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Jeremiah Wistrom

Portfolio & Process Book


Beginning Graphic Design/ GRPH 221 Professor Stacy Asher University of Nebraska-Lincoln Department of Art and Art History Fall Semester 2013

Jeremiah Wistrom

Portfolio & Process Book


Project 01 Exercise 01

Project 02

Exercise 02 Project 03

Exercise 03

Project 04 Exercise 04

This portfolio will illustrate the expansion of my knowledge regarding the graphic design field.


Project

01

What Is Graphic Design Designing systems for making meaning out of designed artifacts. Gathering form, organizing content, creating effective visual communications. The primary objective of this project is to establish a sharper understanding of what graphic design is by engaging with an area, gathering examples of form, and organizing them in a manner that visually communicates an idea regarding a graphic design principle, or the history of graphic design as an art form. This task represented a unique opportunity for me to research graphic design by going through an artistic process, as opposed to reading about the topic in a textbook. While collecting images within my environment, I began to explore two distinct directions. The first of which, is what I classified as instructional signage. This signage ranged from “No Parking” signs, to “Stop” signs, to “Open” signs, and all of them seemed to have at least some element that instructed a viewer in some way, or gave them information that could guide their actions. The second direction that I explored is what I classified as disposable design. This encompassed all types of design, from candy wrappers, to cigarette cartons, to water bottles, for which I felt the design was created to be viewed for a short time interval before being disposed of. I chose to envelop myself in researching the disposable design topic further by addressing a few questions that I had. First, are disposable designs more or less complex than designs intended to occupy a space more permanently? Second, how is the information regarding the product being communicated visually in these designs?

Third, how is color utilized in disposable designs? In an effort to gain a greater understanding of these three questions, I organized my image library so that I could evaluate the different examples of disposable design that I had collected. To conclude whether my results and methods were successful or not, I will explain the patterns that I found as they relate to each of the three questions previously presented. First, I generally found that disposable designs featured a recognizable brand logo, which occupies the majority of the largest portions of the visual surface. Second, the information regarding the product seemed to stem from a viewers understanding of the product based on recognition of the brand logo. In addition to this, a small description of the product was generally present, but it was usually in a far smaller font so as not to detract attention from the logo. Third, I found that the color range of the designs varied greatly depending on the long-standing color schemes of the company producing the product. One interesting trend that I did notice, is that color choices for many brands can be altered to imply a certain flavor. This ability is a testament to the flexibility of graphically designed objects. With all of my work concluded, I feel that I was successful in exploring the topic of disposable design as it relates to the field of graphic design. I have a greater understanding of graphic design as a whole, and this research will be influential in future projects.


Project 01


index

index

core

core

garbage

ga

sign

objective

macro

micro

connotative

denotative

metaphor

subjective

sign

objective

macro

conno Project 01

subjective


Project 01


Project 01


Exercise

01

Billboard as a Messaging Center Tell the city what graphic design can do. Inform, persuade, promote, educate an audience about graphic design.

PERSONAL. INTERPRETATION. OF. VISUAL. LANGUAGE.

Tell “What Graphic Design is to you,” using a billboard. What abilities does graphic design have? What is the purpose of graphic design? How does it communicate?


Exercise 01

PERSONAL. INTERPRETATION. OF. VISUAL. LANGUAGE.


Project

02

Form, Form as Language Find the message content of visual form, and how it correlates with verbal meaning. This project was primarily intended to help us gain a further knowledge of the field of graphic design through exploration of a multitude of different approaches for defining a word using visual imagery. The word that I was given to define was “incongruous.” My first step was to research the definition of “incongruous,” and I found that it essentially was defined as something that is nonharmonious or inconsistent with its environment. With this in mind, I set out to collect and design imagery to portray this meaning. During the course of this project, it became clear to me that a word can be represented in a nearly infinite number of ways, despite the fact that it may seem to have a very concrete definition. Each individual person can interpret one image in a variety of different ways. In an attempt to establish a unifyied concept throughout my images, I chose to burrow deep in the idea of an object that is nonharmonious with its environment. My hope was for similar concepts behind the images to bridge the gap in the viewer’s mind between the word and its visual definition.

When I felt I had ten quality images, I pressed forward with the task of cohesively merging all of the images on to a single poster along with the word “incongruous” itself. This combination proved to be complex, and resulted in multiple attempts. My final poster featured the most effective visual encompassing the entire picture plane with the word “incongruous” in a small, futura typeface, so as not to detract from the imagery. This project had a strong influence on the way that I think about viewer interpretation of work. Prior to this assignment, I believed that a word was strictly defined, and could easily be represented to a diverse audience. After completing my research and receiving feedback from my peers, I came to realize that every person interprets things differently. Not only can this be applied to a single word, but also the field of graphic design as a whole. A designer must view his or her work from multiple perspectives to determine the most effective way of communicating the message. This is a concept that seemed simple in theory, but I now know just how challenging it can be in practice.


Project 02


Project 02


Project 02


Project 02


incongru us

incongruous

c

in

Project 02

c in gr on us u

in con gru us

r

g on

s

u uo


Exercise

02

Visible Signs Reading Quiz Quiz and written exercise over assigned readings from required text books. Test knowledge of key concepts related to design.

5. What is visual literacy and how does it relate to the field of graphic design? Visual literacy is the understanding of the cultural signposts present in graphic communication along with the understanding of formal considerations of shape, color, organization and composition. In order to create successful and effective designs, all of these elements must be taken into consideration. Visual literacy in graphic design helps to ensure that the interpretation of the design is in line with the designers intentions.


Project

03

Form as Identity Create a short narrative about the evolution of a symbol. How can form represent identity? How can form communicate to specific identities? For this project, we were assigned the task of taking a previously established logo and putting it through an evolutionary series to create a completely new logo. Prior to being assigned a logo, our task was to collect a number of examples of logos, and organize them based on their compositional elements. These examples were used to inform our later process of the evolution. Through previous projects, I had developed a greater understanding and appreciation for the different visual characteristics that a designer must consider. For this project, the most important idea that I observed was the relationship between the viewer and the brand that was being represented. Considering the different perspectives of the viewers is imperative in developing a stable brand identity. Essential to this brand identity is a logo that stimulates immediate recognition of the brand. For this reason, the logo must be unique, representative of its object, and straightforward enough to be readily recognized and reproduced.

In the process of creating a new logo it was necessary to maintain a connection to the original logo. Whether it be through similar line weight, shape, sense of movement, or other design elements and principles, the connection to the original logo had to be discernable. This was necessary to maintain the representation of the brand in the viewer’s mind. Within the six steps of evolution, the logo lost its identity and formed a new identity that was still clearly a result of the icon from which it originated. This task was a wealth of knowledge regarding brand recognition, brand identity and brand image. The graphic designer must consider all of the formal elements that comprise a design to create a recognizable brand logo that can be easily utilized to represent a brand’s identity. The designer must take into account the opinions of viewers to ensure that the design is properly communicating its desired purpose. Finally, a consistent brand image must be maintained and re affirmed in all future designs.


Project 03


Project 03


Disintegration

Re-collection

Diffusion

Re-organization

New Symbol

Project 03

Disturbance


Disintegration

Re-collection

Diffusion

Re-organization

New Symbol

Project 03

Disturbance


Exercise

03

Color + System = Visual Language Learn to design systems for color coding compositions. Further develop your design skills and proficiency in Adobe Illustrator. Jeremiah Wistrom

Contrasting Conditions

Nature/Industy & Energy/Calm

Design 6 different color combinations using the following systems. • monochromatic [one color + tints and shades] • complementary [opposite on the color wheel] • analogous [next to each on the color wheel] • triad [three in between] • contrasting pairs of conditions [two colors] eg. gloomy = 1 cheerful = 1

Jeremiah Wistrom

Triad

• wildcard 3 but no more than 8 different colors of your choice


Analagous

Exercise 03

Jeremiah Wistrom


Project

04

Type + Image / Page Layout and the Grid Visual Organization and Grid Structures Found Typography and Exploring Typographic Variation The goal of this project was to expand familiarity and appreciation for the grid structure and visual hierarchy as they pertain to page layout. To understand these ideas, we first read an article by Ellen Lupton, which beautifully articulated the essence of the grid. Next, we were to explore all types of print media to not only see different page layouts, but to also collect different examples of typography to be used applied in our own studies. Then, with a library of typography, we dove into hand making page layouts that pertained to and, in some cases, broke the grid structure. In conducting these studies, a few key ideas required consideration. The first of these for me was visual emphasis. This tied in with a variation in the typographic forms in the studies, as well. Visual emphasis and variation dealt with the necessity to have different forms of type, along with different sizes of said type to keep the viewer engaged with a page. Having a monotonous type size throughout a page is one of the easiest ways to push readers away before they even get started.

Next, I studied the arrangement of the type in a logical manner that still capably maintained visual interest. This was one of the most difficult tasks, in that abstraction and manipulation of the type was very interesting, yet it had a tendency to push the grid to the wayside. As I worked more, I was able to find a cohesive balance between organization and abstraction, and I gained an appreciation for the flexibility of the grid. Lastly, I worked with the negative space of each layout. After I had arranged all of the text on the page, I carefully considered the negative space. In a strictly black and white composition, the white space functions as form in itself. For this reason, it was important to give it the attention that it deserved. With all of these concepts in mind, I digitally created two different series of five page layouts. I made sure to consciously consider all of the visual elements we had discussed in class, and I now have a broadened understanding of how to attract visual interest on a page using only type as image.


Project 04


Project 04


Project 04


Exercise

04

Authorship + Graphic Design History Discover how graphic design shaped history and was shaped by history. Consider the concept of authorship and the intention behind the artists and designers.

Stanley Mouse Psychedelic Movement (1958-1975) Early Life

Stanley Mouse was popular during the 1970ʼs, and made contributions to the Psychedelic Movement.

“Quiet and always drawing in class, Stanley earned his pen name, Mouse in the seventh grade.” (MouseStudios). http://www.mousestudios.com/art/breezy

Fine Art

Early in the 1980s, Mouse moved to New Mexico and began to explore the realm of fine art. He utilized a variety of different media, the primary of which was oil painting.

Art & Music

Mouseʼs art schooling was shortlived as he moved to San Francisco to work on rock posters during the radical 1960s. He often collaborated with Alton Kelley to create some of the most iconic symbols of this era in rock and Late in his career, Mouse has made roll. The duo worked with festivals like Wooda return trip to the realm of his early stock and famous acts such as Jimi Hendrix, career with hot rods and rock and roll. Jefferson Airplane, and Janis Joplin. The group “Stanley Mouse is a they became most closely associated with is the revered elder in that Grateful Dead. tribe, lately contributing to the movement “That is generally considered a with new and classic has more to do with than it monsters and rat-rod art.” (MouseStudios). .” (Visible Signs- Pg. 94) does with

http://creativity.denverartmuseum.org/wp-content/uploads/2009/03/2007_4368_ 72dpi1.jpg

1. Artist / Graphic Designer’s Name 2. Name and dates of the movement they were categorized in. 3. Paragraph [250 words] in your own words or properly cited, about the artist / designer, discussing the time frame the artist was “popular” and why they are significant. Describe the visual language, visible signs and goals of their visual research. Mention what was going on in the world at the time of their popularity. Include, architecture, fashion, technologies, modes of communication, levels of literacy [Who was reading their message? Who was the audience?] 4. Include 3-5 images of their work, [high enough resolution for print publication]

http://www.mousestudios.com/art/irresistible-beast

Hot Rods

graphic design minor art reality

posturing

(MouseStudios)-http://www.mousestudios.com/

5. Include a quotation from “Visible Signs”, pages 51-105, that references “Reading the Sign, Text and Image, Official / Unofficial Language”


“That graphic design is generally considered a minor art has more to do with posturing than it does with reality.”

Exercise 04

(Visible Signs – Pg. 94)


This portfolio was created created during the fall of 2013 at the University of Nebraska–Lincoln by Jeremiah Wistrom. The typeface used throughout the work is Futura STD. The project was completed using Adobe InDesign, Adobe Illustrator and Adobe Photoshop. This work was published and printed by Jeremiah Wistrom for a beginning level graphic design course.


Jeremiah Wistrom 48 Oak Ridge Dr. Castle Rock, CO 80104 (402) 470–1981 jwist21@gmail.com

Jeremiah Wistrom Graphic Design Portfolio  
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