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Sports&Outdoors Beste shooter in the bunch By DEAN SIEMON Thaddeus Beste, 15, from Matlock, was hit by the hunting bug when his father, Mike, first started showing him how to shoot with rifles. “It kind of brings you back to early civilizations and brings you back to when things were simple,” he said. “When you go outside and you are the only person within a hundred miles and you just hear nature and you see nature, I think it’s really cool.” His mother, Barb, said that it was not expected that hunting would be a hobby between the father and son. “Mike, when he was growing up, his dad hunted but he never did,” Barb said. “Then when we had kids, we didn’t think that gene was passed on.” Barb said that she grew up in a household that had guns and a family member who was shot and killed by his own gun. “I didn’t really want him [Thaddeus] to embrace this,” Barb said. “I would rather have him do it with knowledge and be taught correctly than to have him turn 18 and go out and shoot.” Thaddues was allowed to go into hunting with his father but not until a few requirements set by his mother were met. “The stipulation that I had made was that he had to go through hunter’s [edu-

Journal photo by Dean Siemon

Matlock’s Thaddeus Beste aims at a target set up behind his family’s home. Beste recently won the Pacific International Trapshooting Association’s Washington State High All-Around Junior championship. cation],” Barb said. Eventually, Thaddues said he wanted to find a club to improve his shooting skills. He and his father learned about the Mason County 4-H shooting club – the Hair-Triggers. “When I learned about the 4-H Hair-Triggers, I was really interested and my dad was interested in that too,” Thaddeus said. The club took part in trap shooting, a competitive form of shooting at clay pigeons

(clay targets). During their first practice, Thaddeus hit one of his first targets, which he was told is normal. “I hit the third one and that inspired me that I can do better,” Thaddeus said. After a while, the club’s organizer, Joe Rothrock, approached the family about the 2007 Grand Pacific competition sanctioned by the Pacific International Trapshooting Association (PITA). “Joe came to the house

MMK athletics stay intact; seeking for new A.D. internally By DEAN SIEMON Mary M. Knight High School in Matlock is keeping the athletic programs in place for the upcoming 2010-11 school year. But a few changes due to budget restraints have led to an internal search for a new athletic director. Seth Daneker, MMK principal and superintendant, said that budget restrictions forced the school district to release Joclin Julmist at the end of last school year. “He was one of the lowest in seniority,” Daneker said. Daneker said that he is sure they will hire the school’s next athletic director within their current staff. One reason being that it would be much harder for there to be communication with an athletic director not on the office or teaching staff. “Communication is a big piece of the job,” Daneker said. While the budget restraints cut the MMK staff, it did not reduce the number of athletic programs offered. The Owls will still compete in football and volleyball in the fall, boys and girls basketball in the winter and track and field in the spring. “With cuts in staff, we try really hard not to eliminate athletic programs,” Daneker said. Football was one of the sports at the end of the last school year that was expected to be on the chopping block. But Daneker said that support for football through the booster club, sponsors and the district, in addition to the community’s interest, helped keep the program for this fall.

“We have to keep kids involved and active or they’ll find ways to amuse themselves that we may not approve of.” “Football is also one of those sports that brings in gate money,” Daneker said. “People in this area like football.” Daneker said that in a small town such as Matlock, it is important for there to be athletic programs offered to the students. “Given that we are a small area, there is not a lot of recreational opportunities,” Daneker said. “We don’t have a movie theater, a mall or any places for kids to go.” While it is scheuled to be Daneker’s second year at Mary M. Knight, he said he has grown up in the Matlock area and understands how important the athletic programs and other recreational activities (i.e. 4-H Club) are in the area. “We have to keep kids involved and active or they’ll find ways to amuse themselves that we may not approve of,” Daneker said.

one night and said, ‘I hate to do this to you mom,’” Barb said. It was agreed upon that Thaddeus would go with the rest of the club to the competition, earning a patch for getting a perfect 25 out of 25 at a house – four houses (stations) in each round. “There are only two current members of the club that have shot 25, me and a kid named Kyle Willey,” Thaddeus said. As the father and son

continued to pursue the interest in trap shooting, Barb and Thaddeus’ sister Amanda, 18, continued to show support at competitions. “They would go out and go shooting and mom and I would be on the sidelines for support,” Amanda said. On Nov. 26, 2008, Mike died, leaving the family to continue on. “After Mike passed away, the support for Thad was still there,” Barb said. “But I’m not his dad, and it made

it difficult for Thad in many ways because I don’t go shoot.” Amanda became supportive of her brother’s interest and became involved with the 4-H club and took part in competitions. She was told in her first practice what her brother was told – she would hit one of her first three shots. “Sure enough I hit the second one,” Amanda said. See Shoot on page C-4

New NM baseball coach wants to build on success By DEAN SIEMON Bill Geyer, who has been involved with the North Mason School District for several years, has been named the new head baseball coach for North Mason High School. Geyer replaces Jay Hultberg who retired in May after 28 seasons and a trip to the WIAA 2A State Baseball Tournament in May. Geyer has coached for Hawkins Middle School for the last three years – Hawkins is within the North Mason School District. “I have worked with a lot of these kids,” Geyer said. “I’ve been Jay’s [Hultberg] assistant off and on for several years basically.” While Geyer said he will have big shoes to fill after the Hultberg regime, he said it is a once in a lifetime opportunity. “I don’t look at it as pressure,” Geyer said. “I look at it as a fun challenge.” The Bulldogs finished 11-13 last season, winning six out of the last eight. A large number of core players are returning, including leading pitcher and batter Kasey Bielec for his senior season “[Hultberg] didn’t leave me with my cupboards bare,” Geyer said. “The [junior varsity] had a decent team and in the middle school, we won the league championship last year. We’ll be all right.” Geyer said he has some changes he would like to make, including the community’s attitude torward baseball. His plan is for his coaching staff and Bulldog baseball players to go to local little leagues and “pee-wee” teams and help develop baseball in Belfair. “We’re going to do clinics, we’re going to umpire, we want kids to see us and I want kids to want to be Bulldog baseball players again,” Geyer said. “I want the Little League and the middle school to run my signs, my plays, so when they get up here, they’ll have all that.”

Cyan Magenta Yellow Black

Journal photo by Dean Siemon

Bill Geyer, the new North Mason High School baseball head coach.

While Geyer said there will be a Geyer has been in the area since challenge in getting the players to 1979. During his time in the North jump on the ship and be a part of Mason School District, Geyer has his plan, he said the coaching staff also been an announcer for Bulldog he has inherited will have the same athletics (football and basketball) challenge. and a substitute bus-driver. “We’re going to get the assistant But he looks forward to making coaches to do that same because the baseball head coaching position they’ve been under the other coach a top priority and working yearforever,” Geyer said. round. For the focus of the team, Geyer Geyer has been working during said he wants a “speed” based team the summer to maintain the basethat will put pressure on opposing ball field, as well as building new defenses, no matter who is batting dugouts. in the Bulldogs’ lineup. “We start working on the field “We’re going to run, we’re going and they’ll [the team] have pride to hit and run, we’re going to steal because this field is going to be nice and my four or five hitter might be again,” Geyer said. asked to bunt,” Geyer said. Geyer’s goals for helping youth “I want that defense to make players prepare for high school and mistakes because they’re hurrying helping players play baseball after and they’re worried.” high school. Geyer said the Bulldogs and But as for the Bulldogs in comyounger baseball players at petition, Geyer wants to continue Hawkins Middle School like speed. building on where Hultberg left off. “Some of the kids I won’t have “We’re going to be able to play to give steal signs to,” Geyer said. right now and instill the winning “They’ll have a green light to steal attitude and that will carry over to when they want to.” the long term.” Geyer said. Thursday, August 5, 2010 - Shelton-Mason County Journal - Page C-1


Rock hounding in Washington Of the many things that can include the outdoors in Washington, one I thought I would never partake in was the hobby of rock hounding or searching for the gemstone called “thunder eggs.� This is just like elk scouting, hiking, camping and treasure hunting all wrapped up into one package. Last Friday, it was decided that my family of six was to accompany my good friend Frank and most of his entire family, including his mom, his brother and family, his sister and family and friend Kippy, on a camping trip to the area of Naches for the aforementioned rock hounding. This trip found all of us caravanning one by one over Chinook Pass to what looked like a National Lampoons gathering in the woods. Upon a fashionably late arrival, my family found that camp was already set up and us “blue tarp campers� were ready for the weekend. The only tent we had to set up was my son’s little pup tent that he just had to sleep in by himself. Camped along the Little Naches River, my first thought was fishing. But after hearing about our upcoming treasure hunt, I got excited and went to bed early so we could get up at the crack of dawn and be ready. Jumping into bed, my thoughts wandered about searching and digging in the hills for the geodes (thunder eggs) we were after when a faint rumbling moved through our camp. I focused on the sound, again a long, slow rumbling. This time it was closer and I realized with a flash in the pitchblack sky that a thunderhead (thunder cloud) was moving our way. Wifey Laura turned to me and said, “I wonder how long until the kids are bangin’ on the camper door?� I thought about it for a second and

replied “As soon as the rain starts.� We both joked about it as the rain started to pour. Climbing back out of bed and slipping on my shoes I opened the camper door to check on the status of the tents. Happily I saw that the rain fly had held up and the tents were dry. By KELLY Snoring could be RIORDAN heard so I went back to bed and fell asleep with the sound of gentle rain and soft thunder. Morning came and I popped up, ready to hunt for rocks. Our camp was buzzing with a mixture of sleepy kids chomping on Pop Tarts and parents sipping grain-filled coffee (because you know those camp coffee sets just don’t retain any of the coffee grains). After only three hours we were set. All 18 of us headed up the gravel road five miles to the trailhead. Parents, kids and gear all spewed out of the vehicles in no real order and after another 30 minutes, we were walking the quarter-mile trail single file toward our final destination. Taking up the rear, my mind again wandered about finding my first “thunder egg� and how many we might find. Reaching the top of the hill (mountain), I peered down the ridge to see what looked like a pack of six foot gophers had made homes on the hillside. There were literally a dozen huge holes with some having depths of nine feet. Now let me just say that “friend� Frank had told me there was a little

Mason COUNTY OUTDOORS

Journal photo by Dean Siemon

Thaddeus Beste, right, stands with his mother, Barb, center, and his sister, Amanda.

digging to be done, but he never said we would be burrowing nine feet into a mountain. It really reminded me of the movie “Holes.� Before I could start giving directions to my kids, my son dove feet first into the nearest hole and was immediately covered head to toe in dirt and mud. It was ok. That is what we were there to do so I followed suit and started digging. We looked like an old west mining crew as we dug and talked for the first 15 minutes. Then without notice I stopped, put my shovel down and stood in silence. Laura asked me what was wrong. “I just realized that I have no idea what I am doing or what I am looking for,� I said. Sandy, Frank’s mom, started laughing, as did most everyone else. They too realized I was just digging a hole for no apparent reason. After the last snicker and headshake, directions and instructions were given and again off to diggin’ I went. Shouts started, “I found one,� proclaimed Frank’s brother. “Me too,� said his sister. Soon everyone was finding thunder eggs – everyone but me. Analyzing situations is something I often do in these circumstances, so I took a minute and went over everyone else’s holes and found out that digging straight down (which is what I was doing) was not the same course of action as the rest of the clan. Peeling side layers was the key and soon I hit a nice little honey hole and found my first two right in a row. Everyone was having a good time, as was I. Most of the day was spent on that hillside digging holes and tossing dirt clumps back and forth. It truly was a great family affair for all 18 of us.

Shoot Continued from page C-1

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“Dropped everything else that day, but got the second one. After that, I think my first contest was the Washington State shoot and that was last year.� What was discussed between Barb and her husband before his death was eventually purchasing a new shotgun for the continually improving Thaddeus. “The firing pin wasn’t hitting the shells as hard, so I was having misfires,� Thaddeus said. Having started with a Stoeger Model 200 shotgun, Thaddeus was able to get a new Browning Cynergy valued over $5,000. “I gave him a price cap,� Barb said. “But then the price cap kept going up.� The new shotgun helped Thaddeus as he continued in competitions, with the goal to earn trophies. For a lot of the PITA events, belt buckles were the prizes. Most recently, Thaddeus won three championships symbolized in belt buckles at the PITA Washington State Championship July 7-11, at the Evergreen Sportsmen’s Club in Littlerock – Handicap, Junior Doubles and High All-Around Junior. His mother reflected to a time in 2007 when Thaddeus and his father were at an event, walking up to the belt buckles that were displayed for all to see – telling his father that he wanted to win one someday. “He’s got three and I’m

sure his dad would have been very, very proud,� Barb said. It was a surprise for a young gun to step up and outshine over all shooters in the Handicap division with a score of 95. “So when some 15-yearold kid comes out and shoots better than everyone [164 entries], it was like holy cow,� Amanda said. With the junior and the handicap championships, Thaddeus earned $600 in prize money. He said he is in the competition for bragging rights and trophies and money is not a factor for him. “As soon as you start shooting for money, it becomes a job,� Thaddeus said. “It puts more pressure on you, because now every time you see a bird [clay pigeon], you see a dollar.� As far as keeping Mike Beste’s memory alive, the 4-H Club started a shooting tournament that was originally about to be named the Mike Beste Memorial Tournament, but was named the Best of the Best. “He was the silent supporter of the club,� Barb said. “He didn’t want fan fare or notoriety.� “We just knew it was going to be a memorial shoot for dad,� Amanda said. While members of the community have shown support, the Beste family said they have changed in the last year. “As far as making us stronger, I don’t know if it’s made us stronger,� Barb said. “It has made us more cohesive.�

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Journal

Sports&Outdoors NMFOOTBALL

Third time not the charm for the Bulldogs By DEAN SIEMON A record of 1-8 can be deceiving in the game of football. North Mason High School learned that the hard way in a 2A state play-in game on Tuesday night at Interlake High School, losing 55-34. The Bulldogs (4-6) have been in this situation before, losing to the Saints (2-8) in a play-in game to end their season. In 2009, the Bulldogs lost 47-23 and in 2008 they fell to the Saints 35-20. North Mason’s defense had a tough time stopping the Saints’ junior running back Jordan Todd, who had 206 yards on 22 carries and six touchdowns. Todd’s first carry in the game was a 65-yard touchdown run on Interlake’s first offensive drive in the first quarter. Todd would score on runs of 32, 11, 18, 75, 16 and 7 yards. “He’s got great quickness and great speed at the corner of attack,” said Jeff Bevers, North Mason head coach. The Bulldogs allowed 28 points before scoring their first touchdown on a three-yard run from sophomore Tommy Renne. Renne also had a receiving touchdown in the fourth quarter to bring the score to 49-28. Bevers said Renne has been a successful offensive weapon all season. “That’s all the same stuff I see out of him every day,” Bevers said. Interlake took a 42-7 lead into halftime. Bev-

A little me time In the busy schedule between family and work, I find that rarely am I out in the woods on my own. On Saturday the 23 (if only by a friend canceling on a trip), I found myself By KELLY standing at a RIORDAN locked gate, in the early morning pitch black, with miles of open space and a deer tag to fill. Packing my bag and readying my gear, I had until noon to hunt and then had to be back at my place for my son’s 10th birthday party. Locking the door of my truck, the rain began to pour and in the light of my flashlight, shiny raindrops filled the light. I was glad I had worn my good rain gear as the hike to my preferred spot was twomiles away and it was downpouring. Upon arrival of what I call “The Big Hill”, I knew the last three-quarters mile was all uphill. Arriving in good time, the weather had held off daylight a little longer than I had anticipated, so I had to sit under a tree for a few minutes and wait for shooting light. Early sunrise started over the hill and it was time to begin the ascent to my honey hole at the top. Ten minutes in and the weather again threw me a curveball. Fog started to roll in above me and I knew the clearcut I wanted to glass over with my binoculars might be out of the question. Sure enough as I entered the clearcut, visibility was only 60 to 70 yards, Dang. This was normally a huge area almost a half-mile long and several hundred yards wide. Pulling up my binoculars only gave me another few yards to see. Deciding that I didn’t have time to wait out the fog, I made the choice to hike slowly and hunt two miles to another area where my brotherin-law, Rodgar, was hunting with my nephew and one of his friends, Dillon. This area was a little lower in elevation and I thought I might be able to help out my nephew and his friend. Creeping through the clearcut, I had made it about 300 yards when a covey of quail flushed at my feet and almost gave me a heart attack! After a few choice words for the fleeing fowl, I resumed my deer hunt. Fog socked in the area and nothing was moving (except quail) and I just moseyed along at a snail pace. There was good deer sign via droppings and even a buck rub on a small alder tree when I came up a small rise in the clearcut. Peering through the fog I could see a deer rump lying down behind a small Douglas fir tree on the edge of a “small” cliff. Up came the binoculars, but I couldn’t tell if the deer was a buck or a doe. What I could tell was the deer was large! Thinking about my next move, I remembered that I had bought a grunt tube from Verle’s a few years back. Digging into my pocket, I located the call and decided to give it a try, “RRRRRR…RRRRR…RR…R”. It kind of made me snicker at the sound. Apparently the deer didn’t think it was too funny and jumped up, spun around, stomped and snorted at me! Thinking about it now, I am sure there was a priceless look of shock on my face. There was no doubt, it was a buck

Mason COUNTY OUTDOORS

Journal photos by Dean Siemon

Above, Interlake High School’s Jordan Todd escapes North Mason senior Kameron Crosswhite’s tackle en route to one of six touchdowns in a state tournament play-in game. Right, North Mason’s Tevin Williams attempts to shake off a defender after making a catch. ers told the team heading into the contest that the Saints would be the toughest 1-8 team they faced. “I think we took them a little too lightly and that’s why we didn’t come out fast,” said Tevin Williams, North Mason senior. After trailing 49-7 with 9:41 left in the third quarter, the Bulldogs went to the passing attack, which totaled 301 yards. Junior quarterback

Charlie Becker threw 11 out of 22 for 146 yards with two touchdowns and three interceptions. Becker concluded his first full season as a varsity starting quarterback, which Bevers said has included a lot of growth he hopes to see continue next year. “He’s become the leader of this football team and I expect that to last the rest of the way his senior year,” Bevers said. Senior Kasey Bielec threw two completions

SHSFOOTBALL

in halfback trick pass plays, both were touchdowns to Williams for 87 yards (third quarter) and 68 yards (fourth quarter). “We’ve run them [halfback passes] a couple of times earlier in the year and they’ve worked for us,” Bevers said. The senior wide receiver for North Mason had eight catches for 261 yards. “They were playing up See Bulldogs on page C-6

MMKFOOTBALL

Oly beats Shelton in OT thriller By DEAN SIEMON The Shelton High School football Highclimbers looked like they were about to have their best game of the last three years, let alone this season, at home on Friday against 4A Narrows League rival Olympia High School. But the Highclimbers allowed 28 unanswered points for Olympia to win in overtime, 41-35. Shelton (2-7, 1-6 Narrows League) held a 35-14 lead after senior running back Jacob Barrett rushed for an eight-yard touchdown. Barrett rushed for 178 yards with three touchdowns, two in the first half. Senior Joey Wuolle ran for 87 yards on 15 carries and one touchdown. Matt Hinkle, Shelton head coach, said the one-two punch of Wuolle, who is six-foot-four and 284 pounds, and the much lighter and faster Barrett was a factor in Shelton’s success on the ground. “Wuolle running inside led to the defense hesitating,” Hinkle said. “When the opportunity arose, we went outside to Jacob [Barrett].” The Shelton offense rushed for 351 yards in the game on 62 rushing plays in the game. Hinkle said he gives credit for the offensive numbers to the offensive line. “With those rushing totals, the offensive line must have been doing well,” Hinkle said. The Bears (8-1, 7-0 Narrows League) had one costly fumble in the first quarter to keep Shelton ahead by two scores, in addition to unsportsmanlike conduct penalities to continue Highclimber drives. “Oly had some turnovers and some big penalites,” Hinkle said. “But I was just pleased with the way the kids

Journal photo by Dean Siemon

Mary M. Knight High School’s Jeremy Pais prevents a pass on defense during the Owls’ home game against Lake Quinault High School on Saturday. Journal photo by Rick Kennedy

Shelton High School’s Jacob Barrett gets a few blocks on a sweep play during a home game against Olympia High School on Friday.

played.” Hinkle said he was not shocked to look up at the scoreboard with nine minutes left, which read Shelton 35, Olympia 13. “In the last three games, we’ve played well,” Hinkle said. “Was I shocked? No, because these kids are battlers.” But Olympia started strong in the third quarter with rushing touchdowns by juniors Spenser Killman (three yards) and Trevor Houser (one yard). The Bears trailed 35-27 late in the fourth quarter until senior Griffin Boudia rushed for a four-yard touchSee Overtime on page C-6

Owls remain winless at home By DEAN SIEMON Mary M. Knight High School football came back home for a 1B Southwest League game on Saturday but fell to the Lake Quinault High School Elks, 54-14. The Owls (1-7, 1-5 Southwest) totaled 236 yards of offense. Freshman Austin Thompson started at quarterback, throwing one completion for 22 yards. The young Owl threw an interception in the third quarter to Lake Quinault (4-4, 3-3 Southwest) sophomore Chris Erdman, who returned 20 yards for a touchdown. Sophomore Kyle Willey, the previous starting quar-

terback, was inactive due to injury. “[Thompson is] not very well seasoned but we gave him a chance,” said Eric Smith, Mary M. Knight head coach. Sophomore Juan Jimenez led the Owls’ rushing attack, which totaled 214 yards. Jimenez scored on a four-yard touchdown run to cap a first quarter drive to bring the score to 8-6. Jimenez came off the field in the second quarter due to a hand injury and was limited to playing on defense in the second half. “Everytime he’s on the field, he leads the team,” See Owlson page C-5 See Outdoors on page C-5 Thursday, Nov. 4, 2010 - Shelton-Mason County Journal - Page C-1

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Bulldogs

“They come to work every day and are a lot of fun to coach,” Bevers said. Williams, one of the seniors leaving, said playing for North Mason was the best experience of his life. “I wouldn’t want to play football anywhere else if I had the choice,” Williams said.

Continued from page C-1 tight on me so I just used my speed,” Williams said. Williams also caught a 14-yard touchdown from Becker with 8:02 left in the third quarter on North Mason’s first scoring drive of the half. The Bulldogs will graduate 11 seniors from the team next year, a class that Bevers said was a hard working group of athletes.

(Evans kick) Third quarter I - Todd 16-yard run (Evans kick) NM - Charlie Becker 14-yard pass to Tevin WIlliams (Bielec kick) NM - Bielec 87-yard pass to Williams (Bielec kick) Fourth quarter NM - Becker 32-yard pass to Renne (Bielec kcik) I - Todd 7-yard run (Evans kick failed) NM - Bielec 68-yard pass to Williams (Bielec run failed)

First quarter I - Jordan Todd 65-yard run (Danny Evans kick) I - Todd 32-yard run (Evans kick) Second quarter I - Todd 11-yard run (Evans kick) I - Todd 18-yard run (Evans kick) NM - Tommy Renne 3-yard run (Kasey Bielec kick) I - Todd 75-yard run (Evans kick) I - Matt Malos 21-yard pass to Scotty Gehlhausen

November 2 at Interlake High School In Bellevue N. Mason 0 7 14 13 - 34 Interlake 14 28 7 6 - 55

www.lesschwab.com

Journal photo by Rick Kennedy

Shelton High School senior quarterback Ryan Adams looks for an opening against Olympia High School’s defense during Friday’s game at Shelton.

Overtime Continued from page C-1

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down with 2:09 left. Boudia ran for the twopoint conversion to tie the game at 35-35. In overtime, the Highclimbers had the first possession starting from the Olympia 25-yard line (college overtime rules applied). Wuolle, who had a touchdown earlier in the game, fumbled to turn the ball over. In Olympia’s overtime drive, Killman scored the game-winning touchdown from five yards out. “Olympia is a good team and I’m proud of the way the kids battled,” Hinkle said. Olympia had 19 first downs in the game and converted on a few third-andlong situations. The Bears were four out of nine in third down conversions, but Hinkle said the Highclimbers should have done better, primarily in the second half. “[Olympia] capitalized on some stuff and we missed an opportunity,” Hinkle said. “When we put this team in third and long, we need to do a better job getting our guys off the field.” The Highclimbers are scheduled for their final game of the season at 7 p.m., Thursday, Nov. 4, at Yelm High School. Yelm is 2-7 with a 1-4 record in the 3A Narrows League. The Tornadoes lost their last game at Wilson High School 21-14. Hinkle said playing a 3A school is not going to make a difference in the expectations entering the season finale. “They put 11 kids out there just like everybody else,” Hinkle said. “The kids will play well, I’m sure.” After having played the top three teams in the 4A Narrows League (Gig Harbor High School, Bellarm-

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Sports&Outdoors SHSFOOTBALL

Whitetails aplenty

NMFOOTBALL

Climbers swept away by Tides By DEAN SIEMON Shelton High School football took another tough 4A Narrows League loss on Friday at home against Gig Harbor High School, 40-18. The Highclimbers (2-6, 1-5 Narrows League) were strong on offense, including an opening drive that led to Gig Harbor’s (6-2, 5-1 Narrows League) three-yard line on fourth and goal late in the first quarter. Matt Hinkle, Shelton head coach, said while the Highclimbers have a good field goal kicker in junor Joe Strand, he wanted to make a “statement.” “But at the beginning of the game, you want to make a philosophical statement as far as that situation,” Hinkle said. Shelton turned the ball over on downs and the Tides put together a long offensive drive which concluded with Gig Harbor’s Jesse Cauble scoring on a 47-yard run at the start of the second quarter. Cauble ran for 195 yards for Gig Harbor on 31 carries. He had a second touchdown in the third quarter. “A couple of those were big runs,” Hinkle said. Gig Harbor’s Kyle Pape threw for 196 yards with one touchdown to Austin SeferianJenkins for 17 yards in the second quarter. Seferian-Jenkins, a University of Washington football recruit, was considered a big, athletic threat for the Highclmber defense, Hinkle said. The Tides’ star receiver had three catches for 42 yards. Hinkle said Seferian-Jenkins had trouble finding separation from the Shelton defense. “He was not the factor in the game,” Hinkle said. “The kids responded well to that challenge.” The Highclimbers struggled on third down defense, allowing the Tides to convert eight third downs out of 12 attempts. Gig Harbor successfully converted a number of third downs with more than eight yards to go, a concern Hinkle said they will work on. “On third and long, that should be an opportunity to get off the field,” Hinkle said. See Climbers on page C-8

Mason COUNTY OUTDOORS

“Our offense has been a good defense for us and it didn’t happen tonight.” Senior Kasey Bielec stepped in at quarterback as junior

Last week I chronicled the arrival By KELLY of my daughRIORDAN ters and I for a deerhunting trip to Latah, Washington. It was a great bonding experience as sometimes fathers and teenage daughters don’t always see eye to eye. Leaving off with my sleeping issues, I had finally fallen asleep and the next thing I heard was the pesky alarm on my cell phone… Jumping up and doing the mad dash to dismember my cell phone and that horrid wake up tone, I successfully uncovered everyone and woke them up. With grumbles and sleeping bags being pulled back over their heads I barked, “Get up. It’s time. You girls get your gear on and I will get the rest of the stuff ready.” Like hibernating bears, my daughters awoke to a very cool morning and pitch-black skies. Already our guide Garry was up and making preparations for the hunt. After a few minutes, sleepy-eyed teenagers in hunter orange shirts came walking up to the house. Then a car pulled in and three people got out with what looked like 1980’s-sized camcorders. With a raised eyebrow I asked Garry what was going on. He calmly informed us that our hunts were to be filmed for an outdoor production company and our hunt may be aired on the Outdoor Channel! Turns out that Alwine Outdoors was filming for a youth hunt and Garry’s place was where it was happening. Groggy girls, another youth hunter and his family were also there and everyone grouped up on the front porch for the morning meeting. Garry instructed us on the rules of the hunt, the animals that we were hunting and shot placements for when the time came. The clock struck 6:15 a.m.

See Bulldogs on page C-8

See Outdoors on page C-7

Journal photo by Dean Siemon

North Mason High School quarterback Kasey Bielec attempts to run from the pursuit of Kingston High School’s defense during the Bulldogs’ homecoming game on Friday.

Bulldogs lose important homecoming game By DEAN SIEMON The North Mason High School football team had to win Friday’s game at home against Kingston High School to clinch third place in the 2A Olympic League standings for a better playoff berth. But the Buccaneers (5-3, 4-2 Olympic League) were able to establish the run game for the 29-8 win over the Bulldogs (44, 3-3 Olympic League), led by Lou Hecker, who rushed for 280 yards on 28 carries and two touchdowns. Kingston rushed for a total of 362 yards on the night. Jeff Bevers, North Mason head coach, said the team knew the Buccaneers were going to line up and attempt to establish the run. “I don’t want to say our kids weren’t prepared for that, but I don’t think they were quite ready for what they were going to bring,” Bevers said. The Bulldogs struggled on the offensive side of the ball, compiling 114 yards of total offense in the game. Bevers said it was not their typical performance and could not find their rhythm, averaging close to 70 plays per game. The North Mason rushing attack, which usually averages

Journal photo by Dean Siemon

Kingston High School’s Lou Heckert runs past North Mason High School defenders during the Bulldogs’ homecoming game on Friday. close to 300 yards per game, only totaled 99 yards. Sophomore Tommy Renne, who has been the workhorse for the Bulldogs, only had 12 yards on six carries. “We’re based on a tempo and that’s how we play,” Bevers said.

Editor’s Note: This is the second part of a twopart column. The first part ran in last week’s Journal Sports and Outdoors.

Showing the heart and soul of Shelton By DEAN SIEMON No one at Shelton High School can question the heart of junior Clara Robbins. “Every time, Clara will leave it on the field, whether it’s on the basketball court or the soccer field or track,” said Scott Ranney, an assistant coach for SHS girls soccer and girls basketball. It is only this year that Robbins can give 100 percent without her heart failing. On January 5, Robbins had heart surgery at the Seattle Children’s Hospital. She was diagnosed the month before with superventricular tachycardia. “It’s where you have an extra piece of muscle in your heart and it makes an electrical current and makes it beat twice as fast,” Robbins said. Robbins said while playing sports, she would attempt to push herself as hard as she can but would

go into an episode where the rapid heart beat could make the heart less effective in pumping while decreasing cardiac output and blood pressure. “I could feel my heart going into an episode and when I did I would feel fatigue and light-headed and I would have to stop,” Robbins said. “It was painful and scary and it would end in tears.” The student-athelte explained that she would always have the thought of going into an episode and would hold back at times during games. “I felt so horrible for my team and I hated it,” Robbins said. Robbins said that she was seeing doctors about her heart condition for a few years as her condition was gradually becoming worse. In December 2009, doctors discovered her condition after using a meter to measure her heart rate during an episode.

“They said it was a simple procedure and could get it fixed easy,” Robbins said. Robbins said she was taken to the hospital at 6 a.m. and was given anesthesia for a procedure that included six incisions and the removal of a loose muscle found in one of the accessory pathways in the heart. “I just had to lie still,” Robbins said. “That was the hardest thing of the whole procedure.” After three hours in recovery, she went home that night and was told by doctors that she could return to sports in one week, just in time for the second half of the girls basketball season. “I didn’t expect her to come back in the basketball season,” Ranney said. Robbins said she returned to practice and playing basketball only four days after the surgery. She was asked if doctors told her whether returning before a week was a good idea. “They might have men-

tioned it once or twice,” she said. “But I felt fine by how my body told me if I was ready.” Since the surgery, coaches at SHS have said that Robbins has become an inspiration to teammates, being awarded “Most Inspirational” by the girls soccer team the last two seasons at the team’s awards banquet. Robbins also won the same award in girls basketball last season. “The thing that has always impressed me about Clara, whether it’s basketball or soccer or track, she always gives 100 percent,” Ranney said. “Even without the heart story, she’s still an amazing story.” Ranney said there is a saying used by coaches in all sports: “You play the game like you practice.” “Well Clara is someone who epitomizes that,” he said. “She practices like she plays the game.”

Journal photo by Dean Siemon

Shelton High School junior Clara Robbins, shown in a soccer game earlier this fall, has given as much as possible in athletics after heart surgery in January.

See Heart on page C-7 Thursday, Oct. 28, 2010 - Shelton-Mason County Journal - Page C-1

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Outdoors Continued from page C-1 and it was time to head out. In our group was Garry, Ashley, Taylor, myself, camera man David and Shannon (Ms. Alwine). Walking directly from the house we made a 15-minute hike to a series of rolling, grass-covered hills, I could barely handle my excitement. Just as good shooting light was upon us Garry threw his hand up and whispered, “There is a big doe about 300-yards away!” My eyes popped open and I should have just stopped right there and pinched myself. The sneak was on. We all crouched and walked up a brush-covered draw, all the while David the camera guy filmed the anticipation. After only an additional five minutes of walking, Garry again put his hand up in the “halt” motion. Rising up his binoculars I could tell he was examining the deer. Just above us was a slight rise in the hill. Garry motioned for Ashley to go with him. In nearly a belly crawl our guide, my daughter and the camera guy made their way into position for a potential

shot. Minutes seemed like hours and then Garry gave Ashley the green light to fire. Like a pro, she took her time and aimed the .30-06 rifle on the rest of Garry’s shooting sticks (a shooting rest). We all waited for the gun to go off for the 146-yard shot. Then, CLICK! Nothing, the rifle had not been loaded. After a five second chuckle Garry handed her a shell. Gun loaded, Ashley was again given the green light to shoot. Finding myself nearly shaking, the .30-06 fired and my eyes were fixated through my binoculars on the Whitetail deer. The shot was absolutely perfect, a quick, clean and ethical harvest. High-fives almost commenced when out of nowhere a second deer emerged from the draw below us. Garry’s professional expertise quickly determined the second deer was also a good deer and Taylor was on focus. Ashley stepped aside and another round was loaded for her sister to have an opportunity. Again the waiting game that probably took one minute seemed like an eternity. Garry talked to Taylor about the shot

placement and then told her she could shoot when she was ready. Looking like a mirror image of shooting professionalism, Taylor solidified her aim and touched a round off. My heart pounded as her shot, like her sister’s, flew true. We all sat in silence and pondered the events that had just taken place, then fist-pumps, high-fives and hugs commenced. Even the camera guy was almost cheering and I was more proud at that moment than I have been in a long time. The recovery was easy, as I had watched both deer go down. Both Taylor and Ashley stepped up and took part in the sometimes-gross job of field dressing, smiling all the way through. After all was said and done, my two daughters had accomplished what many deer hunters have not – two whopper deer in one morning. More imporJournal photo by Kelly Riordan tantly they had learned Ashley Matheson, left, and Taylor Riordan, along with guide Garry Greenwalt to deer hunt while being and two members of the Alwine Outdoors film crew, far right, pose with two safe and ethical. A special thanks to whitetail deer harvested on opening weekend. Garry Greenwalt and his family, Wild Country Guide Service and the outdoor production company Alwine Outdoors, “Wish we had a thousand of all first-class hunters and her.” people. Robbins said she loves Continued from page C-1 being considered the heart Coaches have said the and soul of a team. “It’s become a part of me efforts have been noticed when Robbins is seen after and I feel that if I’m not giva game where she gives ev- ing my all, giving my encouragement to people, then erything she has. “She goes all out until I’m not doing my job,” she she can’t go anymore,” said said. $O\VVD.ORNNHYROG¦§%DWDULQD¨ “More than anything, she Courtney Weeden, an assistant coach for SHS girls leads by example and the soccer and girls basketball. other players follow that,” Ranney said. “They feed off of it and you can really see at times her energy driving Digital Art the team.” & Photo Robbins said she will Reproduction more than likely move on Negatives & Slides up to 8”x10” from athletics when she digitized for Printing gets to college to focus on or Archiving to Disk her studies. Prints copied, retouched With this year and her or restored. senior year next year, RobGiclee: Digitize your art for print or Web bins’ goal is more than imEpson: Professional scanners, proving herself. printers, and ink. “I want people to get References upon request. excited about our teams 360-427-8669 again,” Robbins said.

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Shelton-Mason County Journal -Thursday, Oct. 28, 2010 - Page C-7

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Sports&Outdoors NMFOOTBALL

Third time not the charm for the Bulldogs By DEAN SIEMON A record of 1-8 can be deceiving in the game of football. North Mason High School learned that the hard way in a 2A state play-in game on Tuesday night at Interlake High School, losing 55-34. The Bulldogs (4-6) have been in this situation before, losing to the Saints (2-8) in a play-in game to end their season. In 2009, the Bulldogs lost 47-23 and in 2008 they fell to the Saints 35-20. North Mason’s defense had a tough time stopping the Saints’ junior running back Jordan Todd, who had 206 yards on 22 carries and six touchdowns. Todd’s first carry in the game was a 65-yard touchdown run on Interlake’s first offensive drive in the first quarter. Todd would score on runs of 32, 11, 18, 75, 16 and 7 yards. “He’s got great quickness and great speed at the corner of attack,” said Jeff Bevers, North Mason head coach. The Bulldogs allowed 28 points before scoring their first touchdown on a three-yard run from sophomore Tommy Renne. Renne also had a receiving touchdown in the fourth quarter to bring the score to 49-28. Bevers said Renne has been a successful offensive weapon all season. “That’s all the same stuff I see out of him every day,” Bevers said. Interlake took a 42-7 lead into halftime. Bev-

A little me time In the busy schedule between family and work, I find that rarely am I out in the woods on my own. On Saturday the 23 (if only by a friend canceling on a trip), I found myself By KELLY standing at a RIORDAN locked gate, in the early morning pitch black, with miles of open space and a deer tag to fill. Packing my bag and readying my gear, I had until noon to hunt and then had to be back at my place for my son’s 10th birthday party. Locking the door of my truck, the rain began to pour and in the light of my flashlight, shiny raindrops filled the light. I was glad I had worn my good rain gear as the hike to my preferred spot was twomiles away and it was downpouring. Upon arrival of what I call “The Big Hill”, I knew the last three-quarters mile was all uphill. Arriving in good time, the weather had held off daylight a little longer than I had anticipated, so I had to sit under a tree for a few minutes and wait for shooting light. Early sunrise started over the hill and it was time to begin the ascent to my honey hole at the top. Ten minutes in and the weather again threw me a curveball. Fog started to roll in above me and I knew the clearcut I wanted to glass over with my binoculars might be out of the question. Sure enough as I entered the clearcut, visibility was only 60 to 70 yards, Dang. This was normally a huge area almost a half-mile long and several hundred yards wide. Pulling up my binoculars only gave me another few yards to see. Deciding that I didn’t have time to wait out the fog, I made the choice to hike slowly and hunt two miles to another area where my brotherin-law, Rodgar, was hunting with my nephew and one of his friends, Dillon. This area was a little lower in elevation and I thought I might be able to help out my nephew and his friend. Creeping through the clearcut, I had made it about 300 yards when a covey of quail flushed at my feet and almost gave me a heart attack! After a few choice words for the fleeing fowl, I resumed my deer hunt. Fog socked in the area and nothing was moving (except quail) and I just moseyed along at a snail pace. There was good deer sign via droppings and even a buck rub on a small alder tree when I came up a small rise in the clearcut. Peering through the fog I could see a deer rump lying down behind a small Douglas fir tree on the edge of a “small” cliff. Up came the binoculars, but I couldn’t tell if the deer was a buck or a doe. What I could tell was the deer was large! Thinking about my next move, I remembered that I had bought a grunt tube from Verle’s a few years back. Digging into my pocket, I located the call and decided to give it a try, “RRRRRR…RRRRR…RR…R”. It kind of made me snicker at the sound. Apparently the deer didn’t think it was too funny and jumped up, spun around, stomped and snorted at me! Thinking about it now, I am sure there was a priceless look of shock on my face. There was no doubt, it was a buck

Mason COUNTY OUTDOORS

Journal photos by Dean Siemon

Above, Interlake High School’s Jordan Todd escapes North Mason senior Kameron Crosswhite’s tackle en route to one of six touchdowns in a state tournament play-in game. Right, North Mason’s Tevin Williams attempts to shake off a defender after making a catch. ers told the team heading into the contest that the Saints would be the toughest 1-8 team they faced. “I think we took them a little too lightly and that’s why we didn’t come out fast,” said Tevin Williams, North Mason senior. After trailing 49-7 with 9:41 left in the third quarter, the Bulldogs went to the passing attack, which totaled 301 yards. Junior quarterback

Charlie Becker threw 11 out of 22 for 146 yards with two touchdowns and three interceptions. Becker concluded his first full season as a varsity starting quarterback, which Bevers said has included a lot of growth he hopes to see continue next year. “He’s become the leader of this football team and I expect that to last the rest of the way his senior year,” Bevers said. Senior Kasey Bielec threw two completions

SHSFOOTBALL

in halfback trick pass plays, both were touchdowns to Williams for 87 yards (third quarter) and 68 yards (fourth quarter). “We’ve run them [halfback passes] a couple of times earlier in the year and they’ve worked for us,” Bevers said. The senior wide receiver for North Mason had eight catches for 261 yards. “They were playing up See Bulldogs on page C-6

MMKFOOTBALL

Oly beats Shelton in OT thriller By DEAN SIEMON The Shelton High School football Highclimbers looked like they were about to have their best game of the last three years, let alone this season, at home on Friday against 4A Narrows League rival Olympia High School. But the Highclimbers allowed 28 unanswered points for Olympia to win in overtime, 41-35. Shelton (2-7, 1-6 Narrows League) held a 35-14 lead after senior running back Jacob Barrett rushed for an eight-yard touchdown. Barrett rushed for 178 yards with three touchdowns, two in the first half. Senior Joey Wuolle ran for 87 yards on 15 carries and one touchdown. Matt Hinkle, Shelton head coach, said the one-two punch of Wuolle, who is six-foot-four and 284 pounds, and the much lighter and faster Barrett was a factor in Shelton’s success on the ground. “Wuolle running inside led to the defense hesitating,” Hinkle said. “When the opportunity arose, we went outside to Jacob [Barrett].” The Shelton offense rushed for 351 yards in the game on 62 rushing plays in the game. Hinkle said he gives credit for the offensive numbers to the offensive line. “With those rushing totals, the offensive line must have been doing well,” Hinkle said. The Bears (8-1, 7-0 Narrows League) had one costly fumble in the first quarter to keep Shelton ahead by two scores, in addition to unsportsmanlike conduct penalities to continue Highclimber drives. “Oly had some turnovers and some big penalites,” Hinkle said. “But I was just pleased with the way the kids

Journal photo by Dean Siemon

Mary M. Knight High School’s Jeremy Pais prevents a pass on defense during the Owls’ home game against Lake Quinault High School on Saturday. Journal photo by Rick Kennedy

Shelton High School’s Jacob Barrett gets a few blocks on a sweep play during a home game against Olympia High School on Friday.

played.” Hinkle said he was not shocked to look up at the scoreboard with nine minutes left, which read Shelton 35, Olympia 13. “In the last three games, we’ve played well,” Hinkle said. “Was I shocked? No, because these kids are battlers.” But Olympia started strong in the third quarter with rushing touchdowns by juniors Spenser Killman (three yards) and Trevor Houser (one yard). The Bears trailed 35-27 late in the fourth quarter until senior Griffin Boudia rushed for a four-yard touchSee Overtime on page C-6

Owls remain winless at home By DEAN SIEMON Mary M. Knight High School football came back home for a 1B Southwest League game on Saturday but fell to the Lake Quinault High School Elks, 54-14. The Owls (1-7, 1-5 Southwest) totaled 236 yards of offense. Freshman Austin Thompson started at quarterback, throwing one completion for 22 yards. The young Owl threw an interception in the third quarter to Lake Quinault (4-4, 3-3 Southwest) sophomore Chris Erdman, who returned 20 yards for a touchdown. Sophomore Kyle Willey, the previous starting quar-

terback, was inactive due to injury. “[Thompson is] not very well seasoned but we gave him a chance,” said Eric Smith, Mary M. Knight head coach. Sophomore Juan Jimenez led the Owls’ rushing attack, which totaled 214 yards. Jimenez scored on a four-yard touchdown run to cap a first quarter drive to bring the score to 8-6. Jimenez came off the field in the second quarter due to a hand injury and was limited to playing on defense in the second half. “Everytime he’s on the field, he leads the team,” See Owlson page C-5 See Outdoors on page C-5 Thursday, Nov. 4, 2010 - Shelton-Mason County Journal - Page C-1

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Bulldogs

“They come to work every day and are a lot of fun to coach,” Bevers said. Williams, one of the seniors leaving, said playing for North Mason was the best experience of his life. “I wouldn’t want to play football anywhere else if I had the choice,” Williams said.

Continued from page C-1 tight on me so I just used my speed,” Williams said. Williams also caught a 14-yard touchdown from Becker with 8:02 left in the third quarter on North Mason’s first scoring drive of the half. The Bulldogs will graduate 11 seniors from the team next year, a class that Bevers said was a hard working group of athletes.

(Evans kick) Third quarter I - Todd 16-yard run (Evans kick) NM - Charlie Becker 14-yard pass to Tevin WIlliams (Bielec kick) NM - Bielec 87-yard pass to Williams (Bielec kick) Fourth quarter NM - Becker 32-yard pass to Renne (Bielec kcik) I - Todd 7-yard run (Evans kick failed) NM - Bielec 68-yard pass to Williams (Bielec run failed)

First quarter I - Jordan Todd 65-yard run (Danny Evans kick) I - Todd 32-yard run (Evans kick) Second quarter I - Todd 11-yard run (Evans kick) I - Todd 18-yard run (Evans kick) NM - Tommy Renne 3-yard run (Kasey Bielec kick) I - Todd 75-yard run (Evans kick) I - Matt Malos 21-yard pass to Scotty Gehlhausen

November 2 at Interlake High School In Bellevue N. Mason 0 7 14 13 - 34 Interlake 14 28 7 6 - 55

www.lesschwab.com

Journal photo by Rick Kennedy

Shelton High School senior quarterback Ryan Adams looks for an opening against Olympia High School’s defense during Friday’s game at Shelton.

Overtime Continued from page C-1

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down with 2:09 left. Boudia ran for the twopoint conversion to tie the game at 35-35. In overtime, the Highclimbers had the first possession starting from the Olympia 25-yard line (college overtime rules applied). Wuolle, who had a touchdown earlier in the game, fumbled to turn the ball over. In Olympia’s overtime drive, Killman scored the game-winning touchdown from five yards out. “Olympia is a good team and I’m proud of the way the kids battled,” Hinkle said. Olympia had 19 first downs in the game and converted on a few third-andlong situations. The Bears were four out of nine in third down conversions, but Hinkle said the Highclimbers should have done better, primarily in the second half. “[Olympia] capitalized on some stuff and we missed an opportunity,” Hinkle said. “When we put this team in third and long, we need to do a better job getting our guys off the field.” The Highclimbers are scheduled for their final game of the season at 7 p.m., Thursday, Nov. 4, at Yelm High School. Yelm is 2-7 with a 1-4 record in the 3A Narrows League. The Tornadoes lost their last game at Wilson High School 21-14. Hinkle said playing a 3A school is not going to make a difference in the expectations entering the season finale. “They put 11 kids out there just like everybody else,” Hinkle said. “The kids will play well, I’m sure.” After having played the top three teams in the 4A Narrows League (Gig Harbor High School, Bellarm-

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Shelton-Mason County Journal

Sports

NMWRESTLING

Zac Joaquin earns state title, brother Pedro loses in finals By DEAN SIEMON North Mason High School junior Zac Joaquin achieved what 1,200 grapplers across the state traveled to the Tacoma Dome this weekend have dreamed of – being a champion. Joaquin won the 2A 112-pound championship match at the WIAA Mat Classic on Saturday at the Tacoma Dome, defeating Squalicum High School’s Ren Bishop 11-9 in overtime. In the third period, Joaquin was leading 9-6 before Bishop earned an escape and takedown as time expired. “It was pretty crazy,” Joaquin said. “He got away from me in a split second.” After both grapplers were defending each other’s attempt in the first minute, Zac Joaquin was able to defend a takedown attempt from Bishop and gained position for the two points. “I was looking for the switch for a split second he showed an opening,” he said. “I still had to work for it.” The North Mason junior said he began wrestling in 2006 while in eighth grade “I’ve always wanted a state championship,” he said. “But I knew I had to work hard and it feels great.” But only half the battle is winning the state championship, as Joaquin is already thinking about defending his title next season as a senior. “That means I have to step it up way more this year,” he said. “There’re some certain moves I want to work on, defensive ones.” “We’re already planning an offseason program for him,” said North Mason head coach Tony Coppinger. “He’ll be better next year.” While one Bulldog basked in the glory of a state championship, another was unable to repeat the same success. Senior Pedro Joaquin, Zac’s

“I’ve watched them transform into true gentlemen, into incredible leaders and great teammates.” brother, faced a familiar foe in North Kitsap High School’s Jake Velarde during the 2A 119-pound championship match, who won the 2010 championship at the same weight. “This season, I knew Jake was going to be tough,” Pedro Joaquin said. “And if I wanted to hang with him, I had to work hard.” Velarde was able to match the North Mason senior’s speed in a 6-2 decision on Saturday. The two wrestled to a 4-3 decision where Velarde won at the North Mason invitational tournament in January. Pedro Joaquin was scheduled to wrestle Velarde during the 2A Region III tournament the week before but pulled out due to illness. “I thought people would think I coward out, but I didn’t, I was ill,” Pedro Joaquin said. “To wrestle him in the state finals, it felt great.” The senior said after giving everything he had on the mat, wrestling in the state finals was a good way to end his North Mason See Joaquins on page C-5

Journal photos by Dean Siemon

Above, North Mason High School junior Zac Joaquin gives a hug to head coach Tony Coppinger after winning the 2A 112-pound championship on Saturday at the WIAA Mat Classic on Saturday. Right, North Mason senior Pedro Joaquin, who finished second at 119 pounds, is shown wrestling Bellingham High School’s Nolan Takemura during Friday’s preliminary rounds of the Mat Classic.

SHSWRESTLING

Three Climbers end season at first day of 4A Mat Classic By DEAN SIEMON

Journal photo by Dean Siemon

Shelton High School’s Colby Barber attempts to bridge out of a pinning attempt from Mariner High School’s Alex Coffman on Friday at the WIAA Mat Classic at the Tacoma Dome.

While the three Shelton High School Highclimber wrestlers who competed at the 4A WIAA Mat Classic wrestling tournament had high expectations, the competition at the Tacoma Dome was too much. In the first day on Friday, all three Highclimbers were eliminated in the double elimination rounds. “It’s the top 16 in the state and you have to bring you’re A-game,” said junior Ty McCullough, who competed in his second Mat Classic. While many of the more than 500 wrestlers (ranging from 1B to 4A) feel the nerves and emotion from the tournament, some felt right at home. “I’ve grown up with wrestling all my life and it just felt right being here,” said Shelton junior Colby Barber. At 112 pounds, McCullough

went 0-2 for the second straight season. McCullough’s day first started with an 11-0 decision loss to Richland High School’s Josh Andrew. “My gameplan was to get the first takedown, then it changed to turning him and pinning him,” McCullough said. In a loser-out match, McCullough was trailing before being pinned in the final second against Andrew Vulliet from EdmondsWoodway High School. Sophomore Jakeob Garrick began his day in the 125-pound division with a pinfall victory over Roosevelt (Seattle) High School’s Calvin Olds with 10 seconds left. “I was real surprised I was able to pin a high-level guy like that,” Garrick said. “I knew all my matches were going to be tough.” But he was unable to get a good start in his second match, where See Climbers on page C-4

Thursday, Feb. 24, 2011 - Shelton-Mason County Journal - Page C-1

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Joaquins Continued from page C-1 wrestling career. “It felt great to leave everything I had out there,” Pedro Joaquin said. “And it’s especially a good feeling to leave it out here.” Pedro Joaquin began wrestling in his freshman year in 2006 and the senior said he has grown a lot between then and the weekend’s state tournament. “I started my freshman year as this little guy that didn’t know anything,” he said. But the senior admitted no feeling was greater than watching his younger brother win only moments before his match. “I couldn’t have imagined a better way to end my senior season than for my little brother to go to finals and take it,” he said. “I was glad to see us go to the finals together,” Zac Joaquin said. Both Bulldogs talked about having their matches during the tournament almost back to back, especially in the finals. “I tried my very best to watch him [Zac],” Pedro Joaquin said. “When I got a chance, I watched as much as I could.” Both Joaquin brothers said they have been thankful for the coaches at North Mason, including not only Coppinger, but assistant coaches Bill McCarty and Wayne Jackson. “They’ve always believed in me,” Zac Joaquin said. “If it wasn’t for them, I wouldn’t be here,” Pedro Joaquin said. “They believed in me more than I believed in

Journal photo by Dean Siemon

North Mason High School’s Pedro Joaquin shown competing in the 2A 119-pound championship on Saturday at the Mat Classic at the Tacoma Dome. myself.” While the brothers said coaching has made them better wrestlers, Coppinger said the two pushed him to be a better coach. “They wanted to get better and I had to get better,” Coppinger said. “Those boys worked for everything they have; they know work ethic.”

Coppinger said the Joaquin brothers not only grew athletically while he has coached them, but also on other levels. “I’ve watched them transform into true gentlemen, into incredible leaders and great teammates,” Coppinger said. “They were quiet at first but I watched them blos-

som into all of the above.” Road to state championships - 2A Mat Classic, February 18-19 at Tacoma Dome 112-pounds: First round - Zac Joaquin (NM) def. Will Bardezbain (W.F. West), 14-4 Quarterfinals - Zac Joa-

quin (NM) pinned Logan Merkle (East Valley), 3:10 Semifinals - Zac Joaquin (NM) def. Daniel Page (Tumwater), 5-2 Championshp - Zac Joaquin (NM) def. Ren Bishop (Squalicum), 11-9 (OT) 119-pounds: First round - Pedro Joa-

quin (NM) def. James Nolan (Tumwater), 11-4 Quarterfinals - Pedro Joaquin (NM) def. Nolan Takemura (Bellingham), 9-0 Semifinals - Pedro Joaquin (NM) def. Cole Harris (Deer Park), 7-3 Championship - Jake Velarde (North Kitsap) def. Pedro Joaquin (NM), 6-2

Newman earns fifth-place medal, three other Bulldogs end season at state While the Joaquin brothers advanced to their respective championship matches, only one other North Mason High School grappler earned a medal on Saturday at the 2A Mat Classic at the Tacoma Dome. Senior Sam Newman finished fifth-place overall at 152 pounds after defeating Juan Canales from Burlington Edison High School in a 7-1 decision in his final consolation match. “It’s a tough weight and a tough draw,” said North Mason head coach Tony Coppinger. Newman began the tournament on Friday defeating Quincy High School’s Ben Horning in a 10-5 decision. After losing to Interlake High School’s Jacob Marks in a 14-3 decision, Newman earned himself a berth in Saturday’s medal round by earning a pinfall against Centralia High School’s Andrew Huerta at 2:18 in the second round. Newman would defeat R.A. Long High School’s Jared Lafrance, 11-9, before los-

ing in an 8-1 decision to Cedarcrest High School’s Cody Paxman to find himself in the fifth-place match. Coppinger said Newman, who finished eighth-place last season, was a much better wrestler in different ways this year. “His stamina improved; he improved a lot riding on top,” Coppinger said. “He finishes a lot better.” While Coppinger said he was going to miss the skills Newman brought to North Mason, he said he’ll also miss Newman’s sense of humor. On Thursday night, Coppinger said Newman made a prank phone call to the Sequim High School coach about a noise complaint towards the Wolves’ hotel rooms. Coppinger said the next day, the Sequim wrestlers told him they received a lecture from the Sequim coach. “That’s Newman,” Coppinger said. “He’s a fun loving kid. You hate losing kids like that.” Three of the six North Mason High School wrestlers

were eliminated on Friday at the Tacoma Dome. At 119 pounds, junior Rene Gaspar, who finished with an eighth-place medal in last season’s state tournament, suffered an opening round loss to R.A. Long High School’s Josh Johnson in an 8-4 decision. With a win over Medical Lake High School’s Anton King in a 6-3 decision, Gaspar was eliminated with a loss to Tumwater High School’s James Nolan, 6-2. “His [Gaspar’s] weight was unbelievably tough,” Coppinger said. “It was just a loaded weight [class].” Coppinger continued to say that Gaspar should return as a tougher competitor at the 119-pound weight division. “We’re pleased with the way he wrestled this season,” he said. Junior Brian McCarty was eliminated in a losersout match to Blaine High School’s Shayden Hendricks in a 6-4 decision, losing by takedown in overtime. “That was a heartbreaker,” Coppinger said. “He very

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easily could have placed. But he’ll be back [next season].” McCarty began with a first round loss to Othello High School’s Matt Jordan via first round pinfall at 1:15. McCarty would remain alive in the consolation bracket with a 3-1 decision win against Mount Baker High School’s Cody Thayer before his loss to Hendricks. Senior Andy Hicks was unable to advance to the second day of competition after losing to Washougal High School’s Brenden Casey in a second round pinfall at 1:40. Hicks lost his first round match to Othello High School’s Amando Deleon in a final round pin at 4:42. The senior Bulldog did earn a win in his first consolation match with a 3-0 decision over W.F. West (Chehalis) High School’s Sean Koreis. If Hicks had stayed at 171-pounds like he started the season at, Coppinger said it would have been tough to advance to the state tournament. “Andy dropped to 160 at the end of the season,” Coppinger said. “But when you come up here at this level, everybody is tough.” As a team, the Bulldogs finished eighth place overall out of the 64 schools represented. North Mason finished with 58 team points. Deer Park High School won the overall team title with

147.5 points, followed by Centralia High School at 102.5. WIAA 2A Mat Classic team scores - 1) Deer Park, 147.5; 2) Centralia, 102.5; 3)

Klahowya, 102; 4) Tumwater, 86; 5) White River, 83.5; 6) Othello, 82.5; 7) Ellensburg, 64; 8) North Mason, 58; 9) W.F. West (Chehalis), 54; 10) Mount Baker, 53

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Shelton-Mason County Journal - Thursday, Feb. 24, 2011 - Page C-5


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