as an amphitheater, a snack bar, and two team meeting rooms. The second floor includes athletes’ spaces such as the locker rooms, gear storage, and training rooms, and the third floor has practice courts and coaches’ rooms.


JUMP CUT GSD CORE 1 FALL 2016 ADVISOR : ANDREW HOLDER

The jump-cut in film is an abrupt transition where an object jumps from one part of the frame to another. In this project, the building “jump cuts� through two incompatible sections which are bridged as part of the design exercise. Through the interpretation of section cuts as walls at a 60 degree angle from the cut, a system of geometrical rules govern the creation of rooms around a central triangular atrium. The atrium opens onto one side of the building on the lower floor, then rotates, is truncated, and emerges on the opposite side of the building. The urban condition generated by and for this building involves a series of these bricklike buildings arranged on 60 degree axes so that circulation can occur in hexagonal courtyards.


HIDDEN ROOM GSD CORE 1 FALL 2016 ADVISOR : ANDREW HOLDER

Through the use of a series of crown molding profiles, a hidden room is disguised among four other rooms. The crown molding is treated as a surface condition, as opposed to a localized application of ornament, and is manipulated through a series of revolutions and extrusions. As one circulates through the first four rooms, it is ambiguous whether the crown molding exists as a two-sided, thin wrapper, or the surface of a thick mass. The hidden room is the interstitial space between the two crown molding profiles, which one can assume is poche until confronted with the possibility of occupying the space between the two wrappers. In the sequence of the four rooms, a looping circulation is made possible by ignoring the entrance to the hidden room, and returning through a staircase which leads back to the first room. This stair runs parallel to another stair, which tunnels through the poche of the building and leads from the hidden room to an exterior exit.


The model is constructed to reveal a sectional cut through the stair leading from the hidden room to the exit. The sections are taken perpendicular to this cut, revealing interesting symmetries and asymmetries created by the revolutions of the crown molding.


ISLAND CEMETERY YALE SPRING 2015 ADVISORS : STEVEN HARRIS, MARTA CALDIERA

Through the contrast created between an organic tidepool ecosystem and hermetic concrete buildings, the cemetery evokes a scene of the eternal set among cycles of decay and regeneration. These columbaria rest as closed and pure objects in the field, as if the concrete cubes rose up from the island. However, when one enters one of these buildings, the scale shifts to that of a private room. The buildings face each other in pairs to conceal the entrance from the outside viewer, who approaches along axis to the central chapel and then branches off to the side.


There are three types of columbarium structures, which are generated from the differing heights of the island topography. The columbaria nearest to the water’s edge have stairs ascending up, while those nearest the island center have stairs descending down. This distance of this stair allows for these structures to accommodate the burial of a body, while the structures with no stair and thin walls accommodate funerary urns.


axon of 3 different cubes


GASTRONOMY SPACE YALE SPRING 2014 ADVISORS : SUNIL BALD, JOYCE HSIANG

Near the terminus of the Farmington Canal Trail, the trail runs underneath Hillhouse Avenue on Yale’s campus. My design connects Hillhouse Ave and the trail by creating geometries from the intersection of their two grids, and planting these structures into the landscape. These forms are in dialogue with topography; land is squeezed between prisms, prisms press into land, and land flows into prisms. The model utilizes the language of plywood and the connotations of grain; landscape is signified by the topographical texture, while structural interventions are represented by the flat edge of the wood. Programmatically, the rotated square contains a dining hall and serves as the main structure in the compound, and it is surrounded by a below-grade kitchen and a small learning space.


ZONGZI BENTO YALE SPRING 2013 ADVISORS : SUNIL BALD, JOYCE HSIANG

The zongzi is a traditional Chinese dish created by molding sticky rice and meat inside bamboo leaves, which are wrapped in a tetrahedral shape. Inspired by the food’s tetrahedral geometry and the recipe’s focus on repeated folding and unfolding, my bento box transforms from a closed prism into a landscape defining a meal for two. The bento box contains pockets for zongzi, as well as four dishes which unfold like two leaves. Crafted from plywood with canvas joints, the bento box holds itself together through its weight and the nesting of its geometries.


HEXAGON HOUSE YALE FALL 2013 ADVISORS : BIMAL MENDIS, KATHERINE DAVIES

This house uses a kit of 9’ x 9’ parts to create a tightly connected series of hexagons resembling a molecule of bonded geometrical units. The large and smaller hexagons are intertwined together based on a modular unit which allows for complex spatial arrangements. On one side of the central hexagonal courtyard, the private wing culminates in the dead end of a bedroom, while on the other side, the more public wing delineates a progression of gathering spaces. The house is situated in a landscape which continues the hexagonal motif as it negotiates both organic and paved areas.


ANALYTIC MODELS YALE SPRING 2013 ADVISOR : EMMANUEL PETIT

As an analytic exercise, an existing building is modelled to investigate the massing, tectonics, contours, and programmatic design of the assigned project. I analyzed the formal geometries and modular systems that govern the seemingly irregular geometries of Paul Rudolph’s Tuskegee Chapel, a religious structure on a college campus built in 1969.


The tectonic model sheds light on the unique structural system of the roof, which is a hyperbolic parabaloid supported by cables in tension. The juxtaposition between thin elements, like these cables expressed as fins, and the massive elements, like the roof and floor plate, is coded through material selection. The massing model portrays the continous interior space as a composite of distinct geometrical volumes. The program model demonstrates the procession towards sacred space in the chapel, beginning from circulation and back of house areas and culminating in the tower behind the pulpit. The contour model expresses movement within the chapel, whether this is circulatory movement or movement of the viewer’s gaze.


A+B WORK APICELLA + BUNTON ARCHITECTS NEW HAVEN, 2014-2016

During the time I worked at Apicella + Bunton Architects, I aided in multiple residential and commercial projects, including single family homes, office renovations, and historic renovations of dormitories and libraries. I was involved in predesign, construction documents, and construction administration for the projects shown below.

WORKSTATION COUNT 6X6 6X8 (68) (6) OPEN OFFICE 1 (16) (0) OPEN OFFICE 2 (38) (2) OPEN OFFICE 3 ---------------------------------------------(124) (8) TOTAL

1 SK-50

FLOOR PLAN - MASTER PLAN G SCALE

(25)

TOUCHDOWN

1/16" = 1'-0"

SHEET REFERENCE

DATE

DRAWING NAME

PROJECT NO.

DRAWING NO.

MASTER PLAN G

15024

SK-50

CELLA + BUNTON ARCHITECTS LLC

CT NAME

RIZON WIRELESS

09/29/15

Y CAFE

BUILT IN BENCH W/ LABOR LAW POSTINGS VITRINE

T

VERIZON OFFICES A+B was engaged for renovations including new space planning, raised ceiling, a new cafeteria, and new finishes and furniture. I worked with the client on the cafe design, and was involved in schematic design, construction documents, finish selection, and construction administration. CAFE SEATING

SCALE

1/16" = 1'-0"


GENE

THE FOL THROUG 1.

YNHH HOSPITAL LOUNGES A+B designed two lounges for the Yale New Haven Hospital. I aided in schematic design, construction documents, and finish selection for these projects.

A31A BEDROOM

A31B BEDROOM

B31D BEDROOM

D32B BEDROOM

B31C BEDROOM

B31B BEDROOM

B31A BEDROOM

B32A BEDROOM

A390S STAIR

DN

A31 COMMON

DN

B32B BEDROOM

B32C BEDROOM

B32D BEDROOM

D31D BEDROOM

D31C BEDROOM

D31B BEDROOM

D31A BEDROOM

D32C BEDROOM

E31A BEDROOM

3.

D32A BEDROOM

D32K BATH

A31F BATH

UP

B31G BATH

B32G BATH

D31G BATH

B390S STAIR

C390S STAIR

D390S STAIR

UP

DN

B31 COMMON

B31E BEDROOM

B32 COMMON

UP

DN

B32E BEDROOM

D31E BEDROOM

E31C CORRIDOR

5. 6.

E390S STAIR

7.

UP

D31 COMMON

4.

D32 COMMON

D32D BEDROOM

DN

UP

E31 COMMON

DEMO MILLWORK CLOSET DOORS, TYPICAL

2 A101

DEMOLITION PLAN - THIRD FLOOR SCALE

1/8" = 1'-0"

SALVAGE, MODIFY, AND REINSTALL CLOSET DOORS, TYPICAL

A21A BEDROOM

A21B BEDROOM

B21D BEDROOM

D22B BEDROOM

B21C BEDROOM B21B BEDROOM

B21A BEDROOM

B22A BEDROOM

B22B BEDROOM

B22C BEDROOM

D21B BEDROOM

B22D BEDROOM D21D BEDROOM

B22 COMMON

A101

1 SK-08

D290S STAIR

D21E BEDROOM

D21 COMMON

E21A BEDROOM

E21C CORRIDOR

E290S STAIR

D22 COMMON D22D BEDROOM

E21 COMMON

DEMO MILLWORK CLOSET DOORS, TYPICAL

WORKSTATIONS (48") WORKSTATIONS (42") LOUNGE CHAIRS TABLE SEATS BAR SEATS

DEMO

DEMOLITION PLAN - SECOND FLOOR SCALE

1/8" = 1'-0"

ENLARGED FLOOR PLAN - 1.0 FIRST FLOOR OPTION D SCALE

B22E BEDROOM

B21 COMMON

SEATING 3 6 1 8 8

D22C BEDROOM

D22A BEDROOM

D21G BATH

C290S STAIR

B290S STAIR

UP B21E BEDROOM

1

B22G BATH

B21J BATH

A290S STAIR

DN

A21 COMMON

D21A BEDROOM

D21C BEDROOM

D22K BATH

A21F BATH

1/4" = 1'-0"

SHEET REFERENCE

UNTON ARCHITECTS LLC

ge

2.

SALVAGE, MODIFY, AND REINSTALL CLOSET DOORS, TYPICAL

CON 'EX DOC DET COO CON DRA AND CON COM LOC INS NOT CON LOC SEE PRO FOR OF PRO TO IT IS BUI GRE ALL AND COO SUC REM EQU TO

DATE

02/10/16

SCALE

1/4" = 1'-0"

DRAWING NAME

PROJECT NO.

DRAWING NO.

FLOOR PLAN OPTION D

16002

SK-08

NOT

DURFEE HALL I aided in the first of a two part renovation of a Yale dormitory, which included gut renovation of the washrooms and heating system. I was responsible for building the Revit model, and aided in construction documents and construction administration.


Example Unit Layouts 3 Bedroom Typical Unit

DND FELLOWSHIP DEPARTMENT OF NEIGHBORHOOD DEVELOPMENT BOSTON, 2017

As a Community Service Fellow under the Harvard Joint Center for Housing Studies, I worked as a summer fellow with the DND architect who reviews architectural drawings and construction of DND funded projects. I primarily focused on researching affordable housing design guidelines and developing a graphic appendix for the department’s guideline document. I also created site plans and presentation material for community meetings, including a plan for a Mattapan cottage neighborhood.

2 Bedroom Corner Unit

2 Bedroom Typical Unit

11Bedroom Bedroom Corner Corner Unit Unit

1 Bedroom 1Typical Bedroom Unit Typical Unit

Studio Typical Unit Studio Typical Unit


Unit Layout Design Considerations Minimum clearances in bedrooms Minimum clearances in living and dining

Example Kitchen Layouts

Guideline Unit Sizes Studio One Bedroom Two Bedroom Three Bedroom Four Bedroom

500 sf 600 sf 750 sf 1000 sf 1100 sf

Galley Kitchen DO consider opening kitchen with a half wall or extending the counter

Clearances for furniture Circulation Access to natural light Storage space

L Shaped Kitchen DO provide a corner lazy Susan base cabinet for more accessible use of below counter space

Example Unit (3 Bedroom Corner Unit) DO locate bedroom and bathroom doors off of hallways for privacy DO NOT locate bedroom and bathroom doors off of the living area

DO provide bedroom closets with minimum dimensions 4’ x 2’

DO provide larger living and dining areas in larger units

DO orient the 12’ min. clearance for the living area parallel to an exterior wall.

DO NOT require unit circulation to pass through the kitchen work area. If the dining table is placed within “L” area, the primary circulation path must not require passing between the dining table and kitchen.

DO locate living and dining areas on the corner in corner units

Island Kitchen DO provide counter height seating at island DO provide furniture plan showing functional spaces and appropriate clearances

DO NOT consider island seating as a replacement for a distinct dining area DO NOT require unit circulation to pass between the kitchen and island.

DO provide a distinct dining area, especially in family units

DO provide access to natural light in living rooms, dining areas, and bedrooms

U Shaped Kitchen DO consider opening kitchen with a half wall or extending the counter

DO provide coat closets near the entry with minimum dimensions 3’ x 2’

DO provide linen shelving in at least one closet in each unit. A separate closet is not required

DO create a defined area for the kitchen DO NOT require unit circulation to pass through kitchen work area

DO provide a line of sight from the kitchen to natural light

DO provide lazy Susan base cabinets in the corners for more accessible use of below counter space DO place refrigerator away from the corners


UTILE UTILE ARCHITECTURE & PLANNING BOSTON, 2018

During a 6-month internship with Utile, I worked primarily on a new 237-unit multifamily development in Weymouth, MA. I aided in conceptual design and site test fits, producing renderings and presentation material, and schematic design including interior planning and unit layouts.


ARTWORK This series of paintings explores lighting on architectural interiors. Different areas of the same house are portrayed with attention to the various moods and atmospheres created by daylight.


Profile for Jessica Yuan

Jessica Yuan GSD M.Arch Portfolio  

portfolio of design work from Harvard GSD M.Arch, Yale BA in Architecture, and personal work

Jessica Yuan GSD M.Arch Portfolio  

portfolio of design work from Harvard GSD M.Arch, Yale BA in Architecture, and personal work

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