2022 RELOCATE 2 Metro Detroit

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Neighborhoods

The following provides an overview to some of the neighborhoods that make up Detroit.

Downtown and Immediate Vicinity

Boundary Streets: Fisher Freeway, Lodge Freeway, I-375, Detroit River Downtown has seen an influx of new lofts and apartments in recent years. Some are new construction while others have a certain cache that results from the creative reuse of exciting building stock. The reintroduction of residential living in downtown Detroit is the result of other renewal projects that created the critical mass necessary for these types of projects to flourish.

Midtown/Cultural Center

Boundary Streets: Lodge Freeway, I-94, Brush, Alexandrine The neighborhood bordering Wayne State University has become a trendy zip code. An influx of new housing, both university-funded and private, has transformed this historic neighborhood into one of Detroit’s more desirable retail and housing markets. New restaurants, clubs and entertainment facilities have brought portions of Woodward and Cass Avenues back to life. A mixture of luxury apartments, turn of the century townhouses and upscale ultra-modern loft/condo complexes make up the housing profile of this eclectic neighborhood. West Canfield, between Second and Third Avenues, is a historic cobblestone street with Victorian era houses. The focal point of this neighborhood is its cultural offerings. Residents are within walking distance of the Detroit Cultural Center, which includes the DIA, the Main Library, art galleries, theaters and the Max M. Fisher Music Center, home of the Detroit Symphony Orchestra.

New Center

Boundary Streets: Virginia Park, Baltimore St., Brush St., Byron St. The New Center area is just north of Midtown/Cultural Center. It offers an inviting mix of commercial, office, and residential development. The Fisher Building is the focal point of this neighborhood that offers a variety of entertainment and restaurant options. New Center is home to the State of Michigan offices at Cadillac Place (the former GM Headquarters building), the Henry Ford Hospital complex, and a number of historic churches. Many parts of New Center are recognized on local or national registers of historic places.

Lafayette Park/Elmwood Park Boundary Streets: Larned, I-75, Mt. Elliott, Gratiot/Vernor

The Lafayette Park/Elmwood Park area represents one of Detroit’s most ambitious and successful redevelopment efforts. Nearly 8,000 townhouses, co-ops, and apartments have been built in these two neighborhoods since the 1950s, attracting people from all economic and social strata. Located just east of downtown and north of Rivertown, Lafayette Park and Elmwood Park is populated with people working downtown and in the Cultural and New Center areas. The neighborhood’s proximity to all the major metro-area freeways also make it a favorite of many people working outside the City. Designed to be visually and environmentally appealing, a greenbelt of parks and bike paths winds through the residential developments of both neighborhoods.

Boston-Edison/Arden Park

Boston-Edison Boundary Streets: W. Boston Boulevard, Edison Avenue, Woodward Avenue, Linwood Avenue, Arden Park Boundary Streets: Woodward, Arden Park, Oakland Avenue, East Boston Boulevard This area is characterized by spacious historic homes on broad, tree-lined streets and boulevards. Boston-Edison and Arden Park were built by auto barons and retail giants. Boston-Edison is comprised of single-family homes built between 1904 and 1922. The neighborhood is the largest single-family residential historical district in the state and is listed in the state and national registers of historic sites. Across Woodward Avenue is Arden Park. Like Boston Edison, prominent business professionals built most of the homes in Arden Park. The neighborhood has a historic designation. Blessed Sacrament Cathedral is the major landmark.

Indian Village

Indian Village Boundary Streets: East Jefferson, Mack, Burns, Seminole Located on what was originally a French farm, Indian Village is one of the finest residential neighborhoods on Detroit’s east side. In the 1890s, the land was subdivided into spacious lots and oak, elm and maple trees were planted to shade the three main streets. Many of the trees still stand. Most of the district’s fine residences were built between 1900 and 1925. Today, the area retains much of its original charm and elegance. Some 360 homes are included in Indian Village, which is listed on the state and national registers of historic sites. It is a Detroit historic district.

Palmer Woods/Sherwood Forest

Palmer Woods Boundary Streets: Evergreen Cemetery, Seven Mile Rd., Woodward, Pembroke, Sherwood Forest Boundary Streets: Pembroke, Seven Mile Rd., Parkside, Livernois Palmer Woods and Sherwood Forest are located In the northwest-central section of the City. Both neighborhoods are west of Woodward and north of Seven Mile Road. Palmer Woods was created in 1916. Adjacent to Palmer Woods are the Sherwood Forest and Sherwood Forest Manor subdivisions, which were laid out at approximately the same time. Both Palmer Woods and Sherwood Forest are characterized by tree-shaded, winding streets and unusually shaped lots. In a city where most streets run at right angles, the curving streets of Palmer Woods and Sherwood Forest provide a unique setting. There are a number of public and private schools in the area including, the prestigious University of Detroit Jesuit High School and Academy.

University District/ Detroit Golf Club Properties

Boundary Streets: Seven Mile Road, Six Mile Road, Parkside, Livernois The University District is a placid setting just south of Sherwood Forest. It was named for its proximity to the main campus of the University of Detroit Mercy. It is a neighborhood of manicured lawns and peaceful streets shaded by a canopy of trees. The University of Detroit Mercy’s Memorial Clock Tower is the area’s landmark. Residents of the University District enjoy a relaxed atmosphere usually found in the suburbs. Palmer Park and the Detroit Golf Club offer recreational opportunities. Along the outer edge of the Detroit Golf Club are some of Detroit’s most opulent homes reflecting the district’s variety of architectural styles.

North Rosedale Park/ Rosedale Park/Grandmont

North Rosedale Boundary Streets: Grand River, McNichols, Southfield Freeway, Evergreen, Rosedale Park Boundary Streets: Lyndon, Grand River, Southfield Freeway, Outer Drive, Grandmont Boundary Streets: School craft, Grand River, Asbury Park, Southfield Freeway Many people choose North Rosedale Park, Rosedale Park, and Grandmont because of their beauty and value. Many of the homes were custom built with a craftsmanship that cannot be duplicated today. The houses are spacious and many include extras such as libraries, breakfast rooms and finished basements. A variety of architectural styles create an unusual diversity of curbside appeal in these neighborhoods. North Rosedale Park boasts the only neighborhood-owned recreational park in the City of Detroit. 5