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Jessica Goodwin 2013/14

PORTFOLIO Stage 2 B.A Architectural Studies


End Of Year Report Looking back on the year, I have definitely found the longer projects easier to cope with. I think I have been able to get into my stride more in terms of design and presentation .I definitely feel that with each project I have learnt something that I have been able to develop and incorporate in to the following one.

ically, i could reevaluate the orientation of my bedrooms, yet I feel that this is only minor as the other properties of the building work better by keeping the design this way. The challenge of getting light into such a restricted site was hard, and even harder to get natural light into the back of the building as i needed to use as much space as i could for my design, so bringing it away from the wall wasn’t an option. Although the Placed:Displaced glazed fenestration subtly provides light down into the building and For this project I felt I achieved a reasonable design with some strong the high atrium space allows this light to travel to the bottom floors. aspects in a short space of time. I found that my Mezzanine level really worked well with linking spaces yet still providing privacy, even though Civic Centred no internal walls were actually present. Looking into space saving op- I remember last year looking at all the second years work when their pin tions really helped me realise about how far design can go in terms of in- up came around and it literally scared me, these definitely put me in an internal aspects and the overall aesthetic of the project. Turning the un- stant state of doubt and fear when we came to tackle this project. Lookderneath of a staircase into a storage space or walkway seems so simple ing back, it really wasn’t that scary and I think I actually came to like it. now, yet with this project it was all about space conservation and these For me I felt my design was quite bold and obtuse, with the cantilevered ideas really helped. Critically I don’t think that at the time I developed debating chamber protruding out so dramatically from the rest of the my idea as far as it could go, yet I know that I struggled with the Brief’s street. As much as I found this aspect daunting, I feel it really worked, furniture restrictions, which seemed oversized and cumbersome. One of with my concept and the interaction with Front Street. I also found that my initial ideas was to have lots of split levelling within the house, yet i learnt my lesson from Placed Displaced, and didn’t shy away from the thought of struggling with the restricted dimensions really put me having lots of split levels all interacting together. Critically I felt like off. Looking back I wish i had chosen this idea and accepted that the i didn’t get involoved with this project as much as Living on the Edge, building would be a challenge, but one i think now would have paid off. yet this may be because of my lack of optimisim at the start. I chose site B because of the relationship my building would have to have with Front Living on the Edge Street. Initially I wanted a building that would compliment the area, yet This has to be my favourite project of the year. I really liked the site and as my concept developed I found that I was actually looking for something how we were able to make our design interactive with the surroundings. I that stood out. This decision to stick with my concepts is something I have chose site A which was challenging in terms of how narrow the site was, really developed over the year, and I feel that it has helped me becomer a yet I felt it had the most potential in terms of access. This was the first better designer as well as being clearer when explaining myself in crits. project that I have created a concept idea at the start and kept my design following the restrictions of this. I have always been sceptical of how Crossover Group Project this works, preferring my designs to just flow how I would want them I really liked the group I had for this project, although we had no civil to. However, I can now see how this only makes the design confusing and engineer which I feel was abit disappointing, I think we worked really well less cohesive. I found this project to be the most stressful in deadline together and focused on each others strengths. The most interesting week, with this being the biggest project we had ever tackled, the amount part of this project I feel was realising how different everyone works of work really seemed to pile on. In my crit, Dan mentioned how I hadn’t and how we all have different development styles. The rest of my group inhabited some of my drawing and I think this really let me down in terms are really efficient workers, which definately helped me become more of of selling my design. Although I was really pleased with how the fenes- one By seeing the benefits of thismakes me want to give myself a stricter tration of my design really brought it altogether and solidified my con- regime in the future. I would like to continue this aspect into third year cept. I found that because I was enjoying this brief so much that I was as the projects mean so much and i think it will help me deal with the able to keep my motivation up, which in the past I have found harder in the overall stress of the design process. bigger projects. I am really pleased with this project and think that my design compliments the site as well as the puropse of the building. Crit-


Contents Charette Week - Gang Hut - PODCAST

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Placed Displaced

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Living On The Edge

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Civic Centered

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Crossover Group Project

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Non Design Modules:

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Principles and Theories Essay

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Environment and Sustainablity Report

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Structural Report

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Means of Escape Report

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Charrette Gang Hut - Podcast

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For this charette we had to create a type of ‘gang hut’ that would then be exhibited at the end of the week within the university campus. We would have no budget and the task required us to advertise the event and potentially gain sponsorship.

We decided to create a ‘radio shack’ that would allow the union’s radio station to provide a live feed outside the men’s bar. We used completely recyclable materials, creating the main structure out of a steel frame that we found, reinforcing it with wooden crates. We then clad the shelter in plastic crate side to give a shabby effect.

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Placed Displaced

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Public

8

Private


For this project the brief asked us to design a terrace house the house, with a big double height window and ceiling height. In the livthat had very strict volumetric dimensions. Challenging me to ing room I wanted to create a lowered level so that people feel as if they have to create a functional environment within a restricted space are stooping into the space, making a more private and personal space. whilst designing a variant on the traditional terrace house. Materiality: Within my design I wanted to maximise light, yet minimise priAs the house is aimed at a young working couple, I decided to keep it very vacy. Therefore I have used a huge glass pane on my front façade, yet open plan, so that they won’t feel lonely within the house as they will be covered it with a steel mesh. I chose this material as it is bold and conable to hear each other. By creating a mezzanine level, the first floor tradicting to the typical terrace red brick design, helping to emphasise overlooks the ground floors key social spaces. The layout of the house the ‘unique’ qualities the brief requires. The rest of the house uses has been aimed at what times of the day the space will be occupied. The red brick, to help the design fit into the site. My interior is primarily kitchen is the most public space, with it being orientated near the front of timber, helping to provide a natural warmth throughout the building.

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Front Elevation 10

Rear Elevation


Section A

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N 12

Ground Floor Plan

First Floor Plan


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Living On The Edge

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PUBLIC

HOME

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WORK

PRIVATE


The brief specified , a small housing facility aimed at a group of disadvantaged adolescents. As well as providing accomodation the foyer will include a boat building workshop, to help build confidence and obtain life skills. The workshop also combines as an exhibition space for the public. The main emphasis within my design is the distinction between public and private domains and how the tenant has the oppurtunity to be as involved as they want. The open plan communal living quarters allows interactions between the tenants to be heard throughout the building, increasing social inclusion. The accomodation and workshop area are kept seperate to allow privacy to the tenants and public areas to be clearly accessible. The exoskeleton structure bridges the two elements of the design, externally showing the connection and relationship between the two parts of the building. The gradual closure of the cladding on the facade emphasis’ the importance of privacy, whilst highlighting the public ‘exhibition space’, with more of the glazing being visible exhibiting the building of the boats externally.

Site Map 17


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N

20 -2 Floor Plan

-1 Floor Plan


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Ground Floor Plan Lime Street Level

First Floor Plan

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Internal Atrium Space showing Interaction between tenants

22 Perspective at lime street showing tenants theshold blending in

Inside The Workshop/ Exhibition Space


LONG SECTION

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24 Small Section


Elevation

Journey of boats leaving the workshop/ getting put in storage area

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Civic Centered

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The brief for this project gave us a variety of options in what type and size of building we wanted to design. I chose to design a library/moot hall facility on site B - Front Street, Tynemouth. This site presented challenges from its historic setting as well as the spatial limitations the site provided. After researching the local area of tynemouth, I found that there isn’t that many activites or places for young people to go, even though there is a few schools situated in the town. I then decided to aim by building at younger people, providing a social place for them to relax as well as giving them a chance to take an interest in politics.

As you climb through my building you reach different levels of focus, with the ground floor becoming the main social area and the top of the building being more private and reserved. The debating chamber overhangs the outdoor social space, sheltering it whilst also cantilevering over the pavement of front street. This asserts the political power the chamber has within tynemouth, becoming an obvious focus as the public walk up front street. As the building is built for the public and has a main learning focus, the public will be able to access every level, whilst also being able to observe the otgfloors below so that they can learn from them. The main circulation seperates into different floor levels to allow for this.

Key

Historical

Metro Station

Territorial Army

Parks and Allotments

Site

Education

Site Map showing places of activity for 29 young people


Journey to the Site

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Public Space: Step - Seating area directing the path for the Entrance to the building

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Inside Library Space, overlooking the cafe area below

View from Mayoral Suite looking into Debating Chamber


Front Street Elevation

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Short Cross Section

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Ground Floor Plan

First Floor Plan

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Second Floor Plan

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Third Floor Plan

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Fourth Floor Plan

Roof Plan

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Long Cross Section

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Crossover Group Project

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Shelter

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Route

View


For this group Project we had to design a bike facility, located in sheffield, that would hold 1000 bikes. Our site was situated in the middle of a playing field, where football is regularly played and the footpath allows people to pass through. From this we decided that we needed to utilise the existing path to divert people past our building. Our design allows for people and bikes to enter the building at different levels, with each levels being used to hold different facilities. These paths keep pedestrians and cyclists seperate, yet they are able to see each other entering and exiting the facility.

SITE MAP 1:1000 41


Materiality: Cladding: Larch cladding can be installed horizontally to accentuate length or vertically to accentuate height. It has a fantastic surface finish for cladding. It’s wholly sustainable with great supply routes from properly managed forests. As sourced from the UK larch will have less resin making it easier to treat. It is generally tough and hard with good strength. If home grown it is slightly durable, if it’s imported then moderately durable. It has a fine texture and has small moisture movement across the board. Although larch trees don’t grow as high as some other trees, it works excellent as an air dried external cladding. Structural: For the main structural

components of the design, columns and overhead canopy, we will be using European Oak. This is as Oak is renowned for its durability and pure mechanical strength. It is also commonly used in glulam construction, allowing for custom orders to be easily created as well as increasing the materials strength. Due to the slower growth of the timber and its availability it is a more expensive hardwood, yet this will be outweighed by the structural properties it gives. If left untreated the Oak will GRADUALLY FADE INTO A SILVERY GREY, YET IF TREATED IT WILL KEEP ITS BLOND APPEARANCE

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PHOTOMONTAGE FIRST FLOOR THIS IS A VIEW COMING OFF THE RAMP ENTRANCE ONTO THE FIRST FLOOR, HIGHLIGHTING THE ACCESS POINTS OF THE BUILDING AND THE INTERACTION BETWEEN THE VIEWING DECK AND THE ENTRANCE RAMP.

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THIS HIGHLIGHTS THE EFFECT OF THE LIGHTWELL WITHIN THE STORAGE SPACE, AS WELL AS SHOWING THE INHABITATION OF THE SPACE.

THIS SHOWS THE MAIN PEDESTRIAN ENTRANCE TO THE BUILDING , SHOWING THE INTERACTION BETWEEN THE STORAGE FACILITY AND MULTI-PURPOSE HALL.

CONCEPTUALIZED BIKE STORAGE

PHOTOMONTAGE GROUND LEVEL

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PHOTOMONTAGE FIRST FLOOR THIS SHOWS THE LIGHTWELL INTO THE STORAGE SPACE WITH SURROUNDING SEATING, AS WELL AS THE GLASS CAFE THAT PROVIDES VIEWS OF ALL SURROUNDING AND BALCONY SEATING.

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A

B

A

B

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GROUND FLOOR PLAN 1:300 47


A

B

B

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A

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FIRST FLOOR PLAN 1:300


A

B

A

B

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SECOND FLOOR PLAN 1:300 49


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Non Design Work

Principles and Theories Essay Environmental and Sustainability Report - Living on The Edge Structural Report - Living on The Edge Means of Access and Fire Escape - Civic Centered

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Many people see home as a place ‘more about the emotional connection and sense of comfort’ (Psychologies Magazine, 2013) rather than just a dwelling to shelter its inhabitants. Yet what components bring this essence of home together and creates this image that we strive to create throughout our life? The home is the place where most of a family’s social interactions take place, be it sat around the kitchen table at breakfast time, watching a film around the fire, or simply discussing what to do at the weekend. ‘These remembrances, often fixed in a place, have to do with the family as a unit’ (Cooper-Marcus, 1995), defining a home by these memories that we have shared and creating a link between the two make it a place we want to hold onto. As we get older and look back on what we remember when growing up, it is these happy memories that we try and reproduce within our own homes when we start to have a family of our own. CooperMarcus supports this by saying that some people have ‘profound memories of a special childhood home and unconsciously reproduce aspects… in a house of adulthood’ (Cooper-Marcus, 1995). An example of this would be to continue to have a circular kitchen table in your home, similarly to what you had as a child or to continue a tradition within the home that is unique to your family life.

It is within our home that we learn most of our social identifications such as behaviour, language and culture. For most of us our culture is something that we have learnt from our family and is something we share. It is common that there is some reference of this culture displayed within the home, as the culture is an important aspect of the family’s lifestyle and ‘the domestic interior has always demonstrated a feeling of intimacy and hominess’(Rybczynski, 1986), something that culture provides automatically . By having this religious routine in place, it is common for the children to take it into adulthood; as it is seen as a resemblance of faith and home. An example of this would be to have a dedicated prayer room, where the position of this room within the house plays an important role on family life and the worship of this culture. The circulation throughout the house will be affected by this decision, as only during particular times of the day will this room need to be accessed. If a house has a disconnected circulation, it can lead to some of the rooms to be left unoccupied and unused; leading to other rooms within the house becoming cluttered. Spatial limitations are crucial to how the floor plan of a house works. In some cases, it can lead to awkward spaces being created or an inappropriate circulation being introduced. Images 3 and 4 below clearly show how spaces can be thought out incorrectly. This house in particular is a student residence, where flatmates may not necessarily know each other that well or be at that level of comfort with one another, leading to feelings of embarrassment and discomfort.

As we grow up, travel and meet new people, we accumulate a lot of belongings and personal items that we then like to display within our homes. These possessions help us express our personality and decorate our houses in a way that we find aesthetically pleasing and comforting. We also use possessions to create an ideal image of our home as ‘people feel constrained to present appropriate images of themselves’ (Chapman and Hockey, 1999). This is as we want to be perceived as a decent family that people are happy to associate with. It is these possessions that we then take with us when we move house, and that bring the essence of home into the new dwelling. This association of the possessions and home is called autobiographical memory recall, an action of the brain that allows us to access memories that ‘encompass discrete forms of abstract knowledge about the self’(Mace, 2010). The familiarity of these ‘symbols of self’ (CooperMarcus, 1995), help us disregard the sense of unknown within our new habitat and help us to accept our new surroundings. Our favourite childhood toy is probably the best example of this recall, as this toy is the epitome of our upbringing, instigating definitive happy memories of childhood that we strive to reciprocate in our children.

Image 3 (Left): Plan of a student flat in Jesmond, Newcastle (Original Drawing)

The home doesn’t just consist of the interior parts of the house; the external areas, are for most people, just as important and distinctive in personalising a home. Many childhood memories are most prominent from activities that were held in the garden, as this was most likely an area of play, ‘I have precise memories of the outdoor environments’ (Cooper – Marcus, 1995). Not only do possessions help us recall elements of our childhood, but similarities between places also act as a ‘psychic anchor’ (Cooper – Marcus, 1995) that we can call upon.

Image 4 (Above): Photomontage of flat in Jesmond, Newcastle, showing disconnection. (Original Photos)

Childhood is a time when we gain a social identity and start to learn our basic morals and mannerisms that last our lifetime. The home helps children develop this social identity by providing a secure, controlled environment for them to learn within. Bowlby’s attachment theory looks into the relationship between parents and their children and how it is helped develop. Where ‘the developing child has a propensity to form attachments, the nature of these attachments and their dynamics will depend on the parental environment to which he or she is exposed’ (Holmes, 1993). When a child is raised in an unsafe environment, or broken home, this connection can be lost or thwarted and the home is seen as a, ‘site of intimidation and violence’ (Chapman and Hockey, 1999). A common example of this is from divorce; adults who have come from this background have lost the sense of home as they ‘find their bondedness to home to be dramatically changed’ (Cooper-Marcus,1995), leading them to have to create their own vision of this concept.

Image 1 (Above): Typical family scene around the breakfast table (Original Drawing) Image 2 (right): Typical home garden with swing for children (Original Drawing)

Image 5 (Top): Mies Van Der Rohe’s Farnsworth House Exterior Image 6 (Above): Mies Van Der Rohe’s Farnsworth House Interior (National Trust for Historic Preservation in the United States, 2013)

Bibliography Chapman, Tony and Hockey, Jenny, (1999, Routledge, London), Ideal Homes? Social Change and the Experience of Home, Pages 133-134 [Accessed online] , <http://libsearch.ncl.ac.uk/primo_library/libweb/action/display.do?tabs=detailsTab&ct=display&fn=search&doc=NCL_LMS000661087&indx=1&recIds=NCL_LMS000661087&recIdxs=0&elementId=0&renderMode=poppedOut&displayMode=full&frb rVersion=&dscnt=1&frbg=&scp.scps=scope%3A%28NCL_LMS%29%2Cscope%3A%28NCL_SFX%29%2Cscope%3A%28NCL_ML%29%2Cscope%3A%28%22NCL%22%29%2Cscope%3A%28NCL_EPR%29&tab=default_tab&dstmp=1389565373857&srt=ra nk&mode=Basic&dum=true&vl(freeText0)=tony+chapman+and+jenny+hockey&vid=NCL_V1>, 02/01/2014 Cooper- Marcus, Clare (July 1995, Conari Press), House as a Mirror of Self, pages 4, 11, 20, 21, 46 Holmes, Jeremy (1993, Routledge, London), John Bowlby and the Attachment Theory, Page 65 [Accessed Online] <http://libsearch.ncl.ac.uk/primo_library/libweb/action/display.do?tabs=detailsTab&ct=display&fn=search&doc=dedupmrg103752596&indx=1&recIds=dedupmrg103752596&recIdxs=0&elementId=0&renderMode=poppedOut&displayMode=full&f rbrVersion=&dscnt=1&frbg=&scp.scps=scope%3A%28NCL_LMS%29%2Cscope%3A%28NCL_SFX%29%2Cscope%3A%28NCL_ML%29%2Cscope%3A%28%22NCL%22%29%2Cscope%3A%28NCL_EPR%29&tab=default_tab&dstmp=1389565929156&srt=r ank&mode=Basic&dum=true&vl(freeText0)=jeremy+holmes+john+bowlby&vid=NCL_V1>, 01/01/2014 Mace, John H (2010, John Wiley & Sons Ltd, Chichester), The Act of Remembering Toward an Understanding of How We Recall the Past, Page 4, [Accessed Online] <http://libsearch.ncl.ac.uk/primo_library/libweb/action/display.do?tabs=detailsTab&ct=display&fn=search&doc=NCL_LMS000835097&indx=2&recIds=NCL_LMS000835097&recIdxs=1&elementId=1&renderMode=poppedOut&displayMode=full&frb rVersion=&dscnt=1&frbg=&scp.scps=scope%3A%28NCL_LMS%29%2Cscope%3A%28NCL_SFX%29%2Cscope%3A%28NCL_ML%29%2Cscope%3A%28%22NCL%22%29%2Cscope%3A%28NCL_EPR%29&tab=default_tab&dstmp=1389566129118&srt=ra nk&mode=Basic&dum=true&vl(freeText0)=john+mace+&vid=NCL_V1>, 01/01/2014 National Trust for Historic Preservation in the United States (2013, Washington), History – Farnsworth House, [Accessed Online] <http://www.farnsworthhouse.org/history.htm >, 12/01/14 National Trust for Historic Preservation in the United States (2013, Washington), Photos – Jon Miller, Hendrich Blessing, [Accessed Online] < http://www.farnsworthhouse.org/photos.htm >, 12/01/2014 Patio Enclosures (January 2014, 2014 Patio Enclosures, Macedonia), The Benefits of Natural Light, [Accessed Online] < http://www.patioenclosures.com/benefits-of-natural-light.aspx >, 09/01/2014 Psychologies Magazine (December 2013, KELSEY Publishing Group), How to make your house a home, [Accessed Online] <http://www.psychologies.co.uk/self/how-to-make-your-house-a-home.html >, 03/01/2014 Rybczynski, Witold (1986, Viking Penguin Inc., 1987, Penguin Books), Home – A Short History of an Idea, page 124 and 218

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Jessica Goodwin | 110177858 | A Place Of Houses | ARC2023

As we look around neighbourhoods in our society, there is a clear distinction between privately owned properties and rented accommodation. Where the property is rented, you will see the house is less personalised as tenancy agreements restrict major decoration and layout decisions to be undertaken without the landlord’s permission; keeping the houses to a tenant friendly status. As previously stated, different elements can help define a home, a place people are able to ‘mould it to their own needs of comfort and security, style and personal morality’ (Chapman and Hockey, 1999). In private housing, the owners of the property have pride of ownership and therefore look after the property better. This standard of maintenance helps the overall aesthetic of the house and clearly shows the passer-by that it is a lived in home. If you compare areas of rented accommodation to private, we can see from the exterior the difference, e.g. garden maintenance, house’s paintwork. In contradiction to the above arguments, that a home is a place that seems lived in and is functional; is the modern approach to architecture, where ‘form follows function’ rules and homes and buildings are seen more as expressions of art. The vast expanses of glass and pristine white walls, provide naturally lighted spaces, ‘to make spaces appear larger, illuminate an interior structure and increase the beauty of a space’ (Patio Enclosures, 2014). Yet the uncluttered and cool collaboration of these elements, create spaces of no emotion, ‘a pronounced softening effect, due not only to the upholstered furniture, but also to the patterned paper that covers the walls’ (Rybczynski, 1986). Yes, personal taste is clearly shown, but the house could still belong to anyone. This crisp finish becomes an obsession to its inhabitants, where if an object becomes misaligned or put out of place, the whole emphasis of the room is hindered. The lack of personality within the room, can also affect the enjoyment held; with visitors feeling lost and unsure of how to behave in such a neat environment. Mies Van Der Rohe’s, Farnworth House is a prime example of this modern architecture, where ‘the interior is unprecedentedly transparent to the surrounding site, and also unprecedentedly uncluttered in itself’ (National Trust for Historic Preservation in the United States, 2013). The vast amounts of glass and lack of storage, in my opinion, make this house inappropriate to live in and more about exhibiting the way of family life rather than it being a functional home. From a young age we are brought up with this concept of home surrounding us, whether it is from literature, family or advertisements. It is within our society, that we learn its different elements and create our own understanding of it. Home is an innate concept that is continuous and even as we age and develop our comprehension of this, there is never going to be a definitive answer. Pallasmaa says ‘Perhaps our homes of adulthood are an unconscious search for the lost home of childhood’. Yet from my understanding, our home of adulthood is a development from our childhood. Elements, yes, will be continued into our new homes, but new elements will also be created, as we mature, settle and merge our conceptions of home with our peers; ready to create the stability and comfort we want for our family.


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Jessica Goodwin ARC 2009 Technology Assessment Access for All & Means of Escape

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JGoodwin: Newcastle University Stage 2 Architecture Portfolio  
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