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PITTSBURGH 2024 CLARA LEE JEREMY LU VICTORIA PAI KELSEY SIMPSON



TABLE OF CONTENTS MISSION STATEMENT

PHASE 0O

CONTEXT 10 OVERVIEW 12 SITE ISSUES 12 SYSTEMS

PHASE 01

OLYMPICS 18 PAST OLYMPICS 19 2024 PITTSBURGH SUMMER GAMES

PHASE 02

LEGACY 28 32 34 38 44 XX

SUSTAINED LEGACY OF THE GAMES 2030 VISION SPINE OF TOWERS ALLEGHENY AQUA CENTER MARKET PAVILION CONCLUSION

CREDITS



MISSION STATEMENT



07 MISSION STATEMENT

TO CONNECT, RE-DEVELOP, AND REVITALIZE PITTSBURGH’S INFRASTRUCTURE BY HOSTING THE 2024 SUMMER OLYMPIC GAMES, A WORLDUNITING EVENT THAT WOULD SERVE AS A CATALYST FOR LASTING IMPACT IN THE COMMUNITY.



CONTEXT


HEINZ FIELD HEINZ FIELD

PNC PARK PNC PARK FORT DUQUESNE BRIDGE BRIDGE FORT DUQUESNE

POINT STATE PARK POINT STATE PARK 6TH ST. BRIDGE 6TH ST. BRIDGE

7TH ST. BRIDGE 7TH S

DOWNTOWN DOWNTOWN

above view of downtown Pittsburgh in relation to the Northside

overview From its founding in 1788 to its current state today, the previous municipality of Allegheny City has always had a unique character. It was eventually was absorbed into the jurisdiction of Pittsburgh after more than a century of operating independently. The post-war period technological and economic breakthroughs swept the nation

with excitement for the modern and its promise of a better life. In Pittsburgh, Allegheny Center became the premier site of urban renewal experimentation, with over 500 buildings razed to make way for a 1,000,000 square foot mall to serve the greater Pittsburgh area. Rather than repeat the modernist mistakes of leveling the heighborhood, this proposal

seeks to work with the existing context without conceding a grand and bold vision to reimagine Pittsburgh.


11 CONTEXT

ALLEGHENY CENTER

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ST. BRIDGE 9TH ST. BRIDGE

16TH ST. BRIDGE


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NATIONAL AVIARY

I-279 RIVERS CASINO

LIGHT RAIL

PNC PARK HEINZ FIELD

ST

EA

AY

SW

BU

CONVENTION CENTER

STEEL PLAZA

POINT PARK MARKET SQUARE

MELLON SQUARE

28x

CONSOL CENTER

DUQUENSE UNIVERSITY

61s - 71s

MOUNTWASHINGTON

28x

*HOTELS *LANDMARK

WALKING UTES MIN 10

WALKING UTES MIN 10

ALKING TES W INU 5M

MATTRESS FACTORY

ALKING TES W INU CARNEGIE 5M LIBRARY

NATIONAL AVIARY

NEW HAZLETT THEATER CHILDREN’S MUSEUM

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LIGHT RAIL

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LIGHT RAIL

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top left overall existing site assests top right overall existing site transportation bottom left ten-minute walk circle, transportation bottom right ten-minute walk circle, site assests

site issues One of the site’s most obvious issues starts with I-279, the primary artery connecting the suburbs to downtown Pittsburgh. Although the problem is obvious, the solution is not nearly so clear, given the extensive use of the highway during rush hours, merely tearing down the highway is not a feasible solution. The highway is among one of several barriers on the site

which isolate and alienate this central node in the Northside from its neighbors and the region at large. Physically and visually, these manmade and natural barriers become walls from the human perspective, and isolate the site from its surrounding neighbors. Because of this, the site tends to be used by people coming in for very specific

needs; corporate jobs at the Allegheny office complex, a trip to the Children’s museum, or a Pirates Game, rather than random and leisurely use. The existing program is also primarily daytime oriented, with little opportunity to extend in to the nighttime, besides the occasional Pirates or Steelers game by the riverside.


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CONTEXT

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systems opportunity Despite the prevailing issues on the site, there are several assets in the proximity that are particularly promising. The existing light rail and its Northside station are some of the most critical existing features. Although the barriers are large and imposing, several systems in the existing framework begin to break those walls down. The site is within a ten minute walk

of several existing attractions that bring in users from all over the city, particularly, the sports stadium, the Children’s Museum, and the New Hazlett Theater. Downtown Pittsburgh is also a ten minute walk connected by the Roberto Clemente Bridge that connects the Northside to Pittsburgh’s Cultural District, home to some of the most prevalent insti-

tutions the city has to offer. The site also sits on a flat plateau, overlooking the river and the Downtown skyline, a primary viewpoint that some of Pittsburgh’s most popular sites, Heinz Field and PNC Park have taken advantage of for the views of the city. The Allegheny Commons make up a ring of green space that is often used for pop-up events.



THE OLYMPICS


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top timeline of past summer Olympic host cities and figure ground of respective master plans

past olympics The Olympics have historically been an event of great prestige and spectacle. The games is a symbol of desired world unity and common celebration, bringing together athletes representing ninety-some countries to participate in the 16-day event. The cost of prestige, however, is often quantitatively more detrimental than beneficial to the host city--the Olympics are notorious for being absurdly over-budget, and much of the Olympic infrastructure and program are little used after the games. The venues used for the 2004 Athens games is in a

state of disrepair--a common fate for Olympic program--and every Olympic games thus far has been drastically over budget. The event brings a country great pride while it is taking place, but can cripple it in the long run, as is seen in Greece as it faces economic depression, record unemployment, and poverty. History has seen host cities fail to sustain use of Olympic venues, and the games themselves, costing billions of dollars at the expense of the city’s residents, have failed to bring lasting social and economic change for cities like Athens.

The notable exception to this trend is the 1992 Barcelona Summer games. Prior to the games, Barcelona had seen the need to renew its infrastructure and bring life back into the city. The Olympic games was used as a catalyst for major infrastructural overhaul, and allowed the city to invest a hefty budget into revitalizing its waterfront--all within an accelerated timeline as the city prepared for the games. In Barcelona’s approach, the games were not the end goal; rather, the city used the event to propel momentum for the infrastructural changes it needed to thrive as a city of the future.


17 THE OLYMPICS

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Despite the heavy criticism of the games, the opportunity it presents to the host city is still of great value--Pittsburgh could utilize this world event as a catalyst for change, but could also restore a positive perception of the games and set an example for future host cities. In addition to learning from the 1992 Barcelona games, the 2012 London games as well as the upcoming 2020 Tokyo games are useful as precedents in the implementation of the Olympics in Pittsburgh. The London Summer games prepared a comprehensive legacy plan that prepared Olympic

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venues for a life after the event, including housing, sports recreation, and commercial program. The 2020 Tokyo plan proposes using existing venues throughout the city rather than creating completely new venues that would remain half-used after the games. Pittsburgh’s city scale could easily implement a similar concept, and utilize existing sports venues to host the games, with strategic additions to support the capacity needed for the games. Preparing for the games with this approach allows Pittsburgh to improve citywide connectivity for both Olympic and post-Olympic use.


top left cultural and sports assets of Pittsburgh top right waterfront walking circles and sightlines middle right waterfront green spaces bottom right proposed metro lines

2024 pittsburgh summer games Ultimately, the issues seen on the Northside reflect larger infrastructural and density problems seen citywide. While Pittsburgh has seen great improvement since its initial post-industrial era depression, the city still struggles with outdated transportation systems and high vacancy rates. The 2024 Summer Games would bring the kind of international

prestige that would cause a great influx of both visitors and new residents to Pittsburgh. The 16-day event is broadcasted to approximately 2 billion people worldwide, providing a unique opportunity to rebrand and advertise the city’s amenities. The Olympic Games itself brings upwards of two million people to the host city (spectators, athletes, officials), which

would force Pittsburgh to prepare for future population influxes by revamping transportation systems and densifying areas to entertain the Olympic entourage. The sports culture is already deeply embedded in Pittsburgh. The city has major championship teams--the Steelers (football), Pirates (baseball), Penguins (ice hockey); no one


19

THE OLYMPICS


top overall view of proposal during Olympic festivities

rounds the sports teams. Pittsburgh natives bleed black and yellow, and it is this same fanatic energy that can be used to transform the city. One could argue that Pittsburgh, in fact, could benefit from increased sports infrastructure to capitalize on sports frenzy. Is it possible that the Northside could become a sports center for the city following the

Olympic Games? Instead of implementing completely new programs on the site, perhaps a sports-oriented Northside could thrive based on existing relationships with Heinz Field and PNC Park, which already draw significant crowds to the waterfront. The Olympics could give the appropriate impetus for this densification to occur, and to effect lasting

infrastructural change for Pittsburgh--all the while, giving the city a new image on an international scale.


21

THE OLYMPICS


ALLEGHENY RIVER

AQUA CENTERcapacity: 6,000

COST CENTER 250,000 gsf

HEINZ FIELD

capacity: 65,000

NORTH SHORE STADIUM capacity: 50,000

PNC PARK

capacity: 40,000

PETERSON EVENT CENTER CONSOL CENTER

capacity: 12,500

capacity: 19,000

SCHENELY PARK 456 acres

above Olympic program dispersed throughout Pittsburgh’s existing sports assets top right new media coverage pavilion in Allegheny Center during Olympics bottom right view of the main Olympic plaza and tower coming up from metro station


23

THE OLYMPICS


above Olympic pool inside Allegheny Aqua Center during the games




LEGACY PLAN


axonometric Olympic Plaza in legacy phasing


29 LEGACY sustained legacy of the games The transition from Olympic events to sustainable post-games program is often the greatest challenge in planning for the games, and also the most important factor in choosing the host-city. Densification can be sustained post-Olympics through proposed infrastructural changes such as the implementation of expanded metro lines throughout the city. The existing metro stop at the junction between Heinz Field and PNC park allows a great population influx onto the site during and after the games. The hotel and residential towers will retain their function so that the Allegheny Center site can be established as a major node in the city with an increased number of inhabitants.


OFFICE BLOCK 250,000 GSF RING ROAD 5,000+ LF

RESIDENTIAL 250,000 GSF

RESIDENTIAL 250,000 GSF

OFFICE COMPLEX 1.2 MILLION GSF

RESIDENTIAL 250,000 GSF OFFICE BLOCK 150,000 GSF

INDUSTRIAL 75,000 GSF

RESTAURANT 50,000 GSF

RESTAURANT 50,000 GSF

PARKING 60,000 GSF

RESTAURANT 50,000 GSF STAGE AE 35,000 GSF

top left existing buildings to be repurposed, altered, or demolished top right circulation paths on site based on different user profiles

2030 vision An easily accessible network into and throughout the site is a core concern that is addressed in many ways throughout our proposal. A core device is the implementation of a spine; a central corridor of key landmarks and wide path-finding walkways that allow a user to easily and quickly access and traverse the site. Anchored at the highly trafficked existing

North Shore subway stop, it effectivly penetrates the site to end at the existing Allegheny General Hospital. Key program including Olympic housing, commercial space, F&B, green space, and the Olympic pool follow the spine across the entirety of Allegheny Center. The prevailing perception of the Olympic Games legacy is often one short-lived ,

as seen in many of the precedents, where the urban realm undergoes a radical metamorphosis for a mere sixteen day event. However, exceptions can occur when cities plan their Olympic proposals for enduring legacy. The Olympic Games are only one piece of a greater master plan that is sustained by its residents, long after the Games are gone.


31

MARKET

BAR URBAN FARM

MUSEUM

THEATRE

F&B

AQUA CENTER

P SCHOOL

AIRPORT

T2

M T1 MUSEUM PNC PARK PARK TRAIL

In the years after the Olympics, the site will redevelop in its use to better accommodate the existing residents. The Olympic Aqua Center will operate as a large recreation center with various gyms, training rooms, and other programs that promote individual health and well-being. The pool has potential appeal to local schools, universities, and clubs

which lack an Olympic size pool currently. The market, home to the media and press relations during the Games, picks up operation again as mixed temporary and permanent retail space that strings together several new proposed cultural institutions as well.

LEGACY

TLIFE

ALLEGHENY GENERAL


5 1 4

1

2

above site plan


33 LEGACY

12

11

10

8 9 7

6 1

SITE PLAN 5 1

3

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12

HEINZ FIELD OLYMPIC STADIUM PNC PARK T1 TOWER + EXISTING METRO STOP SKYBRIDGE T2 TOWER T3 TOWER OLYMPIC PLAZA ALLEGHENY AQUA CENTER MARKET T4 TOWER ALLEGHENY GENERAL HOSPITAL


T2 & T3 SAME STACK

RESIDENTIAL

OFFICE

top left sectional perspective showing T1 facing Northside top right sectional perspective showing the waterfront and T2 and T3

spine of towers The existing South Side station is a critical point of existing infrastructure with the potential for increasing pedestrian traffic, mass transport accessibility, and waterfront access. The current light rail of Pittsburgh runs from downtown to the Northside with stops located between PNC Park and Heinz Field. Because of the existing limitations of the infrastruc-

ture, the Northside station is a crucial starting point to the start of a spine which carves out a path from the waterfront to most northern part of the site, Allegheny General Hospital. A spine of towers creates a pedestrian way-finding strategy on site that help users contextualize their environment within the larger urban realm. Creating towers allows

for more office, residential, hotel, and commercial program, helping the densification of the overall site. The heights of each tower are successively stepped down--the highest tower grows out of the existing Northside metro station, forming a transit oriented development, while the last residential tower compliments the height of Allegheny General. Important nodes


35 LEGACY

HOTEL

~300,000 GSF

RESIDENTIAL

~200,000 GSF

OFFICE

~400,000 GSF

PUBLIC

of program, like the market a home for more permanent and Aqua Center, branch off residents of the Northside. from the spine, organizing the site’s program through a common path generated by the spine. During the Olympics, the towers help to house officials from the International Olympic Committee; after the games, the rentable units will house those coming into the city from the airport as well as provide


above overall spine diagram


37

LEGACY


above axonometric of major public spaces and the south entrance of the Aqua Center


39 LEGACY

allegheny aqua center The reprogramming of the existing Allegheny office complex proposes a large gym and training complex. Underneath and embedded within the new interventions, lies the original plinth and structure, which would be reinforced to accommodate the loads of the new program. After the Olympics, the Aqua Center is inherited by the community, providing a

place of recreation and activity for a larger and more diverse user group. The Olympic size pool would be the first in Pittsburgh, generating use from local schools, universities, and clubs who might take advantage from the Aqua Center’s facilities. Because the program is typically on an early morning to late night schedule, the gym program creates another

opportunity for the site to generate 24/7 activity. Terraced steps and seats are offset from the main plinth eroding the definition between street and building, as was one of the primary issues the original building presented. The roof ’s form, similar to the market’s, is informed by the pedestrian street grid and opened up in key areas as light wells.


DIVING POOL

OLYMPIC POOL

ATRIUM

F&B

top left Aqua Center lower level plan top right Aqua Center first level plan bottom sectional perspective facing downtown Pittsburgh (south)

LOBBY ATRIUM

OLYMPIC POOL

DIVING POOL

PARKING/SERVICE

LOWER LEVEL


F&B

F&B

TRAINING

DIVING POOL

OLYMPIC POOL

LOBBY ATRIUM

TRAINING

LEGACY

TRAINING

41

FIRST LEVEL


above view showing west entrance to Aqua Center


43

LEGACY


top left public spaces adjacent to new market top right market plan bottom right post-Olympic usage of market pavilion

market pavilion Part of the issues that were identified with the original site had to do with a lack of variety in the program. The market’s main concourse is popualted with permanent stalls that would be used early in the morning and through the late afternoon. Blocks of program are arrayed along the market plan which contain more nighttime oriented activity, including restaurants, bars, and a cinema. To compliment the Children’s Museum and the New Hazlett Theater, a dance studio directly linked to the New Hazlett and an art gallery repurposed from an existing school have extend-

ed the site’s cultural program. The market’s programming and circulation intentionally continue the line of the tower spine to draw in more users in to the Northside from the existing metro station. The modular form of the roof is informed from the diagrid of circulation path to blend in with the urban landscape, rather than stand out. The market funnels in movement and acitivity and is intended to operate at all hours. Making the market’s main concourse public and open create a brightly lit, active, and covered pathway for pedestrians walking late at night.

The current site benefits from a lively farmer’s market once a week that take place along the original Commons, the green perimeter of the Alleghey complex. The Commons were critical to the placement of the market on the site, which provide spillover for the new market as well as provide space for more temporary stalls and events. Smaller plots of the pedestrian grid were broken up on the southeast side to provide vendors space to grow fresh produce to be sold in the market.


URBAN FARM

DANCE STUDIO

RESTAURANT

RETAIL

ART GALLERY

RESTAURANTS

MARKET

CINEMA

LEGACY

RETAIL

45

GROUND LEVEL


above night time aerial view of new development in Northside




49 LEGACY

conclusion Ultimately, this proposal attempts to envision radical changes for the Northside neighborhoods that could revitalize and densify the district as well as improve its connectivity and accessibility to the rest of Pittsburgh. In exploring issues and possible solutions to the Northside, the project natural expands and comments on the state of the city as well. Citywide infrastructure must be upgraded in order to prepare Pittsburgh for the future. While the Olympics is a unique event, the games themselves are not the end goal, and are not even necessary for the realization of the proposed changes to the Northside. The games do, however, symbolize a large part of what urban designers and architects aspire to accomplish: it provides an opportunity to reimagine a city surrounded by excitement and promise, to embark on a journey to becoming its best form in the hopes of establishing lasting energy for its inhabitants , all the while inviting international spectators to also participate in its potential.



51 CREDITS

TEAM FLEXHUB

Urban Design Studio at Carnegie Mellon University with Heinz Architectural Center, Carnegie Museum of Art

KELSEY SIMPSON

CLARA LEE JEREMY LU

VICTORIA PAI

SPECIAL THANKS RAMI EL SAMAHY, URBAN DESIGN STUDIO INSTRUCTOR, CARNEGIE MELLON UNIVERSITY FRED THIEMAN, PRESIDENT, BUHL FOUNDATION DIANA BUCCO, VICE PRESIDENT, BUHL FOUNDATION RAY GASTIL, CITY PLANNING DIRECTOR, CITY OF PITTSBURGH ANDREW DASH, ASSISTANT DIRECTOR STRATEGIC PLANNING, CITY OF PITTSBURGH DANIEL CESSNA, DISTRICT EXECUTIVE, PENNDOT ENGINEERING DISTRICT 11 PAT HASKELL, PATRICK HASSETT, ASSISTANT DIRECTOR, BUREAU OF TRANSPORTATION AND ENGINEERING, DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS JEREMY LEVENTHAL, MANAGING PARTNER, FAROS PROPERTIES CHRIS SEIFERT, DEPUTY DIRECTOR, CHILDREN’S MUSEUM OF PITTSBURGH ANDREW WICKESBERG, PRESIDENT, ALLEGHENY CITY CENTRAL ASSOCIATION



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