Page 1

English Teaching Pronunciation


Index Pronunciation Activities

3 - 4 Pages

Article

5 Page

Tips of Pronunciation

6 Page

Advertisement

7 Page


Pronunciation Bingo Instruction Each students receive a bingo card containing words instead of members. A bingo card designed to practice the minimal pairs contrast /i/ vs /I/. The games begins as listening exercise with teacher reading aloud of words containing target minimal pairs words. When it will call 12th words. Students need to arrive same time to call Bingo. Some students have mistaken to listen the sounds. So it need to check what correct answer is.

1. beat 2.heel 3.seek 4.skied 5.pitch 6.reach 7.leaving 8.feel 9.seat 10.sick 11.sleep. 12. chip B

I

N

G

O

beat

bit

cheap

chip

feel

fill

heel

hill

leaving

living

peach

pitch

Free Space!

reach

ridge

scene

seat

seek

sick

sin

sit

skid

skied

sleep

slip

Writing Limericks Instruction Work in pairs of small groups to write own limericks. Students will receive words cards to make their own limerick. First they need to find their minimal pairs words partner. After the students make their own limerick using their words. rang

rung

tack

tuck

sax

sucks

hag

hug

stand

stunned

track

truck

scam

scum

cab

cub

fanned

fund

tang

tongue

pat

putt

gash

gush

flash

flush

sand

sunned

tramps

trumps


Choose correct answer. Target sounds: Practice /f/ and /p/ sounds Instuction Make pairs for students. Students will receive prepared paper. Paper has examples of practice /f/ and /p/ sounds. Separate sheet of practice sounds. It will give each group. One people will receive already taken correct answer for A. Another people will receive already taken correct answer for B. Each group need to read sentences. They need to check correct words for their sheets A. Jane said time was gone fast. A. Jane said time was gone (fast, past). B. Jan (face, pace)’s is slow. B. Jan pace’s is slow. A. June has fear to read books. A. June has (fear, pier) to read books. B. John was visited (flee, plea) market. B. John was visited flee market. A. Jake flop over to the other party. A. Jake (flop, plop) over to the other party. B. (fax, packs) came from Australia. B. Fax came from Australia. A. He caught a pox last Saturday. A. He caught a (pox, fox) last Saturday. B. She received some (fries, prize) for hers B. She received some prizes for hers game. game. A. My fashion is so bad for teach students. A. My (fashion, passion) is so bad for teach B. I don’t like (fad, pad) students. B. I don’t like fad.


Tips to Teach Pronunciation

Vowel Length One of the biggest difficulties in clear pronunciation is vowel length. Short vowels aren’t short enough and long vowels aren’t long enough. Do contrasting exercises where long vowels are extra long (e.g. ‘seeeeeat’) and short vowels are very abrupt (e.g. ‘sit’). This is especially great if you are doing short/long minimal pair exercises. It’s important to exaggerate in the beginning so that students can hear the difference more clearly. Do competitions where students see who can hold the sound the longest. Over time, make the vowels shorter and shorter until they are the appropriate length. Long vowels (& dipthongs) The vowels in: beat, boat, boot, bait, bite Short vowels: bet, bot, but , bat, bit Mouth Positions Studies have shown that explicit instruction in how to position the mouth while speaking greatly helps learners tackling difficult sounds. First, demonstrate with videos and exaggerate making the sounds yourself. Then pass out

mirrors and have students observe their own mouth positions while forming the sounds. Here are some of the most important mouth positions for tricky English sounds: Open mouth: bot, bought (note: for some English dialects, there is no distinction between these vowels) Round mouth: boat, boot, Neutral position: but, bit, bet Corners of mouth pointed down (makes a frown): beat / bat Tongue between teeth: threat; let

Practice Listening You need to hear it before you can say it. Encourage student to get as much listening experience outside of the classroom as possible. Assign listening reports in order to check in and see what kinds of English students are listening to outside of class. Listening doesn’t have to be boring; tell students to listen to popular music, TV shows, movies, anything in English will work!


Article

Teaching pronunciation has undergone many changes by language and language studying theory. Teaching pronunciation’s way not only has changed by pedagogy’s change in studying English, but also ways of teaching guidance has changed by pedagogy’s point of view. Two general approaches to teaching English pronunciation have existed.

(analytic-linguistic approach) is the way that students understand the word’s sound and rhythm utilizing explicit tools and information such as phonetic alphabet, articulatory description and charts of apparatus.

From now, in teaching pronunciation, pronunciation education has developed in two ways of intuitive-imitative approach and analytic-linguistic approach. The first one (intuitive-imitative approach) is the way that listen some word’s sound and rhythm and imitate without offering any information. And in opposition to the first one, the second one


iTunes U - a life time of learning on tap. The world’s largest online catalog of free education content. Learn a new language. Study Shakespeare. Discover the cosmos. It’s all possible on iTunes U, home to more than 500,000 free lectures, videos, books, and other resources on thousands of subjects. Among the hundreds of colleges, universities, and elementary and high schools on iTunes U, you’ll find Stanford, Yale, MIT, Oxford, and UC Berkeley, along with other distinguished institutions such as MoMA, the New York Public Library, and more. You can also experience courses created by your instructor and sent only to the students in your class. All the materials for a course.Just a tap away. Whether you’re taking a European history course in your spare time, learning Spanish in high school, or majoring in molecular biology at a university, you now have a powerful tool to help you get the most out of your classes. The iTunes U app expands the classroom experience by putting all the materials for a course — audio and video, new iBooks textbooks for iPad1 and other books, a syllabus and class assignments, posts from the instructor, PDFs, presentations, and more — just a tap away on your iPad, iPhone, or iPod touch.2 Better notes make better students. Take some of the work out of homework with a note-taking feature like no other. While watching video, listening to audio, or reading a book, just tap the Add Note button and start typing what you want to remember. The iTunes U app keeps track of where in the audio, video, or text you took each note. So finding it later — and recalling the context of the note — is easy, too.


Trenz Pruca

Veli Praesen

Eget Toque

Fringilla Viverra

Urna Semper

Orci Aliquam

Nobis Eget

Fermen Pede

Uam Scelerisque

페이지 8

English