Page 1

JEONGHYUN KIM 2000-2015

Tradition and Technology

01 02 03 04 05 06 07 08 09 10 11

Group Design, 2014

Soccer Stadium with Mathematically Defined Surface Design Research, Competition, and Practice, 2008-2013

Timber Frame Structure Design MIT Workshop, 2014

Palladian Grammar MIT Workshop, 2014

Rule-based Analysis and Design Using Shape Grammar Group Design, 2013

Deep Sea Glass Sponge Inspired Fibrous Tectonic Design MArch Thesis, 2015

Fibrous Branching Personal Design, 2006

Mt. Nam-san in Seoul, an Island in the Metropolis Personal Design, 2011

Deconstruction of Mega-Christian Church Personal Research, 2008

Study on Wood Structure of Japanese Architecture Personal Research, 2011

Technology and Eclecticism of Wooden Roof Structure in Colonial Period of Korea Personal Professional Design and Constuction, 2013

Buk-chon Guest House Remodelling


01 Soccer Stadium with Mathematically Defined Surface Coworked with Julia Michalaski(MArchII 2015), 2014 Course Title : Option Design Studio at Harvard Graduate School of Design


03.01

BOWL

opening

03.03.01 - 03.03.04

infR

03.03.05 -

03.03.12

5

40

cantingR

03.03.13 - 03.03.18

0.0

0.5

ed

03.03.19 - 03.03.25

1

30

45

03

03.02

ENVELOPE

03.03

ROOF

Parametric Modulation

4

Original Seeds

Modulation 01

Modulation 02

43_geometric 43_tectonic 43_waving 43_smoothed

max

min heightB

43.01.01 -

43.01.11

15

25

Ra

43.01.12 - 43.01.28

80

140

top

43.01.19 - 43.01.29

1

1000

bottom

43.01.30

43.01.45

0

15

infB

43.01.46 - 43.01.58

0

12

_h

43.01.59 -

43.01.71

1

10

heightE

43.02.01 - 43.02.15

10

50

cantingE

43.02.16 - 43.02.20

0.05

infE

43.02.21 - 43.02.45

0

20

0

20

43.03 - Waving Skirt 43.03 - Elegant Skirt 43.03 - Tectonic Skirt 43.03 - Smooth Roof A

δ _h

43.01 43.02

43

0.18

43.03 - Smooth Roof B 43.03 - Smooth Roof C

BOWL

ENVELOPE

opening

43.03.01 - 43.03.17

20

70

infR

43.03.18 - 43.03.33

10

60

cantingR

43.03.34 - 43.03.39

0.1

0.4

ed

43.03.40 - 43.03.49

1

10

61.02 - Jellyfish

endL := 60 endJ := 200

43.03

endL := 100 endJ := 200

ROOF

51_extending 51_pleated 51_inverted 51_teardrop

endL := 50 endJ := 50

variable

file names (range)

min

max

heightB

51.01.01 - 51.01.16

10

40

Ra

51.01.17 - 51.01.26

80

200

top

51.01.27 - 51.01.32

0.0

3.0

bottom

51.01.33

51.01.34

0.0

3.0

infB

51.01.35 - 51.01.46

0

12

_h

51.01.47 - 51.01.58

1

12

52.02 - Extended Leg 52.02 - Fluting 52.02 - Inverted Arch 52.02 - Teardrop

51.01

51

inner_Ρ

51.02.01 - 51.02.04

50

outer_ρ

51.02.05 - 51.02.10

20

30

sbx,sby

51.02.11 - 51.02.16

0.0

0.4

ξ2

51.02.11 - 51.02.16

10

12

Λ

51.02.11 - 51.02.16

5

6

Θ

51.02.11 - 51.02.16

2

6

Ωs

51.02.11 - 51.02.16

0

12

ι

51.02.11 - 51.02.16

0

8

κ

51.02.11 - 51.02.16

0

8

εz

51.02.11 - 51.02.16

0

10

BOWL

endL := 100 endJ := 60

ENVELOPE

70

51_extending 51_pleated 51_inverted 51_teardrop

endL := 200 endJ := 40 endL := 100 endJ := 60

51.02

52.02 - Teardrop

endL := 100 endJ := 60

61.02 - 4-leg Dome A

variable

file names (range)

min

max max

min heightB heightB RaRa top top

51.01.01 61.01.01- - 51.01.16 61.01.16 51.01.17 61.01.17- - 51.01.26 61.01.26 51.01.27 61.01.27- - 51.01.32 61.01.32

bottom bottom infB infB

51.01.33 61.01.33 51.01.34 61.01.34 51.01.35 61.01.35- - 51.01.46 61.01.46 51.01.47 61.01.47- - 51.01.58 61.01.58

_h_h

1015

4025

8080

200 140

0.0 1

3.0 1000

0.0 0

3.0 15

00

1212

11

1210

61.02 - 4-leg Dome B 61.02 - 4-leg Dome C 61.02 - Eccentric Dome A 61.02 - Eccentric Dome B 61.02 - Eccentric Dome C 61.02 - Inverting Shell

inner_Ρ inner_P outer_ρ outer_p sbx,sby sbx,sby ξ2completeness Λ^_ δ Θexc_ δ Ωs low δ outline_

61

61.01 51.01 61.02

51.02.16 61.02.16 51.02.11 61.02.11- - 51.02.16 61.02.16 51.02.11 61.02.11- - 51.02.16 61.02.16 51.02.11 61.02.11- - 51.02.16 61.02.16

κuff_ δ εzdeform_ δ

51.02.11 61.02.11- - 51.02.16 61.02.16

BOWL endL := 200 endJ := 40

ENVELOPE

51.02.04 61.02.04 51.02.10 61.02.10

51.02.11 61.02.11- - 51.02.16 61.02.16 51.02.11 61.02.11- - 51.02.16 61.02.16 51.02.11 61.02.11- - 51.02.16 61.02.16

ι lff_ δ BOWL

51.02.01 61.02.01- 51.02.05 61.02.05- 51.02.11 61.02.11- -

endL := 100 endJ := 60 endL := 100 endJ := 60 endL := 100

5010

7050

20 0.05

300.18

0.0 0

0.420

10 0

1220

5

61.02 - Jellyfish

Mod

ulat

ion

01

61.02 - Turbine Shell

6

2

6

0

12

0

8

0

8

0

10

52.02 - Teardrop


Categorization and Selection Process

43.03 - Waving Skirt ( from Seed C )

43.03 - Tectonic Skirt ( from Seed C )

61.01 - Jellyfish ( from Seed E )

SEL

ECT

ED


_SPHERE ELONGATED Complete

_SPHERE ELONGATED Complete

_SPHERE ELONGATED Complete

VARIABLES

VARIABLES

VARIABLES

endI  300 in  0 1  endI

Manipulation of The Eccentric Geometry

_BOWL.............................................................................................. _BOWL.............................................................................................. _PITCH....................................................... _BOWL.............................................................................................. _PITCH....................................................... _PITCH....................................................... _SPHERICAL ENVELOPPE.......................................................................................... _SPHERICAL ENVELOPPE.......................................................................................... _SPHERICAL ENVELOPPE.............................. endI  300 endI  300 _Max height

endJ  100

_Radius

jn  0 1  endJ

_Global scale

_Dimensions in  0 1  endIpitchW _Max height _Max height Outline _Filletted Outline _Filletted heightB  21in  0 1  endI _Filletted heightB  21_Width  68 heightB  21_Width pitchW  68Outline _height heightW  36 _Radius _Top _Radius _Top _Aspect ratio scalePX _Top endJ  100 endJ  ratio Ra  80 β  Ra160  80 _Aspect 100 scalePX  1.544β  Ra 160  80  1.544 β  160

_Dimensions _Edges _Width pitchW  68 _height heightW  36factor _Aspect ratio _lower filletting scalePX  1.544

_Dimensions _Edges _height

ι  100

heightW  36 _lower filletting factor

ι  100

_Bottom scale _Bottom scaleBX  0.7 jn scaleBY 0 1  endJ  1.0 _Global η scaleBX 1  jn0.7scaleBY 0 1  endJ scalePY 1.0 _Global  1scale η scaleBX 1  0.7 _scale scaleBY scaleEX scalePY 1.0 _Bottom   1.6 1 η  scaleEY 1  2.4 _scale _upper scalePY scaleEX   11.6 scaleEY 2.4 _scale scaleEX  1.6 scaleEY filletting factor _upper filletting factor κ   80 κ 802 _Elevation humps δh  8 _Elevation _Bottom (adjustment) humps δh  8_Length _Elevation _Bottom humps _Length _Length pitchW  scalePX(adjustment)  104.992 δh  8_Setback pitchW_Bottom  scalePX(adjustment)  104.992 pitchW scalePX  104.992sby _Setback from bowl (%) sbx  0.215 from bowl (%) sbx  0.215 from bowl (%) sbx  0.215 sby  _Setback 0.27 _upper deform _upper deform εz  0 0.27 εz sby  0 _Hump inflection infB  4 _Hump inflection _Hump inflection σx  infB 0.25  4 σx  infB 0.25  4 σx   0.25 0 1 3 _excentricity Λ   π _excentricity Λ   π _excentricity Λ   π σy  0.1 σy  0.1 σy  0.1 4 4 4 4 4    in π in π jn      jn     _Lower outline Ωs  13.6 DEFin jn  sin_Lower DEFinjn  sin_Lower DEFin jn  si  32 π outline 2Ωs    13.6    Ωs  8 π outline 2Ωs     13.6    Ωs endI endI endJ        endJ  

VARIABLES

VARIABLES

VARIABLES

_1

_1

_1

_2

_2

_2

_3

_3

_3

_4

_4

_4

_UPPER/LOWER TIERS

_UPPER/LOWER TIERS

_UPPER/LOWER TIERS

_SPHERE ELONGATED Complete

_SPHERE ELONGATED Complete

_SPHERE ELONGATED Complete

VARIABLES

VARIABLES

VARIABLES

140

140

140

93.333

93.333

93.333

_SPHERE ELONGATED Complete

bowlYendI jn 46.667

_pink solid is upper edge of enveloppe bowlYendI jn 46.667

bowlYendI jn 46.667

VARIABLES

_pink solid is upper edge of en

............................. _PITCH....................................................... _BOWL.............................................................................................. _PITCH....................................................... _BOWL.............................................................................................. _BOWL.............................................................................................. _PITCH....................................................... _BOWL.............................................................................................. _PITCH....................................................... _SPHERICAL ENVELOPPE.......................................................................................... L ENVELOPPE.......................................................................................... _SPHERICAL ENVELOPPE.......................................................................................... _SPHERICAL ENVELOPPE.......................................................................................... _SPHERICAL ENVELOPPE.......................................................................................... _SPHERICAL ENVELOPPE.......................................................................................... endI  300 endI  300 endI _PITCH....................................................... 300 endI  300

_Edges _Dimensions _Edges _Dimensions _Edges _Dimensions _Edges _Dimensions _Edges _Dimensions  0 1 _Width endI in  0 1  endI in  0 1_Width  endI in  0 1 _Width endI _pink _Max height _Max height heightB _Max height _Filletted Outline _Width _Max height _Filletted Outline _Filletted Outline _Filletted Outline _Width pitchW heightB  68  21 pitchW heightB  68  21 pitchW 68  21 pitchW heightB  68  21 pitchW  68dotted is lower edge of enveloppe bowlY bowlY bowlY0 jn _height _height _height _height heightW  36 heightW 36 36 heightWβ 36 heightW 36 heightW  36 0 jn 0factor jn ι _height _Aspect _Radius ratio scalePXRa _Top ratio scalePXRa _lower ratio _Radius _lower filletting factor _Radius filletting _Aspect ratio scalePX  _lower β endJ 160  100 _lower 1.544 80 filletting factor ι  100 β  endJ 160  100_Aspect _Radius 1.544 80 filletting factor ι  100_Top heightW β 160 endJ  _Aspect 100 scalePX Ra 1.544  80 ι  100 _Top endJ 160  100_Aspect ratio scalePX_lower Ra 1.544 80 100 _Top β 160 1.544filletting factor ι  100 Bottom _Global scale scaleBX scale scaleBX scale scaleBX _GlobalscalePY scale scaleBX _scale scaleEX η  jn 1 1.60 1  scaleEY endJ  2.4 scalePY _upper 1  0.7 scaleBY _scale 1.0 _Bottom scaleEX η  1.60 1  scaleEY endJ _Global 2.4 scalePY  1  0.7 scaleBY  _scale 1.0 _Bottom scaleEX η   1 jn1.6  0 scaleEY 1  endJ  _Global 2.4 scalePY 1  0.7 scaleBY _scale  1.0 _Bottom scaleEXη   jn 1.6 1  0scaleEY 1  endJ 2.4  1  0.7 scaleBY _scale 1.0 _Bottom scaleEX η 1 1.6 scaleEY  2.4 scalePY  1 scaleEX  1.6 scaleEY  2.4 jn1 filletting factor _upper filletting factor _upper filletting factor _upper filletting factor _upper filletting factor κ  80 κ  80 κ  80 0 κ  80 0 κ  80 0 envY envY envY Bottom (adjustment) _Length _Elevation humps _Bottom (adjustment) _Length _Elevation humps _Bottom (adjustment) _Length _Elevation _Bottom (adjustment) _Length _Elevation humps _Bottom (adjustment) _Length in in 0 _Setback from bowl (%) sbx  0.215 sby  0.27 pitchW  scalePX δh   104.992 8 pitchW  scalePX δh  8104.992 pitchWhumps scalePX δh  104.992 8 0 pitchW  scalePX δh   104.992 8in 0 pitchW scalePX  104.992 rom bowl (%) sbx  0.215 _Setback from bowl (%) sbx  0.215 _Setback from bowl (%) sbx  0.215 _Setback from bowl (%) sbx  0.215 _Setback from bowl (%) sbx  0.215 sby  0.27 sby  0.27 sby  0.27 sby  0.27 sby  0.27 _upper deform _upper deform _upper deform _upper deform _upper deform εz  0 εz  0 εz  0 εz  0 εz  0 _Hump inflection infB  4 _Hump inflection infB  4 _Hump inflection infB  4 _Hump inflection infB  4 σx1 0.25 σx1  0.25 σx1  0.25 σx1  0.25 1σx  0.25 1 y Λ   π _excentricity Λ   π _excentricity Λ   π _excentricity Λ   π _excentricity Λ   π _excentricity Λ   π σy  0.1 σy  0.1 σy  0.1 σy  0.1 σy  0.1

ns in etted Outline

_Edges _pink dotted is lower edge of e

Top

4

ine

Ωs  13.6

 

DEFinjn  sin  4 π

VARIABLES

in

endI

4

4 π   jn     Ωs_Lower outline Ωs  13.6     2   endJ  

 

DEFin jn  sin  6 π

VARIABLES

in

endI

4

4 π   jn     Ωs _Lower outline Ωs  13.6     2   endJ  

 

DEFinjn  sin  8 π

VARIABLES

in

endI

envYin endJ 4

4

π   jn    46.667 outline Ωs  13.6       Ωs_Lower 2   endJ  

 

DEFin jn  sin  10 π

VARIABLES

_1

_1

_1

_2

_2

_2

_3

_3

_3

_3

_4

_4

_4

_4

 93.333

in

endI

envYin 4endJ π   jn   46.667 outline        Ωs _Lower 2   endJ  

_1

4

Ωs  13.6

 

DEFin jn  sin  16 π

envYin endJ 4

in

endI

 93.333

_2

_UPPER/LOWER TIERS

_UPPER/LOWER TIERS

140

140

140

93.333

93.333

93.333

_pink solid is upper edge of enveloppe

bowlYendI jn 46.667

_pink dotted is lower edge of enveloppe

bowlY0 jn

bowlYendI jn 46.667 bowlY0 jn envYin 0 envYin endJ

0

_pink solid is upper edge of enveloppe

bowlYendI jn 46.667

_pink dotted is lower edge of enveloppe

bowlY0 jn

envYin 0

0

 46.667

bowlXendI jn bowlX0 jn envXin 0 envXin endJ bowlYendI jn 46.667

_pink dotted is lower edge of enveloppe

bowlY0 jn

0

envYin endJ

0

_pink dotted is lower edge of enveloppe

bowlY0 jn

0

46.667

 140

( bowlX 93.333bowlY140 tiers ) ( pitchX pitchY  140 pitchZ  93.333 ) ( envX 46.667 envY envZ0)

XendI jn bowlX0 jn envXin 0 envXin endJ

Target directory

PATH  "\"

Initial Seed by George L. Legendre IJP 2004-14

envY envZ)

46.667

 140

( bowlX 93.333bowlY140 tiers) ( pitchX pitchY  140 pitchZ  93.333 ) ( envXenvY 46.667envZ) 0

bowlXendI jn bowlX0 jn envXin 0 envXin endJ

Target directory

PATH  "\"

Initial Seed by George L. Legendre IJP 2004-14

( bowlX bowlY tiers ) ( pitchX pitchY pitchZ) ( envX envY envZ )

46.667

 140 93.333 ( bowlX bowlY 140 tiers) ( pitchXpitchY 140 pitchZ  93.333 ) ( envX  46.667 envY envZ 0)

bowlXendI jn bowlX0 jn envXin 0 envXin endJ

Target directory

46.667

4 π   jn     Ωs     2   endJ  

0

46.667

bowlXendI jn bowlX0 jn envXin 0 envXin end _pink solid is upper edge of enveloppe

_pink dotted is lower edge of enveloppe

_pink dotted is lower edge of enveloppe

0

 93.333

46.667

93.333

bowlXendI jn bowlX0 jn envXin 0 envXin endJ

140

 140  140

 93.333

 46.667

0

46.667

93.333

140

bowlXendI jn bowlX0 jn envXin 0 envXin endJ

PATH  "\" GSD 1315 Global Arenas

Initial Seed by George L. Legendre IJP 2004-14

( bowlX bowlY tiers) ( pitchX pitchY pitchZ) ( envX envY envZ)

εz  0

envYin endJ  46.667

 46.667

 140 93.333 ( bowlX bowlY 140 tiers ) ( pitchX pitchY  140 pitchZ  93.333 ) ( envX 46.667 envY envZ0)

bowlXendI jn bowlX0 jn envXin 0 envXin endJ

endI

κ  80

_pink solid is upper edge of enveloppe

envYin 0

 93.333  93.333  93.333 ( bowlX bowlY tiers) ( pitchX pitchY pitchZ) ( envX ( bowlX envY bowlY envZ tiers ) ) ( pitchX pitchY pitchZ) ( envX bowlXenvY bowlY envZ tiers) ) ( pitchX pitchY pitchZ) ( envX envY 93.333 envZ)

vXenvY 46.667envZ) 0

in

ι  100

93.333

bowlYendI jn 46.667

envYin endJ

 46.667

140

_pink solid is upper edge of enveloppe

envYin 0

_upper deform

 140 46.667 140 93.333  93.333 140 46.667

bowlXendI jn bowlX0 jn envXin 0 envXin endJ

93.333

_pink solid is upper edge of enveloppe

envYin 0

envYin endJ  46.667

140

 

DEFinjn  sin  32 π

_upper filletting factor

 93.333

_UPPER/LOWER TIERS  140  140 ( bowlX bowlY tiers) ( pitchX pitchY pitchZ) ( envX ( bowlX envY bowlY envZ tiers ) ) ( pitchX pitchY pitchZ) ( envX bowlXenvY bowlY envZ tiers) )140 ( pitchX pitchY 93.333pitchZ  46.667 ) ( envX envY 0 envZ 46.667 )  140 93.333  93.333 140  46.667

_UPPER/LOWER TIERS

4

π   jn    46.667 outline Ωs  13.6       Ωs _Lower 2   endJ  

_lower filletting factor

( bowlX bowlY tiers) ( pitchX pitchY pitchZ) ( envX envY envZ)

( bowlX bowlY tiers ) ( pitchX pitchY pitchZ) ( envX envY envZ )

GSD 1315


Verification of Seating and Viewing

th id

tW ea S rm (a 0 +4 0 6 :4

Independent = R

Independent = D

R = 600(mm) D = 35000(mm) T = 800(mm) N = dependent on D, R, T, C

C= 120(mm) D = 35000(mm) T = 800(mm) N = dependent on D, R, T, C

R = 600(mm) C = 120(mm) T = 800(mm) N = dependent on D, R, T, C

re

Independent = C s) st

Ma

x.

#o

fS

ea

ts

in

ar

ow

=2

8(

Br

itis

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tan

C = 60(mm)

R = 1000(mm)

D = 35000(mm)

C = 90(mm)

R = 3000(mm)

D = 38000(mm)

C = 120(mm)

R = 5000(mm)

D = 41000(mm)

C = 150(mm)

R = 7000(mm)

D = 44000(mm)

C = 180(mm)

R = 9000(mm)

D = 47000(mm)

y

da

rd)

a gw

an

Fr

G ial

d

nt

o

Ra ay

w

g

an

G C

value = 60mm : between head in front

= 90mm : head tilted backwards = 120mm : reasonable viewing standard = 150mm : spectators with hats

C

N

R t

T

Point of Focus D N=

(R+C)X(D+T) D

-R

N = riser height R = height between eye on ‘point of focus’ D = distance from eye to ‘point of focus’ C = value that determines quality of view T = Depth of seating row: 610 to 800 t = Clearway: 400(Minimum)


Getting 40,000 seats Security Regulations ( 16 sectors, 2500 people )

The underlying assumption of this calculation is that the three factors; seating configuration viewing distance flooring option will be mostly considered and manipulated by architect. The basic design guideline is

Seating Configuration

1. Choose a type of seating configuration 2. Try to fit the type into the optimal range of viewing distance diagram 3. If it did not generate the proper number of seat, try one or both of the two options below to get more seats.

Pitch Size

Option B - Creating another tier above following the geometry of the original one. If it should be asymmetrical, try to consider the direction of the sunlight and get rid of some seats facing the sunlight. Option A - Extend the seating configuration to a certain degree within the range of maximum viewing distance. But it will sacrificing the viewing quality of some seats.

27520

34860

40096

40060

40816

40816

Viewing Distances Gangway Pattern

Gangway Dimentsions

Clustering Regulations

Max. # of Seats in a row

Chair Type

Seating Dimensions

Roof Coverage

Pitch Style

Viewing Distances

Flooring Variations

Seating Configuration

Flooring Options

Number of Seats

40040


Structural Analysis of The Surface This project is about how to design a stadium based on using parametric modulation with mathematically generated form. We started with a “seed” which generates forms with lots of practical restrictions, “real variables”, following basic principles of the stadium design. By manipulating all the variables, we explored all kinds of possible forms generated by the seed and went through several selection processes.

Support = 20 points (5 X 4legs)

Deflection

Primary : (i=40, j=20)

i - thread

j - thread

Support = 4 points (1 X 4legs)

Bending Moment

Primary+Secondary : (i=40, j=20) + (Triangulated lines)

_SPHERE ELONGATED Com VARIABLES

endI  300 in  0 1  endI

_BOWL..

endJ  100 jn  0 1  endJ

_Radius

_Max he _Global

_Elevati

Support = 20 points (5 X 4legs)

_Hump i

Vonmises Stress

Primary+Secondary : (i=40, j=20) + (Triangulated lines) VARIABLES _1 _2

_SPHERE ELONGATED Comp _3 VARIABLES _4

endI  300 in  0 1  endI

_BOWL...

endJ  100 jn  0 1  endJ

_Radius

_UPPER/LOWER TIERS

_Max he

_Global s

_Elevatio

_Hump in


Fabrication

i0 i1 i2

Inward Offset ( Negative Normal )

i3

i - thread

i4

Outward Offset ( Positive Normal )

i5 i6 j - thread

UPward Offset ( Positive Binormal )

i7 i8 Self - intersections

Use overlap to our advantage, structurally

i9

( takes role of i - 7, the most problematic thread)

Reinforces the top of the giant arch

i 10

arch

arch


Primary Structure Primary Circulation


Principles of Plan Design 0.0.0 Plan Monumentality

tranc

CO

RE

SUPPORT

e tranc

Bowl En

En Bowl

e

In the nearest future, the decentralizationpolicy will continue, recognizing the need to relieve the overcrowded Central area. The trend will manifest itself as a spreading of commercial activities to the immediate surroundings, such as the Marina Bay, which is already under developmment, as well as the development of new commercial centres or nodes.

nc

e

w Bo

lE

ntr

c an

e

ZONE 01 ZONE

ZONE

16

03

02

e

Res

s

ms

Entran Bowl

ce

12

Retail

Private Room ZONE

ZONE

10

08

Private Room

Office

11

ZO

NE

NE

ZO

07

Retail

Office

SUPPORT

ZONE

Bowl Entran ce

troo

ZONE 05

rag

06

Sto

ZONE

e

ZONE 13

Rest room

ra g

SUPPORT

Sto

14

ZONE

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04

C

15

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tra

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CO

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CO

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ZONE 09

RE

CO

Retail

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SUPPORT

Bowl Entrance

Bowl Entrance

o

Service

Conference

00

46. VIP Lounge

Central Press Work

o

11.25

Kitchen

Press Lounge

o

50

22.

Bowl Entrance

Bowl Entrance

ZONE 0 Retail

Retail

2

E0

ZON

Retail

Corporate Room

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0

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22 Bowl

Entran ce

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ms

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ce Entran Bowl

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tion Informa Room

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ry


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ms

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GYM Warm-u

Office

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e

p

Retail

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Private Room

Office

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Changing

Office

WC Shower Office

Room

Changing

Retail

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Room

Office

Bowl Entrance

Bowl Entrance

Office

Dope Exam

Office

Conference

Info.

Reception

Office

Office

Central Press Work

Medical Exam

Info.

Press Lounge

Office

Office

Office

Bowl Entrance

Bowl Entrance

Office

Match Management

Office

Dope Exam

Office

Reception

Office

Medical Exam

Media

Catering

Officials

Service

Conference

VIP Lounge

Central Press Work

Kitchen

Press Lounge

Bowl Entrance

Bowl Entrance

Bowl Entrance

Bowl Entrance

Office Changing Room

Exhibit

Changing Room

Office Tickets

WC Shower

Retail

Retail

Retail

Office

Office

Changing

Exhibit

Changing

Office

Room Tickets

Room

GYM Warm-up

Press Officers

tion Informa Room

Corpora te Room

Press Officers

Office

Office

Massag

Storage

e

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Office Ticket

e

s

Retail

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Bowl

Entranc

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e

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il

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C

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Bowl

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rag e

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+ 14500 Floor Plan

+ 21000 Floor Plan

RE O C

C O RE

Entranc

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Bowl

e Entranc

C O RE C O RE

Bowl

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g Room Changin

Office

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ms

Entranc

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Tickets

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e Entranc

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e

ge Massa

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Post-match Control

e

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Info.

rag

ice

+ 25500 Floor Plan

Corporate Room


02 A

Academic Research and Design

Timber Frame Structure Design 3rd Prize for National Design Competition in South Korea, 2011


Usefulness of Assembly Unit

17750

Buildin

24 Assembly

One of the most important features of Han-ok is that each building element is separately fabricated offsite and then assembled onsite. This well suits to the object-oriented feature of BIM modeling which requires individual building elements to be separately modeled. Object-oriented modeling, however, is somewhat problematic in terms of efficiency. Tens of thousands of building elements are needed to build a simple house and there are various kinds of combination of building element. It takes a vast amount of effort to make BIM models in that architects usually need to make several design alternatives. Therefore, we need a reasonable modeling methodology that is based on the structural principle of Han-ok and topological approach. I applied the structural principle of “Kan� to the assembly unit for modeling, which makes the modeling much simpler. For example, over 17,000 building elements are needed to make a model of a house, while just 24 assembly units are used to make the same model. An assembly unit is a bundle of building elements that are closely related to each other. In case of a frame type assembly unit, for example, the building elements of 4 columns, 4 small columns, 4 foundation stones, 5 purlins, 5 purlin supports, 4 beams, 8 beam supports, 2 king posts and comprise an assembly unit. Furthermore, an assembly unit can be combined with other assembly units to complete the entire structure of a house. Assembly units are divided into five types: roof, rafter, frame, floor and wall. A model for a house is completed by the proper combination of these five types of assembly unit. frame-type assembly units consist of such elements as columns, purlins, beams, and foundation stones. Wall-type assembly units consist of such elements as windows, window frames, wainscots and lintels. Floor-type assembly units consist of On-dol and Ma-ru, which are traditional Korean floor systems.

g Elem

ents

Roof T

ype

Units

Rafter

Type Frame

1Building

Type Floor

Type Wall T

ype


Combination of 4 Kinds of Structural Frame

3

4

5

7

X+Y X= 5+5

5

3 = Y

-II 5+5

-II

4 Kinds of Roof Shape

II

I

Gable ( x ) Corner Rafter ( o )

III

Gable ( x ) Corner Rafter ( o )

IV

Gable ( x ) Corner Rafter ( o )

Gable ( x ) Corner Rafter ( o )

Typology of Corner-connection


5 + 3 - II

5 + 3 - III

Iro-dang

Chunghyo-dang

Difference Between Types Roof design varies according to the vertical relation of the structural frames, even same combination of structural frame are used. In case of Iro-dang, the column purlins on X-axis(5-purlins) and Yaxis(3-purlins) make two joints at the inside and outside of corner. Also, the middle purlins on X-axis and the top purlin on Y-axis make two joints on the upper level of former. On this vertical relation, corner rafter can take place above the two joints of purlins which are located at the outside of the corner. It enables the edge of the eaves to have continuous form and makes a roof shape-II which have both hip and gable.

5-pu

rlin

X-ax

is

5-pu

rlin

ru lin

-3 p

ru lin

xis Y-a

Y-

ax

is

-3 p

X-ax

is

5 + 3 - II

5 + 3 - III

On the other hand, Chunghyo-dang has different vertical relation of the structural frames. First of all, the column purlins on X-axis(5-purlins) and Y-axis(3-purlins) doesn’t have the same height and doesn’t make any joint at the corner, either. Instead of middle purlins, column purlins on X-axis make joints with top purlins on Y-axis. Because the column purlins are not connected at the corner, corner rafter cannot take place. Consequently, it has roof shape-III which does not have hip line but gable. The comparison between Iro-dang and Chunghyo-dang shows that the roof shape varies according to the vertical relation of the structural frames.


3

3

3

3

D

1 1

C

D

3

1

3

1

3

3

3

D

1 1

D

2 D

1

3

1

1

3

1

1

3

B

A

1

3

Com

bina

A

Extr

C

actio

n of

3

Asse

mbly

3

Unit

1

s

D

3

1

3

3

1

1 2

2

3

3

3

1

2

ssem

bly U

nits

D

C

1

2 C

2

of A

3

2

1

D

1

2

tion

1 3

3

1 D

C

2

B

2 C

3

3

3

Application of Assembly Units Architects can use assembly units at the early stage of their design process based on the feature of assembly unit optimized for customization. After a overall frame design is finished, architects can control some detailed part, such as changing a dimension of a building element and determining a type of joint connection. Each dimension of the building elements in the assembly units are defined as parameters in parametric modeling. If an architect changes a value of a parameter, the value of the other parameter that is relevant to the first one is automatically recalculated.


BASE_SKETCH_XY

EXTRUDE_Z

CUT_SKETCH_XY_1

CUT_Z_1

CUT_SKETCH_XY_2

Feature-based Categorization

CUT_Z_2

There are various types of each building elements in traditional Korean architecture. They are traditionally classified according to their shape and construction method. For more efficient modeling, I re-categorized them with regard to parametric operation. The categorization method is based on the modeling command, such as sketch, cut, extrude, and loft. Parameters are defined according to each modeling command and the form of building elements are described by the parameters.

BASE_SKETCH_YZ

BASE_SKETCH_XY

BASE_SKETCH_XZ

LOFT_Z

CUT_SKETCH_XY_1

EXTRUDE_Y

GI-DUNG

LOFT_Y

LOFT_SKETCH_YZ

CUT_Z_1

LOFT_SKETCH_XZ

CUT_SKETCH_XY_2

CUT_Z_2

CUT_SKETCH_XY,YZ

CHEOM-CHA

JU-DU

BO


D A

Q

C

B G

C

A

D

P

B

E

R H I

O

Z

C

F

K

Y N

S J

L M

X

D

B

T

A

B

Phase 01. BASE_SKETCH_XZ PARAMETER NAME Daedeulbo_BASESKETCHXZ_A Daedeulbo_BASESKETCHXZ_B Daedeulbo_BASESKETCHXZ_C Daedeulbo_BASESKETCHXZ_D Daedeulbo_BASESKETCHXZ_E Daedeulbo_BASESKETCHXZ_F Daedeulbo_BASESKETCHXZ_G Daedeulbo_BASESKETCHXZ_H Daedeulbo_BASESKETCHXZ_I Daedeulbo_BASESKETCHXZ_J Daedeulbo_BASESKETCHXZ_K Daedeulbo_BASESKETCHXZ_L Daedeulbo_BASESKETCHXZ_M Daedeulbo_BASESKETCHXZ_N Daedeulbo_BASESKETCHXZ_O Daedeulbo_BASESKETCHXZ_P Daedeulbo_BASESKETCHXZ_Q Daedeulbo_BASESKETCHXZ_R Daedeulbo_BASESKETCHXZ_S Daedeulbo_BASESKETCHXZ_T

Phase 02. EXTRUDE_Y FORMULA

Independent Independent Independent Gidung2_BASESKETCHXY_A * 0.624 Daedeulbo_BASESKETCHXZ_M * 0.33 Daedeulbo_BASESKETCHXZ_M * 0.65 Independent Independent Jusimdori_CUTSKETCHXYYZ_D Jusimdori_BASESKETCHYZ_B Jusimdori Janghyeo_CUTZ_A Jusimdori Janghyeo_EXTRUDEZ_A - Jusimdori Janghyeo_CUTZ_A Independent Sujangpok Independent Independent Independent Gansari_Y / 2 Daedeulbo_BASESKETCHXZ_M * 0.02 Independent

Topological Modeling I re-categorized the building elements of Han-ok to increase the efficiency of modeling. Unless there are topological distinction between two building elements, I classified them into a category. There are tree types of formula which define the value of parameters. A designer only inputs the “independent” value in modeling. The values of other parameters are calcuated by the parametric logics. Various forms of a building element can be generated according to the set of independent values, even though they share the same parametric logics.

PARAMETER NAME Daedeulbo_EXTRUDEY_A Daedeulbo_EXTRUDEY_B

FORMULA Independent Sujangpok

Phase 04. CUT_SKETCH_XY,YZ

Phase 03. LOFT_SKETCH_XZ PARAMETER NAME Daedeulbo_LOFTSKETCHXZ_A Daedeulbo_LOFTSKETCHXZ_B Daedeulbo_LOFTSKETCHXZ_C Daedeulbo_LOFTSKETCHXZ_D

FORMULA Daedeulbo_EXTRUDEY_A * 0.7+0.05 Daedeulbo_BASESKETCHXZ_(H + I +J + K + L) * 0.1 Daedeulbo_BASESKETCHXZ_(H + I +J + K + L) * 0.1 Daedeulbo_BASESKETCHXZ_(H + I +J + K + L) * 0.1

PARAMETER NAME CUTSKETCHXYYZ_A Daedeulbo_CUTSKETCHXYYZ_B Daedeulbo_CUTSKETCHXYYZ_C Daedeulbo_CUTSKETCHXYYZ_D

FORMULA Independent Independent (Daedeulbo_EXTRUDEY_A - Daedeulbo_LOFTSKETCHXZ_A) / 2 Daedeulbo_CUTSKETCHXYYZ_C * 3

A


A B

a

vertical difference of the curve of eaves

b

(corner-rafter parameter) X 0.85

c

(corner-rafter parameter) X 0.42

d

horizontal difference of the curve of eaves

e

vertical distance between two purlins

f

(corner-rafter parameter) X 0.60

g

(corner-rafter parameter) X 0.80

h

corner-rafter parameter

i

corner-rafter parameter X 1.10

g f

RT

E

PU

S

E INN

IN RL

e

A

V

LE

IDD

A RP

M

R TE

OU

RT

PA

C

U

R

VE

OF

E

IN

a

b

M

LU

CO

h i

d

RL

U NP

c

Traditional Carpentry Translated into Parametric Functions A = (horizontal distance between purlins) / 10 x

(vertical distance between purlins) 2 + 10 2

B = (horizontal distance between the center of column and the end of rafter) x 1.25 x 1.414

While implementing the drawing method used by traditional carpentry, I adjusted some parameters and functions for improving the user interface and convenience.


Experiment of Hybridization Different roof types and glass masses are combined into an integrated roof system covering the enlarged timber structure below. During design process, the integrated roof was divided into several parts and its proportion was adjusted for both of spatial need and aesthetic purpose. It was a fascinating experiment of hybridizing traditional form, tectonic, universal space, and modern building technology.

Hybridized Roof System


Civic Center as a Public Space As a civic center, the space should be opened and easy to enter. I proposed two entrances. One is the entrance to the building inside and it is directly connected to atrium to the public library and public service center which will be the most frequently used spaces by citizens. The other entrance is for the courtyard which faces north elevation of civic center. The courtyard is surrounded by civic center and existed buildings and the old trees will greet the citizens who has enjoyed this place since it was built as public school in early 19th century.

+ 10000

+ 6400 G ETIN

L

HAL

ME IUM

R ATT

LIC PUB RARY LIB

+ 3800

IC UBL

SER

L

PUB

V

E

FFIC

O ICE

P

BY LOB

+0

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OU IC L

RIS

TOU

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F T IN

ATE

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+ 0 - 3800


Lounge

Skylight

Attrium

Public Library

Skylight

Modern Office

Lobby

Traditional Roof with Glass Mass Because the there has been no way to introduce sunlight, the space between the ceiling and the roof has not been used in traditional architecture. It is a considerable loss of space so that I combined the traditional roof structure with transparent mass which uses contemporary curtain wall system to introduce the sunlight. The glass mass is higher than the traditional roof and it serves spaces for skylight. In the public library, I exposed the timber structure because it is well matched to the texture that books and bookshelves make.


30m

20m

10m

0m Jongno Civic Center

Traditional Buddhist Temple

Modern Scale and Traditional Form In order to meet functional demand as a civic center, I designed a structural frame up to 6th floor while most of the traditional building only has 1 or 2 floors. The form generated by roof shapes in traditional Buddhist temple inspired me to design the overall shape of the building


Timber Frame Structure and Details To design the structural frame of Jongno Civic Center, I actively applied the principle of traditional Korean timber frame. To increase load bearing capacity, I reinforced the traditional wood joint with metal.


02 B

Professional Application

Timber Frame Structure Design Professional Design, 2012 with DMP Architects Collaborated for timber frame and traditional roof shape design


02 C

Professional Application

Timber Frame Structure Design Professional Design, 2011 with KYWC Architects Responsible for structural design and 3D modeling of traditional roof


Column Height

M0 X 10

03

Palladian Grammar

Intercolumniation

Personal Research, 20144 Course Title : Palladio Digitale Workshop at MIT

1

M0 X 2

2

Number of Columns 38 M0 X

10

M0 X

38

M0 X 2

2

1 2

Wall Thickness

2

M0 X

3

Dome Diameter

38 M0 X

17 38

Column Diameter = M0

Colum Location Point - Y cordinate

38 M0 X

26.5 38

Building Width = 38 M0

Stair Step Length

M0 X

6 10

Architrave Height

M0 X

19 10

Pediment Offset

M0 X

1 6


Local-local Dimensions Pediment


Local-local Dimensions Columns


What is the range that a set of rules in the book works? My initial question starts from the first exercise. The parametric operation of the Villa Rotunda model generates a lot of variations. While the variations are acceptable to a certain level, the model also generate ‘proportionally broken’ variations. I assume that a set of rules works in a certain range and it should be modified “somehow” to respond to the various architectural needs.

Parametric Variation And The Range That The Rule Works

12 M

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16 M

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32 M

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36 M

38 M

40 M

42 M

44 M

46 M

48 M

50 M

52 M

54 M

56 M

58 M

60 M

62 M

64 M

66 M

68 M

70 M

72 M

74 M

76 M

78 M

80 M

82 M


1500

1900

1700

1950

Palladian Influence in Historical Cases

Korean Governmental Buildings

East Asia

Japanese Imperial Style

Neo-classicism Governmental Buildings

USA

Modern Architecture

Architectural Style

Urban Office Buildings

Colonial Williamsburg

Palladio

Europe

Giacomo Quarenghi

European Palladian Style

Rule-based Design Studies

Modern Architecture

Rudolf Wittkower

Colin Rowe

William Mitchell


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Computation From Villa Cricoli(16C, Italy) to Maison de Champaign(18C, France) and Masonic Temple Building(20C, USA)


04 Rule-based Analysis and Design Using Shape Grammar Personal Research, 2014 Course Title : Introduction to Shape Grammar, Visual Computing I at MIT


05 Deep Sea Glass Sponge Inspired Fibrous Tectonic Design Group Design, Fall 2013 Course Title : Option Design Studio at Harvard Graduate School of Design

Deep Sea Glass Sponge inspired fibrous structure

Micro Structure of Deep Sea Glass Sponge

Deep Sea Glass Sponge


Minimal Conditions

Robotic Fabrication

Variation

Fiber-fiber Interaction

Component Mandrel Spacial Morphology

Hierarchy Studies

The Process The first two keywords are “minimal condition” of scaffolds and “fiber to fiber interaction” generated form. Another important idea was mandrel. With this mandrel idea, we tested a robotic fabrication. Those are developed into component system and its variation. And we started the hierarchy study from the mandrel idea and the hierarchy study evolved into the component connection system. We finally reached to special morphology which is inspired by glass sponge.

Connection

Biological Inspiration


Fibrous Mandrel as Base Component

scaffold

base fibers

connecting fibers 1

connecting fibers 2

component

scaffold

base fibers

connecting fibers 1

connecting fibers 2

component

- structural surface for each component - pre-fabricated/woven with robot

- structural surface for each component - pre-fabricated/woven with robot

- horizontal connections between components - woven on-site

- horizontal connections between components - woven on-site

- vertical connections between components - woven on-site

- vertical connections between components - woven on-site

Surface Generated by Fiber-to-fiber Interaction

model elevation

model elevation

Component Connection with Red Fiber


erial Performance - Fibrous Tectonics

Harvard GSD Option Studio 1306

Component Variation

AXO

PLAN VIEW

PLAN VIEW

ARCH. APPLICATION

3 PLANES 2 PLANES

4-Plane Combination

5 PLANES 3 PLANES

2-Plane Component

6 PLANES 4 PLANES

2, 4-Plane Combination

EDGE

5 PLANES 5-Plane Combination

EDGE 6 PLANES

AXO

ARCH. APPLICATION


Ramp Slab Part Generated by 4-Plane Components

Ramp Slab Part Generated by 4-Plane Components


Roof Part Generated by 5-Plane Components Floor Part Generated by 5-Plane Components

Bifurcating Part Generated by 4-Plane Component Aggregations


Condition A Floor

A

Condition B Vertical Element

B C Condition C Edge

D

Condition D Floor

Component Aggregation Going back to the Mandrel, as mentioned before, we went beyond the original Le Ricolais’ inspired form of the cylinder and begin to incorporate multiple planes into the scaffold. Then we explored how these might aggregate together, and how these mandrels could be developed into a system of components, that are tailored to serve a specific purpose. The components are applicable to generate architectural conditions such as slab, column, floor


06 Fibrous Branching Design Thesis, Jan 2015 Advisor : Prof. Jorge Silvetti and Pangiotis Michalatos

Softwood - Needleaf Tree - Conifer - Pine Tree Reaction wood, as compression wood, are formed on the downside of the lean

Hardwood - Broadleaf tree Reaction wood, as tension wood, are formed on the upside of the lean


Topological Optimization of Branching Column Load

Material Distribution

Support

Boundary Condition Setting

Optimized Geometry Suggested

Topological Variation Generated by Typologically Manipulated Boundary Settings


Surface Generation and Reinforcement

Scafolding System Adjusted Following Topological Optimization Result

Surface Structural Pattern (Von-Mises Stress)

Surface Structural Pattern (Von-Mises Stress)

Reinforcement with another hierarch of red fiber following Surface Structural Pattern


Branching Rules

Branching Components

Surface Rules

Br-rule 1 : branching

Surf-rule 1

Br-rule 2 : rotating

Surf-rule 2

Assembled Branching Components

Br-rule 3 : merging

Br-rule 4 : Global Optimization

Assembled Branching Components

Surf-rule 3 : Reinforcement


Br-rule 1 Applications

Br-rule 2 Applications

Br-rule 3 Applications

Surf-rule 1 Applications


Global Structure Optimization

Deflection

Suggested Sizes of Mandrels

Tension and Compression Distribution


Building System Design with Fibrous Tectonic

Columns

Slabs

Roofs

Circulation

Facades


Strassbourg Architecture Museum

Exhibition 02

Exhibitio

n 02

The Street of the Medieval Village Exhibitio

n 03

Exhibitio

n 01

Exhibition 03 The Facade of the Renaissance

Exhibition 01 The Monument of Strassbourg


Structural Optimization Process


Order of Applying Fiber Winding Algorithm

Component Variation and Assembly of Braching Columns and Spreading Facades


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Mt. Nam-san in Seoul, An Island in the Metropolis Personal Design, 2006 Grand Prix for 2006 Graduation Competition at Seoul National University

Seoul Tower

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3

City Hall

Link the mountain to urban life Because of the rapid modernization of Seoul, Mt.Nam-san is surrounded by urban area. Urban infrastructures, such as tunnels and roads, penetrate the mountain.Now, it is very hard to go by walk from downtown, even though there are amenities. This project aims to increase the accessibility to Mt. Nam-san and restore the original landscape of this place.


GRAND PERFOMANCE HALL

LOBBY

OFFICE PERFOMANCE HALL

SHOPPING ZONE

OUTDOOR SQUARE

SHOPPING ZONE

SUNKEN GARDEN

GALLERY

FOOD COURT

Seoul Tower

ENTRANCE HALL

CABLE CAR LOUNGE

+ 13000

+ 22000

+ 31000

se

T r a

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a m

s

a n

W a

l

i l k w

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Above the Tunnel

Cable-car Stn.

Nam-san Tunnel #3

The basic idea is covering “3-dimensional form of plate” above the valley to tunnel. The plate going to offer a route for the mountain and serve for a ceiling of diverse facilities: gallery, performance hall, food court and water fountain squares. I designed the form of the plate following the original landscape of this area before the tunnel was built. It connects the existing amenities, such as Nam-san walkway, trail and cable car station. original landscape of this area before the tunnel was built.


Program Organization The basic idea is covering “3-dimensional form of plate” above the valley to tunnel. The plate going to offer a route for the mountain and serve for a ceiling of diverse facilities: gallery, performance hall, food court and water fountain squares. I designed the form of the plate following the original landscape of this area before the tunnel was built. It connects the existing amenities, such as Nam-san walkway, trail and cable car station. original landscape of this area before the tunnel was built.

CABLE CAR HOUSE

OBSERVATORY

LOBBY GALLERY

ENTRANCE HALL

LOBBY FOOD COURT

SHOPPING ZONE

PERFORMANCE HALL STAGE BACK STAGE

PARKING

TOLL GATE

NAM-SAN TUNNEL #3


Walkway - Art Museum - Cable Car Stn. - Seoul Tower

Sunken Garden - Performance Hall - Trail

Bus Stn. - Courtyard - Roof Garden - Walkway


Restoration of the Landscape


08 Deconstruction of Mega-Christian Church 2011, Personal Design At Graduate School of Seoul National University

Worship Sevice at Gwangseong Church in Korea


1

Bible Study Lounge Communitiy Cafe

2

3

Missionary Center Childcare Center

4

“Pray at Dawn” Hall Public Garden

Outdoor Bible School Children’s Playground

5

Outdoor Worship Place Event Plaza

6

Church Cemetery Community Charnel House

04

Hybridized Space for the Church and Local Community

02 03

01

Renovation

05 06

Renovation

New Construction

Since 1970s the typical mega churches in Korea have been through rapid development and extended to other regions. It was common for these mega churches to purchase surrounding land and buildings to grow in size. Despite their increasing size and influence they did little to bridge gaps among the people and provide sufficient service to the local community. In this project, I have defined normality, flexibility and changeability to address the issues surrounding Korean mega-christian church. I investigated the development history of Sam-il church which was very different to the other typical mega-churches. Even though Sam-il church is mega church in terms of size, it occupies much smaller space and thus does not cause any inconvenience to the community of surrounding area. Based on the history and philosophy of Sam-il church, we suggest an alternative model for Korean mega churches in metropolis area

Adaptive Reuse

Lease

Adaptive Reuse


The Memory Scattered in the City The church is composed of 25 ‘camp’s and one camp is composed of about 20 ‘team’s and one team has 30~50 members. Even the largest worship hall can accommodate 2000 people, which means only 2or3 camps can come together for a worship service. The camps are grouped and come together in different time and place. For this, there are 6 identical Sunday worship services and they are broadcasted to each branch. While one group of camps is participating worship service, other camps do various activities, such as team meetings, bible studies, volunteer works, missionary works, and so on. These activities are scattered into surrounding area.


1

Bible Study Lounge Communitiy Cafe

2

Missionary Center Childcare Center

3

“Pray at Dawn” Hall Public Garden

4

Outdoor Bible School Children’s Playground

5

Outdoor Worship Place Event Plaza

6

Church Cemetery Community Charnel House

The New Model for Mega-church Instead of massive construction, I suggested different strategies for expanding, such as adaptive reuse, renovation and even lease. The new model for mega church contributes to urban regeneration and offers spaces for community service well as worship service.


1

Bible Study Lounge Communitiy Cafe

Renovation

2

Missionary Center Childcare Center

Renovation

3

“Pray at Dawn” Hall Public Garden

New Construction

4

Outdoor Bible School Children’s Playground

Adaptive Reuse

5

Outdoor Worship Place Event Plaza

Lease

6

Church Cemetery Community Charnel House

Adaptive Reuse

Adaptive Reuse

Renovation Namsan tower and Samil church are in sight of the ‘Sam-il Observatory’, and from this view point 4 story buildings and the run down residential areas were remodelled. The lower sections of the buildings have cafes and outdoor decking to enjoy the surroundings, whereas the higher sections are designed for prayer space and bible study lounge. The outdoor decking space is linked by stairs to give short cuts in between levels and serves for community cafe.

‘Sam-il Outdoor Bible School’ locates in the middle of residential area. It has been redisigned the deserted wooden structure for the children of this region. Several slides were installed using differences of topography. In weekdays, it is used as a playground for the neighborhood. It also serves as a space for children’s bible school in the weekends.


1

Bible Study Lounge Communitiy Cafe

Renovation

2

Missionary Center Childcare Center

Renovation

3

“Pray at Dawn” Hall Public Garden

4

New Construction

Outdoor Bible School Children’s Playground

Adaptive Reuse

5

Outdoor Worship Place Event Plaza

6

Lease

Church Cemetery Community Charnel House

Adaptive Reuse

Lease

Renovation ‘Sam-il Missionary Center’ connects the discontinued footpaths for localities and offers short cuts. The external wooden decking is extended indoors to create space for missionary center. The decking is also connected to the rooftops where locals can use it as a park. The rooftop park will become an open space for outdoor activities for people living in densely populated areas.

‘Sam-il Outdoor Worship Place’ has kept the original structure of an existing building for the atmosphere of the locality. This place offers space for various events and activities of the Church and local residents. Free food service and flea market will take place during the weekdays and it will be transformed as an outdoor congregation place on Sunday. The internal space of the existing building is composed of two parts, a kitchen and storage. The seating can be configured to accommodate various numbers of people for each of the events and activities so that the space can be used efficiently. The place is open to the local residents as a communal space.


1

Bible Study Lounge Communitiy Cafe

2

Missionary Center Childcare Center

Renovation

Renovation

3

“Pray at Dawn” Hall Public Garden

New Construction

4

Outdoor Bible School Children’s Playground

Adaptive Reuse

5

Outdoor Worship Place Event Plaza

Lease

New Construction

Adaptive Reuse

“Pray at Dawn” hall is located at a junction five streets meet. Local residents can use the junction as a terminal to shorten their journeys and benches have been installed for those who may wish to seek refuge.

The shortage of cemetery has been an issue in Korea. I redesigned the old apartment, which had been abandoned, into the church cemetery. It offers charnel house for the local community.

View from the street

Its ‘Pray at dawn’ motto is important to the church as is its close proximity and central location for easy access to its service. On the 2nd and 3rd floor it has its own congregation space and meeting place connected by spiral staircase in the middle. The open plan staircase is intended to promote interaction between the local residents walking across and the churchgoers walking down.

Abandoned Apartment

Most Mega churches have a cemetery for their congregation. It is normal for a memorial service to be held out of the city in Korea, however in this project we are creating an exemption to this norm by incorporating a memorial place close to the centre. There will be a congregation cemetery and memorial service on the upper floor of the building.

6

Church Cemetery Community Charnel House

Adaptive Reuse


09 Study on Wood Structure of Japanese Architecture Personal Research, 2008 At Architectural History Lab. in Seoul National University

is

X-ax

is

X-ax

Cultural Identity in Timber Frame Roof design varies according to the vertical relation of the structural frames, even same combination of structural frame are used. In case of Iro-dang, the column purlins on X-axis(5-purlins) and Y-axis(3-purlins) make two joints at the inside and outside of corner. Also, the middle purlins on X-axis and the top purlin on Y-axis make two joints on the upper level of former.


East A

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Long

urved

Rafte

10

Roof

r for P

rotrud

East A

Technology and Eclecticism of Wooden Roof Structure in Colonial Period of Korea

ing Ea

sian T

imber

ves

Frame

INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE Jeonghyun Kim and BongHee Jeon, “Technology and Eclecticism in Wooden Roof Structure”, presented at the 2011 East Asian Architectural Culture International Conference(EAAC 2011), “South of East Asia: Re-addressing East Asian Architecture and Urbanism”, National University of Singapore, Singapore

BOOK

Tradit io

nal Ko

East A

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Canti

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Eclec

d Raf

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ss Str

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avilion

Roof

ter fo

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Bong Hee Jeon, Sanghun Joo, Yeonjeong Do, Jeonghyun Kim, A Bibliographical Introduction of Architectural Drawings in the Japanese Colonial Period – Joseon Government General Building, Government Agencies and Conservatories, National Archives of Korea, Daejeon, Dec. 2011 (ISBN: 9788996772507)

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Korea

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Pavilio

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*Original drawing Is housed at the National Archives of Korea.


Audience Hall Chang-deok Palace Seoul, Korea (1908)

The Waiting Hall Chang-deok Palace Seoul, Korea(est.1912~1917)

Korea Pavillion Showa Industial Exhibition Hiroshima, Japan (est.1929)

Imperial Household Museum Chang-gyeong Palace Seoul, Korea(est.1910)

Office Building Ministry of Imperial Household Seoul, Korea (est.1908)

Korea Guesthouse Oita Exhibition Kyushu, Japan (est.1921)

Korea Pavillion Showa Industial Exhibition Hiroshima, Japan (est.1929)

Store of Korea Pavillion Oita Exhibition Kyushu, Japan (est.1921)

Shop Korea Exhibition Seoul, Korea (1929)

Korea Pavillion Taisho Exhibition Tokyo, Japan (1914)

Science Museum Government General of Joseon Seoul, Korea (est.1922)

Korea Pavillion Kobe Naval Exhibition Kobe, Japan (est.1930)

Storehouse Chang-deok Palace Seoul, Korea (1914)

Worship Hall Bu-gok Methodist Church Gang-gyeong, Korea (1923)

National Museum Gaeseong, Korea(1931)

Korea Pavillion Exhibition of Industries and Tourism Kanazawa, Japan (est. 1932)

Korea Pavillion Taisho Exhibition Tokyo, Japan (est.1914)

Korea Pavillion Tokyo Peace Exhibition Tokyo, Japan (est.1929)

Office Building The Imperial Police Station Seoul, Korea (1910~45)

Guesthouse Bae-hwa Girls’ Highschool Seoul, Korea (est.1915)

The Main Gate Korea Exhibition Seoul, Korea (est.1929)

Banggwang Primary School Gurye, Korea (1946)

Analytic Drawing

ORIGINAL DRAWING

SIMPLICATION

COLORING BY ELEMENT

National archives of Korea, the depository of historical records of the country, have recently constructed digital data base of colonial-era buildings. The data base includes schematic plans and detailed drawings of the buildings. It allowed us not only grasp a concept of the design principle, but also understand the structural system and the concrete building methods. I selected 22 buildings constructred in this period after reviewing drawing collection of National archives of Korea and The Academy of Korean Studies to perform this research. The drawings were so detailed that I had to abstract them to diagrams which only includes columns, rafters, truss members and roof tiles.


Published Books Bong Hee Jeon, Sanghun Joo, Yeonjeong Do, Jeonghyun Kim, A Bibliographical Introduction of Architectural Drawings in the Japanese Colonial Period – Joseon Government General Building, Government Agencies and Conservatories, National Archives of Korea, Daejeon, Dec. 2011 (ISBN: 978-89-96772-50-7) Bong Hee Jeon, Sanghun Joo, Jeonghyun Kim, Hyowon Seo, A Bibliographical Introduction of Architectural Drawings in the Japanese Colonial Period – Joseon Government General Building, Government Monopoly and Police Facilities, National Archives of Korea, Daejeon, Dec. 2012 (ISBN: 978-89-98057-50-3)

Tobacco Factory in Je-cheon, Korea. Built in 1945. Designated as Modern Cultural Heritage.


1920

a

a’

New shower space and laundry space

b

b’

Entrance for the new restroom and a wooden closet

( 京城府壹筆每地形明細圖 )

2000

( Designation of Historic District )

c

c’

2011-12

New restroom and shower space

( Private House )

d

d’

a

New wooden wall

b c

e

e’

New wooden floor

e

d

PROPOSAL 2013 ( Guest House )


11 Buk-chon Guest House Remodelling Personal Professional Design and construction, 2013 Located at the Historic Preservation District of Seoul Responsible for design and construction supervision


30 Days of Construction

Day 01 Demolishment of concrete walls Day 02 Realignment of sewerage Day 03 Realignment of sewerage

UTILITY WORK

Day 04 Installment of water supply pipe Day 05 Realignment of floor heating system Day 06 Building a interior wall Day 07 Building a interior wall / Timber triming Day 08 Plastering interior walls / Timber triming

MASONRY PLASTERING GRINDING

Day 09 Grinding the old wood beams and rafters Day 10 Timber triming Day 11 Timber triming Day 12 Installment of wood frames for a interior wall Day 13 Installment of wood wall frames Day 14 Installment of wood partition for a boiler Day 15 Installment of wood closet Day 16 Installment of wood floor

CARPENTRY

Day 17 Installment of wood floor Day 18 Tiling for restrooms

FINISHING

Day 19 Tiling for restrooms Day 20 Installment of wood shelf Day 21 Installment of wood sliding door for a restroom Day 22 Installment of sink and toilet / Building walls Day 23 Waterproofing for wood closet / Building walls Day 24 Installment of wood window frames / Building walls

MASONRY PLASTERING

Day 25 Installment of glass for wood windows / Building walls Day 26 Stonepaving of a courtyard

GLAZING

Day 27 Installment of a glass partitions for a shower space Day 28 Varnishing for wood walls and floors Day 29 Wallpaper Works Day 30 Cleaning

FINISHING


JEONGHYUN KIM 47 Linden St. #6, Boston, MA, USA 02134 archi206@naver.com / +1-857-208-8885 EDUCATION • 09 / 2013 – 05 / 2015 : Master in Architecture II, Harvard University • 09 / 2010 – 09 / 2012 : Ph.D. candidate, Seoul National University • 03 / 2007 – 02 / 2009 : M.S. in Architecture Engineering, Seoul National University • 03 / 2000 – 02 / 2007 : B.S. in Architectural Engineering, Seoul National University

PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE • 02 / 2014 – 05 / 2015 : Research Assistant, WYSS Institute in Harvard University • 03 / 2010 – 08 / 2013 : Research Associate, Seoul National University Engineering Research Institute • 12 / 2011 – 01 / 2012 : Architectural Designer(part-time), Design Camp Moonpark Partners, collaborated for the design competition for Yeong-cheon Oriental Medical Complex • 08 / 2011 – 09 / 2011 : Architectural Designer(part-time), KYWC Architects, collaborated for the design competition for Bu-yeo Resort • 01 / 2009 – 01 / 2010 : Architectural Designer(full-time), Design Camp Moonpark Partners, worked for the design competition team • 01 / 2008 – 02 / 2008 : Architectural Designer(part-time), Guga Architects, Made an object-based full 3D model and a 3D movie of Mi-myung-je house • 07 / 2005 – 08 / 2005 : Intern, Atelier 17 Architects & Associates, assisted for the design competition for Ma-ri-so-ri-gol Instrument Museum

PATENT AND BOOK • 02 / 2015 : Parametric Description Method, 1st inventor of 5, Registration No.: 2013-0103868, Int. Classification: G06T 17/00, Issuing Organization: The Korean Intellectual Property Office • 05 / 2012 : Modeling Methodology for Han-ok with Parametric Operation, 1st inventor of 5, Registration No.: 1011455150000, Int. Classification: G06T 17/00, Issuing Organization: The Korean Intellectual Property Office • 12 / 2011 : A Bibliographical Introduction of Architectural Drawings in the Japanese Colonial Period vol.6, 3rd author of 4, ISBN: 9788996772507, Publisher: National Archives of Korea, Daejeon, South Korea • 12 / 2011 : A Bibliographical Introduction of Architectural Drawings in the Japanese Colonial Period vol.5, 4th author of 4, ISBN: 9788996772507, Publisher: National Archives of Korea, Daejeon, South Korea

JOURNAL ARTICLE • Jeonghyun Kim and BongHee Jeon, “Design Integrated Parametric Modeling Methodology for Han-ok”, Journal of Asian Architecture and Building engineering (JAABE) (SCIE), Vol. 11, No. 2 (Nov. 2012): 239-243 • Jeonghyun Kim, Pilgu Chang and BongHee Jeon, “A Parametric Modeling Methodology Optimized for Traditional Korean House”, Journal of Architectural Institute of Korea, Vol. 28, No. 2 (Feb. 2012): 105-112 • Jeonghyun Kim, Hana Kim and BongHee Jeon, “Study on the Types of Corner-connections in the Traditional Korean House”, Journal of Architectural Institute of Korea, Vol. 25, No. 6 (Jun. 2009): 177-186

INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ARTICLE • Jeonghyun Kim and BongHee Jeon, “The Myth of Roof Shape in Korean Architecture”, presented at the 2012 Conference of the International Association for the Study of Traditional Environments(IASTE), “Myth of Tradition”, Portland, USA • Jeonghyun Kim and BongHee Jeon, “Technology and Eclecticism in Wooden Roof Structure”, presented at the 2011 East Asian Architectural Culture International Conference(EAAC), “South of East Asia: Re-addressing East Asian Architecture and Urbanism”, NUS, Singapore • Jeonghyun Kim and BongHee Jeon, “A Study on a Parametric Design of Han-ok”, presented at the 8th International Symposium on Architectural Interchanges in Asia(ISAIA), “Asian View: Order and Wisdom for the Future”, Kitakyushu, Japan • Jeonghyun Kim and BongHee Jeon, “Structure and Design of Corner-connections in the Korean Traditional House”, presented at the 7th International Symposium on Architectural Interchanges in Asia(ISAIA), “Urban Renewal and Architectural Creation”, Beijing, China

DOMESTIC CONFERENCE ARTICLE • Dongsub Lee, Jeonghyun Kim and BongHee Jeon, “Parametric Modeling Methodology for Han-ok”, Proceeding of the 2011 Spring Conference of Korean Association of Architectural History, pp. 151-156 • Jeonghyun Kim and BongHee Jeon, “Adaptation of Western Modern Trusses for Korean Traditional Roof in the Early 20th Century”, Proceeding of the 2011 Fall Conference of Korean Association of Architectural History, pp. 131-134 • Jeonghyun Kim and BongHee Jeon, “Classification System of Parametric Modeling for Han-ok”, Proceeding of the 2010 Spring Conference of Korean Association of Architectural History, pp. 307-314 • Jeonghyun Kim, “The Structure and Design of Corner Connection in Traditional Korean House”, presented for the Best Thesis Award for 2009 at the Spring Conference of Korean Association of Architectural History

RESEARCH PARTICIPATION • 02 / 2010 – Present : Construction of Integrated Database and 3D Object-based BIM Library of Han-ok (government research and development), produced parametric BIM models of 120 individual elements and 24 assembly units for Han-ok • 02 / 2007 – 07 / 2008 : Seoul Han-ok Future Asset Portfolio (Seoul city government grant), made full object-based 3D models of 3 traditional Korean houses • 02 / 2007 – 07 / 2008 : Digital Library of Korean Carpentry (government grant), made 3D models of 23 traditional houses and organized them into a digital library

AWARD • 3rd Prize in the 2011 National Han-ok Competition, 1st participant of 2, granted by Ministry of Land, Transport and Maritime Affairs of Korea • 2nd Prize in the 2011 BIM Design Awards, 1st participant of 2, granted by Building SMART Korea • Best Thesis Prize in the 2009 Best Thesis Awards, master thesis, granted by Institution of Korean Association of Architectural History • Grand Prix in the 2006 Graduation Competition, personal design project, granted by Department of Architecture, Seoul National University

TEACHING EXPERIENCE • 03 / 2010 – 12 / 2012 : Teaching Assistant (Dept. of Architecture, Seoul National University), Subject: Architectural Design Studio, History of Architecture, and History of Korean Architecture (undergraduate course) • 03 / 2012 : Special Lecturer “Contemporary Wood Architecture” (Seoul National University), Subject: A Glance at Korean Contemporary Urbanism and Architecture (undergraduate course) • 02 / 2011 : Modelling Tutor, Workshop on Parametric Modelling with Digital Project • 09 / 2009 : Special Lecturer “3D Modelling with Sketchup”(Dept. of Architecture, Chung-ang University), Subject: Architectural Design Studio (Undergraduate course) • 03 /2007 – 06 / 2008 : Teaching Assistant (Dept. of Architecture, Seoul National University), Subject: History of Modern architecture, History of Eastern Architecture, and History of Korean Architecture (undergraduate course)

OTHERS • Computer Graphics : Extensive Technique in “Digital Project”, “Sketch-up”, Familiar with “AutoCAD”, “Photoshop”, “InDesign”, “Piranesi” and “Rhino” • English Proficiency : TOEFL Test(IBT): score of 108, Certificate from American Language Program in Columbia University(fall semester, 2003) • Field Survey : Korea(82 days), Japan(15days), China(19days) : Traditional Architecture Survey • Military service : Discharged as Sergeant of Republic of Korea Air Force (Dec. 2000 – Jun. 2003) • Volunteer Activities : Heritage Maintenance Volunteer of Cultural Heritage Administration of Korea at the Changdeok Palace(UNESCO World Heritage) (Jan. 2007 – Dec. 2009)


Profile for Jeonghyun Kim

Portfolio  

Jeonghyun Kim's Work 2000-2015

Portfolio  

Jeonghyun Kim's Work 2000-2015

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