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aletrails Walking routes to build a thirst

jersey.com


Walking routes to build a thirst Take a trip around Jersey’s finest pubs and experience iconic landmarks, picturesque countryside and fabulous sea views on these carefully planned walking routes. This guide will accompany you along the way, giving an insightful glimpse into the Jersey history that has shaped its unique character. Of course, you’ll have the opportunity to savour some of Jersey’s fine Ales and Wines along the way. As you visit each pub, simply ask a member of staff to stamp your guide when you enjoy a drink*. Once you’ve collected all eight stamps simply fill out a form at your final venue to receive a t-shirt as a memento of your journey around this fabulous Island.

Ale Trails: The Routes

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Walk 1 The Town Trail Walk 2 St Mary’s Country Inn Walk 3 The Trinity Arms Walk 4 The Victoria in the Valley Walk 5 The Rozel Bay Walk 6 Le Hocq Inn Ale Trail Pub Information

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Visit our website www.liberationgroup.com Check out taste2day.com for some great info and offers on bars and restaurants in the Channel Islands Follow on twitter: taste2day jersey or become our friend on facebook: tastetoday channelislands Winner CIM Awards 2009 Marketing Excellence – Liberation Group Winner CIM Awards 2009 Best Brand Campaign – Liberation Ale CAMRA Jersey – Champion Beer 2009

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* Alcoholic or soft drink

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Walk 1

The Town Trail

Mileage: 1 Mile Time: 30 minutes Difficulty: Easy Full details of the pubs on this trail are shown on pages 20-21

The Town trail starts at The Cock and Bottle (1A) in the Royal Square. Leave the pub and walk out into the Royal Square, go straight ahead then bear right to walk up Library Place. The Royal Square This square was named the Royal Square, in honour of King George II, following the unveiling of the statue in 1751. Before that it was simply called Le Marchi; the market place. It remained the market place until 1804, when the noise and dirt that emanated from it proved to be too much for the Court Officials, who were also there on Saturdays: market day. A new market was proposed on the corner of what is now called Beresford Street and Halkett Place, on land that was purchased by the States in 1796. For many people, the most important event that took place here in the square was a 15-minute skirmish that became known as the Battle of Jersey. This was the last occasion that the French attempted to wrestle Jersey from the clutches of Great Britain, and they nearly managed it! The Governor, Moyse Corbett, had been coercised into signing the capitulation and had it not been for the young, untried, Major Francis Peirson, together with two companies of Scottish and English 2

troops, and 3,000 men of the Jersey Militia, The Baron de Rullecourt and his 600 men might have bluffed their way into the history books. One could spend a whole morning in the Royal Square, but here are just a few of the interesting things that are around the area. The plaque that is on the corner of Gallichan the Jeweller, the oldest established jeweller in the town, is a fire mark. Before St Helier had a municipal fire brigade, each insurance company had their own fire fighters. On the fire mark is the symbol of the insurance company and the building’s policy number. If you hadn’t paid your premium, they didn’t put the fire out. On the wall of the Picket House is a sun dial made by Elie Le Gros. It runs about four minutes ahead of Greenwich Mean Time. Le Gros was a talented man; he was a schoolmaster, a watchmaker, a cartographer and an engineer. The horse chestnut trees around the square were planted in 1894.


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Leave The Post Horn, turn e right and walk to the of P l a cend Grove Gas Methodist Tho E Hue Street. Cross the road, P turn left and take the efirst right Tu lac P n into Pitt Street, R o b i then left into King Street. Continue along New King Street until we reach the R o a d Forum o n t Belmont Gds junction, e l m and Cinemathen turn Bleft l m o n t P l a ce walk up New Street. Carry onBe Salvation Army Citadel along Street, and using Ann Place St de n New the crossing, cross over to the Jersey of the road. The MIND EN right B76 PL ACEhand-side Phillips St Arts Centre Town House is just a few yards beyond the junction with Union Indoor Supermarket Fish Street and Burrard s C h a r l e Street. Street Market

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The Central Market As mentioned earlier, the market in the Royal Square had become untenable due to the noise and smell, and a new site was bought by the States in 1796 from a Mr. Le Maistre. The original market on this site was modelled closely on the market in Bath, and funded with the proceeds of seven lotteries. When it opened in 1803, three sides of the market were roofed over, underneath were stalls selling eggs, butter, flowers and vegetables. In the middle stood butchers’ stalls which also had a roof over them. Close by was a fish market and a cattle market.

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DISCLAIMER: While every effort is taken to ensure the accuracy of information in this booklet, no liability can be accepted by the author or the publishers for any loss, damage or injury caused by errors in, or omissions from, the information given.

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The market gates in Market Street and Hilgrove Street are the original gates from the 1803 market. They were designed by the States’ Architect, Philippe Le Sueur and cast in Jersey by George Le Feuvre.

Walk the length of Halkett Place, passing The Central Market on our left, then take the second right into King Street and finally the first left to return back into the Royal Square and The Cock and Bottle.

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After almost 80 years the market had become too small. It was knocked down in 1881, and a new covered market was built which opened in September 1882. It was designed by Mr. T. W. Helliwell, of Helliwell and Bellamy, of Brighouse in Yorkshire who had won the contract in an architectural competition. This new market was double the size; it had granite walls, cast iron railings and 37 cast iron columns that held up the roof. There was a 15-foot high, three-tiered fountain as its centrepiece. This was cast at the Glasgow Sun Works foundry of George Smith, and installed by Abraham Viel a local builder.


Walk 2

St Mary’s Country Inn

Mileage: 3 Miles Time: 1 hour 15 Minutes Difficulty: Medium Wear stout shoes – Might be slippery Full details of St Mary‘s Country Inn are shown on pages 20-21

Leave The St Mary’s Country Inn and turn right, then right again to pass the pub car park. At the crossroads walk straight on into La Route de L’Eglise. As the lane turns right, notice the cross sitting on the column ahead; this is almost certainly the remnants of a wayside cross taken down during the Reformation. After the bend, we find ourselves in La Rue de la Grange. Continue on and at the junction turn right. In a short distance we reach Le Marais, a private house where the founder of Methodism, John Wesley, preached when he visited Jersey in 1787.

Le Marais Methodism was brought to the Island by two young Jerseymen; Jean Tentin and Pierre Le Sueur. Like many young men of that time, they had gone to fish for cod off Newfoundland and the Grand Banks of Nova Scotia, and while there, they had been converted to Methodism by English missionary Laurence Coughlan. In 1787, John Wesley himself came to Jersey. He arrived on Monday, August 20th, and went to the home of Robert Carr Brackenbury, a Lincolnshire man, who had been sent to Jersey to preach, because he spoke both English and French. On the following Thursday, Wesley rode out to preach at Le Marais in St Mary, the home of Mrs. Le Couteur. As no one there spoke English, he was assisted by Robert Carr Brackenbury and Mrs. Marie Arthur, who lived across the road at Les Puits. Return back to the junction with La Rue de la Grange, and walk past it towards the bend ahead. At the end of La Rue des Marais, don’t turn left, but go straight ahead into La Hougue Mauger. At the T junction, turn left into La Rue des Touettes and descend the slope. Over to the right, we can see some of the other Channel Islands in the distance, and closer to shore the reef known as the Paternosters. 5


The Paternosters In 1565, Queen Elizabeth I had granted the Seigneur of St Ouen, Helier de Carteret, the right to colonise Sark. Until then Sark had been uninhabited and, because of this, it had often been used as a base for pirates. De Carteret chose 35 Jersey families and five Guernsey families to become the first settlers. The boats carrying the young families left Grève de Lecq bound for Sorel Sark, visible a few miles away in the distance. On the way there, one of the boats struck Les Pierres des Lecq reef and many drowned, Le Fosse Vicq among them several small children. Legend has it that their frightened cries can still be heard whenever a storm approaches. This tale so affected the local fishermen that they always said The Lord’s Prayer or an Our Father when they sailed past these rocks. In Latin, ‘Our Father’ is ‘Pater Noster’, and this is how the reef got its name.

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Take the first right onto aa Vfarm a track and head towards thellée sea. Continue on, avoiding any tracks that go off to the right. After some distance, beside an abandoned metal post, turn left onto a narrow path that descends. Follow this bridle path, which soon begins to run parallel with the cliff path below. When the two paths converge, move onto the cliff path. After 300 yards or so, look over to the right, where a sloping section of cliff side has become detached. This tiny area is Île Agois. l

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Île Agois. This 76-metre high tidal stack that was once joined to the land, appears to have been inhabited possibly since the Iron Age. Coins and other artefacts found here suggest that the stack was inhabited during the 9th century. Excavations that Carrefou took place during the 1970s Selous revealed traces Rueof around 20 e u ong La L and two rectangular earth huts, stone buildings, one of which is thought to be an oratory. Furthermore, the shape and lay out of these buildings are similar to other eremitic sites around the coast of Brittany and the British Isles, which gives credence to the idea that in the 9th century this site was Par St Lawrence probably a small community ofChurch Parish Eremitic monks. ute d

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Île Agois When the cliff path ends, walk inland between the granite gate posts, then follow a wide farm track. Where it joins another track at right angles, turn right and carry on, passing Crabbé Farm, until we reach the yellow line. Here turn left.

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Walk on and take the first turning on the right. This lane drops gently between houses and we emerge at the end of La Rue du Rondin. Continue uphill, to turn left into La Charrière. After a few yards, bear right into Le Hurel. Climb this slight hill. At the end of this lane turn right. We pass the new Community Centre and the Parish Hall. Where the lane meets the main road, turn left and walk past ottleofstthe road where St Mary’s Primary School. Cross to the other nd Bside am ka p St Mary’s there is a narrow verge. At the crossroads, oc turn right, The Country Inn is ahead on the left.

DISCLAIMER: While every effort is taken to ensure the accuracy of information in this booklet, no liability can be accepted by the author or the publishers for any loss, damage or injury caused by errors in, or omissions from, the information given.

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Walk 3

The Trinity Arms

Mileage: 4 Miles Time: 1 hour 45 Minutes Difficulty: Hard/Medium Wear stout shoes – Might be slippery Full details of The Trinity Arms are shown on pages 20-21

Leave The Trinity Arms by the rear door, closest to the children’s play ground. Walk past the playground and descend the steps. On reaching the road turn left, then continue along the left hand-side of this busy road. Take the first left into La Rue du Mont Pellier. Across the meadow on our right, we see the double-arched entrance to Howard Davis Farm. Howard Davis Farm This experimental farm was one of many gifts given to the Island by Jerseyman T. B. Davis. Davis went to sea as a boy; settled in South Africa and made his fortune in stevedoring and lighterage. He eventually controlled all the port facilities between Port Elizabeth and Dar-es-Salaam, and became well-known in both South Africa and Jersey for his generosity. T. B. Davis gave the farm, originally called Parkfield, to the Island in 1928. Like many of his other gifts, it is named after his youngest son, Howard, who fell on the first day of the Battle of the Somme. Carry on down this gentle incline, passing Rue du Travers on the left. Bear left when a lane comes in from the right. A little further on, we see another double-arched entrance at Mont Pellier. At the end of the lane, turn sharp left and climb Ruelle ès Biches. This ancient footpath is often thought to be the entrance to the vast earthwork known as Le Chastel Sedement, a castle of refuge that was said to offer security to several thousand people in times of attack. When the track emerges on tarmac again, go to the yellow line on the left, and turn right. Walk on for a few yards then turn left onto a muddy track: La Rue du Pouillier - the Trinity Millennium Walk. 8


At the end of the Millennium Walk turn left. At the junction at the top of the slope, notice the mounting block and the holy water stoop in the wall of Les Catieaux. The stoop was no doubt taken from a local church during the Reformation, when reformers destroyed the opulence of the Catholic Church; breaking stained glass windows, beheading statues and turning the churches into much more austere places. Here turn right then immediately left. Some distance along this lane is a tall mound on the right hand-side of the lane; this is all that remains of the keep of Le Chastel Sedement earthwork.

Le Chastel Sedement This was an earthwork of around ten acres, guarded by a high embankment and a moat, with a keep at its centre. It is thought that this was one of five castles of refuge in the Island. The others were Mont Orgueil, Grosnez Castle, Le Câtel above Rozel and Le Câtel at Grève de Lecq. These sites would offer safety to islanders, together with their animals and other possessions, during raids on the Island. Le Chastel Sedement is mentioned in an account of a raid by Castilian corsair Pero Nino and Breton knight Hector de Pontbriand. Having successfully defeated a force of 3,000 Jerseymen on the sands at West Park, Nino and his cohorts advanced on Le Chastel Sedement. He saw that an attack on the earthwork could prove costly, but before returning home, he managed to extract a ransom of 10,000 gold crowns, the release of all French prisoners, and he took four rich Jerseymen as hostages. When we pass Rue du Câtel on the left, turn around, and you should be able to see the sea in St Aubin’s Bay. A little further on we can see France over to the right. At the end of Rue de la Falaise using care, cross straight over. Cross straight over the next junction. When the road bends left, walk down the track ahead, to pass the splendid granite ‘No Dumping’ sign. At the end of the track, continue straight on down a muddy bridle path, towards the trees. Leave the bridle path and carry on through a gate to reach a small footbridge that crosses the stream on the right. Bouley Bay This deep-water anchorage has been used in the past for the disembarkation of troops; in July 1549, French soldiers, fresh from capturing Sark, landed here and fought a pitched battle with the Jersey Militia on Jardin D’Olivet. Consequently, we find the bay well defended. To the east, there is L’Etacquerel Fort, built in 1835 to replace a defence that was sited further up the cliff, and to the west, Fort Leicester. Fort Leicester began as a simple defensive position with one single cannon in 1549, and evolved into what we see today; a Napoleonic fortification with positions for five guns, supplemented by concrete gun emplacements that date from the Second World War. 9


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At the bridge, bear left and Rozel ascend the cliff path. Stay on the cliff path as it goes into woodland, and continue upwards, following the signs to La Petite Falaise. The path climbs in a series of hairpins between the trees. When the path forks, turn Ville ès Nouaux right and keep on towards La Petite Falaise, finally arriving at Radio Corner on the hill that rises from the bay.

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3

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The National Hillclimb at Bouley Bay La ed The superbly cambered and surfaced road that runs up from the harbour providesaRuuthe e Ma la Cr istr oix e arena for a number of sporting events that take place during the year.

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Parish Church TheLabest-known of these is the National Hillclimb Championship, a round of which is held here Croix annually in July. Bouley Bay was Victoria one of the five original venues chosen for this championship Village when it started in 1947. Among the well-known sportsmen who have competed here are Sir Stirling Moss and Formula One driver, and local resident, Derek Warwick. in Bottle st Ville ès art and am Gaudins t. Mck S p After remaining unchallenged for some time, the outright record was broken by de o Guernseyman Andy Priaulx in 1995. Andy Priaulx went on to become the FIA World Touring Car Champion in 2005, 2006 and 2007. The current outright record stands at a remarkable 38.25 seconds for the 1011 yard hillclimb, set by Trevor Willis in 2007.

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At the end of Rue des Fontaines turn right, then after a few yards, turn left into Rue du Presbytere. Cross over to the right hand-side Townand Government of the road walk through the graveyard to the far side of the Mills House church. On the other sideStofSaviour's the church, descend the steps, turn left Church and return to The Trinity Parish Arms. & Hall

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Once on tarmac again, descend the hill and at the next corner bear left up a path that rises through the National Trust for Jersey property: Le Grand Côtil du Boulay. At the top of the path is a wellM head with a lavoir beside it. A lavoir is a place where Swomen would t. e go to do their washing, in the days when taps ande dwashing machines were unheard of. Walk past the lavoir, across the stream, and up to a the road ahead. Here turn left. Five Gr

GROUVILLE

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Walk 4

The Victoria in the Valley

Mileage: 4 Miles Time: 1 hour 30 Minutes Difficulty: Hard/Medium Wear stout shoes – Might be slippery Full details of The Victoria in the Valley are shown on pages 20-21

Leave The Victoria in the Valley, turn left, then bear left up La Route De L’Aleval. Walk along the verge and then take the first left into La Rue du Panigot. Climb the hill as it rises through woodland. Once past the houses, the lane levels out, at the far right hand bend take a moment to look back; in the gap ahead, we can see the sea and just make out Elizabeth Castle. After a hundred yards or so, turn left into La Ruette de Coin Varin. At the corner we can see a bunker in the field on the right, notice the chimney stack and the chimney pots built into the bunker in an attempt to disguise it. Infantry Command Bunker This bunker is one of three command bunkers and two communication bunkers that are in the immediate vicinity. What we can see here is only the top half of the bunker the rest of it is below ground. The bunker in front of us is the command bunker of the 582 Infantry Regiment. About half a mile further north, is the Artillery Commander’s bunker which is now incorporated into a house, whilst the Fortress Commander’s bunker is only a few yards away in what is now the ‘Living Legend’. These three buildings were the heart of the German defensive system that was linked by radio and field telephone to all the key defensive positions around the Island.

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Turn right into La Rue Vazon, and follow the lane as it becomes a cart track. Where the track joins another track, turn left and continue along it as it Ronez La Houle descends intoSorel the valley. This is one of the Le Island’s Fosse most natural Green Lanes;Vicq an almost Islandwide network of scenic speedrestricted roads, which grew from an initiative that started here in St Peter in 1994.

Green Lanes When the idea of an Island-wide network of speed-restricted roads was first suggested to the Comité des Connétables by St Peter Constable Mac Pollard, it was flatly rejected. Mr. Pollard had felt that it would be pleasant if several quiet scenic lanes would be speed restricted, thereby allowing cyclists, walkers and horse riders to use them in relative safety, away from the threat of speeding motorists. The Comité des Connétables recommended that Mr. Pollard take Mourier the Bay scheme to the States as a Private Member’s Bill. He did this, and Belle Hougue ST. JOHN'S despite reservations in some quarters, the scheme was accepted, and Les R BAY a law was passed allowing certain roads toBONNE become speed-restricted. Frémont NUIT Giffard

Bay The first Green Lanes were opened in St Peter, on St Peter’s Day, Les 29th June 1994. In other parishes the scheme was enthusiastically Landes La Crête embraced, and within 18 months nearly every parish had some L'É toc u q etLanes. St Green Today Jersey boasts 45-miles of Green Lanes John's Parish Church divided between ten parishes, only St Saviour and Trinity remain unconvinced of the benefits.

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a St . Je de ute Ro

Mont Mado

Parish Hall

Rou The Green Lane Scheme was appreciated by visitors, that in te so des sue 1996 the British Guild of Travel IsWriters awarded Jersey Tourism the s Route d' Eb en ez Silver Unicorn for promoting sustainable tourism. er

n

Rue

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l

Parish Hall

Mont C

St Lawrence Parish Church

Ville Emphrie

Because of the lack of fuel during the German Occupation, the mill was returned to water power and, like Quétivel Mill higher up the valley, it became essential in feeding the Island’s a wartime population. Mont l'Abbé

Millbrook Reservoir

Rout e Be de

au m on

ST. HELIER

t

Beaumont

Bel Royal

Ville ès Nouaux

Mont des Vignes La Haule

Bellozanne First Tower

Grande Route de la Trinité

Les Landes

The Grove

La Ruelle de St . Claire

Le Becquet In 1893, the mill was sold to Servais (Sion) Samuel Gilley. Gilley La RuSamuel e des Houguet tes was forced to rebuild most of La Croix it, following Becquet a disastrous fire in Vincent the early 20th century. In 1934, the Jersey New Waterworks Company bought Tesson Mill and various other mills in St Peter’s Valley to secure ownership of the waterways.

La

4

Dannemarche Reservoir ochon

ST. LAWRENCE

Jean

aV When we get to the gravel car park, follow the path that enters all é on the fare right, to go towards Quétivel Mill. At the mill, using care, Carrefour Selous cross the road, go down the uhill and walk through the car park of e eR ngu Midvale Apartments on Lthe right. We are able to regain the path a Lo at the far end of the car park. The path emerges onto the road at Tesson Mill.

Tesson Mill Trinity Parish Chu There has been a mill on this site, the lowest mill in the valley, since Ville à Norman times. The building that l'Evêque we see at present is thought to be the work of Phillippe Pellier and Phillippe Godfrey, who t he ec e de B La Ruin the early part owned the mill of the 19th century. La Grande Route de St .

La

At the bottom, cross the road, turn right, and walk for a short distance beside the wall. Go through the gap in the wall, and carry St Mary's Parish Church Handois on along the path that runs parallel to the road above. Reservoir

12

Les Croix

ute d

St Mary's Parish Hall

La Grande Ro

ue du Pont

eS t. L

La R

aur ent

L

ST. MARY

s

ST. JOHN

Town Mills

Go Ho


Turn left to pass the mill then turn left again to go through the second gateway in the wall on the left. Walk on beside the road, until we draw level with the start of a footpath on the far side. Cross carefully and climb this path. At the top, follow the path as it turns to the left. Then follow the welltrodden path, avoiding any paths that enter on the left, and keep to the right at any junctions. In due course, the path begins to descend, eventually meeting the road at the bottom of Mont du Rocher. Climb Mont du Rocher. The War Tunnels The tunnels here at Meadow Bank were originally intended to be used as an artillery barracks, artificers’ workshops and a munitions dump.

St. M a

The C

re he

ere ph

The tunnel complex was planned to consist of four long tunnels, each about 100-yards long, connected by seven shorter tunnels running at right angles. By the end of the untry Inn nd Bottle stam o sta k a of the short war, only two of the longer tunnels and csix ones were finished. Duringy’s C m p o r the construction, 14,000 tons of shale was excavated and 4,000 tons of concrete was poured in. Work began in 1941 by 319 Infantry Division, but by 1942 the work had been handed over to the Organisation Todt. It was they who used prisoners of war; Russians, Algerians, Polish, Spanish Republicans and other nationalities, who had been force-marched across Europe, as their labour force. In 1944, with an imminent invasion of France threatened, the tunnels were changed into a casualty clearing station for troops wounded in France.

Th e

The V

L

Inn stamp he ocq H r e

e

l Bay stamp oze he eR

re

Th

DISCLAIMER: While every effort is taken to ensure the accuracy of information in this booklet, no liability can be accepted by the author or the publishers for any loss, damage or injury caused by errors in, or omissions from, the information given.

re he

ere

Though it was never used, at the end of the war the hospital contained 600 beds, an operating theatre, a dispensary, storerooms and kitchens. It was air conditioned and centrally heated, and had all the amenities of a modern hospital. rms stam e Valley sta ity A mp n th p h into Les rin top, turn left At Tthe ci i Gelettes. The lane curves and begins to drop back into the valley. After a hairpin bend, walk down the steps of a footpath coming in on the right, and follow the path. On reaching the road turn left, and walk the short distance back to The Victoria.

13


Walk 5

The Rozel Bay

Mileage: 4 Miles Time: 1 hour 30 Minutes Difficulty: Hard/Medium Wear stout shoes – Might be slippery Full details of The Rozel Bay are shown on pages 20-21

Leave The Rozel Bay and turn left to walk up the valley, passing the pub car park, as we begin to climb the gentle slope. After a short distance, on the wall on our right, we see a plaque dedicated to horticulturist, Samuel Curtis. Samuel Curtis In 1801, Curtis purchased the first of his nurseries at Walworth, and he began to publish a series of horticultural lectures that had been given by his father-in-law; William Curtis. The nursery and the book were a success, and he looked for another garden to develop. This he found at Glazenwood, near Braintree in Essex. During the 1830s, Curtis began looking for a suitable site on which to grow the subtropical species that were being grown under glass at Glazenwood and Kew. Over the next few years, Samuel Curtis searched the British Isles fruitlessly for a suitable site; that is until he arrived at Rozel in Jersey, in 1841. Here was a sunny, sheltered, almost frost-free valley, with a conglomerate soil and its own microclimate, ideal for the subtropical plants that he hoped to grow. Curtis didn’t move to La Chaire permanently until 1852. Over the following eight years, he continued to develop what became known as the Tropical Garden of La Chaire. In this garden, Samuel Curtis grew arguably the biggest range of subtropical plants ever found in a garden in the British Isles. Samuel Curtis died on January 6 1860, and he is buried in the churchyard of St Martin’s Parish Church.

14

La Chaire The valley still reveals much of Curtis’ work; as we go up we see numerous species of unusual plants bordering the lane. After a sharp bend, we leave the valley floor and begin a stiff climb that takes us up towards the mill. At the top of the hill, bear right at the junction, to ascend a little further. The building immediately behind the gates on the right is Rozel Mill.


Rozel Mill Evidence shows that there has been a mill on this site since 1219. Popinjay’s map of 1563 shows three windmills standing: Rozel Mill, St Ouen’s Mill and Grouville Mill, and at one time or another there have been 12 windmills and 38 watermills operating in the Island. Of the earlier windmills, we know that Sir George Carteret put one up at Elizabeth Castle. There were mills at Bel Royal and Mont Mado, and both Samarès Manor and Longueville Manor had their own. In medieval times the mills would have belonged to the King, the seigneur or one of the Norman abbeys that owned land in Jersey. In those days the tenants would have owed ‘suite de moulin’ to whoever owned the mill. This meant that, as well as being obliged to get their corn ground there, they had to offer cartage, labour and materials for the upkeep of the mill. One has to assume that the three windmills of Popinjay’s day must have been rebuilt or restored, as they, together with St Peter’s Mill which was built in 1837, are the only windmills still standing. At the end of Rue du Moulin, turn left. The post box, in the wall on the left, must have been installed during the last sixty years, as it carries the initials of the present monarch Elizabeth II. Walk on, and take the first right into La Rue du Blanc Pignon. This little-used lane has some fine granite properties along its length. After these traditional Jersey houses, a stand of bamboo at the foot of the hill comes as rather a surprise. As we near the yellow line, we see that this Green Lane has now become Rue de la Pallotterie. Judging by the map, the stream that passes beneath us is the dividing line between the two lanes. Turn right onto the main road, and using care, proceed along it for about half a mile. Pass Marett’s Forge and take the first left into Rue Belin. The big building on the left is St Martin’s Methodist Church. Leave the church and carry on down the lane. When the tarmac ends, follow the path on the left into the woods. At the bottom of the valley, don’t turn right, but go straight ahead up the walled path. When we emerge at the top, we can see Rosel Manor across the fields to our left. Rosel Manor This manor ranks second in importance only to St Ouen’s Manor, and it is one of the four that have the right to pay homage to the monarch when they visit the Island. When King John lost his lands in France, local knights were forced to decide who to follow. At Rosel Manor, the de Fourneaux family left Jersey to take sides with Philippe Augustus of France, their manor was escheated and, in 1247, it was granted to Drogo de Barentin, Warden of the Isles. In 1367, the de Barentins were forced to quit the Island, but before doing so Philippe de Barentin sold most of his property to his two lawyers; Raoul Lemprière and Guillaume Payn. Raoul Lemprière acquired Rosel Manor and Dielament Manor. The manor remained in Lemprière hands until 1467, when the unmarried male heir, Renaud Lemprière was killed at the siege of Mont Orgueil Castle. The manor passed through the female line to Catherine, who married Dominic Perrin. In 1625 the manor was sold to the de Carterets who owned it for over 100 years. In 1733, Charles Lemprière of Dielament Manor married Elizabeth Corbett. As Charles was a direct descendant of Raoul Lemprière, the manor returned into Lemprière ownership. It was Charles Lemprière who, in 1770, built the manor that we see today. Although he knocked down the original manor house, he left the medieval manorial chapel and the medieval colombier intact. In 1890, Philip Lemprière, Charles’ grandson, carried out extensive alterations; he covered the granite walls with cement and added the Gothic towers and crenellations. 15


Tour de Rozel

Rozel

La

ar

Ro ut

ran de Ro ute

La G

The V

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The Dolmen at Le Coup eron

M

l tel ga Ba

d oa eR

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te d Le Couperon Dolmen St. Saviour's Rou La Hospital This late Neolithic dolmen or burial chamber, which is about 5,000 YHA years old, is unique in two ways. It is one of only two gallery graves in the Channel Islands; a gallery grave unlike the more common Gorey Village Queen's passage graves has no side chambers. Secondly it’s made of Rozel Valley Conglomerate, a stone that is only found in this corner of Jersey. Reservoir The dolmen was excavated and ‘restored’ by Reverend Porter in 1868, and again in by the Société Jersiaise. What we see here nn stam I1919 ph ocqOne error, er is broadly correct. however, is the stone with the semiH e circular indentation in it that now blocks the entrance. This porthole Ville ès stone is one of a pair that should be sited roughly halfway alongRenauds the chamber, dividing the main chamber from an ante chamber. Royal Jersey

L

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he Valley stam in t p ic

ST. SAVIOUR

ST. HELIER

Ville ès Gaudins

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l Bay stamp oze he R e

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St Saviour's Parish Church & Hall

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Public Hall St Martin's Parish Church

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Government House

Rue au de la Ma Cr istr oix e

Ve

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Ville ès Nouaux

ST. MARTIN

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La Rue à la

Grande Route de la Trinité

Town Mills

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St. M a

The C

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ROZEL BAY

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TRINITY

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La Grande Route de la Trinité

The path becomes tarmac and we arrive at the end of Rue des BOULEY BAY er Mares. Here turn left. At the Les L'Etaquerel Croix crossroads some way ahead, go straight through into Rue Jardin du d'Olivet Scez. The lane right and Parish bends Hall left,Church and we are rewarded with Trinity Parish a view of the French coast in La s Picot turn, the distance. AvoidRuae èright Ville à on towards Evêque and carry straight Bott st and Thelelane amdrops Saie Harbour. ck p o away as we approach the beach. Just as the lane bends right, bear left up a track called La Rue des Fontenelles - footpath to Rozel Hill. Over to the right, what looks like a pile of stones, is actually a dolmen, which is a Stone Age burial site. The small a Croix building, behind the dolmen, was Victoria Village the guard house and powder magazine that supported two 24 pounder cannon sited on the headland behind. The two sta another cannon, together y Armswith initthe far sidempofh Rozel batteryTron Bay, provided cross-fire to protect the anchorage below.

GROUVILLE

La

Golf Club

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Follow the track as it meanders past a small reservoir, turns sharp right, and continues uphill. When we eventually reach the main road, turn right and descend back to RozelGrouville Bay.Parish At the bottom of the hill, Church & Hall bear left and TheoadRozel Bay is immediately in front of you. Longueville

Dicq

Lo eR nguevill

DISCLAIMER: While every effort is taken to ensure the accuracy of information in this booklet, Fauvic no liability can be accepted by the author or the publishers for any loss, damage or injury caused by errors in, or omissions from, the information given. lons

16

s Sab e de ut Ro

Bagot

ST. CLEMENT

St Clement's Parish Church

C

.

ish Church

e le m

nt

c Fauvi ue du La R

Le Hurel

Go


Walk 6

Le Hocq Inn

Mileage: 2 Miles

Time: 45 minutes

Full The Ecrehous

Difficulty: Medium

details of Le Hocq Inn are shown on pages 20-21

e Harbour

La Coupe

FLIQUET BAY St Catherine's Breakwater

erclut Belval Cove

Life Boat Station ST. CATHERINE'S BAY

Archirondel

orey

Leave the pub, turn right and right again into Rue du Hocq. As one might expect in this densely populated parish, we find a large Anne Port number of houses along this Saut lane, theLeage ofGeoffroi these properties ranging from the 18th century to the present day. St Clement is Jersey’s smallest parish, being only 1.7 square miles, yet it is Gorey homeHarbour to just over 8,000 people.

At the crossroads, continue on into Rue du Pignon, and then take the first left at the Green Lane sign. When we reach the yellow line at the top of Rue de Genestet, turn sharp right into a narrow Green Lane. This is ROYAL the BAY start of the coffin path that OFdescends to St Clement’s Church. GROUVILLE The path crosses two lanes on its way down so be aware of traffic. Just before we cross the second lane we arrive at the St Clement’s Millennium Stone.

St Clement’s Millennium Stone These stones were put up to celebrate the new Millennium, they are made from Ronez granite and the plaque in front of the stone tells us who assisted or sponsored the project. The Constable of the parish is named, Stan Le Cornu, who was in office then and the parish crest, the anchor, is highlighted. The parish crests were designed by the art master at Victoria College, Mr. R. G. Wright, and a noted historian of the day, Major N. V. L. Rybot. They chose the anchor because it’s believed that St Clement was martyred by being tied to an anchor and then thrown into the Black Sea. The crests were created especially for the visit of George V and Queen Mary in 1921. Leave the stone and walk ahead, bearing slightly right, into the footpath across the road. The view from this part of the walk is fabulous. On a clear day, the coast of France, Seymour Tower, Icho Tower and Le Hocq Tower, where we started, are all easily spotted. Descend further and we arrive at St Clement’s Church. 17


St Clement’s Church In common with most parish churches in Jersey, St Clement’s Church has at its heart an ancient Norman church which predates the Norman Conquest. Like other churches of the time, it sent tithes to the mother house in Normandy which, in 1090, was the Abbey of St Saveur Le Vicomte.

Cross over to the pavement at the far side of the road. Then turn left and take the first right into Rue de Jambart. Notice the marriage stone in the wall of the building that makes the corner.

The church grew during the 15th century, when a chancel and transepts were added to give the shape of the cross. At the same time the roof was raised and clad in stone, necessitating the addition of buttresses to support the extra weight. The belfry and the spire were added just before the Reformation. The church that we see at present is the product of a major restoration in the late 19th century.

ge Marriaes Ston

Marriage Stone Traditionally called marriage stones, these initialled blocks of stone can be seen throughout the Island. They have been used to record anything from a marriage, a date of inheritance, an anniversary or indeed, anything of significance. The dates range from the late 16th century to the early part of the 19th century, though naturally there are a few modern ones around. What one must remember is that the initials are quite often the initials of the syllables in the name. The stone that we see here is a good example; it records Jean de la Mare marrying Jeanne Godfray. 18


S

d

in art t. M eS

Ville ès Gaudins

La G

ran de Ro ute

fant de Mau

Village

La

Gr a

te ou eR nd

Maufant

tin ar

uet

t. eS

M

e la Hougue Bie te d St. Saviour's Rou La Hospital

nd e

Ro ut

me Da

Government House

le tel ga Ba

The C

Village ountry Inn sta ’s C m

Queen's Valley Reservoir

ry

Ville ès Renauds

GROUVILLE

ad Ro

Royal Jersey Golf Club

e Ru La on àD

wn Hall

Bagot

o ad Lo eR nguevill

Grouville Parish Church & Hall

lons

Walk down Rue de Jambart. Just Fauvic before we reach the coast, turn m a l s r V s tam he leyuesdtuaFm auvic ity A right up another Green Lane; ph in mt ent rin La R p c T St Clement's i C le Dicq Parish Church Rue du Prince. Ascend the lane Le Hurel St . C S La G ra nde e lemen d R Havre Des Pas oute t's R and turn left at the junction at oa d Le Rocquier the top. The view here is also Pontac exceptional, over to the right is Le Squez La Grande Rout ed e la the suburban side of St Clement; St Clement's Cô te Parish Hall Le Marais the four tower blocks of Le Le Haguais 6 Estate La Rocque Le Hocq Marais, Le Rocquier Secondary Samarès ST. CLEMENT'S BAY School immediately in front of Le Nez us and Nicolle Tower, a Victorian La Rocque Harbour folly, on the skyline on the right. Green Island To Icho Tower While over on the left, the full sweep of St Clement’s Bay, with La Rocque Harbour and the coast To Les Minquers of France presents itself. Inn stamp l Bay stamp e z he ocq he Ro H r e Continue on, and at the junction e where Rue de la Houguette meets La Rue du Hocq turn left to return back to our starting point. t.

re he

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The V

ST. CLEMENT

Th e

ROYA O GROU

s Sab e de ut Ro

Longueville

Le Hocq Tower an d e La Gr

Parish Church

Gorey

ere ph

ST. SAVIOUR ST. HELIER

Gorey

nd Bottle stam ka c p o

re he

St Saviour's Parish Church & Hall

YHA

a Five Gr Oaks La

St. M a

La Rue à la

Grande Route de la Trinité

Town Mills

de Faldo

La

Mont a l'Abbé

ed

La

L

e

re

Th

te et 'Az ed ev Gr

DISCLAIMER: While every effort is taken to ensure the accuracy of information in this booklet, no liability can be accepted by the author or the publishers for any loss, damage or injury caused by errors in, or omissions from, the information given.

19

To Seymo


Ale Trail Pub Info All pubs feature Liberation Ale Jersey’s locally brewed beer, a fantastic range of wines and great pub food.

The Cock & Bottle Royal Square, St Helier, Jersey, JE2 4WA Tel: 01534 722184 Opening Times: Monday – Sunday, 11am to 11pm Food Times: Monday – Saturday, 12pm to 5pm Sunday 12pm to 3pm A traditional Jersey Pub and Brasserie boasting a large al fresco dining area actually in the Royal square. Meander the day away enjoying fine food and chilled wines and beers. Using only the finest ingredients their menu incorporates classic French dishes alongside traditional pub favourites, with many of the dishes offered in two sizes to suit your mood and appetite.

The Post Horn Hue Street, St Helier, Jersey, JE2 3RE Tel: 01534 872853 Opening Times: Monday – Saturday, 10am to 11pm Sunday, 11am to 11pm Food Times: Breakfast: Monday – Saturday, 10am to 11am Lunch: Monday – Saturday, 12pm to 2.30pm Dinner: Monday – Saturday, 6pm to 8.30pm A great “locals” pub with a large al fresco area, which is a real sun trap. Traditional furnishings, cosy corners and a real fire always roaring in the colder months. Play pub games such as darts and crib whilst enjoying your favourite tipple from the terrific range of beers and lagers on offer. A function room is available for all occasions. The food is simply good pub food.

20

www.liberationgroup.com

The Town House 57 New Street, St Helier, Jersey, JE2 3RA Tel: 01534 615000 Opening Times: Monday – Sunday, 10.30am to 11pm Offers a great range of real ales and wines. Thelma’s Show Lounge above The Town House is gaining a reputation as being one of the best live music venues in Jersey, bringing over legendary artists and showcasing the best of Jersey’s local talent every weekend. There is also a function room for party hire.

St Mary’s Country Inn La Rue des Buttes, St Mary, Jersey, JE3 3DS Tel: 01534 482897 Opening Times Monday – Saturday, 10am to 11pm Sunday, 11am to 11pm Food Times Lunch: Monday – Sunday, 12pm to 2.30pm Dinner: Monday – Saturday, 6pm to 9pm Sunday, 5pm to 8pm Provides a contemporary interior with modern twists, creating a comfortable, relaxed dining and drinking atmosphere on two levels, linked through a stunning open fire place. The menu offers imaginative food at reasonable prices, including traditional favourites, grills, espetadas and scrummy puddings! The alfresco area is the perfect place to eat and drink on warm sunny days, with a fire pit to ward off any early evening chill. Their games room has everything from a pool table to giant connect four and jenga!


Trinity Arms

Rozel Bar & Restaurant

La Rue des Picots, Trinity, Jersey, JE3 5JX Tel: 01534 864691 Opening Times Monday – Sunday, 11am to 11pm Food Times Breakfast: Monday – S  aturday, 10am to 11am Lunch: Monday – S  aturday, 12pm to 2pm Sunday, 12pm to 3pm Dinner: Monday – Saturday, 6pm to 8.30pm

Rozel Bay, Trinity, Jersey, JE3 6AJ Tel: 01534 869801 Opening Times Monday – Sunday, 11am to 11pm Food Times (Summer) Lunch: Monday – Saturday, 12pm to 2.15pm Dinner: Monday – Saturday, 6pm to 9pm

The perfect place for all occasions, whether it’s a quick daytime bite or an evening meal with friends and family. Dine al fresco in the summer months on the large terrace or simply sit and enjoy a cool drink or two. There are live sports shown in the games bar and an outside play area for the kids.

The Victoria in the Valley St Peter’s Valley, St Peter, Jersey, JE3 7EG Tel: 01534 485498 Opening Times: Monday – Sunday, 11am to 11pm Food Times: (Summer) Lunch: Monday – Saturday, 12pm to 2.15pm Sunday, 12pm to 3pm Dinner: Monday – Saturday, 6pm to 9pm Everything a traditional pub should be. A wonderfully relaxing environment, with great sun-terraces in the summer and a crackling log fire in the winter. Service the way it should be, friendly and knowledgeable. Offering the best draught and cask ales, ciders and fine wines. The food is a delicious tribute to traditional specialities with a commitment to using the best produce from the British Isles and Jersey. Their seasonal dishes are freshly cooked, bringing out the best natural flavours.

A traditional pub set in the heart of the picturesque fishing bay of Rozel and lying at the foot of a beautiful wooded valley. A wood-burning stove is there for the winter months, as well as an al fresco area for outside dining and separate beer garden for those hot summer days. The food is a tribute to the best local ingredients served in a relaxed and comfortable environment, with the freshest fish and seafood direct from the local fisherman.

Le Hocq Inn La Grande Route de la Cote, St Clement, Jersey, JE2 6EP Tel: 01534 854924 Opening Times: Monday – Sunday, 11am to 11pm Food Times Lunch: Monday – Saturday, 12pm to 2pm Sunday, 12pm to 6pm Dinner: Monday – Saturday, 6pm to 9pm A traditional Jersey pub in a fabulous coastal setting boasts dishes ranging from local moules, sizzlers, homemade chips and desserts. They use the freshest local produce, including local seafood and Jersey royals. There is a newly decked al fresco area. A function room with beautiful views is also available to hire for any occasion and plenty of parking opposite the pub.

21


Y

ey in the Vall ia or t ic V e h T

St Mary’s C ountry Inn

Take a trip around Jersey’s finest pubs and experience iconic landmarks, picturesque countryside and fabulous sea views on these carefully planned walking routes.

For further information visit

www.jersey.com Jersey Tourism, Liberation Place, St Helier, Jersey JE1 1BB Tel: +44 (0)1534 448877 Fax: +44 (0)1534 448899 E-mail: info@jersey.com

01

All information correct at time of print - March 2015

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