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SENSE & PROFITABILITY


The effect of sensory branding on the consumer and how it can lead to developments in product delivery packaging innovation

JESSE CLARK FASH30001 RESEARCH DOCUMENT - Word Count 8,034

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SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE.


SECTION 1

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A SENSE OF CONTEXT WHAT IT’S ABOUT WHY I’M DOING IT WHERE I’M INFLUENCING GLOBAL CONTEXT SOCIAL CONTEXT CULTURAL CONTEXT BRANDS MAKING THE MOST NOISE SINGAPORE AIRLINES: CASE STUDY

SECTION 2

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SOUND

SECTION 3

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SIGHT

SECTION 4

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TOUCH

SECTION 5

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TASTE

3 4 5 8 9 10 12 15

INTRODUCTION WHAT I DID WHY I DID IT DUKEBOX EXPERIMENT INFOGRAPHICS WHAT THE RESULTS SHOW

20 21 22 23 26

INTRODUCTION WHAT I DID WHY I DID IT VISUAL SELECTION EXPERIMENT INFOGRAPHICS WHAT THE RESULTS SHOW

30 31 32 33 36

INTRODUCTION WHAT I DID WHY I DID IT ‘FEEL ME’ PHOTOGRAPH RESEARCH TOUCH RESULTS INFOGRAPHIC WHAT THE RESULTS SHOW

40 41 42 43 45 46

INTRODUCTION WHAT I DID WHY I DID IT LOVECHART SURVEY RESULTS INFOGRAPHICS SWEET TASTE OF SHARING

50 51 52 53 55


CONTENTS SECTION 6

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SMELL

SECTION 7

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PACKAGING

SECTION 8

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STRATEGIC OUTCOMES

INTRODUCTION WHAT I DID WHY I DID IT BOX SELECTION EXPERIMENT RESULTS DECISION TIME INFOGRAPHIC WHAT THE RESULTS SHOW

INTRODUCTION TREND 1 IN PACKAGING TREND 2 IN PACKAGING HEINEKEN IGNITE CASE STUDY

HOW TO AFFECT CONSUMERS’ DECISIONS BRAND SELECTION - SME VISUAL TONE OF THE BRAND MISSGUIDED VISUAL SUGGESTION - LUXE BOX MISSGUIDED VISUAL SUGGESTION - PVC PACK SOUND INCLUSION TOUCH INCLUSION SWEET DEAL SMELL INCLUSION THE FULL PACKAGE

60 61 62 63 65 66

70 71 73 75

79 80 81 83 85 87 88 89 91 92

HIGH BUDGET INNOVATION BRAND SELECTION - LUXURY VISUAL TONE OF THE BRAND LN-CC VISUAL SUGGESTION - GEOMETRIC HOLOGRAPHIC SOUND INCLUSION TOUCH INCLUSION TASTE INCLUSION SMELL INCLUSION

93 94 95 97 99 100 101 102

SENSORY SUMMARY

103

LIST OF REFERENCES LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS BIBLIOGRAPHY

105 108 109


INTRODUCTION. WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY? WHAT? HOW? WHY?


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Crandell, C. 2013 Crandell, C. 2013 : online


WHAT IT’S ABOUT

3

Can you think of any memorable experiences you’ve had when receiving a product recently? My experiences generally consist of a day spent waiting followed by an impatient driver throwing the parcel at me and speeding off. Bit of an anti-climax. This document aims to investigate the senses and their potential role to play in creating innovative product delivery solutions that are memorable, practical and exciting all at once. Each sense will be individually explored using a combination of primary and secondary research before they are combined to create a powerful synergy both economically and creatively. When shopping online or ordering in-store, the package we receive represents an extension of the company and is an important component of our brand experience. The more we like what we receive, the more we’ll buy. I aim to generate strategic outcomes in two sections; one for a SME (Small to Medium Enterprise) with a lower budget, and one for a luxury brand with a higher budget for these ideas.


WHY I’M DOING IT

4

There are several well-known existing studies in to the effects and effectiveness of sensory branding on consumers by experts such as Martin Lindstrom and Philip Graves producing the works ‘Brand Sense’ (2010) and ‘Consumer-ology’ (2010). However - though these sources have been studied for secondary research - my project differs as there are few or no studies looking at the way brands could incorporate these sensory elements in to the way they deliver their products to the consumer. In a survey I carried out, 83% of respondants replied ‘yes’ to the question ‘do you take notice of the packaging that you receive your delivery in?’. The importance of an ‘experience’ while shopping is becoming more and more prominent as we are engulfed by this technological age, meaning a brand must aim to stand out from the crowd. The best way to do this? Through involving the senses of course. The invention of new technologies in sectors such as printing, development of material and various others coming in to play it is the perfect time to suggest ways in which more brands can add some excitement to the way in which customers receive their products. Sense and you shall recieve.


Figure 1 - The Consumer Decision Journey, Own Image, 2013.


WHERE I’M INFLUENCING

6

This project has a strong focus on the Consumer Decision Journey, illustrated in Figure 1 (left). David Court from McKinsey & Company (2009) stated that it is of high importance to reach consumers at a time they’re likely to make decisions. Though it may be true that in several cases the packaging may not dramatically affect a consumer’s choice of whether to buy from a certain brand, it does affect the ‘enjoy’, ‘advocate’ and ‘bond’ processes within the decision journey. Through providing a seamlessly engaging experience right through to when the consumer receives and opens a delivery, a brand will be more likely to emotionally bond with the consumer and encourage loyalty. Sensory packaging particularly links with this idea as the senses are known to create emotional connections. The more memorable and appealing this experience is – whether hi-tech or handmade – the better. Martin Lindstrom stated in Brand Sense (2010, p114) that “the more positive the synergy that’s established between our senses, the stronger the connection made between sender and receiver”. If a brand successfully creates this enjoyment and a bond between themselves and consumers then the ‘consider’ and ‘evaluate’ sections of the decision journey will be eliminated, therefore generating more revenue while creating a loyal customer base.


GLOBAL. GLOBAL. GLOBAL. GLOBAL. GLOBAL. GLOBAL. GLOBAL. GLOBAL. GLOBAL. GLOBAL. GLOBAL. GLOBAL. GLOBAL. GLOBAL. GLOBAL. GLOBAL. GLOBAL. GLOBAL. GLOBAL. GLOBAL. GLOBAL. GLOBAL. GLOBAL. GLOBAL. GLOBAL. GLOBAL. GLOBAL. GLOBAL. GLOBAL. GLOBAL. GLOBAL. GLOBAL. GLOBAL. GLOBAL. GLOBAL. GLOBAL. GLOBAL. GLOBAL. GLOBAL. GLOBAL. GLOBAL. GLOBAL. GLOBAL. GLOBAL. GLOBAL. GLOBAL. GLOBAL. GLOBAL. GLOBAL. GLOBAL. GLOBAL. GLOBAL. GLOBAL. GLOBAL. GLOBAL. GLOBAL. GLOBAL. GLOBAL.

SOCIAL. SOCIAL. SOCIAL. SOCIAL. SOCIAL. SOCIAL. SOCIAL. SOCIAL. SOCIAL. SOCIAL. SOCIAL. SOCIAL. SOCIAL. SOCIAL. SOCIAL. SOCIAL. SOCIAL. SOCIAL. SOCIAL. SOCIAL. SOCIAL. SOCIAL. SOCIAL. SOCIAL. SOCIAL. SOCIAL. SOCIAL. SOCIAL. SOCIAL. SOCIAL. SOCIAL. SOCIAL. SOCIAL. SOCIAL. SOCIAL. SOCIAL. SOCIAL. SOCIAL. SOCIAL. SOCIAL. SOCIAL. SOCIAL. SOCIAL. SOCIAL. SOCIAL. SOCIAL. SOCIAL. SOCIAL. SOCIAL. SOCIAL. SOCIAL. SOCIAL. SOCIAL. SOCIAL. SOCIAL. SOCIAL. SOCIAL. SOCIAL.

CULTURAL. CULTURAL. CULTURAL. CULTURAL. CULTURAL. CULTURAL. CULTURAL. CULTURAL. CULTURAL. CULTURAL. CULTURAL. CULTURAL. CULTURAL. CULTURAL. CULTURAL. CULTURAL. CULTURAL. CULTURAL. CULTURAL. CULTURAL. CULTURAL. CULTURAL. CULTURAL. CULTURAL. CULTURAL. CULTURAL. CULTURAL. CULTURAL. CULTURAL. CULTURAL. CULTURAL. CULTURAL. CULTURAL. CULTURAL. CULTURAL. CULTURAL. CULTURAL. CULTURAL. CULTURAL. CULTURAL. CULTURAL. CULTURAL. CULTURAL. CULTURAL. CULTURAL. CULTURAL. CULTURAL. CULTURAL. CULTURAL. CULTURAL. CULTURAL. CULTURAL. CULTURAL. CULTURAL. CULTURAL. CULTURAL. CULTURAL. CULTURAL.

GLOBAL. GLOBAL. GLOBAL. GLOBAL. GLOBAL. GLOBAL. GLOBAL. GLOBAL. GLOBAL. GLOBAL. GLOBAL. GLOBAL. GLOBAL. GLOBAL. GLOBAL. GLOBAL. GLOBAL. GLOBAL. GLOBAL. GLOBAL. GLOBAL. GLOBAL. GLOBAL. GLOBAL. GLOBAL. GLOBAL. GLOBAL. GLOBAL. GLOBAL. GLOBAL. GLOBAL. GLOBAL. GLOBAL. GLOBAL. GLOBAL. GLOBAL. GLOBAL. GLOBAL. GLOBAL. GLOBAL. GLOBAL. GLOBAL. GLOBAL. GLOBAL. GLOBAL. GLOBAL. GLOBAL. GLOBAL. GLOBAL. GLOBAL. GLOBAL. GLOBAL. GLOBAL. GLOBAL. GLOBAL. GLOBAL. GLOBAL. GLOBAL.

SOCIAL. SOCIAL. SOCIAL. SOCIAL. SOCIAL. SOCIAL. SOCIAL. SOCIAL. SOCIAL. SOCIAL. SOCIAL. SOCIAL. SOCIAL. SOCIAL. SOCIAL. SOCIAL. SOCIAL. SOCIAL. SOCIAL. SOCIAL. SOCIAL. SOCIAL. SOCIAL. SOCIAL. SOCIAL. SOCIAL. SOCIAL. SOCIAL. SOCIAL. SOCIAL. SOCIAL. SOCIAL. SOCIAL. SOCIAL. SOCIAL. SOCIAL. SOCIAL. SOCIAL. SOCIAL. SOCIAL. SOCIAL. SOCIAL. SOCIAL. SOCIAL. SOCIAL. SOCIAL. SOCIAL. SOCIAL. SOCIAL. SOCIAL. SOCIAL. SOCIAL. SOCIAL. SOCIAL. SOCIAL. SOCIAL. SOCIAL. SOCIAL.

CULTURAL. CULTURAL. CULTURAL. CULTURAL. CULTURAL. CULTURAL. CULTURAL. CULTURAL. CULTURAL. CULTURAL. CULTURAL. CULTURAL. CULTURAL. CULTURAL. CULTURAL. CULTURAL. CULTURAL. CULTURAL. CULTURAL. CULTURAL. CULTURAL. CULTURAL. CULTURAL. CULTURAL. CULTURAL. CULTURAL. CULTURAL. CULTURAL. CULTURAL. CULTURAL. CULTURAL. CULTURAL. CULTURAL. CULTURAL. CULTURAL. CULTURAL. CULTURAL. CULTURAL. CULTURAL. CULTURAL. CULTURAL. CULTURAL. CULTURAL. CULTURAL. CULTURAL. CULTURAL. CULTURAL. CULTURAL. CULTURAL. CULTURAL. CULTURAL. CULTURAL. CULTURAL. CULTURAL. CULTURAL. CULTURAL. CULTURAL. CULTURAL.

GLOBAL. GLOBAL. GLOBAL. GLOBAL. GLOBAL. GLOBAL. GLOBAL. GLOBAL. GLOBAL. GLOBAL. GLOBAL. GLOBAL. GLOBAL. GLOBAL. GLOBAL. GLOBAL. GLOBAL. GLOBAL. GLOBAL. GLOBAL. GLOBAL. GLOBAL. GLOBAL. GLOBAL. GLOBAL. GLOBAL. GLOBAL. GLOBAL. GLOBAL. GLOBAL. GLOBAL. GLOBAL. GLOBAL. GLOBAL. GLOBAL. GLOBAL. GLOBAL. GLOBAL. GLOBAL. GLOBAL. GLOBAL. GLOBAL. GLOBAL. GLOBAL. GLOBAL. GLOBAL. GLOBAL. GLOBAL. GLOBAL. GLOBAL. GLOBAL. GLOBAL. GLOBAL. GLOBAL. GLOBAL. GLOBAL. GLOBAL. GLOBAL.

SOCIAL. SOCIAL. SOCIAL. SOCIAL. SOCIAL. SOCIAL. SOCIAL. SOCIAL. SOCIAL. SOCIAL. SOCIAL. SOCIAL. SOCIAL. SOCIAL. SOCIAL. SOCIAL. SOCIAL. SOCIAL. SOCIAL. SOCIAL. SOCIAL. SOCIAL. SOCIAL. SOCIAL. SOCIAL. SOCIAL. SOCIAL. SOCIAL. SOCIAL. SOCIAL. SOCIAL. SOCIAL. SOCIAL. SOCIAL. SOCIAL. SOCIAL. SOCIAL. SOCIAL. SOCIAL. SOCIAL. SOCIAL. SOCIAL. SOCIAL. SOCIAL. SOCIAL. SOCIAL. SOCIAL. SOCIAL. SOCIAL. SOCIAL. SOCIAL. SOCIAL. SOCIAL. SOCIAL. SOCIAL. SOCIAL. SOCIAL. SOCIAL.

CULTURAL. CULTURAL. CULTURAL. CULTURAL. CULTURAL. CULTURAL. CULTURAL. CULTURAL. CULTURAL. CULTURAL. CULTURAL. CULTURAL. CULTURAL. CULTURAL. CULTURAL. CULTURAL. CULTURAL. CULTURAL. CULTURAL. CULTURAL. CULTURAL. CULTURAL. CULTURAL. CULTURAL. CULTURAL. CULTURAL. CULTURAL. CULTURAL. CULTURAL. CULTURAL. CULTURAL. CULTURAL. CULTURAL. CULTURAL. CULTURAL. CULTURAL. CULTURAL. CULTURAL. CULTURAL. CULTURAL. CULTURAL. CULTURAL. CULTURAL. CULTURAL. CULTURAL. CULTURAL. CULTURAL. CULTURAL. CULTURAL. CULTURAL. CULTURAL. CULTURAL. CULTURAL. CULTURAL. CULTURAL. CULTURAL. CULTURAL. CULTURAL.


8

The digital age is unavoidably upon us. Technology surrounds us constantly, providing new solutions and experiences across all areas of our everyday lives. This being the case, technology has become a necessity, something we expect to be included in stores, utilised by brands both online and offline.

GLOBAL CONTEXT

This need is putting pressure on brands to generate new and interesting ideas in order to stand out and gain our custom. This research document aims to explore the ways in which sensory elements can be combined with technology to produce a new, engaging delivery experience for consumers while allowing the selected brand to demonstrate their ability to keep up with technological developments. Alongside this, according to branding experts Bertil Hulten (2011) and Philip Graves (2010) visuals have experienced a loss of power as we are constantly bombarded with millions of advertisements daily. In order to be memorable a brand must consider creating a multi-sensory experience. Through appealing to consumers on more than one level a brand will be more likely to really savour the sweet taste of success.


SOCIAL CONTEXT

9

The rise and rise of social media. Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram in particular have seen a huge increase in users over the last couple of years with Twitter experiencing a 40% growth rate (Bullas, J. 2013). People are sharing their experiences and lives in general through these platforms everyday, providing brands with opportunities for free promotion if the consumer is sharing something positive. Almost 825 million active users upload photos to Facebook daily (Bullas, J. 2013), ranking it as the most popular activity on the site. The product delivery packaging innovation suggested in this research report would aim to encourage consumers to share and publicise their experience across their social media accounts, allowing the selected brand to best utilise this ever-important opportunity. This relates back to the ‘advocate’ step in the Consumer Decision Journey on page 5 - The innovation would provide an experience so unique that it simply must be shown off.


CULTURAL CONTEXT

10

How often do you recieve post that isn’t a bill or spam? With texts, wallposts and tweets frequently replacing traditional methods such as cards and letters in today’s culture it is important that we attempt to reignite the excitement produced by receiving a parcel or delivery. This research document aims to suggest a way in which consumers can once again be excited by an engaging and interesting package and in turn be encouraged to purchase from the selected brand repeatedly. This could particularly benefit online brands as “you can’t touch it, or smell it, or see it. You are just relying on pictures.” (Hulten, B. 2009) and therefore a parcel could be a good physical manifestation of the brand.


SINGAPORE AIRLINES. APPLE. DISNEY. MERCEDES-BENZ. MARLBORO. TIFFANY. LOUIS VUITTON B&O. NOKIA. HARLEY-DAVIDSON. NIKE. ABSOLUT. COCA-COLA. GILLETTE. PEPSI. STARBUCKS. PRADA. CATERPILLAR. GUINNESS. ROLLS-ROYCE. SINGAPORE AIRLINES. APPLE. DISNEY. MERCEDES -BENZ. MARLBORO. TIFFANY. LOUIS VUITTON. B&O. NOKIA. HARLEY-DAVIDSON. NIKE. ABSOLUT. COCA-COLA. GILLETTE. PEPSI. STARBUCKS. PRADA. CATERPILLAR. GUINNESS. ROLLS-ROYCE. SINGAPORE AIRLINES. APPLE. DISNEY. MERCEDES-BENZ. MARLBORO. TIFFANY. LOUIS VUITTON. B&O. NOKIA. HARLEY-DAVIDSON. NIKE. ABSOLUT. COCA-COLA. GILLETTE. PEPSI. STARBUCKS. PRADA. CATERPILLAR. GUINNESS. ROLLS-ROYCE. SINGAPORE AIRLINES. APPLE. DISNEY. MERCEDES-BENZ. MARLBORO. TIFFANY. LOUIS VUITTON. B&O. NOKIA. HARLEYDAVIDSON. NIKE. ABSOLUT. COCA-COLA. GILLETTE. PEPSI. STARBUCKS. PRADA. CATERPILLAR. GUINNESS. ROLLS-ROYCE. SINGAPORE AIRLINES. APPLE. DISNEY. MERCEDES-BENZ. MARLBORO. TIFFANY. LOUIS VUITTON. B&O. NOKIA. HARLEY-DAVIDSON. NIKE. ABSOLUT. COCA-COLA. GILLETTE. PEPSI. STARBUCKS. PRADA. CATERPILLAR. GUINNESS. ROLLS-ROYCE. SINGAPORE AIRLINES. APPLE. DISNEY. MERCEDES-BENZ. MARLBORO. TIFFANY. LOUIS VUITTON. B&O. NOKIA. HARLEY-DAVIDSON. NIKE. ABSOLUT. COCA-COLA. GILLETTE. PEPSI. STARBUCKS.PRADA. CATERPILLAR. GUINNESS. ROLLS-ROYCE. SINGAPORE AIRLINES. APPLE. DISNEY. MERCEDESBENZ. MARLBORO. TIFFANY. LOUIS VUITTON. B&O. NOKIA. HARLEY-DAVIDSON. NIKE. ABSOLUT. COCA-COLA. GILLETTE. PEPSI. STARBUCKS. PRADA. CATERPILLAR. GUINNESS. ROLLS-ROYCE. SINGAPORE AIRLINES. APPLE. DISNEY. MERCEDES-BENZ. MARLBORO. TIFFANY. LOUIS VUITTON B&O. NOKIA. HARLEY-DAVIDSON. NIKE. ABSOLUT. COCA-COLA. GILLETTE. PEPSI. STARBUCKS. PRADA. CATERPILLAR. GUINNESS. ROLLS-ROYCE. SINGAPORE AIRLINES. APPLE. DISNEY. MERCEDES -BENZ. MARLBORO. TIFFANY. LOUIS VUITTON. B&O. NOKIA. HARLEY-DAVIDSON. NIKE. ABSOLUT. COCA-COLA. GILLETTE. PEPSI. STARBUCKS. PRADA. CATERPILLAR. GUINNESS. ROLLS-ROYCE. SINGAPORE AIRLINES. APPLE. DISNEY. MERCEDES-BENZ. MARLBORO. TIFFANY. LOUIS VUITTON. B&O. NOKIA. HARLEY-DAVIDSON. NIKE. ABSOLUT. COCA-COLA. GILLETTE. PEPSI. STARBUCKS. PRADA. CATERPILLAR. GUINNESS. ROLLS-ROYCE. SINGAPORE AIRLINES. APPLE. DISNEY. MERCEDES-BENZ. MARLBORO. TIFFANY. LOUIS VUITTON. B&O. NOKIA. HARLEYDAVIDSON. NIKE. ABSOLUT. COCA-COLA. GILLETTE. PEPSI. STARBUCKS. PRADA. CATERPILLAR. GUINNESS. ROLLS-ROYCE. SINGAPORE AIRLINES. APPLE. DISNEY. MERCEDES-BENZ. MARLBORO. TIFFANY. LOUIS VUITTON. B&O. NOKIA. HARLEY-DAVIDSON. NIKE. ABSOLUT. COCA-COLA. GILLETTE. PEPSI. STARBUCKS. PRADA. CATERPILLAR. GUINNESS. ROLLS-ROYCE. SINGAPORE AIRLINES. APPLE. DISNEY. MERCEDES-BENZ. MARLBORO. TIFFANY. LOUIS VUITTON. B&O. NOKIA. HARLEY-DAVIDSON. NIKE. ABSOLUT. COCA-COLA. GILLETTE. PEPSI. STARBUCKS.PRADA. CATERPILLAR. GUINNESS. ROLLS-ROYCE. SINGAPORE AIRLINES. APPLE. DISNEY. MERCEDESBENZ. MARLBORO. TIFFANY. LOUIS VUITTON. B&O. NOKIA. HARLEY-DAVIDSON. NIKE. ABSOLUT. COCA-COLA. GILLETTE. PEPSI. STARBUCKS. PRADA. CATERPILLAR. GUINNESS. ROLLS-ROYCE. SINGAPORE AIRLINES. APPLE. DISNEY. MERCEDES-BENZ. MARLBORO. TIFFANY. LOUIS VUITTON B&O. NOKIA. HARLEY-DAVIDSON. NIKE. ABSOLUT. COCA-COLA. GILLETTE. PEPSI. STARBUCKS. PRADA. CATERPILLAR. GUINNESS. ROLLS-ROYCE. SINGAPORE AIRLINES. APPLE. DISNEY. MERCEDES -BENZ. MARLBORO. TIFFANY. LOUIS VUITTON. B&O. NOKIA. HARLEY-DAVIDSON. NIKE. ABSOLUT. COCA-COLA. GILLETTE. PEPSI. STARBUCKS. PRADA. CATERPILLAR. GUINNESS. ROLLS-ROYCE. SINGAPORE AIRLINES. APPLE. DISNEY. MERCEDES-BENZ. MARLBORO. TIFFANY. LOUIS VUITTON. B&O. NOKIA. HARLEY-DAVIDSON. NIKE. ABSOLUT. COCA-COLA. GILLETTE. PEPSI. STARBUCKS. PRADA. CATERPILLAR. GUINNESS. ROLLS-ROYCE. SINGAPORE AIRLINES. APPLE. DISNEY. MERCEDES-BENZ. MARLBORO. TIFFANY. LOUIS VUITTON. B&O. NOKIA. HARLEYDAVIDSON. NIKE. ABSOLUT. COCA-COLA. GILLETTE. PEPSI. STARBUCKS. PRADA. CATERPILLAR. GUINNESS. ROLLS-ROYCE. SINGAPORE AIRLINES. APPLE. DISNEY. MERCEDES-BENZ. MARLBORO. TIFFANY. LOUIS VUITTON. B&O. NOKIA. HARLEY-DAVIDSON. NIKE. ABSOLUT. COCA-COLA. GILLETTE. PEPSI. STARBUCKS. PRADA. CATERPILLAR. GUINNESS. ROLLS-ROYCE. SINGAPORE AIRLINES. APPLE. DISNEY. MERCEDES-BENZ. MARLBORO. TIFFANY. LOUIS VUITTON. B&O. NOKIA. HARLEY-DAVIDSON. NIKE. ABSOLUT. COCA-COLA. GILLETTE. PEPSI. STARBUCKS.PRADA. CATERPILLAR. GUINNESS. ROLLS-ROYCE. SINGAPORE AIRLINES. APPLE. DISNEY. MERCEDESBENZ. MARLBORO. TIFFANY. LOUIS VUITTON. B&O. NOKIA. HARLEY-DAVIDSON. NIKE. ABSOLUT. COCA-COLA. GILLETTE. PEPSI. STARBUCKS. PRADA. CATERPILLAR. GUINNESS. ROLLS-ROYCE. SINGAPORE AIRLINES. APPLE. DISNEY. MERCEDES-BENZ. MARLBORO. TIFFANY. LOUIS VUITTON B&O. NOKIA. HARLEY-DAVIDSON. NIKE. ABSOLUT. COCA-COLA. GILLETTE. PEPSI. STARBUCKS. PRADA. CATERPILLAR. GUINNESS. ROLLS-ROYCE. SINGAPORE AIRLINES. APPLE. DISNEY. MERCEDES -BENZ. MARLBORO. TIFFANY. LOUIS VUITTON. B&O. NOKIA. HARLEY-DAVIDSON. SINGAPORE AIRLINES. APPLE. DISNEY. MERCEDES-BENZ. MARLBORO. TIFFANY. LOUIS VUITTON B&O. NOKIA. HARLEY-DAVIDSON. NIKE. ABSOLUT. COCA-COLA. GILLETTE. PEPSI. STARBUCKS.


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BRANDS MAKING THE MOST NOISE

12

Stop, listen… do you hear that? That’s the sound of great sensory marketing. When approaching this subject I decided to investigate which brands are currently getting involved in sensory marketing and branding and how they’re using it in order to establish some possible strategic outcomes for other brands later on. Figure 2 - shown on the following page - illustrates the 20 brands with the highest ‘sensory leverage’ according to research conducted by Martin Lindstrom (see Appendix 1 for full chart with percentages). These brands excel by engaging senses across the board, which can lead to higher profit as there is “a correlation between the number of senses a brand appeals to and the price. Multi-sensory brands can carry higher prices than similar brands with fewer sensory features.”(2010, p72) Each brand within the Top 20 is written out in a different font size, the bigger the font size, the bigger the sensory leverage.


MARLBORO MERCEDES-BENZ

LOUIS VUITTON

TIFFANY

ABSOLUT

PRADA

ROLLS-ROYCE

GILETTE STARBUCKS

NOKIA


MERCEDES-BENZ

GUNNESS

DISNEY CATERPILLAR

BANG&OLUFSEN COCA-COLA

APPLE

NIKE

PEPSI

HARLEY DAVIDSON

SINGAPORE AIRLINES

Figure 2 - The 20 Brands with the Highest Sensory Leverage, Own Image, 2013.


Figure 3 - Singapore Airlines Sensory Collage, 2013.

15

“Singapore Airlines is the pinnacle of sensory branding and offers a full scale assault on our brains�

(Cowen, T. 2010)


CASE STUDY OF THE MOST SENSORY BRAND

As Singapore Airlines was ranked as the brand with the highest sensory leverage – 96.3% - I decided to compile a case study of how they’re appealing to each sense and how it has lead them to become the most highly rated airline. The brand is constantly generating high revenue and has experienced growth over the past few years with BBC Business News stating “the firm posted a total net profit of $128.6m (£80.9m) for the quarter, up from $72.1m a year earlier” on the 13th November 2013. These results are largely due to their engaging and highly memorable sensory brand strategy. HEAR. All announcements made on the aircraft are scripted by the advertising agency working with the airline, which combined with the stewardesses’ training on how to address customers links to create a consistent tone of voice. Oriental background music is also played to relax passengers and remind them of the brand heritage. SEE . Every detail of Singapore Airlines’ aesthetics has been arduously planned. Elements are carefully coordinated to create a visually consistent and recognisable brand, with the luxury interiors colour schemes matching the stewardesses’ uniforms and even their makeup. According to Martin Lindstrom “their makeup had to follow an exacting Pantone manual designed by the airline’s marketing department”. The stewardesses - or ‘Singapore Girls’ as they are infamously known - are selected carefully to be an exact look, weight and shape in order to comply with the brand image. TOUCH. Singapore airlines provides luxury seating and even full sized beds made up with the highest quality linen and upholstery to ensure that the passengers are comfortable. These soft materials and accommodation engage the passengers touch receptors and instantly associate the brand with indulgence. TASTE . The airline offers Michelin star quality food and a large menu providing a variety of food as well as authentic oriental dishes. The high quality ingredients and exotic tastes again reflect the brand’s heritage while reminding the passengers that they provide only the best experience. SMELL . The airline has a scent specifically designed for them entitled ‘Stefan Floridian Waters’. It is worn as perfume by the staff, applied to hot towels and diffused throughout the cabins of their fleets. This consistency of scent across all areas of the brand has created a globally recognised smell that is automatically associated with their airline.


HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH.


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2.0


SOUND INTRODUCTION

20

Bertil Hulten talks of the importance of a sensorial strategy when creating a brand experience as it strongly contributes to atmosphere and theme (2013). This importance continues through to the delivery aspect and the overall impression generated by a brand. Though of course music and sound are more easily and obviously included in a store environment strategy it is wise to consider it in delivery packaging in a slightly different way. For example, sound can be created by simple elements such as the material used for the parcel and inner packaging producing a satisfying tearing or ripping noise. When asked if they do in fact find this noise appealing and pleasing, 94% of participants in my primary research survey replied ‘yes’. This links to the quote shown left by Jihyun Song (2011), with the sound influencing the mood of the consumer in a positive way a brand can provide the consumer with an equally positive experience.


WHAT I DID - PRIMARY

21

“Ultimately, music encourages engagement. It doesn’t sit still. Beats, words and sounds arouse energy, emotions and sometimes controversy” (Lusensky, J. 2011, p.21) In ‘Sounds Like Branding’ (from which the above quote was sourced) Jakob Lusensky talks of a need for a focus on the ‘4 E’s’ – Emotion, Engagement, Experience and Exclusivity - rather than the more commonly observed ‘4 P’s’ in most usual marketing practices (2011). This is particularly applicable in this research as sensory elements aim to create emotion and engage with the consumer while presenting a unique experience. For primary research in to the effects of sound, I observed the behaviour of consumers in a Burton store when faced with different songs that I selected on the in-store dukebox. I then recorded their movements and took notes of any actions, responses and expressions on a hand-drawn diagram of the store (see Appendix 3 for originals).


WHY I DID IT

22

“In connection to individual differences in musical preferences, it is therefore important for companies to investigate what type of music their customers prefer.� (Areni and Kim, 1993) Burton’s choice to have a duke box struck me as interesting because most brands carefully select music or sounds that best represent their brand and create the desired atmosphere or emotion. Being provided with the opportunity to choose any genre of music allowed me to play with the moods of the consumers and ultimately affect their choice of whether to purchase. I decided to investigate sound in a store environment to highlight the importance of selecting music or sounds that evoke the correct emotion in the consumer to encourage them to complete purchases, purchase again and generally have a purely positive view of the brand.


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SONG ONE - PHARRELL & ROBIN THICKE - BLURRED LINES

Figure 4 - Sound Result Infographic 1, Own Image, 2013.


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SONG TWO - JASON MRAZ - I’M YOURS

Figure 5 - Sound Result Infographic 2, Own Image, 2013.


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SONG THREE - AC/DC - BACK IN BLACK Figure 6 - Sound Result Infographic 3, Own Image, 2013.


WHAT THE RESULTS SHOW

26

Donald Cunningham (2010- a) stated, “music can be a deciding factor in a consumer’s purchase decision”. This statement is now supported further by my research experiment (results illustrated in Figures 4-6). Consumers that I observed during their experience in Burton were definitely affected by the music, with one consumer – the female - putting back items she was holding before leaving the store completely. The cause of this seemed to be my final choice of song from the heavy rock genre. The first two songs I selected - one acoustic and gentle and the other a happy pop song – generated visual pleasure that the consumers expressed on their faces and through their movements. The pop song actually drew the female consumer in to the store from outside. This demonstrates the power that sound has in pulling in consumers, maintaining their custom and providing them with a positive experience. These findings have confirmed the need for music and sounds that are appropriate to the brand’s target audience or for those that are not overpowering and likely to be unappealing in the eyes of the mass market. “(consumers) have a brand experience whether you planned it or not. That experience determines how long they stay in-store, how they feel about the time they spend there, and how much they value your brand.” (Carter, N . 2013)


HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH.


CH. AR. TE. EE. LL. CH. AR. TE. EE. LL. CH. AR. TE. EE. LL. CH. AR. TE. EE. LL. CH. AR. TE. EE. LL. CH. AR. TE. EE. LL. CH. AR. TE. EE. LL. CH. AR. TE. EE. LL. CH. AR. TE. EE. LL. CH. AR. TE. EE. LL. CH. AR. TE. EE. LL. CH. AR. TE. CH. CH.

3.0


A

M O N

G T H E

D I F F ER E

N T S E N S O R Y

S Y S T E MS V I SU AL I NFO RM A T IO NPRI MARI LYI N F LUE N C E SH O W W E A N A L Y S E T H I N G S A R O

U

N

D

S O N G, J 2

U

0 1 0

S


SIGHT INTRODUCTION

30

According to research, sight is “the most common sense in perceiving goods or services” (Hulten, B. 2010). This said, the power of aesthetics alone are diminishing due to consumers being bombarded with thousands of images daily, increasing the need for visuals to be combined with other senses. Hulten also states that the eyes “do 70 or 80 percent of the buying” (Hulten, B. 2010). Though in my area of study the purchase will have already happened, it is equally important during the first impressions consumers form when receiving a product. When asked whether a more exciting and engaging parcel would encourage them to buy again, 75% of the respondents in my survey replied ‘yes’. This demonstrates the potential power of an aesthetically pleasing delivery on repeat purchases and encouraging the customers in to the ‘loyalty loop’ section of the consumer decision journey. 90% of respondents also replied ‘yes’ when asked if they take notice of the packaging when they receive a delivery, showing that this is something that needs to be addressed and considered more seriously by the vast majority of brands. This point is further supported by the following quote taken from Elin Eriksson: “visual stimuli includes logos, names, packages, product design etc. and are regarded as a critical part that should be included in any strategy that concerns branding.” (Eriksson, E. 2011: online). Eriksson shares the belief that the packaging design is an important component in creating a consistent brand experience across all platforms. This section of research will investigate the visual impact of existing brands’ delivery packaging on consumers through a visual study alongside my written survey.


WHAT I DID - PRIMARY

31

“Attractive packaging induces areas in the brain associated with memory and reward. Unattractive packages change activities in areas associated with uncertainty, disgust and risk.” (Stoll et. Al 2008) In order to investigate whether current brands’ packaging appeals to consumers I produced a simple poster (shown in the Appendix 4) that displayed six different packages that are currently sent out by a selection of brands. Underneath these images I then asked participants to tick next to the number associated with which package appealed to them most on a purely visual basis. I also included a ‘none’ option if anyone did not find any of the packages particularly visually engaging. I decided to place these posters on the wall next to the mirrors in male and female toilets, both in the Bonnington Building and The Victoria Centre. As a hypothesis I would predict more responses from females and a prominence in preference for either none of the boxes or for the more homemade elements demonstrated by the OhComely care parcel.


WHY I DID IT

32

I chose to use this particular methodology for this sense because it seems highly appropriate to involve visual elements of research when investigating sight. The bright green colour of the poster background is intended to catch the eye of potential participants, as it is an experiment that involves free will and must therefore draw them in. The chosen placement of the posters next to the mirror was intended to catch people in a state where they are already actively looking or focusing, meaning they are only having to adjust their line of vision slightly to see the poster. I chose to place the posters in both male and female areas in order to explore whether either sex is more partial to the visual delivery element or shows more appreciation toward it. This may then later allow me to tailor strategic outcome to a brand whose target audience is primarily the more responsive sex, whichever that may turn out to be.


= 2 men

= 2 women


Figure 7 - Visual Preference Result Infographic, Own Image, 2013.


Figure 8 - Visual Preference Podium Infographic, Own Image, 2013.


WHAT THE RESULTS SHOW

36

As expressed in the infographics (Figures 7 and 8) Zara’s delivery packaging was ranked highest as most attractive followed by OhComely. The third highest response was ‘none’, meaning the majority of packages frequently sent out by the brands included in this study aren’t seen as attractive. This highlights the need for more brands to allocate further attention to the packages they are sending out to consumers to represent their brand. Zara’s design is simple, clean and effective – reflecting their store layout, logo and general imagery. Its popularity suggests consumers like an aesthetically modest package that is true to the brand it signifies. The high ranking of Oh Comely’s November Care Package example shows consumers are also partial to a package that presents a personal touch to make them feel cared for and individual. Respondants to my survey also responded that they are looking for “prettier packaging” , “more of a design on the outside” and “something more visually exciting”. These results will be carried through to strategic outcomes to create ideas that are appropriate for the brand they stand for while providing the consumer with a unique experience.


HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH.


CH. AR. TE. EE. LL. CH. AR. TE. EE. LL. CH. AR. TE. EE. LL. CH. AR. TE. EE. LL. CH. AR. TE. EE. LL. CH. AR. TE. EE. LL. CH. AR. TE. EE. LL. CH. AR. TE. EE. LL. CH. AR. TE. EE. LL. CH. AR. TE. EE. LL. CH. AR. TE. EE. LL. CH. AR. TE. CH. CH.

4.0


Eriksson, E. 2011


TOUCH INTRODUCTION

40

“Only a small 19% of consumers we surveyed worldwide believe that the appearance of an item of clothing is more important that how it feels” (Lindstrom. 2010) This surprising fact highlights the importance of a positive impact on the sense of touch for most consumers during a shopping experience. When receiving a delivery this frequently neglected sense can also play a vital role in our first impressions of a parcel when initially picking it up and is therefore worthy of further study. As shopping online prohibits us from feeling the product, the outer packaging of a delivery is the first contact we have with the brand. According to a CEO of a large fashion chain – who prefers to remain unnamed in The European Business Review (2010 ) : “To be able to touch the garment is very important for individuals in stores in the fashion business. In this respect, I believe the physical stores have their main competitive weapon – if you compare them with e-commerce. “See it, feel it, try it, buy it”. Touch is very important.” This quote emphasizes the need to carry some element of touch through to product delivery in order to create a complete and consistent experience for the consumers, particularly when buying online.


WHAT I DID - PRIMARY

41

In a slow lap around one large unisex clothing store – lap lasting 10 minutes - I aimed to capture how often shoppers felt the clothes while passing them and whether this then affected their decision of whether to purchase.* I chose to take these photos in House of Fraser due to its large consumer age range, variety of brands and the inclusion of both sexes. The ability to view whether male and females behave differently in the same store environment will potentially later allow me to apply my strategic outcomes to a brand preferred by a certain age range or sex if one proves to be more affected by sensory elements. *Concerning the ethics of this experiment, no permission forms were required due to the fact that the images only contain hands or the back of a person’s head- features that make them unidentifiable.


WHY I DID IT

42

The purpose of this research is to further highlight the importance of touch and how it is almost a subconscious action when first generating a perception of an item. As previously stated, shopping online eliminates the option of feeling the clothes before purchasing, so this also aims to highlight the need to add an element of touch to a package in order to provide the consumer with that first texture after buying. I chose to use observational research in this section rather than an experiment with knowing candidates in order to catch consumers acting in a natural way in the store environment.


Figure 9 - Collage of Own Photographs the ‘Feel Me’ Collection, 2013.


NUMBER OF PEOPLE CAUGHT FEELING

TWENTY

FOUR

PRODUCTS PICKED UP AFTER TOUCHING

Figure 10 - The Effect of Touch - Own Image, 2013.


WHAT THE RESULTS SHOW

46

In ‘Why We Buy: The Science of Shopping’ Paco Underhill states “the purest example of human shopping I know of can be seen by watching a child go through life touching absolutely everything” (2009). This method of obtaining information about an object through the sense of touch was evident in this ethnographic research. When reviewing the photos it came to my attention that the vast majority caught touching the clothes were female. During my lap of the store only two men were seen touching the clothing, while observing I noticed the other men around the store browsing rather than feeling. As expressed in Figure 10, 20 out of the 24 people observed in my short experiment went on to pick up the items that they previously touched. This demonstrates the impression made through the feel of the product on the consumer and how it can either encourage or discourage them from choosing to purchase. This impact extends to my focus on delivery in the sense that the package will be the first texture the consumer feels having ordered online without having felt the product itself. Therefore the package must generate approval, excitement and contentment through touch on first arrival.


HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH.


UCH. EAR. STE. SEE. ELL. UCH. EAR. STE. SEE. ELL. UCH. EAR. STE. SEE. ELL. UCH. EAR. STE. SEE. ELL. UCH. EAR. STE. SEE. ELL. UCH. EAR. STE. SEE. ELL. UCH. EAR. STE. SEE. ELL. UCH. EAR. STE. SEE. ELL. UCH. EAR. STE. SEE. ELL. UCH. EAR. STE. SEE. ELL. UCH. EAR. STE. SEE. ELL. UCH. EAR. STE. UCH. UCH.

5.0


TASTE INTRODUCTION

50

Donald Cunningham – Marketing and Brand Manager – talks of the difficulty in adding sensory elements specifically for the sense of taste for brands that are not in the food or beverage sectors (2010 - b). This difficulty is illustrated by the lack of taste specific elements in most brands’ sensory marketing and branding practices. Most cater to the sense of smell, sight, touch and sound in-store, online and occasionally through delivery but neglect sound. Royal Mail embarked on a project entitled ‘Sensational Mail’ in 2007. In this project they sent out engraved chocolate bars instead of letters to many customers and as a result saw a dramatic rise in the amount of letters being sent (Lindstrom, M. 2010). This experiment demonstrates the potential power of including a tasteengaging element in a delivery. As this element cannot be provided during the online section of a brand experience, they would be wise to optimize their opportunity to do so when sending out packages.


WHAT I DID - PRIMARY

51

One brand that has incorporated a taste element in their deliveries is online retailer ASOS, who include various sweets or chocolates within the parcel. Though this is a very simple and cheap – if bought in bulk – solution it seems to have a great impact on the recipients’ first impressions of the packages they receive. In order to investigate this decision further I included 2 questions to reference this within my primary research survey. These two questions were; 1. Do elements such as Asos adding sweets to packages increase your enjoyment of receiving it? 2. Would a more exciting and engaging parcel make you more likely to order from a brand again? Alongside these simple questions I also searched #asos on instragram to see whether these elements have an effect on the consumers’ perception of the delivery to the extent that it is worth sharing with their followers.


WHY I DID IT

52

I did not do a physical experiment for this sense in order to maintain a balance of ethnographic research, experiments and data collection from my questionnaire. This method of research answered my questions in a straight, direct way where an experiment was not required. Looking at hashtags on Instagram also allowed me to focus on the social element as discussed in the ‘Social Context’ section (p. 9) earlier in my report introduction. Investigating this area meant I could look in to whether the small details brands such as Asos include actually produce the intended effect. If their methods are successful this demonstrates the need for more online brands to include something as simple as this in order to gain free publicity on important platforms. I sent out the questionnaire to participants of varying ages, professions and of both sexes to gain a more accurate view of peoples’ perceptions as a whole rather than selecting a target age range or gender. Choosing to do this may then present an age range who have been more willing to respond and who may therefore be more appropriate to target later in the strategic outcomes section of my report.


75%

25%

Would more a exciting and engaging parcel make you more likely to order again?

Figure 11 - LoveChart Questionnaire Result Infographic 1, Own Image, 2013.


100%

Do things like Asos adding sweets to packages increase your enjoyment of receiving it?

Figure 12 - LoveChart Questionnaire Result Infographic 2, Own Image, 2013.


SWEET TASTE OF SHARING

55

As visually presented on the final infographics (Figures 11 and 12), the results of the two questions from my survey were conclusive. 100% of participants answered positively to the inclusion of sweets within a package as demonstrated by ASOS. The overwhelming percentage (75%) of participants also agreeing that they would be more likely to purchase again having received an engaging package supports my argument for the need of sensory elements presented throughout. These percentages express that a simple and relatively inexpensive surprise within a delivery can and will ultimately increase the consumers’ positive perception of a brand. Having searched #asos on Instagram (collage of screenshots shown in figure 13) it is evident that this addition also encourages consumers to provide the brand with free publicity and public appreciation on their social media accounts – this was only a small selection of the images posted after one search. I can conclude that more businesses should follow the lead of brands such as ASOS and incur a small cost for a greater return.


Figure 13 - Collage of Screenshoots Sourced from Instagram, 2013.


HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. 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HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH. TASTE. SMELL. HEAR. SEE. TOUCH.


CH. AR. TE. EE. LL. CH. AR. TE. EE. LL. CH. AR. TE. EE. LL. CH. AR. TE. EE. LL. CH. AR. TE. EE. LL. CH. AR. TE. EE. LL. CH. AR. TE. EE. LL. CH. AR. TE. EE. LL. CH. AR. TE. EE. LL. CH. AR. TE. EE. LL. CH. AR. TE. EE. LL. CH. AR. TE. CH. CH. CH.

6.0


“ close

you can

your eyes,

cover your ears,

refrain

from touch

and reject

taste, but smell is an essential element in the air we breathe

It’s the one sense we can’t

turn off.

Lindstrom, M. 2010


SMELL INTRODUCTION

60

“Odour plays a very important role in consumers’ acceptance of a brand.” (Lindstrom, M. 2010, p102) Smell is often an underrated sense in the role it plays in how we form perceptions of people, products and brands. It has the ability to instantly turn us off from something or increase our excitement dramatically. If harnessed correctly, scent can influence the consumer decision journey and improve consumers’ perceptions of a brand. Psychologists Pieter Aarts and Stephen Jellinek studied how feelings and behaviour are subconsciously formed by scent. They referred to this phenomenon as Implicit Odour Memory. Their findings support my hypothesis that fragrance is a decisive factor when a consumer buys, collects or uses a product. Again though this study is aiming at affecting an area where the purchase has already happened, the importance of scent still applies to product collection and first impressions. As it also has such a strong impact on mood, it can also influence happiness and excitement levels that a customer reaches as they first smell and open the delivery. These factors are very likely to support the aim of encouraging consumers to remember and bond with a brand therefore becoming more likely to purchase from them repeatedly.


WHAT I DID - PRIMARY

61

My primary research for this sense was inspired by an experiment undertaken by Charles Gulas in the Journal of Business and Psychology (1995). “Subjects evaluated four pairs of hosiery, differing only in scent. Although researchers did not ask the subjects to smell the hose, 50% of the subjects preferred narcissus scented hose while only 8% of the respondents preferred the unscented hose.” For my personalised take on this experiment I placed four boxes – identical in appearance – on a table in a small room. Two of the four boxes were completely unscented while the remaining two had different elements of scent. Having set the boxes on the table in a random order I then asked my 20 participants - 10 male and 10 female of differing ages - to enter the room individually. The participants were asked to choose which box of the 4 they would rather open if they had the choice – no mention of scent was made while briefing them.


WHY I DID IT

62

I chose this experiment to investigate whether scent has any effect on the desirability of a package in the eyes of the consumer. By spraying one box with scent on the outside and inserting scent inside the other I hope to highlight whether participants are most attracted to one or the other. The preferences displayed will then lead to strategic outcomes according to whether the scent element was most successful on the inside or outside of the package. (The spray-on scent was applied in a different area so the smell did not cover the whole of the test room and influence unscented boxes.) The boxes were specifically identical and plain on the outside in order to eliminate the aesthetic element of deciding between them, allowing the focus to be on the main sense in question.


The Box Selections Made by the 20 Participants Involved Figure 14 - Box Selection Result Infographic, Own Image, 2013.


The Average Time Taken for Female vs Male Participants to Select their Chosen Box Figure 15 - Decision Time Infographic, Own Image, 2013.


WHAT THE RESULTS SHOW

66

In their study of the impact of smells on the likeability of objects, McCauley, Rozin and Wrzesniewski discovered that neutral, pleasant odours associated with an object lead to participants having a more positive view of it (1999). These findings are supported by my experiment, with 75% of participants selecting either of the two scented boxes. Of the two, the box with an exteriour rather than interior odour proved to be most popular, which could suggest a preference for an obvious scent that makes a strong first impression. Interestingly 50% of male participants chose a box featuring no element compared with 100% of women selecting a scented option. Alongside monitoring the choice of box I also recorded the time it took each participant to select the box from when they entered the room. (These results are visually represented in Figure 15, opposite.) Men produced an average time of 15 seconds while women took a much smaller average time of 6 seconds. These two points combined suggest a higher attraction to a lightly scented element in a package in females over males. These results prove that adding a scent to a package can influence the consumer in a positive manner. The female consumers demonstrated an unspoken preference towards a pleasant scent versus something odourless.


INSIDE-OUT. PACKAWARE. MATERIALS. SUSTAINABILITY. NEW PROCESSES. INSIDE-OUT. PACKAWARE. MATERIALS. SUSTAINABILITY. NEW PROCESSES. INSIDE-OUT. PACKAWARE. MATERIALS. SUSTAINABILITY. NEW PROCESSES. INSIDE-OUT. PACKAWARE. MATERIALS. SUSTAINABILITY. NEW PROCESSES. INSIDE-OUT. PACKAWARE. MATERIALS. SUSTAINABILITY. NEW PROCESSES. INSIDE-OUT. PACKAWARE. MATERIALS. SUSTAINABILITY. NEW PROCESSES. INSIDE-OUT. PACKAWARE. MATERIALS. SUSTAINABILITY. NEW PROCESSES. INSIDE-OUT. PACKAWARE. MATERIALS. SUSTAINABILITY. NEW PROCESSES. INSIDE-OUT. PACKAWARE. MATERIALS. SUSTAINABILITY. NEW PROCESSES. INSIDE-OUT. PACKAWARE. MATERIALS. SUSTAINABILITY. NEW PROCESSES. INSIDE-OUT. PACKAWARE. MATERIALS. SUSTAINABILITY. NEW PROCESSES. INSIDE-OUT. PACKAWARE. MATERIALS. SUSTAINABILITY. NEW PROCESSES. INSIDE-OUT. PACKAWARE. MATERIALS. SUSTAINABILITY. NEW PROCESSES. INSIDE-OUT. PACKAWARE. MATERIALS. SUSTAINABILITY. NEW PROCESSES. INSIDE-OUT. PACKAWARE. MATERIALS. SUSTAINABILITY. NEW PROCESSES. INSIDE-OUT. PACKAWARE. MATERIALS. SUSTAINABILITY. NEW PROCESSES. INSIDE-OUT. PACKAWARE. MATERIALS. SUSTAINABILITY. NEW PROCESSES. INSIDE-OUT. PACKAWARE. MATERIALS. SUSTAINABILITY. NEW PROCESSES. INSIDE-OUT. PACKAWARE. MATERIALS. SUSTAINABILITY. NEW PROCESSES. INSIDE-OUT. PACKAWARE. MATERIALS. SUSTAINABILITY. NEW PROCESSES. INSIDE-OUT. PACKAWARE. MATERIALS. SUSTAINABILITY. NEW PROCESSES. INSIDE-OUT. PACKAWARE. MATERIALS. SUSTAINABILITY. NEW PROCESSES. INSIDE-OUT. PACKAWARE. MATERIALS. SUSTAINABILITY. NEW PROCESSES. INSIDE-OUT. PACKAWARE. MATERIALS. SUSTAINABILITY. NEW PROCESSES. INSIDE-OUT. PACKAWARE. MATERIALS. SUSTAINABILITY. NEW PROCESSES. INSIDE-OUT. PACKAWARE. MATERIALS. SUSTAINABILITY. NEW PROCESSES. INSIDE-OUT. PACKAWARE. MATERIALS. SUSTAINABILITY. NEW PROCESSES. INSIDE-OUT. PACKAWARE. MATERIALS. SUSTAINABILITY. NEW PROCESSES. INSIDE-OUT. PACKAWARE. MATERIALS. SUSTAINABILITY. NEW PROCESSES. INSIDE-OUT. PACKAWARE. MATERIALS. SUSTAINABILITY. NEW PROCESSES. INSIDE-OUT. PACKAWARE. MATERIALS. SUSTAINABILITY. NEW PROCESSES. INSIDE-OUT. PACKAWARE. MATERIALS. SUSTAINABILITY. NEW PROCESSES. INSIDE-OUT. PACKAWARE. MATERIALS. SUSTAINABILITY. NEW PROCESSES. INSIDE-OUT. PACKAWARE. MATERIALS. SUSTAINABILITY. NEW PROCESSES. INSIDE-OUT. PACKAWARE. MATERIALS. SUSTAINABILITY. NEW PROCESSES. INSIDE-OUT. PACKAWARE. MATERIALS. SUSTAINABILITY. NEW PROCESSES. INSIDE-OUT. PACKAWARE. MATERIALS. SUSTAINABILITY. NEW PROCESSES. INSIDE-OUT. PACKAWARE. MATERIALS. SUSTAINABILITY. NEW PROCESSES. INSIDE-OUT. PACKAWARE. MATERIALS. SUSTAINABILITY. NEW PROCESSES. INSIDE-OUT. PACKAWARE. MATERIALS. SUSTAINABILITY. NEW PROCESSES. INSIDE-OUT. PACKAWARE. MATERIALS. SUSTAINABILITY. NEW PROCESSES. INSIDE-OUT. PACKAWARE. MATERIALS. SUSTAINABILITY. NEW PROCESSES. INSIDE-OUT. PACKAWARE. MATERIALS. SUSTAINABILITY. NEW PROCESSES. INSIDE-OUT. PACKAWARE. MATERIALS. SUSTAINABILITY. NEW PROCESSES. INSIDE-OUT. PACKAWARE. MATERIALS. SUSTAINABILITY. NEW PROCESSES. INSIDE-OUT. PACKAWARE. MATERIALS. SUSTAINABILITY. NEW PROCESSES. INSIDE-OUT. PACKAWARE. MATERIALS. SUSTAINABILITY. NEW PROCESSES. INSIDE-OUT. PACKAWARE. MATERIALS. SUSTAINABILITY. NEW PROCESSES. INSIDE-OUT. PACKAWARE. MATERIALS. SUSTAINABILITY. NEW PROCESSES. INSIDE-OUT. PACKAWARE. MATERIALS. SUSTAINABILITY. NEW PROCESSES. INSIDE-OUT. PACKAWARE. MATERIALS. SUSTAINABILITY. NEW PROCESSES. INSIDE-OUT. PACKAWARE. MATERIALS. SUSTAINABILITY. NEW PROCESSES. INSIDE-OUT. PACKAWARE. MATERIALS. SUSTAINABILITY. NEW PROCESSES. INSIDE-OUT. PACKAWARE. MATERIALS. SUSTAINABILITY. NEW PROCESSES. INSIDE-OUT. PACKAWARE. MATERIALS. SUSTAINABILITY. NEW PROCESSES. INSIDE-OUT. PACKAWARE. MATERIALS. SUSTAINABILITY. NEW PROCESSES. INSIDE-OUT. PACKAWARE. MATERIALS. SUSTAINABILITY. NEW PROCESSES. INSIDE-OUT. PACKAWARE. MATERIALS. SUSTAINABILITY. NEW PROCESSES. INSIDE-OUT. PACKAWARE. MATERIALS. SUSTAINABILITY. NEW PROCESSES. INSIDE-OUT. PACKAWARE. MATERIALS. SUSTAINABILITY. NEW PROCESSES. INSIDE-OUT. PACKAWARE. MATERIALS. SUSTAINABILITY. NEW PROCESSES. INSIDEOUT. PACKAWARE. MATERIALS. SUSTAINABILITY. NEW PROCESSES. INSIDE-OUT. PACKAWARE. MATERIALS. SUSTAINABILITY. NEW PROCESSES. INSIDE-OUT. PACKAWARE. MATERIALS. SUSTAINABILITY. NEW PROCESSES. INSIDE-OUT. PACKAWARE. MATERIALS. SUSTAINABILITY. NEW PROCESSES. INSIDE-OUT. PACKAWARE. MATERIALS. SUSTAINABILITY. NEW PROCESSES. INSIDEOUT. PACKAWARE. MATERIALS. SUSTAINABILITY. NEW PROCESSES. INSIDE-OUT. PACKAWARE. MATERIALS. SUSTAINABILITY. NEW PROCESSES. INSIDE-OUT. PACKAWARE. MATERIALS. SUSTAINABILITY. NEW PROCESSES. INSIDE-OUT. PACKAWARE. MATERIALS. SUSTAINABILITY. NEW PROCESSES. INSIDE-OUT. PACKAWARE. MATERIALS. SUSTAINABILITY. NEW PROCESSES. INSIDEOUT. PACKAWARE. MATERIALS. SUSTAINABILITY. NEW PROCESSES. INSIDE-OUT. PACKAWARE. INSIDE-OUT. PACKAWARE. MATERIALS. SUSTAINABILITY. NEW PROCESSES. INSIDE-OUT. PACKAWARE. MATERIALS. SUSTAINABILITY. NEW PROCESSES. INSIDE-OUT. PACKAWARE. MATERIALS. SUSTAINABILITY. NEW PROCESSES. INSIDE-OUT. PACKAWARE. MATERIALS. SUSTAINABILITY. NEW PROCESSES. INSIDE-OUT. PACKAWARE. MATERIALS. SUSTAINABILITY. NEW PROCESSES. INSIDE-OUT. PACKAWARE. MATERIALS. SUSTAINABILITY. NEW PROCESSES. INSIDE-OUT. PACKAWARE. MATERIALS. PACKAWARE. MATERIALS. SUSTAINABILITY. NEW PROCESSES. INSIDE-OUT. PACKAWARE. MATERIALS.


UT. LS. NEW UT. LS. NEW UT. LS. NEW UT. LS. NEW UT. LS. NEW UT. LS. NEW UT. LS. NEW UT. LS. NEW UT. LS. NEW UT. LS. NEW UT. LS. NEW UT. LS. NEW UT. LS. NEW UT. LS. NEW UT. LS. NEW DERE. LS. NEW DERE. LS. NEW DERE. UT. LS. NEW UT. LS. LS.

7.0


Henderson, J. 2014


PACKAGING INTRODUCTION

70

According to Lisa McTigue Pierce – Executive Editor of Packaging Digest – the biggest challenge at present is to design packaging that uses less material while performing at the same levels (2013). This is accompanied by the growing usage of sustainable materials which has, in the past, compromised design and possibilities. Mc Tigue Pierce went on to say:

“Balancing material selection with good design and functionality is not easy” In recent years more materials have been developed to produce packaging with which are much less harmful to the environment in both production and usage. One example of this is Pro-Cote® Soy Polmers, a material produced by DuPont Packaging which comprises of 90-100% soybeans. Alongside this more environmentally friendly printing practices are being incorporated by firms such as Reflex who print with benzophenone free ink. These processes and materials will be included in my suggestions. However many of these new ideas are costly and may therefore only be appropriate for a larger brand. “How important is cost in today’s sustainable packaging equation? Uber important.” (Mc Tigue Pierce, L. 2013)


FOOD/DRINK INDUSTRY

Figure 16 -

Collage of Creative Packaging,

Online. 2013.

7

71 CLOTHING/FOOTWEAR INDUSTRIES

“INSIDE OUT”


TREND1 IN PACKAGING

72

When researching current examples of innovative packaging, an emergent trend I discovered was displaying elements of the inner product on the outside. This was particularly present in the food and drink industry from brands such as Smirnoff. This links to my visual research stating that consumers like package aesthetics to reflect the brand it’s from and products they sell. I aim to reflect this trend in some of my own packaging designs for the chosen online clothing brand, Missguided.


FOOD/DRINK INDUSTRY Figure 17 -

Collage of Sustainable Packaging,

Online. 2013.

73 CLOTHING/FOOTWEAR INDUSTRIES

“PACKAWARE”


TREND2 IN PACKAGING

Dr Benjamin Punchard – Global Packaging Insights Director at Mintel – has spoken of modern consumers’ desire to receive something that presents itself as premium even if that isn’t reflected in the price they paid for it (2013). He suggests this is achieved not through ‘bling’ but through appealing to the consumers’ desires and values. One way this is currently being achieved is through sustainable packaging produced using innovative new materials and processes rather than traditional plastics or cardboard. Companies such as Reflex and DuPont and are currently leading the way in the production of such packaging. This has expanded from being somewhat emergent to a dominant trend in today’s industries and must therefore be strongly considered in my strategic outcomes.


HEINEKEN IGNITE - CASE STUDY

75

In April 2013 at Milan Fashion Week, Heineken unveiled the ‘World’s fist interactive bottle’, shown in Figures 18. This – according to the Heineken Ignite Blog – has stemmed from the brand’s “ambition to develop an idea that would create a memorable Heineken experience unlocking the power and possibilities of mobile innovation and technology” (2013). The bottle is equipped with LEDs and motion sensors enabling it to light up with different effects when sipped from or knocked against another bottle. It is also possible to remotely activate it with a light source such as in a club. The redesigned ‘Ignite 2.0’ bottle is expected on shelves at some point in 2014, with new features such as sensitivity to sound, allowing it to light up in time to music as it is synchronised with the rhythm (Melanson, D. 2013). This new sensory technology demonstrates the future possibilities in product packaging and ideas as to how the packaging can react to its surroundings and user in order to create a personalised experience for each consumer.


Figure 18 - Heineken Ignite Bottles, Online. 2013.


STRATEGIC OUTCOMES. SUGGESTIONS. OUTCOMES. SUGGESTIONS. STRATEGIC SUGGESTIONS. STRATEGIC OUTCOMES. STRATEGIC OUTCOMES. SUGGESTIONS. OUTCOMES. SUGGESTIONS. STRATEGIC SUGGESTIONS. STRATEGIC OUTCOMES. STRATEGIC OUTCOMES. SUGGESTIONS. OUTCOMES. SUGGESTIONS. STRATEGIC SUGGESTIONS. STRATEGIC OUTCOMES. STRATEGIC OUTCOMES. SUGGESTIONS. OUTCOMES. SUGGESTIONS. STRATEGIC SUGGESTIONS. STRATEGIC OUTCOMES. STRATEGIC OUTCOMES. SUGGESTIONS. OUTCOMES. SUGGESTIONS. STRATEGIC SUGGESTIONS. STRATEGIC OUTCOMES. STRATEGIC OUTCOMES. SUGGESTIONS. OUTCOMES. SUGGESTIONS. STRATEGIC SUGGESTIONS. STRATEGIC OUTCOMES. STRATEGIC OUTCOMES. SUGGESTIONS. OUTCOMES. SUGGESTIONS. STRATEGIC SUGGESTIONS. STRATEGIC OUTCOMES. STRATEGIC OUTCOMES. SUGGESTIONS. OUTCOMES. SUGGESTIONS. STRATEGIC SUGGESTIONS. STRATEGIC OUTCOMES. STRATEGIC OUTCOMES. SUGGESTIONS. OUTCOMES. SUGGESTIONS. STRATEGIC SUGGESTIONS. STRATEGIC OUTCOMES. STRATEGIC OUTCOMES. SUGGESTIONS. OUTCOMES. SUGGESTIONS. STRATEGIC SUGGESTIONS. STRATEGIC OUTCOMES. STRATEGIC OUTCOMES. SUGGESTIONS. OUTCOMES. SUGGESTIONS. STRATEGIC SUGGESTIONS. STRATEGIC OUTCOMES. STRATEGIC OUTCOMES. SUGGESTIONS. OUTCOMES. SUGGESTIONS. STRATEGIC SUGGESTIONS. STRATEGIC OUTCOMES. STRATEGIC OUTCOMES. SUGGESTIONS. OUTCOMES. SUGGESTIONS. STRATEGIC SUGGESTIONS. STRATEGIC OUTCOMES. STRATEGIC OUTCOMES. SUGGESTIONS. OUTCOMES. SUGGESTIONS. STRATEGIC SUGGESTIONS. STRATEGIC OUTCOMES. STRATEGIC OUTCOMES. SUGGESTIONS. OUTCOMES. SUGGESTIONS. STRATEGIC SUGGESTIONS. STRATEGIC OUTCOMES. STRATEGIC OUTCOMES. SUGGESTIONS. OUTCOMES. SUGGESTIONS. STRATEGIC SUGGESTIONS. STRATEGIC OUTCOMES. STRATEGIC OUTCOMES. SUGGESTIONS. OUTCOMES. SUGGESTIONS. STRATEGIC SUGGESTIONS. STRATEGIC OUTCOMES. STRATEGIC OUTCOMES. SUGGESTIONS. OUTCOMES. SUGGESTIONS. STRATEGIC SUGGESTIONS. STRATEGIC OUTCOMES. STRATEGIC OUTCOMES. SUGGESTIONS. OUTCOMES. SUGGESTIONS. STRATEGIC SUGGESTIONS. STRATEGIC OUTCOMES. STRATEGIC OUTCOMES. SUGGESTIONS. STRATEGIC OUTCOMES. SUGGESTIONS. OUTCOMES. SUGGESTIONS. STRATEGIC SUGGESTIONS. STRATEGIC OUTCOMES.

STRATEGIC OUTCOMES. SUGGESTIONS. STRATEGIC OUTCOMES. SUGGESTIONS. STRATEGIC OUTCOMES. SUGGESTIONS. STRATEGIC OUTCOMES. SUGGESTIONS. STRATEGIC OUTCOMES. SUGGESTIONS. STRATEGIC OUTCOMES. SUGGESTIONS. STRATEGIC OUTCOMES. SUGGESTIONS. STRATEGIC OUTCOMES. SUGGESTIONS. STRATEGIC OUTCOMES. SUGGESTIONS. STRATEGIC OUTCOMES. SUGGESTIONS. STRATEGIC OUTCOMES. SUGGESTIONS. STRATEGIC OUTCOMES. SUGGESTIONS. STRATEGIC OUTCOMES. SUGGESTIONS. STRATEGIC OUTCOMES. SUGGESTIONS. STRATEGIC OUTCOMES. SUGGESTIONS. STRATEGIC OUTCOMES. SUGGESTIONS. STRATEGIC OUTCOMES. SUGGESTIONS. STRATEGIC OUTCOMES. SUGGESTIONS. STRATEGIC OUTCOMES. SUGGESTIONS. STRATEGIC STRATEGIC OUTCOMES. SUGGESTIONS.

OUTCOMES. SUGGESTIONS. STRATEGIC SUGGESTIONS. STRATEGIC OUTCOMES. STRATEGIC OUTCOMES. SUGGESTIONS. OUTCOMES. SUGGESTIONS. STRATEGIC SUGGESTIONS. STRATEGIC OUTCOMES. STRATEGIC OUTCOMES. SUGGESTIONS OUTCOMES. SUGGESTIONS. STRATEGIC SUGGESTIONS. STRATEGIC OUTCOMES. STRATEGIC OUTCOMES. SUGGESTIONS OUTCOMES. SUGGESTIONS. STRATEGIC SUGGESTIONS. STRATEGIC OUTCOMES. STRATEGIC OUTCOMES. SUGGESTIONS OUTCOMES. SUGGESTIONS. STRATEGIC SUGGESTIONS. STRATEGIC OUTCOMES. STRATEGIC OUTCOMES. SUGGESTIONS OUTCOMES. SUGGESTIONS. STRATEGIC SUGGESTIONS. STRATEGIC OUTCOMES. STRATEGIC OUTCOMES. SUGGESTIONS OUTCOMES. SUGGESTIONS. STRATEGIC SUGGESTIONS. STRATEGIC OUTCOMES. STRATEGIC OUTCOMES. SUGGESTIONS OUTCOMES. SUGGESTIONS. STRATEGIC SUGGESTIONS. STRATEGIC OUTCOMES. STRATEGIC OUTCOMES. SUGGESTIONS OUTCOMES. SUGGESTIONS. STRATEGIC SUGGESTIONS. STRATEGIC OUTCOMES. STRATEGIC OUTCOMES. SUGGESTIONS OUTCOMES. SUGGESTIONS. STRATEGIC SUGGESTIONS. STRATEGIC OUTCOMES. STRATEGIC OUTCOMES. SUGGESTIONS OUTCOMES. SUGGESTIONS. STRATEGIC SUGGESTIONS. STRATEGIC OUTCOMES. STRATEGIC OUTCOMES. SUGGESTIONS OUTCOMES. SUGGESTIONS. STRATEGIC SUGGESTIONS. STRATEGIC OUTCOMES. STRATEGIC OUTCOMES. SUGGESTIONS OUTCOMES. SUGGESTIONS. STRATEGIC SUGGESTIONS. STRATEGIC OUTCOMES. STRATEGIC OUTCOMES. SUGGESTIONS OUTCOMES. SUGGESTIONS. STRATEGIC SUGGESTIONS. STRATEGIC OUTCOMES. STRATEGIC OUTCOMES. SUGGESTIONS OUTCOMES. SUGGESTIONS. STRATEGIC SUGGESTIONS. STRATEGIC OUTCOMES. STRATEGIC OUTCOMES. SUGGESTIONS OUTCOMES. SUGGESTIONS. STRATEGIC SUGGESTIONS. STRATEGIC OUTCOMES. STRATEGIC OUTCOMES. SUGGESTIONS OUTCOMES. SUGGESTIONS. STRATEGIC SUGGESTIONS. STRATEGIC OUTCOMES. STRATEGIC OUTCOMES. SUGGESTIONS OUTCOMES. SUGGESTIONS. STRATEGIC SUGGESTIONS. STRATEGIC OUTCOMES. STRATEGIC OUTCOMES. SUGGESTIONS OUTCOMES. SUGGESTIONS. STRATEGIC SUGGESTIONS. STRATEGIC OUTCOMES. STRATEGIC OUTCOMES. SUGGESTIONS OUTCOMES. SUGGESTIONS. STRATEGIC OUTCOMES. SUGGESTIONS. STRATEGIC SUGGESTIONS. STRATEGIC OUTCOMES. STRATEGIC OUTCOMES. SUGGESTIONS


GIC ES. NS. GIC ES. ONS GIC ES. ONS GIC ES. ONS GIC ES. ONS GIC ES. ONS GIC ES. ONS GIC ES. ONS GIC ES. ONS GIC ES. ONS GIC ES. ONS GIC ES. ONS GIC ES. ONS GIC ES. ONS GIC ES. ONS GIC ES. ONS GIC ES. ONS GIC ES. ONS GIC ES. ONS GIC GIC ES. ONS

8.0


HOW TO AFFECT CONSUMERS’ DECISIONS

79

Ultimately this research aims to produce strategic outcome suggestions that affect consumer behaviour, particularly their decision to repeatedly purchase from a brand that provides the level of service they are looking for. According to Michelle Hughes - researcher, communication consultant and lecturer on Fashion Communication – “consumer behaviour is a complex, dynamic, multi-dimensional process, and all marketing decisions are based on assumptions about consumer behaviour” (2012). Hughes goes on to talk about the three key factors that affect consumers’ decisions. These have been targeted throughout my research in order to produce the most effective outcomes that will generate revenue while offering the consumer a memorable experience.

1 – LOYALTY

Brand loyalty is preceded by enjoyment through receiving a completely positive experience when purchasing. This enjoyment then leads to the desire to advocate and bond with the brand. Engaging with consumers on a sensory level aims to achieve loyalty through exceeding expectations while also fending off competitors.

2 – SOCIOLOGY As discussed in the ‘Social Context’ Section (p. 9) social media is becoming a stronger and stronger force in society and in influencing peoples’ decisions. This was further emphasised in my research in to Asos’ use of sweets in packages and the subsequent number of Instagram posts from consumers showing their delight. Providing a delivery worth sharing is a key objective to be addressed in this section.

3 – PSYCHOLOGY It is well documented in various studies that the senses are linked with and stimulate emotions which in turn lead to emotional connections (Hulten, 2009. Graves, 2010. Lindstrom, 2010.). This indicates the opportunity for a brand to form a more emotional bond with consumers through using sensory focused elements throughout their practices. As stated previously I will use my research – both primary and secondary – to generate two different sections of outcomes; one for an SME (Small to Medium Enterprise) and one for a luxury brand. This will allow me to tailor suggestions that are suitable for a brand with a smaller budget or for one with more revenue available to designate to the outcomes.


BRAND SELECTION - SME

80

Due to the fact that throughout my research of each of the senses females have demonstrated more interest and a more obvious preference for the inclusion of sensory elements, I decided to select a brand that caters to this sex. In order to produce something memorable and brand specific I thought it most appropriate to choose a company with a strong and recognisable image and tone of voice. This would allow me to produce suggestions that truly reflect the brand. These points considered, the brand I will use is online clothing retailer Missguided. Missguided were featured in the sight experiment involving the selection of the most visually attractive package chosen by consumers, but received only 1 vote (results chart p33). This demonstrates the opportunity for them to alter this currently unmemorable and unattractive package perception.


81

Figure 19 -

Collage of Missguided Imagery, Online. 2013.


VISUAL TONE OF THE BRAND

Before designing visuals I examined the existing visuals on Missguided’s website and Pinterest to get a sense of the aesthetic tone. I found a combination of a girl power image alongside attitude. This means the use of black and materials such as leather and velvet together with candy shades in lace and fur. COMPOSED COLOUR PALETTE - GIRL GLOWER


Figure 20 - Missguided Velvet Clothing Examples, Online. 2014.

83


LUXE

Figure 21 - Velvet Packaging Design, Own Image, 2014.

BOX

Referring back to what was said by Mintel Packaging expert David Punchard (p.74), modern consumers prefer packaging that presents itself as premium even if the product inside doesn’t reflect that in price (2013). The velvet design shown in Figure 21 does exactly that by simply printing a velvet graphic on to the packaging itself. Missguided could have a small number of packaging designs per season to reflect trends, showing they are able to ‘stay on top of the latest trends’ as stated on their website (Missguided, 2013). This simple approach reflects my visual research results in that consumers preferred packaging that truly represented the brand and its image.


PVC

85

The PVC parcel shown in Figure 23 is another suggestion of a packaging print to reflect the current trend for PVC on the Missguided website (examples shown in Figure 22). Having designs that also portray the brand’s girly yet edgy image – as discussed in the brand visual tone on p.81 – produces variation and possible excitement at receiving the different designs. This in-turn may increase the likelihood of consumers sharing the packages through social media or word of mouth. Both of these packaging designs would be produced in Pro-Cote Soy Polymers or similar as it is described on the product website as “ideal for products without compromising package performance or aesthetics” (2013). The use of this material would allow the package to be visually pleasing while environmentally friendly.

Figure 22 - Missguided PVC Clothing Examples, Online. 2014.

PACKET


Figure 23 -

PVC Packaging Design, Own Image, 2014.


SOUND INCLUSION

87

As proven in my sound experiment, a brand must make sure to include elements of sound and music that are fitting to both their image and their target audience. However, the inclusion of a musical element within a Missguided package in unfeasible due to the cost element as some products are purchased for a lesser value than this addition would cost to include. It would be possible for the brand to include a sound module within the package – once opened to avoid constant playing while being shipped and couriered – if the consumer had purchased items worth over a certain value so as not to generate a loss. Sound modules are available in vast quantities at low prices that could be appropriate for an SME. The minimal effort of placing these in certain packages would satisfy the need for “a surprise” element inside the packages as my survey respondants expressed a desire for on several counts (all comments available in Appendix 5).


TOUCH INCLUSION

88

As well as Pro-Cote Soy Polmers that were previously discussed for the main packaging material, soy fabric is also available. According to Luanne Bradley - West coast Editor at EcoSalon – “soy fabric is friendly and soft and similar to cashmere or silk in texture. It is found in luxury items” (2010). This material could be used as a package lining or product wrap to provide an interesting texture that is also sustainable and recyclable. When asked how deliveries could be made more exciting, one respondant in my survey replied “Perhaps nicer material or lining, doesn’t need to be expensive just more attractive than a lot of current ones.” This soft and pleasant touch on opening the package could create a more exciting and enjoyable experience, targeting the ‘enjoy, advocate and bond’ areas of the consumer decision journey. The consumer will then have a positive view of the brand before even viewing the product itself, while again portraying a luxury feel making the consumer feel good.


SWEET Figure 24 - Sweet Savings at the Cash and Carry , Own Images, 2014.

DEAL

90

As proven in my research, a small addition of sweets or chocolate within a package can make a huge difference to the consumer and the brand. Figure 13 (p.56) demonstrated the number of posts on Instagram concerning their packages having added a Malteser chocolate bar. This in mind, I investigated pricing for bulk-buying different sweets at Booker Cash and Carry. The prices and quantities of sweets available are shown in my photographs in figure 24. A very small budget set aside for these treats is likely to increase brand perception in a positive manner through customer satisfaction. Making the consumer feel appreciated and special will encourage repeat orders and produce an altogether considerate brand image.


SMELL INCLUSION

91

As discovered in my research experiment concerning the sense of smell, many consumers are more drawn to packages emitting some form of pleasant scent than none at all (for results see page 63/Figure 14). I also discovered that it only took a matter of a few seconds for the majority of participants – particularly the females – to make their decision in selecting a scented box. This demonstrates the potential power of scent in affecting consumers’ decisions. For a Small to Medium Enterprise like Missguided, scent can be easily included on a low budget. According to Jessica Henderson of Labelsco scented labels are available that allow the consumer to experience the scent without opening the product, making that all important first impression. The Labelsco website states “This allows the best of both worlds: the consumer can continue to use the scent of the product in their decision making process; and the brand owner can reduce waste and improve product security.” (2013). Elements such as the brand logo or package destination sticker could be suitably infused with a pleasant scent.


Figure 25 - The Complete Package, Own Image, 2014.

92

These simple yet effective sensory packaging solutions for an SME combine to create a subtle synergy and enhanced experience for the consumer, based on research generated throughout this research document. Missguided’s strong brand image will only be heightened by these additions, carrying through a multi-sensory brand manifestation to the consumers rather than remaining a purely visual online retailer. In order to stand out from competitors such as Asos who are already leaning toward similar elements Missguided must establish itself as able to keep up with trends across the board including in packaging. The necessity for eco-friendly materials is satisfied in the designs demonstrated, and as shown in Figure 24, the box also reduces waste through opening on a perforated seam down the middle. The brand logo will be scented, with more of an aroma emitted once it is ripped in opening. Overall the package provides the user with a memorable experience that is ultimately likely to be shared with other potential consumers.


HIGH BUDGET INNOVATION

93

In her presentation at Digital Shoreditch last year, Lynne Murray – Brand Director at Holition - said on the subject of Creative Experiments that experimentation is key in the process of generating amazing sensory experiences for consumers (2013). This experimentation in a large enterprise was demonstrated this month in the January 2014 issue of Wired magazine in a print advert for the Motorola Moto X Smartphone. The advert – shown in Figure 26 – allows the user to change the colour of the smartphone by touching the corresponding button underneath. The ad is made by using polycarbonate paper to cover the LED light pipes that are concealed underneath (Chapman, M. 2013). This innovation of the ‘first interactive print advert’ engages sight and touch while demonstrating Motorola’s ability to incorporate technology in to all aspects of their brand image. Through investigating the possibilities in sensory packaging for a large enterprise I can develop ideas with more elaborate outcomes and innovative concepts.


BRAND SELECTION

94

- LUXURY

In a recent article, Emma Akbareian – Fashion and Style Writer for The Independent – discussed the most prosperous online fashion brands. Amoungst others the LN-CC (Late Night Chameleon Café) was listed as a strong up-and-coming luxury brand that fuses retail with the feel of an art installation (2013). Having visited the store in London, the brand seemed like an appropriate choice for my luxury recommendations due to their innovative ethos, experimentation and involvement of the senses. The LN-CC clientele are an ideal target consumer group for memorable experiences and the appreciation of the delivery packaging outcomes I will generate. At current, the brand’s packaging is simple and low-key with very little interesting consumer engagement. This design does not reflect the sensory elements experienced within the store environment, meaning online consumers will not receive a true physical manifestation of the brand.

Figure 26 – Motorola Moto X Print Ad, Wired Magazine, 2014.

I aim to create a consistent brand image while maintaining an air of mystery and intrigue that encourages consumers to not only purchase but to visit the store itself. This will allow LN-CC to preserve the exclusivity of their appointment only store through providing a ‘sneak-peak’ of what they have to offer through their packaging.


Figure 27 - LN-CC Visual Collage, Online, 2014.


VISUAL TONE OF THE BRAND

96

LN-CC presents a varied visual tone with some store sections and imagery showcasing a cold, grey palette contrasting to other areas of vivid, warm and psychedelic colour. Throughout the varying colour schemes runs a strong geometric feel with clean lines and a play on perspective.


97


GEOMETRIC HOLOGRAPHIC

In order to ensure an air of intrigue around the brand, my suggested LN-CC packaging would remain a high quality black exterior; this way only the consumer may see what’s truly inside. Once opened, the box’ inner lid would display a 3D holographic geometric print to reflect the inner atmosphere of the store. 3D lenses – sustainably disposable and comprised of Pro-Cote Soy Polymers – would also be supplied to provide the consumer with a visually stimulating experience and full view of the graphic depth. Visual mock-up design shown in Figure 28. 3D holographic printing “records your 3D image into the film surface to create an illuminated 3D digital picture” (Zebra Imaging, 2014). A concealed colour-changing LED would be embedded underneath the holographic print, displaying the varying hues of the LN-CC colour palettes illustrated in my visual collage in Figure 27. These effects combined would bear likeness to the store without giving away the full experience. Though these aesthetics do not reflect previously discussed and researched packaging trends (such as on p71) they are more appropriate for a brand that prides itself on being ahead of emergent trends.


SOUND INCLUSION

99

Music and sound are an integral part of the LN-CC experience. An exclusive ‘store-mix’ has been created to form the store’s background music, providing sound you can’t hear anywhere else. With regular live music sessions in the LN-CC clubspace and a record label owned and run by the brand it is in the brand DNA. Conor Donlon – one of the store creators – says “all of the artists who we approach are given total freedom to create a sonic interpretation of the space that we have created” (2013). In order to share live store session artists and the creative expressions produced by the label, a smartphone code would be positioned within the holographic design. When scanned by the package receiver’s phone the code would reveal a mix of exclusive clips of music to be featured in up-coming store sessions. After a short preview the phone would then read a message such as: ‘Like what you hear? Call us.’ This elusive message will then encourage the consumer to book an appointment to visit the store if they want to hear or learn more.


TOUCH INCLUSION

100

As my primary research indicated, a large percentage of people touch clothing to establish their first impression of it. With a view to encouraging the importance of this first touch combined with a luxury and mysterious feel I would propose a small hole in the inner box, cut to allow the consumer but a small section of clothing to touch. The receiver can then open the box fully using the hole having established this first exclusive preview impression. Kate White of The Annexe – Reviewers of Creative Spaces – said “delving further into the sensory experience we also explored the key textures of LN-CC’s collections” (2013). This highlights the production of careful combinations of textures in store through using the clothes themselves rather than other generated elements. This factor will be represented by the clothing in the package providing the key texture to be appreciated.


TASTE INCLUSION

101

In a recent lecture, Steven Wallis – Director of Tastebillion, Sensory Futurists – talked of the importance of sensory elements in creating a full experience, particularly in packaging (2014). LN-CC do not currently have any elements of taste within their store or embedded in their brand ethos. In this instance a collaboration with the Tastebillion brand could work in both of their favours in terms of promotion, creative outcomes and new innovative ideas from their combined artistic flare. If the brand was to produce some taste samples instore, these could then be reflected by a 3D print sample of the food included within the package. A a recent article (published January 8th 2014) Megan Garber of The Atlantic talks of the recently developed ChefJet and ChefJet Pro 3D Printers aimed particularly at innovators in the food industry that can print of almost any food and match their usual taste (2014). New technologies and unique feel the consumers’ as sweets within

such as this would enhance the exclusive to the LN-CC brand. This also reflects desire to find something surprising such a package but on a higher, luxury level.


SMELL INCLUSION

102

The LN-CC store has a distinctive scent created exclusively for LN-CC by Kappa Incense. This recognisable scent is immediately associated with the brand by anyone that has entered the concept store. In order to give online consumers a preview of this scent the package would contain a tab that once broken (through the box being opened) would release a small amount of the signature scent so as to welcome the consumer to the LN-CC world. Kappa Insense said of their aromas “there are no artificially created scents and everything used is organic� (2013), these ethical values echo the need for ecofriendly packaging elements established within my research. This scent would then accompany the 3D holographic print on the inner lid and the music generated from the smartphone QR code to form an all round sensory introduction to the brand. The synergy of these elite sensory elements forms a strong while secretive image fitting to the LN-CC ethos and environment.


SENSORY SUMMARY

103

Through carrying out primary research and evaluating secondary sources I feel I have generated sustainable and practical yet innovative and exciting suggestions for my SME and luxury brands. In both cases contact with industry experts and the brands themselves was attempted to acquire their thoughts and suggestions but no reply was received (see Appendix 8 for efforts). Though this lack of contact prevented me from being able to carry out any proposed alterations or additions I believe they are brand specific, appropriate and would be fitting for their target consumers. My aim of targeting the ‘enjoy, advocate and bond’ sections of the consumer decision journey has been fulfilled by creating more memorable packaging experiences and showing a brand’s ability to exceed expectations in a sustainable manner. With the emergence of the new technologies and processes discussed within this report – such as scented inks, 3D printers, 3D holographic prints and more – the importance of sensory elements in a brand’s strategy will only increase, at least to those who have brand sense.

“Sensory is the way forward. It’s not enough anymore to just have a marketing plan or a communications idea or a design brief. You really need to now connect the dots between all of them and new sensory elements if you want to succeed.” Steven Wallis, 2014


LIST OF REFERENCES

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LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS

108

Figure 1 - The Consumer Decision Journey, Own Image, 2013. Figure 2 - The 20 Brands with the Highest Sensory Leverage, Own Image, 2013. Figure 3 - Singapore Airlines Sensory Collage, 2013. Figure 4 - Sound Result Infographic 1, Own Image, 2013. Figure 5 - Sound Result Infographic 2, Own Image, 2013. Figure 6 - Sound Result Infographic 3, Own Image, 2013. Figure 7 - Visual Preference Result Infographic, Own Image, 2013. Figure 8 - Visual Preference Podium Infographic, Own Image, 2013. Figure 9 - Collage of Own Photographs the ‘Feel Me’ Collection, 2013. Figure 10 - The Effect of Touch - Own Image, 2013. Figure 11 - LoveChart Questionnaire Result Infographic 1, Own Image, 2013. Figure 12 - LoveChart Questionnaire Result Infographic 2, Own Image, 2013. Figure 13 - Collage of Screenshoots Sourced from Instagram, online. 2013. Figure 14 - Box Selection Result Infographic, Own Image, 2013. Figure 15 - Decision Time Infographic, Own Image, 2013. Figure 16 - Collage of Creative Packaging, Online. 2013. Sourced from: http://chirkup.me/a/the-17-most-creative-packaging.html?utm_ source=Facebook&utm_medium=InterestingThings&utm_campaign=IT318#. UqCzKWRdVW0 Figure 17 - Collage of Sustainable Packaging, Online. 2013. Sourced from: www.greenpackaging365.com Figure 18 - Heineken Ignite Bottles, Online. 2013. Sourced from : http:// heinekenignite.tumblr.com/ Figure 19 - Collage of Missguided Imagery, Online. 2013. Sourced from : http://www.pinterest.com/missguidedcouk/ Figure 20 - Missguided Velvet Clothing Examples, Online. 2014. Sourced from: http://www.missguided.co.uk/clothing/category/velvet Figure 21 - Velvet Packaging Design, Own Image, 2014. Figure 22 - Missguided PVC Clothing Examples, Online. 2014. Sourced from: http://www.missguided.co.uk/clothing/category/pvc Figure 23 - PVC Packaging Design, Own Image, 2014. Figure 24 - Sweet Savings at the Cash and Carry, Own Images, 2014. Figure 25 – The Full Package, Own Image. 2014. Figure 26 – Motorola Moto X Print Ad, Wired Magazine, 2014. Sourced from: http://static2.businessinsider.com/image/52b44cc8eab8eaf81cf848cf/googlehas-created-a-print-ad-for-the-moto-x-that-changes-colors-the-brief.jpg Figure 27 - LN-CC Visual Collage, Online, 2014. Sourced from: http://www. ln-cc.com/ Figure 28 – Geometric Holographic Packaging Design, Own Image, 2014.


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109

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HEARD. SEEN. TOUCHED. TASTED. SMELT. HEARD. SEEN. TOUCHED. TASTED. SMELT. HEARD. SEEN. TOUCHED. TASTED. SMELT. HEARD. SEEN. TOUCHED. TASTED. SMELT. HEARD. SEEN. TOUCHED. TASTED. SMELT. HEARD. SEEN. TOUCHED. TASTED. SMELT. HEARD. SEEN. TOUCHED. TASTED. SMELT. HEARD. SEEN. TOUCHED. TASTED. SMELT. HEARD. SEEN. TOUCHED. TASTED. SMELT. HEARD. SEEN. TOUCHED. TASTED. SMELT. HEARD. SEEN. TOUCHED. TASTED. SMELT. HEARD. SEEN. TOUCHED. TASTED. SMELT. HEARD. SEEN. TOUCHED. TASTED. SMELT. HEARD. SEEN. TOUCHED. TASTED. SMELT. HEARD. SEEN. TOUCHED. TASTED. SMELT. HEARD. SEEN. TOUCHED. TASTED. SMELT. HEARD. SEEN. TOUCHED. TASTED. SMELT. HEARD. SEEN. TOUCHED. TASTED. SMELT. HEARD. SEEN. TOUCHED. TASTED. SMELT. HEARD. SEEN. TOUCHED. TASTED. SMELT. HEARD. SEEN. TOUCHED. TASTED. SMELT. HEARD. SEEN. TOUCHED. TASTED. SMELT. HEARD. SEEN. TOUCHED. TASTED. SMELT. HEARD. SEEN. TOUCHED. TASTED. SMELT. HEARD. SEEN. TOUCHED. TASTED. SMELT. HEARD. SEEN. TOUCHED. TASTED. SMELT. HEARD. SEEN. TOUCHED. TASTED. SMELT. 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