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Jenny Ly Portfolio Magazine and Newspaper I Fall 2013


George W. Cook Hall Dormitory 125 bedrooms 98 baths 1 weight room 1 club room 1 courtyard 1study hall area

601 Fairmont Street, NW Washington, DC 20059 Photo credit: Jenny Ly 2010

The George W. Cook Hall is a co-educational residence hall that houses approximately 200 undergraduate students. Students are provided with a twin size bed and extra long mattress, desk, and dresser. Rooms are air conditioned and wired for cable television, the Internet, and local telephone. Other amenities include the “Club Room”— a television lounge that is also used for official hall programs—mail boxes, study hall, athletic weight room (athletes only). Front desk service is provided 24/7.

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219 This is Jenny Ly

and welcome to my crib (portfolio)

M&NI-F13-Lyj • 3


THE DESIGNER

My name is Jenny Ly and I am a graphic designer with a genuine love for beautiful, functional, and eye-catching design. Being a native of Los Angeles, CA made me appreciate the city’s artistic culture and inspires me to be a unique individual. As a creative, I have worked with various mediums of art such as painting, animation, sculpting, film and digital photography. I am a very detail-oriented and hands-on designer who enjoys learning new things everyday.

CLASS OF 2015

SOLICITATION PAGE 18

SKILLS IN ACTION PAGE 8-9

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physics

3d

3-d Printing

WHAT WHATISIS3-D 3-DPRINTING? PRINTING?

It is a possible today that you can download product data 3-d printing is the where a physical object can be printed by from the internet, personalize it, and have it sent to a designing a virtual 3d model by laying down successive layers of desktop machine that will fabricate it in just a couple of material. Seems too good to be true right? The reason we can hours. too 3-d good to beuses trueemerging right? The reason called we can do thisSeems is because printing technology doadditive this is manufacturing. because of emerging technology called “additive manufacturing”, or 3-d printing.

a n ew la n dsca pe o f m a n u factu r i n g

HOW IT HOW IT WORKS WORKS

Y-axis

C O L L O Q U I U M

X-axis

A product is designed by engineers, architects, or product designers through a software using computer-aided design (CAD).

The data is sent to a machine that will slice the data into 2-dimensional representations throughout the model; e.g similar to slicing salami. Heats supply and

Printhead

The product is first created using product design programs such as computer-aided design (CAD).

build materials

Printed Layers

Building Platform

It then gets sent to a machine that slices the data into 2-d representation all the way through the product. (e.g like slicing a salami)

The process can take a couple of hours to create but once it is complete, it is ready to use. Build substrate

Layer by layer will be passed through the machine while creating a new layer to be fused with the older layer in a addititve process.

Elevator z-axis

Each layer would get passed through the machine while creating a new layer that would be fused with the older layer. (additive process)

HOWARD UNIVERSITY DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICS AND ASTRONOMY PRESENTS

Once all the layers have been added and fused, the product is fully formed and ready to use.

MATERIALS

Clint Sprott Department of Physics

University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI Durable Fine Plastic Material: UV curable resin From $3.39/cm3

Self-Organization - Nature's Intelligent Design Complex patterns are common throughout nature, from the distribution of galaxies in the Universe to the organization of neurons in the human brain. It is generally assumed that such complex structure must have a complex cause, but it may be that the patterns spontaneously arise through the repeated application of simple rules. This talk will provide examples of self-organization in nature and will describe six simple computer models that can replicate the features of these patterns. The models typically produce fractal spatial structure and chaotic temporal dynamics characterized by power laws and unpredictability, even when the models are simple and purely deterministic. The work has application to fields as diverse as physics, ecology, political science, economics, sociology, and art.

WHAT YOU CAN MAKE

Clint Sprott earned his bachelor's degree from MIT in 1964 and his Ph.D. in physics from the University of Wisconsin–Madison in 1969. His professional interests are in experimental plasma physics and chaos theory. In 1984, the University of Wisconsin–Madison began a program called The Wonders of Physics, which Sprott presented in a typical travelling showman style to audiences of all ages. The show has been presented on the Madison campus over 200 times to a total audience of over 60,000 over a period of 25 years. His shows are available freely as streaming video from his website.

WHAT YOU CAN MAKE

Durable Gloss Plastic - Ivory Material:ABS plastic From $2.00/cm3

Stainless Steel Material:Stainless steel (bronze infused) From $10.53/cm3

Durable Plastic Material:Nylon / polyamide From $1.70/cm3

Superfine Plastic - White UV curable resin From $2.50/cm3

Glazed Ceramic Material: Alumina Ceramic From $0.20/cm3

Rainbow Ceramic Material:Proprietary ceramic powder From $0.99/cm3

Basically, you can print anything you can design.

KEEP IN MIND THAT IT'S NOT ALWAYS ABOUT HOW YOU SWING,

Replacement Parts

Co-sponsorship by the College of Arts & Sciences, Office of the Provost and Howard University Chapter of Sigma Xi

Durable Gloss Plastic - Black Material:ABS plastic From $2.00/cm3

Gold Plate Material:Gold plated stainless steel (bronze infused) From $10.53/cm3

Home Decor

Animal Heads

Penrose Triangle

Body Parts

Weapons

Apparel

Wednesday, October 16, 2013 3:30 pm THIRKIELD HALL AUDITORIUM, ROOM 300 Co-sponsorship by the College of Arts & Sciences, Office of the Provost and Howard University Chapter of Sigma Xi

Designed by : Jenny Ly

M O RE I N F O RMAT I O N : Dr. Prabhakar Misra | pmisra@howard.edu | (202) 806-6245

Howard University Art Show 2013 2nd Place

Howard University Art Show 2012 Honorable Mention

“BEST OF SHOW” PAGE 10-11

The History of Newspapers by M i t c h e l l S t e p h e n s f o r C o l l i e r s E n c y c l o p e d i a 1610 Printed weeklies appeared in Basel 1470s One of the first printed works that might qualify as news was an Italian account of a tournament

1450s Johann Gutenberg invented the letter press, employing movable type

1541 The first news report printed in the Americas described an earthquake in Guatemala and was printed in Mexico

1695 The Licensing Act lapsed, and a belief in the importance of a press that had the right to criticize government eventually took root in England and was transplanted to its American colonies. 1702 The first successful English daily was the Daily Courant, which first appeared in London

1615 Frankfort and Vienna 1616 Hamburg

1609 The oldest surviving European printed newspapers were both published weekly in German - one in Strasbourg, Relations: Aller Furnemmen, printed by Johann Carolus; the other, Aviso Relations over Zeitung, printed by Lucas Schulte, probably in Wolfenbuttel.

1650 The world's oldest surviving printed daily newspaper, Einkommende Zeitung, appeared in Leipzig

1704 The Boston News-Letter, which first appeared in print survived for 72 years

1618 Amsterdam

1617 Berlin

1620 The oldest surviving newspaper written in English appears to have been published in Amsterdam. by Pieter van de Keere, a Dutch map and print engraver who had lived in London for a few years..

1770 All the duties except that on tea were removed.

1736 Virginia Gazette in Williamsburg

1729 Benjamin Franklin wrote in his Pennsylvania Gazette

1729 Benjamin Franklin took over control of the Pennsylvania Gazette in Philadelphia, made it into one of the finest papers in the colonies and embarked upon an extraordinary career as a writer, journalist, printer, businessman, postmaster, scientist and statesman.

1832 An improved version of this press, using two cylinders, was developed by Richard Hoe in New York

1855 The British stamp tax was abolished

1765 The Stamp Act passed by the British Parliament passed

1765 The Stamp Act was to take effect on November 1

1767 British Parliament approved the Townshend Acts which imposed taxes on American imports of glass, lead, paint, tea and, significantly, paper.

1889 Out of the battle between Hearst and Pulitzer for the rights to a cartoon character known as the "Yellow Kid" came a new term for sensationalism: "yellow journalism." This was also a time of "stunt" journalism: Pulitzer sent a reporter named Elizabeth Cochrane, who wrote under the name Nellie Bly, around the world

1831 The abolitionist crusader William Lloyd Garrison started The Liberator with the expressed purpose, of course, of changing people's minds.

1798 Congress passed and President John Adams signed the Sedition Act -- probably the most significant threat to press freedom in the history of the United States. The Sedition Act made "any false, scandalous and malicious writing...against the the Government of the United States," the Congress or the president, "with intent to...bring them...into contempt or disrepute" punishable by a fine or imprisonment. Among others, the leading Republican editor in New York, New England and Philadelphia (Bache) were all indicting for violating the Sedition Act or the common-law prohibition against seditious libel, which had been the charge against Zenger. There were at least fifteen convictions.

1801 There were about 200 newspapers in the United States when Jefferson assumed the presidency

1820 More than half of the newspapers in the largest cities had the words "advertiser," "commercial" or "mercantile" in their names. These "mercantile papers" were often published on large, or "blanket," sheets, and they were expensive -- about six cents a copy, more than most of the artisans or mechanics in the cities could afford.

1807 Jefferson wrote, "...to demonstrate the falsehood of the pretext that freedom of the press is incompatible with orderly government."

1846 Dickens founded and edited The Daily News in London

1868 to 1871 Elizabeth Cady Stanton's The Revolution, for which Susan B. Anthony served as business manager.

1872 James Gordon Bennett, Jr., who took over the Herald after his father's death

1932 New York Times had a circulation of 1.2 million daily and 1.8 million Sunday

1895 William Allen White, who purchased the Emporia Gazette

1898 In their battle for circulation leadership in New York, Hearst and Pulitzer cut the price of their newspapers to a penny, tried to hire away each other's editors and reporters and filled their papers with even more bloody, bizarre and salacious stories. Pulitzer and particularly Hearst also crusaded, with huge front-page headlines and emotional, sometimes misleading stories, for war with Spain over Cuba. "How do you like the Journal's war?" Hearst's paper asked after war broke out

1896 Adolph Ochs, who purchased the New York Times and set it on its present respectable course.

1897 Another major advance during this period was the introduction of regular use of photographs in newspapers, which began.

1897 The Jewish Daily Forward, printed in Yiddish, first appeared in NewYork

1849 to 1859 The Lily, which was published by Amelia Bloomer

1887 William Randolph Hearst, an admirer of Pulitzer, took control of his father's San Francisco Examiner

1931 Perhaps the most mourned newspaper to expire in New York during this period was the World, which Pulitzer’s heirs sold to Scripps-Howard

1825 The first cylinder press, invented by a German, Frederick Koenig and improved by Napier in England, was first used in the United States

1840 James Gordon Bennett, with his eagerness to investigate the details of bloody murders and pass on rumors of sex scandals, even became the object of a "moral war," led by other newspapers

1847 The great black writer Frederick Douglas started The North Star "to Attack Slavery in all its forms and aspects."

1887 A style of journalism similar to that of Pulitzer and Hearst was practiced with similar success in London by Alfred Harmsworth who started the Daily Mail

1639 Italy's first printed weekly appeared

1835 Philadelphia had the Daily Transcript, and the Public Ledger, in 1836; Baltimore's Sun was first published in 1837 -- all selling for a penny.

1830 Charles Dickens worked as a reporter for The Morning Chronicle and wrote sketches, similar in tone to his great novels, for The Evening Chronicle in London

1828 The first native American newspaper, the Cherokee Phoenix, was printed in Georgia

1827 John B. Russwurm and Reverend Samuel Cornish brought out the first newspaper published by blacks in the United States, Freedom's Journal, with a similar purpose. "We wish to plead our own cause," they wrote. "Too long have other spoken for us."

1800 Thomas Jefferson was elected president, partly because of resentment over the Sedition Act, and the Act was allowed to lapse. "I have lent myself willingly as the subject of a great experiment,"

1721 The first paper to attempt to give voice to political debate was Boston's third successful newspaper, the New England Courant by James Franklin

1796 The Aurora, a Republican paper published in Philadelphia by Benjamin Franklin Bache, greeted George Washington's retirement as president

1814 Steam engines had first been used to drive presses at the Times in London

1808 Early Spanish language newspapers appeared in New Orleans

1631 France produced a newspaper of its own. 1641 Spain's weekly appeared

1644 The ideal of freedom of the press was articulated with great eloquence in England by John Milton

1727 The Maryland Gazette appeared in Annapolis

1733 John Peter Zenger's New York Weekly Journal, began printing

1625 A German newspaper, published by Lucas Schulte, had begun appearing two times a week

1641 The first English newspaper to attempt to report on national news was a sedate little weekly entitled, The Heads of Severall Proceedings In This Present Parliament, which appeared in November

1719 Campbell lost the position of postmaster but he refused to give up the newspaper. So, his replacement as postmaster, William Brooker, began printing his own newspaper, the Boston Gazette, on December 21.

1725 New York City's first newspaper was the New York Gazette, founded by William Bradford

1631 In Paris, Theophraste Renaudot began publishing his Gazette de France 1621 The first newspaper printed in England appeared

1883 The second period when sensationalism seemed to increase in American newspapers began with the "new journalism" of Joseph Pulitzer. Pulitzer, who created the St. Louis Post-Dispatch in 1878 and then took over the New York World

1961 The Columbia Journalism Review, a forum for such criticism, was first published.

1924 Munsey sold the Herald to the owners of Greeley's old Tribune, creating the Herald Tribune

1923 The American Society of Newspaper Editors drafted the "Canons of Journalism which included this dictum: "News reports should be free from opinion or bias of any kind."

1904 The first School of Journalism was founded at the University of Missouri

1903 Harmsworth created the first modern, small-sized or "tabloid" (The term was borrowed from the drug industry) newspaper, the Daily Mirror,

1992 only 37 cities in the United States had separately owned, competing daily newspapers

1920 Munsey bought and threw into his mix the Bennetts' old Herald and the associated Evening Telegram.

1914 In Chicago the Inter Oceanmerged with the Record-Herald and called itself the Herald.

1905 Chicago Defender, a major black newspaper, began publishing

Flash

After Efects

Lightroom

Illustrator

InDesign

Photoshop

D5100

KNOWLEDGE IN ACTION PAGE 14-17

Knowledge in Action

1993 The Wall Street Journal had a daily circulation of about 1.9 million

1910 The black activist W. E. B. Du Bois was a correspondent for the Springfield Republican and the New York Age, before he began editing his own journal, the Crisis

HISTORY OF NEWSPAPERS PAGE 12-13

SKILLS AND CAPABILITIES PAGE 6-7

1982 USA Today, a national newspaper introduced by Gannett, has imitated the short breezy stories featured on television newscasts. It was also one of the first newspapers to make heavy use of color in pictures, maps and graphics.


I used the first program Photoshop was ting art signing and crea de d te ar st st fir I when er than used it much long projects so I have ot ph oshop, programs. With the other Adobe it photos, ulate images, ed ip an m to le ab photo I am ns. I have done tio si po m co te ea any and cr ns that can fix m tio ec rr co d an ng retouchi rimented I have also expe clients problems. atures to shop tools and fe to ho P of t lo a ith w unique raphy and create og ot ph al on rs pe te edit I am able to crea k. or tw ar g in st re and inte ns, and detailed selectio clipping masks, ve a fair images (.gifs). I ha g in ov m te ra ne sional ge ooting in a profes sh of g in nd ta rs unde m it. to learn more fro studio but eager

Photoshop

Flash

Indesign

6 • M&NI-F13-Lyj

I just started using flash for a shor t amount of time to create animations tha t contain illustrated stills . I am, however ,open to learning more abou t using this software if necessary.

I have used Indesign for projects such as magazines, booklets, single pages, and posters. I can create grids using Indesign to create a well-structured layout and setup a pages correctly for printing. I have designed projects that need to be printed with folds and know how to do imposition. With Indesign, I have designed brochures, magazine covers, and newspaper spreads. I know how to work effiently in a house style that contains master pages, style sheets, color palettes, paragraph styles, character styles, libraries, and templates.


Illustrator

After Effects

I have used Illustr ator to design and create many custo m illustrations. I have worked with illu strating type and have created my ow n typeface. With Illustrator, I have de signed cd covers, typographic posters, log os, t-shirt designs, infographics, patterns, perspective mockups and graphic s. I have created templates and mockups for many different products to give a cli ent an idea of how a product will look lik e with the desired graphic on it.

After used I a Effects to create t tha ce en movie sequ d ate im an ins conta s type, and photo I . eo vid a ate to cre ng am open to learni s more on using thi ll. we as m gra pro

d n a ills

Sk

s e i t i l i Capab Lightroom

I used Lightroom to edit photos that I ha ve shot using professio nal lighting. I have also us ed lightroom when I ne ed to work on a batch of photos that I can ap ply the same settings of effects because they all require the same amou nt of adjustments.

D51

00

Photography I have shot photos for the same amount of tim eI started using design programs. Until I came to colle ge, that’s when I learned more on how to shoot photos correctly in a studio and in any setting. I have also shot using a film ca mera and know how to use softw are to edit and correct any errors or flaws in the photograph.

M&NI-F13-Lyj • 7


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M&NI-F13-Lyj • 9


physics C O L L O Q U I U M

HOWARD UNIVERSITY DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICS AND ASTRONOMY PRESENTS

Clint Sprott

Paper Camera Bank Howard University Art Show 2012 Paper 10” x 8” x 8” 2012

Department of Physics

University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI

Self-Organization - Nature's Intelligent Design Complex patterns are common throughout nature, from the distribution of galaxies in the Universe to the organization of neurons in the human brain. It is generally assumed that such complex structure must have a complex cause, but it may be that the patterns spontaneously arise through the repeated application of simple rules. This talk will provide examples of self-organization in nature and will describe six simple computer models that can replicate the features of these patterns. The models typically produce fractal spatial structure and chaotic temporal dynamics characterized by power laws and unpredictability, even when the models are simple and purely deterministic. The work has application to fields as diverse as physics, ecology, political science, economics, sociology, and art. Clint Sprott earned his bachelor's degree from MIT in 1964 and his Ph.D. in physics from the University of Wisconsin–Madison in 1969. His professional interests are in experimental plasma physics and chaos theory. In 1984, the University of Wisconsin–Madison began a program called The Wonders of Physics, which Sprott presented in a typical travelling showman style to audiences of all ages. The show has been presented on the Madison campus over 200 times to a total audience of over 60,000 over a period of 25 years. His shows are available freely as streaming video from his website.

Co-sponsorship by the College of Arts & Sciences, Office of the Provost and Howard University Chapter of Sigma Xi

Wednesday, October 16, 2013 3:30 pm THIRKIELD HALL AUDITORIUM, ROOM 300 Co-sponsorship by the College of Arts & Sciences, Office of the Provost and Howard University Chapter of Sigma Xi

M O R E IN FO R MAT IO N : Dr. Prabhakar Misra | pmisra@howard.edu | (202) 806-6245

Annual Physics Colloquium Flyer Flyer for Howard University physics event 2013 Software: Adobe Illustrator

Human Trafficking Conference Photograph and event logo design Software: Adobe Illustrator

Human Trafficking Conference Photograph and event logo design Software: Adobe Illustrator and Photoshop

10 • M&NI-F13-Lyj

MLB World Series Event Poster Type-only Commemorative Poster Print 11x17 2013 Software: Adobe Illustrator


3d

3-d Printing

WHAT WHAT IS 3-D PRINTING? WHAT IS 3-D WHATIS IS3-D 3-DPRINTING? PRINTING?

ItItisisaapossible that download product data possibletoday today thatyou youcan canobject download productby data 3-d printing where 3-dthe printingisisthe thepersonalize whereaaphysical physical objectcan canbe beprinted printedaby from it,it, and from theinternet, internet, personalize andhave haveititsent senttotolayers a of designing aavirtual 3d by designing virtual 3dmodel model bylaying layingitdown downsuccessive successive layers desktop machine that will fabricate aacouple ofof of desktop machine thatgood willtoto fabricate itininjust just couple material. be material.Seems Seemstoo toogood betrue trueright? right? The Thereason reasonwe wecan can hours. Seems too good totobe true right? reason we hours. Seems too3-d good be trueemerging right?The The reasoncalled wecan can do printing uses technology dothis thisis isbecause because 3-d printing uses emerging technology called do this because do thisisismanufacturing. becauseofofemerging emergingtechnology technologycalled called“additive “additive additive additive manufacturing. manufacturing”, manufacturing”,oror3-d 3-dprinting. printing.

aa nnew ew la lanndsca dscape pe ooff m maannuufactu facturriinngg

HOW WORKS HOW IT IT WORKS HOW IT HOW IT WORKS WORKS

Y-axis Y-axis

X-axis X-axis

AAproduct productisisdesigned designedby byengineers, engineers,architects, architects, ororproduct productdesigners designersthrough throughaasoftware softwareusing using computer-aided computer-aideddesign design(CAD). (CAD).

The Thedata dataisissent senttotoaamachine machinethat thatwill willslice slicethe thedata datainto into 2-dimensional 2-dimensionalrepresentations representationsthroughout throughoutthe themodel; model; e.g e.gsimilar similartotoslicing slicingsalami. salami. Heats Heatssupply supplyand and

Printhead Printhead

The Theproduct productisisfirst firstcreated createdusing using product productdesign designprograms programssuch suchas as computer-aided computer-aideddesign design(CAD). (CAD).

build buildmaterials materials

Printed PrintedLayers Layers

Building BuildingPlatform Platform

ItItthen thengets getssent senttotoaamachine machine that thatslices slicesthe thedata datainto into2-d 2-d representation representationall allthe theway way through throughthe theproduct. product. (e.g (e.glike likeslicing slicingaasalami) salami)

The Theprocess processcan cantake takeaacouple coupleofofhours hourstotocreate create but butonce onceititisiscomplete, complete,ititisisready readytotouse. use. Build Buildsubstrate substrate

Layer Layerby bylayer layerwill willbe bepassed passedthrough throughthe themachine machine while whilecreating creatingaanew newlayer layertotobe befused fusedwith withthe the older olderlayer layerininaaaddititve addititveprocess. process.

Elevator Elevatorz-axis z-axis

Each Eachlayer layerwould wouldget getpassed passedthrough throughthe the machine machinewhile whilecreating creatingaanew newlayer layerthat that would wouldbe befused fusedwith withthe theolder olderlayer. layer. (additive (additiveprocess) process)

Once Onceallallthe thelayers layershave havebeen beenadded added and andfused, fused,the theproduct productisisfully fully formed formedand andready readytotouse. use.

MATERIALS MATERIALS

Durable DurableFine FinePlastic Plastic Material: Material:UV UVcurable curableresin resin From From$3.39/cm3 $3.39/cm3

Diverse Magazine Spread and Front Cover Typography 2 Spring 2013 Magazine 8 page spread Software: Adobe Illustrator and Indesign

Durable DurableGloss GlossPlastic Plastic- -Black Black Material:ABS Material:ABSplastic plastic From From$2.00/cm3 $2.00/cm3

Gold GoldPlate Plate Material:Gold plated stainless

Material:Gold plated stainless WHAT steel WHAT YOU YOU CAN CAN MAKE MAKE steel(bronze (bronzeinfused) infused) From From$10.53/cm3 $10.53/cm3

WHAT WHATYOU YOUCAN CANMAKE MAKE

Durable DurableGloss GlossPlastic Plastic- -Ivory Ivory Material:ABS Material:ABSplastic plastic From From$2.00/cm3 $2.00/cm3

Stainless StainlessSteel Steel Material:Stainless Material:Stainlesssteel steel(bronze (bronze infused) infused) From From$10.53/cm3 $10.53/cm3

Durable DurablePlastic Plastic Material:Nylon Material:Nylon/ /polyamide polyamide From From$1.70/cm3 $1.70/cm3

Superfine SuperfinePlastic Plastic- -White White UV UVcurable curableresin resin From From$2.50/cm3 $2.50/cm3

Glazed GlazedCeramic Ceramic Material: Material:Alumina AluminaCeramic Ceramic From From$0.20/cm3 $0.20/cm3

Rainbow RainbowCeramic Ceramic Material:Proprietary Material:Proprietaryceramic ceramic powder powder From From$0.99/cm3 $0.99/cm3

Basically, Basically,you youcan canprint printanything anythingyou youcan candesign. design.

KEEP KEEPIN INMM

Replacement ReplacementParts Parts

Home HomeDecor Decor

Animal AnimalHeads Heads

Penrose PenroseTriangle Triangle

Body BodyParts Parts

Weapons Weapons

Apparel Apparel Designed Designedbyby: :Jenny JennyLyLy

3-D Printing Infographic The process of 3-D Printing Illustration Fall 2012 Software: Adobe Illustrator

Howard University Art Show 2013 2nd Place

Howard University Art Show 2012 Honorable Mention

Paper objects in lightbulb Howard University Art Show 2013 Paper 5” x 5” x 10” 2013

M&NI-F13-Lyj • 11


The History of Newspapers by M i t c h e l l S t e p h e n s f o r C o l l i e r s E n c y c l o p e d i a 1610 Printed weeklies appeared in Basel 1470s One of the first printed works that might qualify as news was an Italian account of a tournament

START 1450s Johann Gutenberg invented the letter press, employing movable type

1616 Hamburg

1541 The first news report printed in the Americas described an earthquake in Guatemala and was printed in Mexico

1695 The Licensing Act lapsed, and a belief in the importance of a press that had the right to criticize government eventually took root in England and was transplanted to its American colonies. 1702 The first successful English daily was the Daily Courant, which first appeared in London

1615 Frankfort and Vienna 1617 Berlin

1609 The oldest surviving European printed newspapers were both published weekly in German - one in Strasbourg, Relations: Aller Furnemmen, printed by Johann Carolus; the other, Aviso Relations over Zeitung, printed by Lucas Schulte, probably in Wolfenbuttel.

1650 The world's oldest surviving printed daily newspaper, Einkommende Zeitung, appeared in Leipzig

1704 The Boston News-Letter, which first appeared in print survived for 72 years

1618 Amsterdam

1729 Benjamin Franklin took over control of the Pennsylvania Gazette in Philadelphia, made it into one of the finest papers in the colonies and embarked upon an extraordinary career as a writer, journalist, printer, businessman, postmaster, scientist and statesman.

12 • M&NI-F13-Lyj

1631 France produced a newspaper of its own. 1641 Spain's weekly appeared

1644 The ideal of freedom of the press was articulated with great eloquence in England by John Milton

1832 An improved version of this press, using two cylinders, was developed by Richard Hoe in New York

1639 Italy's first printed weekly appeared

1855 The British stamp tax was abolished

1835 Philadelphia had the Daily Transcript, and the Public Ledger, in 1836; Baltimore's Sun was first published in 1837 -- all selling for a penny.

1721 The first paper to attempt to give voice to political debate was Boston's third successful newspaper, the New England Courant by James Franklin

1796 The Aurora, a Republican paper published in Philadelphia by Benjamin Franklin Bache, greeted George Washington's retirement as president

1770 All the duties except that on tea were removed.

1736 Virginia Gazette in Williamsburg

1729 Benjamin Franklin wrote in his Pennsylvania Gazette

1625 A German newspaper, published by Lucas Schulte, had begun appearing two times a week

1641 The first English newspaper to attempt to report on national news was a sedate little weekly entitled, The Heads of Severall Proceedings In This Present Parliament, which appeared in November

1727 The Maryland Gazette appeared in Annapolis

1733 John Peter Zenger's New York Weekly Journal, began printing

1621 The first newspaper printed in England appeared

1620 The oldest surviving newspaper written in English appears to have been published in Amsterdam. by Pieter van de Keere, a Dutch map and print engraver who had lived in London for a few years..

1719 Campbell lost the position of postmaster but he refused to give up the newspaper. So, his replacement as postmaster, William Brooker, began printing his own newspaper, the Boston Gazette, on December 21.

1725 New York City's first newspaper was the New York Gazette, founded by William Bradford

1631 In Paris, Theophraste Renaudot began publishing his Gazette de France

1765 The Stamp Act passed by the British Parliament passed

1765 The Stamp Act was to take effect on November 1

1767 British Parliament approved the Townshend Acts which imposed taxes on American imports of glass, lead, paint, tea and, significantly, paper.

1798 Congress passed and President John Adams signed the Sedition Act -- probably the most significant threat to press freedom in the history of the United States. The Sedition Act made "any false, scandalous and malicious writing...against the the Government of the United States," the Congress or the president, "with intent to...bring them...into contempt or disrepute" punishable by a fine or imprisonment. Among others, the leading Republican editor in New York, New England and Philadelphia (Bache) were all indicting for violating the Sedition Act or the common-law prohibition against seditious libel, which had been the charge against Zenger. There were at least fifteen convictions.

1801 There were about 200 newspapers in the United States when Jefferson assumed the presidency

1825 The first cylinder press, invented by a German, Frederick Koenig and improved by Napier in England, was first used in the United States

1820 More than half of the newspapers in the largest cities had the words "advertiser," "commercial" or "mercantile" in their names. These "mercantile papers" were often published on large, or "blanket," sheets, and they were expensive -- about six cents a copy, more than most of the artisans or mechanics in the cities could afford.

1807 Jefferson wrote, "...to demonstrate the falsehood of the pretext that freedom of the press is incompatible with orderly government."


1814 Steam engines had first been used to drive presses at the Times in London

1808 Early Spanish language newspapers appeared in New Orleans

1831 The abolitionist crusader William Lloyd Garrison started The Liberator with the expressed purpose, of course, of changing people's minds.

1827 John B. Russwurm and Reverend Samuel Cornish brought out the first newspaper published by blacks in the United States, Freedom's Journal, with a similar purpose. "We wish to plead our own cause," they wrote. "Too long have other spoken for us."

1800 Thomas Jefferson was elected president, partly because of resentment over the Sedition Act, and the Act was allowed to lapse. "I have lent myself willingly as the subject of a great experiment,"

1889 Out of the battle between Hearst and Pulitzer for the rights to a cartoon character known as the "Yellow Kid" came a new term for sensationalism: "yellow journalism." This was also a time of "stunt" journalism: Pulitzer sent a reporter named Elizabeth Cochrane, who wrote under the name Nellie Bly, around the world

1840 James Gordon Bennett, with his eagerness to investigate the details of bloody murders and pass on rumors of sex scandals, even became the object of a "moral war," led by other newspapers

1846 Dickens founded and edited The Daily News in London

1847 The great black writer Frederick Douglas started The North Star "to Attack Slavery in all its forms and aspects."

1887 A style of journalism similar to that of Pulitzer and Hearst was practiced with similar success in London by Alfred Harmsworth who started the Daily Mail

1849 to 1859 The Lily, which was published by Amelia Bloomer

1868 to 1871 Elizabeth Cady Stanton's The Revolution, for which Susan B. Anthony served as business manager.

1872 James Gordon Bennett, Jr., who took over the Herald after his father's death

1887 William Randolph Hearst, an admirer of Pulitzer, took control of his father's San Francisco Examiner

1932 New York Times had a circulation of 1.2 million daily and 1.8 million Sunday

1895 William Allen White, who purchased the Emporia Gazette

1931 Perhaps the most mourned newspaper to expire in New York during this period was the World, which Pulitzer’s heirs sold to Scripps-Howard 1898 In their battle for circulation leadership in New York, Hearst and Pulitzer cut the price of their newspapers to a penny, tried to hire away each other's editors and reporters and filled their papers with even more bloody, bizarre and salacious stories. Pulitzer and particularly Hearst also crusaded, with huge front-page headlines and emotional, sometimes misleading stories, for war with Spain over Cuba. "How do you like the Journal's war?" Hearst's paper asked after war broke out

1896 Adolph Ochs, who purchased the New York Times and set it on its present respectable course.

1897 Another major advance during this period was the introduction of regular use of photographs in newspapers, which began.

1897 The Jewish Daily Forward, printed in Yiddish, first appeared in NewYork

1830 Charles Dickens worked as a reporter for The Morning Chronicle and wrote sketches, similar in tone to his great novels, for The Evening Chronicle in London

1828 The first native American newspaper, the Cherokee Phoenix, was printed in Georgia

1924 Munsey sold the Herald to the owners of Greeley's old Tribune, creating the Herald Tribune

1923 The American Society of Newspaper Editors drafted the "Canons of Journalism which included this dictum: "News reports should be free from opinion or bias of any kind."

1904 The first School of Journalism was founded at the University of Missouri

1903 Harmsworth created the first modern, small-sized or "tabloid" (The term was borrowed from the drug industry) newspaper, the Daily Mirror,

1905 Chicago Defender, a major black newspaper, began publishing

1883 The second period when sensationalism seemed to increase in American newspapers began with the "new journalism" of Joseph Pulitzer. Pulitzer, who created the St. Louis Post-Dispatch in 1878 and then took over the New York World

1961 The Columbia Journalism Review, a forum for such criticism, was first published.

1982 USA Today, a national newspaper introduced by Gannett, has imitated the short breezy stories featured on television newscasts. It was also one of the first newspapers to make heavy use of color in pictures, maps and graphics.

1992 only 37 cities in the United States had separately owned, competing daily newspapers

1920 Munsey bought and threw into his mix the Bennetts' old Herald and the associated Evening Telegram.

1914 In Chicago the Inter Oceanmerged with the Record-Herald and called itself the Herald.

1993 The Wall Street Journal had a daily circulation of about 1.9 million

1910 The black activist W. E. B. Du Bois was a correspondent for the Springfield Republican and the New York Age, before he began editing his own journal, the Crisis

M&NI-F13-Lyj • 13


KNOWLEDGE IN ACTION Magazine Basics 101 Know the three basic magazine categories.

1

CONSUMER MAGAZINES Consumer Magazines are sold primarily for popular consumption. These magazines are sold by newstand or subscription. Consumer Magazines can be narrowed into general interest and special interest. Special interests magazines focuses on hobbies, issue of concern, or acivity. Titles include American Baby, Food and Wine, and Budget Travel. General interest titles

2 3

contain material of interest to a broad audience ie. Reader’s Digest and The Atlantic. A “magalog” provides readers with ideas on goods to buy and information on where to buy them at; sort of a magazine meets catalog.

TRADE MAGAZINES Trade magazines are also called specialized business magazines, or Business-to-Business magazines. Their content is primarily job related and their audience consists of readers in specific occupations or professions.

ORGANIZATION

Organization Magazines fall into three general categories: PUBLIC RELATIONS SIERRA Magazine Association Magazine

Also known as corporate communications magazines, these are probably the most ubiquitous of all magazine types. These magazines tell employees what’s happeneing in the organization, explain the organization to clients, and smooth the way for the organization to deal with outside agencies. CUSTOM

Also known as sponsored publications, these magazines are a type of public relations magazine, but with a slightly different focus. They are send to clients as a benefit of purchasing a particular product or service.

Walgreenworld Public Relations Magazine

SOCIETY AND ASSOCIATION

National Geographic Kids Association Magazine

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These Magazines usually come as one benefit of membership’ examples include Sierra, National Geographic, and Smithsonian. The Largest would be the AARP The Magazine with 24 million circulation.


BEHIND THE MAKING OF THE PORTFOLIO If you haven’t realized by now, this concept was influence by the show on MTV called “Cribs”, where MTV brings you into many of the wealthiest and most expensive homes owned by celebrities in our culture.There are many different editions to the show such as “Teen Cribs” or “Pro-Basketball Cribs” however this unique “Howard University” edition shows what it is like to be inside my dorm room full of my personal work.

PURPOSE

COVER The way I designed my portfolio cover was to familiarize it with society’s own reality show of MTV Cribs where cameras take a look inside famous celebrity homes and show viewers the tour around the real estate. I recreated the logo of the show and adapted it to my personal story and created a way to engage audiences to take a look inside a special Howard University edition of my dormitory room.

CONTENT I used every page as if you were going around my room. The viewer would navigate its way around my room by turning the pages. The contents page would show a view of the room entirely and include page numbers to navigate to the desired location. Even though it is a small dorm room, the pages will navigate to each piece of work that is shown on the contents area with a page number. If they are for the books shown, the books will be an open book illustration with the blank pages used for placeholder text. The use of backgrounds for certain spreads are for the books and newspaper where they would ideally be read on top of the wooden desk.

Photo credit: funnyjunk.com

Jenny Ly Portfolio Magazine and Newspaper I Fall 2013

I wanted to use the idea of a show an MTV Crib episode where it starts with the that is commonly seen by young adults location of the house and works its way inside because it would be relatable the house and gives a tour on “Take pride in to young adults. The younger camera. My book will show an generation has yet to grasp everything you idea of what is in my room and gratefulness because society have; what looks the viewer will navigate its own has brainwashed the minds to tour of my room by flipping the like nothing to think that materialistic things pages. In the end, the viewer someone could are what makes the individual. will understand why my work Sure, they can create an image be everything to is placed on the wall because of being of money but it’s making it shows my sense of pride in someone else. the best out of the very little you my work. I would hope this will have that makes a stronger statement. My influence other designers to create their own book brings the viewer to an idea of watching version of creating their crib.

VOICE In this society, it’s easy to get lost in the rmoney and by creating this portfolio, it shows how I can make something so creative out of showing something other than a big pool or huge mansion. People watch the real MTV Cribs show because they want to see the lifestyles of the wealthy class but the concept behind this one-of-a-kind book is to show that there are some rich, high-quality things that need to be seen rather than fancy cars. I am trying to promote positivity and the beauty of how my small, boring, abused dorm room can feel like a luxurious home in my eyes. Many people may not be grateful for what they have or where they are living but for me, this is one of the best things that happened in my life. I appreciate every little thing that I have right now because this is all I have ever

wanted. My education, my body, my home, all that was stuff I never had when I was younger, especially a home. Growing up with seven people in my family with two bedrooms and one bathroom was definitely not my ideal way of living but at the moment, it was all my family had. Now that I am on my own with a dorm room to myself, it is the closest thing to my own home than anything. I never had a bed to myself. I never had a bathroom that I took care of. I didn’t have to worry about cleaning up after someone. It’s just me now. And that is something I truly take pride for and therefore why I chose to present my “crib” and show that money doesn’t stop me from being grateful and positive, my pride from coming this far is what I’m showing everybody. M&NI-F13-Lyj • 15


DESIGNS FOR READABILITY HOT SPOTS

When reading a page, the designer has the ability to place elements in regions of the page where they would generally be “hotter” and more active than other parts of the page. The boxes shows areas of focus with the darker shade being the strongest.

GRIDS

A grid provides a reference structure which guides the placement of elements such as text, images, and illustrations; all composing a design. By dividing the space with lines, it helps the designer by producing designs with effective placement. That is how I placed the text on this spread.

TYPOGRAPHY

Typography is an art form. Legibility is what makes type easy to read. Serif typefaces are easier to read with larger body texts. Sans serifs are better for short body copy. The name of the individual typeface is its font. Style refers to the different options within the font. Points and Picas are two units of measurements in design and indicates the size of type.

COLOR

Black on white is the most legible choice for large text. Color has basic associations. RED is active and hot. Red is passion, vitality, anger, and love. BLUE is peaceful and cool. Blue is serenity, loyalty, reserve, and gloom. YELLOW is cheerful and optimistic yet also caution and cowardice. GREEN is tranquilizing and earthy. Green is envy, mold, and seasickness. ORANGE is halloween and autumn. PURPLE is royalty.

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1 point = 1/72 of an inch 72 points = 1 inch 12 points = 1 pica 1 pica = 1/6 of an inch 6 picas = 1 inch

DESIGN PRINCIPLES

When designing a magazine, there must be unity. Using a grid can provide unity. It is also cost and time effective because you would only need to modify it and not reinvent it. Consistency in a typeface provides unity. Column rules and borders offer bothing unit and variety. The elements on a page should look natural and contained to keep balance. It can be either formal or informal. When contrast is used effectively, readers notice more important elements.


BOOKLET PRODUCTION

I

f I were to produce my self-promotional booklet, it would require me to follow these specificatios for production.

PAPER STOCK: If I were to decide on what paper stock to produce this booklet from, I would need to decide several factors. I would choose a matte coating with a top-grade because I would want my illustrations on bright white with pops of color without the gloss from the coating affecting the colors of the graphics. I would need a high whiteness becasue is would evenly reflect each color of the spectrum. I would want high smoothness paper because i want the ink to absorb evenly because they are illustrations. I would want a high opacity paper because there are many colors that cover a wide aray of the page and therefore would not like the dark colors to pass through the paper. I think I would decide on a number 3 grade paper because I still want the high end look without it being as costly as premium number 1 and 2. Because my book will be produced under 10,000 quantities, it would need to be sheet-fed which is a press that takes one sheet of paper at a time. My publication would need to be saddle stitched because there are not that many pages for the need to have a perfect bound.

COATING: I wouldn’t want a special coating on my cover because it would add extra costs. If I were to decide, it would be to have an aqueuous coating because it is environmentally friendly and it would not an an extra gloss like a uv coating or varnish would.

EYE MOVEMENT

When faced with a new page, naturally, the eye enters from the top left and works down and across to the bottom right corner (as you follow the white line).

M&NI-F13-Lyj • 17


WHY SHOULD YOU HIRE ME? TURN TO PAGE 1

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STILL NOT SURE?

GO CHECK OUT MY SITE WWW.JENNYLY19.WIX.COM/JCREATIVE

I’LL BE EXPECTING YOUR CALL OR EMAIL SOON

M&NI-F13-Lyj • 19


Liu Bolin’s “The Invisible Man”


Graphic Design Portfolio 2013