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Shorebank Enterprise Detroit Detroit Go Green Get Green Project (Detroit G4 Project) Weatherization Innovation Pilot Program Objective 3 Application for Federal Assistance U.S. Department of Energy, Weatherization Assistance Program: Weatherization Innovation Pilot Program (Funding Opportunity Announcement #: DE-FOA-00000309) CFDA Number 81.042 June 2, 2010 Detroit Go Green Get Green Project (Detroit G4 Project)

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Program Summary Applicant: Shorebank Enterprise Detroit (SED); Project Manager: Ray Waters Project Title: Detroit Go Green Get Green (G4) Project - (Detroit G4 Project) Project Objectives (completed by December 2013): 1) Create approximately 33 energy focused jobs; Weatherize approximately 1,235 homes of low-income families in the five (5) targeted Detroit neighborhoods; 2) Complete 20 deep energy retrofits; 3) Reduce residential energy consumption by 0.2 TBTUs per year; 4) Deliver consumer education and neighbor-to-neighbor/peer-to-peer energy promotion in five (5) targeted Detroit neighborhoods; 5) Install Advanced Metering Infrastructure in the five (5) targeted neighborhoods; 6) Monitoring, verification and the development of promising practices delivering reports each quarter including extensive project evaluation with at ANSI required levels; 7) Through Behavior Change Technologies and feedback decrease residential energy consumption from 10 -30%; 8) Promote a General Contractor model to build stronger energy efficiency infrastructure for scale and replicability; 9) Develop an informed knowledge base about best energy efficiency practices by studying two levels of improvements across five low-moderate income Detroit neighborhoods; 10) Increase number of homes weatherized and using energy tax credits and rebates. Project Description: The Partnership led by Shorebank Enterprise Detroit will launch a Weatherization Innovation Pilot Program in Detroit and Wayne County, Michigan under the DE-FOA-0000309 to promote innovative ways to weatherize homes of 1,235 low-income families. The partners request a total of $2,999,900 from DOE over 2 years to implement the G4 strategy for Objective 3. The project team has identified five (5) Detroit neighborhoods to implement the pilot program: Morningside, Corktown, West Village, North End and residencies near the Woodward corridor. The innovation component of the program includes 1) the grassroots engagement process, 2) the residential energy related behavioral intervention (informational campaign), 3) DTE installation of Advanced Metering Infrastructure (AMI), state-of-the art metering technology for better understanding and management of energy use, 4) leveraging incentives available for weatherization and other energy-related opportunities, 5) weatherization program including energy audit and weatherization services (basic, full cost or deep retrofit), 6) training of local residents, 7) feedback to residents through personalized information about energy consumption to decrease consumption, and 8) extensive project evaluation with at ANSI required levels. The Partners will work with thousands of building industry professionals across tens of thousands of building retrofit transactions to conduct applied research, education and marketing to build a more robust, effective, standardized residential retrofit marketplace. This is a strong research project with an emphasis on participatory, applied research to facilitate broad adoption of new and tested technologies including. Major Participants: Shorebank Enterprise Detroit, City of Detroit, Ferris State University, WARM Training Center, DTE Energy, Detroiters Working for Environmental Justice, CLEARCorps Detroit, Next Detroit Neighborhood Initiative, and O’Brien Construction.


Project Narrative Continuing net population loss is forcing Detroit to spatially re-define itself as a city. Whereas 1.8 million people once occupied the city’s 138 square mile land mass, its current population is less than 900,000, much of the city has been abandoned, and some projections indicate that the city will eventually need only 50 square miles to support normal human functions: housing, commerce, industry, transportation. Forward-thinking leaders in Detroit are now viewing spatial re-configuration as an opportunity. They envision a Detroit with a dense downtown core and compact urban villages connected by transportation corridors and surrounded by productive, intentionally managed open space: urban agriculture, urban forestry, park spaces, and natural reserves. The new urban configuration should conform to smart growth land use principles and should also incorporate renewable energy, energy conservation, water conservation and re-use, other green technologies, local food production, recycling and waste reduction, and other green practices. Given the current state of the City of Detroit, the project partners propose the Detroit Go Green Get Green Project (Detroit G4 Project). The idea is to inform Detroit Residents how weatherization, energy efficiency, renewable energy systems, recycling, and innovative high performing technology (“going green”) can result in savings on utilities, employment training for access to green jobs or skills to complete services that otherwise would have been contracted out, weatherization activities that improve the efficiency of homes and increase values (“getting green”). By concentrating activity on several contiguous blocks in 5 neighborhoods, the range of possibilities are concentrated and potentially generate a critical mass of enthusiasm, and create the foundation for effective community-based social marketing. People will be able to tangibly see what is possible. SED through its partner FSU will collect data and report on cost-effectiveness, environmental and economic impact, so others can make informed choices. By focusing in targeted areas, SED through its partner DWEJ can embark on an effective community engagement campaign and can consciously connect with the social institutions that are important to the residents of each community, e.g., a neighborhood association, church, school, etc. The green movement has often been criticized as being predominantly white and middle-upper class, which does not match the demographics of Detroit. With strong community outreach and the right partners, SED can broadly educate people about weatherization, green technologies and strategies, and strengthen communities in this effort to promote innovative ways to weatherize the homes of low-income communities. Project Objectives Project objectives are outlined in the logic model below. Low income homeowners typically are unable to invest in energy efficiency retrofits, yet are the most likely to benefit from reduced utility bills. Homeowners in target Detroit Go Green Get Green Project (Detroit G4 Project)

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neighborhoods with incomes at or below 200% of the federal poverty guidelines will receive energy efficiency upgrades. The project team will partner with utility low-income energy optimization programs, various foundations, the Michigan Retrofit Ramp-Up Initiative, (DE-FOA-0000148 awarded $30M in April 2010), Weatherization Assistance Program, and the Low Income Energy Efficiency Fund (LIEEF) to cover these expenses. There are several strategies commonly used to induce residential energy conservation.  Informational campaigns tend not to be effective on their own. However, they have been shown to be a helpful component in combination with other interventions. Incentive strategies tend to be most effective. However, they generally suffer from high costs of implementation and a lack of sustainable results following the end of an incentive program. Feedback appears to be the most promising method of inducing large-scale conservation, and with the state-of-the-art technology provided by the Advanced Metering Infrastructure, feedback can be provided to residents.   Energy audits will direct the needed weatherization for each home. Moreover, the opportunity for training local residents on completing weatherization techniques, and education for a better understanding of energy consumption and energy conservation strategies, strengthens the approach.  In fact, the combination of education, weatherization of homes to increase energy conservation, feedback on energy consumption, a grassroots marketing and community engagement process, the commitment to leverage other sources of funding to impact homes that may not be eligible for funding under this FOA or may be eligible for other incentives, suggests an innovative solution with the potential to have a significant impact on problems faced by low-income residents in our targeted neighborhoods.  Logic Model

Resources DOE & Project Team

Activities

Objectives

Outcomes

Impact

Weatherization

Create approximately 34

Develop an economical,

Lower project costs and

services, outreach,

energy focused jobs

community-driven

additional resources for

model

weatherization activities

project management

with lean processes DOE & Project Team

Assess income eligibility

Weatherize 1,235 homes

Energy audits

Increased household

of 5,000 prospective

of low-income families.

conducted and basic

disposable income

energy efficiency

through lowered utility

measures installed.

costs, broader adoption

program participants.

of energy saving

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Resources DOE & Project Team

Activities

Objectives

Outcomes

Impact

Deliver marketing,

Reduce residential

Neighborhood-wide

Create a community

outreach and energy

energy consumption

marketing and outreach

conversation and

efficiency behavior-

engaging residents at

“buzz” on energy

change messages to

home, school, churches,

efficiency, carbon

15,000 households

and block clubs.

reduction and green economy

DOE & Project Team

Comprehensive

Deep retrofit for 20

40 to 60% energy

Increased disposable

wetherization services

homes of low-income

savings for households

income

families DOE & Project Team

Neighbor-to-Neighbor/

Deliver consumer

Deliver home wellness

Residents

Peer-to-Peer Energy

education

or environmental health

knowledgeable about

education

weatherization, energy

Campaign - “whole neighborhood”

Provide energy

approach utilizing

efficiency education to

community anchor

15,000 households

institutions and civic

efficiency, renewable energy systems and how each of these measures saves money

networks DTE Energy

FSU

Identify homes for AMI

Install AMI - Advanced

Meters monitored

Help residents better

Metering Infrastructure

remotely

manage energy costs

Design research method

Monitoring, verification

Evaluation for impact

Verification of energy

and collect data

and reporting

and replication; Analysis

savings; Electricity

of specific electricity

savings (3,200,00

savings, natural gas

kWh); Natural Gas

saving, total energy bill

Savings (762,000

reduction, & total

therms); energy bill

emissions reduction

reduction ($177,000); emission reduction in pounds of carbon, (26,720,00)

AMI technology

Project manager

Regularly present

10 to 30% reduction of

Financial savings &

personalized info about

Provide feedback

energy consumption by

energy conservation

energy consumption

the end of the project

Consistent delivery and

Promote a General

6 to 8 eligible homes

Build increased

results of work

Contractor model

weatherized in 2 - 3 days

consumer confidence in

performed by certified

save on mobilization &

energy efficiency

contractors

supervision

measures

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Resources

Activities

Objectives

Outcomes

Impact

SED, CLEARCorps,

Partnering with MRRI,

Study improvement

Cover 100% of the costs

Deep retrofit

WARM, City of Detroit,

LIEEF, WAP

levels

of deep energy

households become

State of Michigan, Peer

(subsequent year

efficiency upgrades in

ambassadors for energy

Energy Promoters

funding) foundations

low income households

efficiency

and government

within our pilot

initiatives

neighborhoods

Utility rebate programs

Community

Increase number of

Leverage subsidized &

Growing energy

and preferential loans

engagement campaign

homes weatherized and

private weatherization

efficiency adoption by

using energy tax credits

and renewable energy

year 2.

and rebates

systems funding

from MI Saves; WARM

CRITERIA 1: PROJECT IMPACT Impact. The project will outreach to 15,000 homes; Assess income eligibility of 5,000 prospective program participants; Weatherization services for 1,235 homes of low-income families; Create approximately 33 energy focused jobs; Participants will achieve 10 to 30% reduction of energy consumption by the end of the project; Leverage subsidized & private weatherization and renewable energy systems funding; Increase number of homes weatherized and using energy tax credits and rebates; and Reduce energy consumption as follows: (1) total electricity savings (kWh) 3,200,4000; (2) total natural gas/oil savings (therms) 762,000; (3) total energy bill reduction (in $) $177,800; and (4) Total emissions reductions (pounds of CO2) 26,720,800. Leveraging Funds. The Detroit Go Green Get Green (Detroit G4) Weatherization Innovation Project will leverage a .5:1 ratio, sourcing $0.50 for every $1 from DE-FOA-0000309 funds.  Sources of leveraged investments are: Michigan Public Service Commission Low-Income Weatherization funding ($1.9M in 2010, $4.8M in 2011, $5.9M in 2012) MI Saves Program; Michigan Ramping Up Retrofit Initiative; DTE Energy and MichCon Energy Optimization funds; Michigan Regional Energy Offices initiatives for low-income residents, tenant/homeowner contributions both financial and in-kind community service work. EECBG funds supporting retrofits of schools and public housing units in the five (5) target neighborhoods are another form of communitybased energy efficiency investment that will bring an estimated $1,150,000. Innovation. Project innovations include: world-class project evaluation; project management coordination supervised by a General Contractor with a strong track record managing large, public projects; community-based, peer-to-peer marketing and outreach by 8 Energy Promoters; concentrated deployment of weatherizations in 5 defined communities in batches of 6-8 homes; extensive Consumer Education before, during and after weatherization to maximize impact; utilization of Behavior Change technology in messaging and branding of energy efficiency; independent verification and monitoring by the leading institution in Michigan; close coordination of weatherization with Dept. of Health Healthy Homes program to reduce hazardous exposure and Detroit Go Green Get Green Project (Detroit G4 Project)

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improve household wellness; direct cooperation with Detroit WAP network, Michigan Ramping Up Retrofits Initiative, MI Saves program, DTE Energy Optimization Program, Low-Income Home Energy Assistance Program/THAW, minor home repair with – Weatherization Innovation partners are directly involved with each of the above-mentioned state and federal programs; deep, granular study of 25-30 homes utilizing AMI “smart meter” technology. Replicable Strategy. The project design and implementation are designed to weave directly into existing state and local energy efficiency efforts. The 5 targeted communities have been chosen because they have characteristics similar to those of the entire city of Detroit as well as many inner city neighborhoods across the nation. The deep engagement with the community that concentrated deployment, community organizing, consumer education and Peer Energy Promoters is a portable and potentially economical model for reaching low-income residents with appropriate messages and long-term engagement. The nation’s low-income communities have many of the same assets: civic and community development corporations; professional community organizers; etc. The project management approach, on a pattern similar to a general contractor model, is also very portable to other communities and regions. Ability. The partners have over 200 years collective experience in the building trades, project management and energy efficiency marketplaces. The regional utility provider, DTE Energy and MichCon is in their second year of implementation of the Michigan Renewable Portfolio Standards legislation and has worked to surpass the initial goals of energy efficiency and renewable energy deployment. WARM Training has worked on Low-Income Weatherization efforts with the local Community Action Agency: Detroit Department of Human Service for over 30 years. Their strong relationships with the WAP agency is complimented by their leadership to the state of Michigan energy efficiency efforts through Michigan Saves, Michigan Regional Energy Office and co-principal investigator on the DoE Ramping Up Retrofits program in Michigan that recently received a $30M award. WARM has successfully engaged thousands low-income recipients of weatherization grants and provided award-winning in-home educational services for many years. Detroiters Working for Environmental Justice (DWEJ) have led the campaign in Detroit for healthy homes. Working in concert with the Detroit Department of Public Health, DWEJ will leverage whole-house wellness for the households targeted in this project. Shorebank Enterprise Detroit is a leading economic development intermediary in the region with an investment portfolio in energy efficiency and real estate development of over $30,000,000. O’Brien Construction is a 60-year old General Contractor with a strong practice in low-income and other tax credit projects in Detroit. They have successfully managed numerous multi-million dollar developments subject to Davis-Bacon, HUD Section 3 and related public benefit regulations. O’Brien is committed to working with 12-15 Detroit-based sub-contractors in the proposed project to create 25 building trades jobs. The partners have implemented weatherization, building retrofits and renewable energy products in hundreds of homes and businesses throughout the region. Strong relationships with public and private regional energy Detroit Go Green Get Green Project (Detroit G4 Project)

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coordinators make this a promising public/private partnership that can coordinate and leverage a massive investment in EERE. The partners are also driving three Department of Labor Pathways Out of Poverty training grants totaling $12,000,000 preparing a new economy, weatherization workforce.  CRITERIA 2: PROJECT APPROACH & IMPLEMENTATION Project Management. Homeowners will be offered four tiers of assistance in weatherizing their homes. The source of funds offered in these packages will be extremely simplified in its presentation to the homeowner. Weatherization Services are as follows: (1) Kits: Weatherization kits include CFL, face plate insulation caulking, water pipe insulation, door sweep, weather stripping, mastic, shower head replacement, and faucet aerators. (2) Base package: Kits plus install/improve insulation, blower door test, air sealing, thresholds; insulate doors, replace incandescent with fluorescent, reduce set points; insulation on heating and water pipes, low flow shower heads and descriptors, etc. (3) Full cost savings package: Base package plus energy efficiency appliances, replace vents, replace doors, replace window frames, selected storm replacement. (4) Deep retrofit package: Full cost savings package plus, replace HVAC, replace doors, replace windows, smart control systems, water heater upgrade, duct ceiling, etc. Rental properties are a widely recognized challenge to energy efficiency uptake due to the principal agent issue (i.e., tenants have no incentive to make long-term investments in a short-term rental, and landlords have no incentive to invest in upgrades because they do not pay the utility bills). As a result, this subgroup will require additional outreach and financial incentives. To address this challenge, we will provide (1) additional outreach/ education for the landlords of rental properties, (2) base package audit results to both tenants and landlords, and (3) landlords contracting energy efficiency work with certificates of work completed and estimated impact on utility bills for use in marketing to future renters. Outreach/Marketing. Our strategy seeks to build from both national and global research on best practices. Our strategy builds upon a neighbor-to-neighbor/peer-to-peer community-based social marketing. Our guiding thoughts on engagement feature flexibility, choice, value, connectivity and influence. Our engagement process will be open, provisional, informal, action oriented and provide perpetual access; to create an environment filled with ambitious, creative residents. Other important social and psychological factors come into play to create motivation. Our strategy will build upon internal motivations within the community. In neighborhoods where the community is internally organized, self-identified and self-motivated as committed to energy efficiency, then weatherization services and other renewable energy systems will be notably improved. Where that internal motivation needs boosting, the project will focus first on developing and enhancing that motivation. For example, Detroit Go Green Get Green Project (Detroit G4 Project)

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once the neighborhood is self-motivated, then information and assistance can be provided to actualize needed changes to make energy efficiency improvements happen. The project will work with communities to selforganize around energy issues in ways that create significant energy related improvements. This approach is critical in overcoming the key obstacle of consumer reluctance and uncertainty about investing in energy improvements, despite clear demonstrated economic and environmental benefits. Once a consumer is motivated, then action is self-driven instead of driven by exterior market interests. More specifically, some of our outreach efforts are outlined below: Marketing is all about exchanges. The appeal to ordinary people that “going green” can mean “getting green” is a simple message that has the potential to create the desire and motivation to make changes. The target market to receive our message is somewhat bifurcated into two classes: 1) elderly women (55 and older) and 2) females in the household (25-50 years). Places identified to create these exchanges include: Detroit Department of Transportation (i.e., senior card recipients); AARP; Develop a school-based outreach campaign (PTO Meetings, School-based orientation, Young Weatherizers, scholastic fair, Count-day, concerts); Social hubs (e.g., Block Clubs, Local Churches, Garden Clubs, Grocery stores, U-Buy/We-Fry, Festivals and Parades, where people get on the buses to casino); Community business hubs (e.g., hair care, day care, health care, DTE Payment Centers, nail studios, banks). Printed materials, broadcast media, electronic media and public service announcements will be platforms for communicating our set of messages.  Each of these arenas require slightly different styles and sensibilities, but the objective is to connect energy efficiency and energy consumption and conservation to a sensible economic move, namely weatherization services and renewable energy systems.  The messages will coordinate other programs available (e.g., LIHEAP, THAW, LIHEEF) tax-incentive and tax credit publicity, and other DTE Energy programs. The proposed project will also build on existing research by Build America and other groups to develop some simple marketing messages and begin to build a brand for energy efficiency.  The target audiences are multiple, but can be divided among consumers (homeowners, multi-tenant managers, renters). Our goal is to make Energy Efficiency media work with real and virtual messages designed for specific demographic and psychographic groups. In summary, promotion will include traditional components (i.e., flyers, handbills, PSAs, local radio, yard signs); less traditional components (i.e., plaques for installed properties that all show the address; Community Guide – collect neighborhood data that has the potential impact of heightening awareness in key community institutions e.g., schools, libraries, parks, community centers, health centers); and innovative components (i.e., neighborhood promoters). Neighborhood promoters serve as weavers of the community fabric that provide value propositions and make neighbor-to-neighbor/peer-to peer connections. Neighborhood promotors are the eyes on the street and connection to the neighborhoods.

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Viability. Data on the Weatherization Innovation will be collected through utilities, customer service and intake staff, contractors,  and through surveys. All building owners will be required to sign a waiver allowing the program to collect utility information for one year before and one year after installation of energy efficiency measures, and agreeing to participate in follow up surveys. Pre- and post installation, audits will be completed and the following recorded: (1) occupancy; (2) conditioned and unconditioned square footage; (3) measures implemented; and (4) financing options chosen (if any). Finally, at the end of the neighborhood retrofit, and one year after, project evaluation (coordinated by FSU) will include survey of property owners for any changes in the above data, satisfaction with the program implementation and results, feedback on what drove or prevented uptake of packages offers, attitudes toward energy efficiency, and additional perceived benefits such as home comfort and safety. Partnership program staff will collect all information in a central database, as well as coordinate with utilities to gather utility bill information. Energy usage in the home pre- and post- energy efficiency upgrades will be normalized based on (1) heating/cooling degree days in each year; (2) increase/decrease in occupancy, and (3) changes in the square footage of the building. Greenhouse gas emission reductions will be determined for electricity reductions by assigning a carbon intensity factor to the Midwest grid. Greenhouse gas emission reductions for other fuel types (e.g., natural gas, propane) will be calculated using EIA carbon intensity levels. All data collected during these pilots will be available in a synthesized, homeowner-disguised form to all partners in the proposal. In addition, homeowners will receive a mailed report on energy savings realized in their home and in their neighborhood. The project team will develop the rubric for evaluation and metric for data acquisition from the project sites and other sites.  The objective will be to ensure that sufficient and appropriate information will be collected to assess the energy use and performance of the remodeling systems, and the energy use of similarly sized residences that have not received weatherization services.  For project site residences, a three-tiered evaluation design will be used.  The highest level will measure aggregate energy use and demand at the level of the subdivision, to account for load diversity.  The second level will measure the energy use and demand of the whole residence and the project sites in a statistically significant subset of the residences.  At the third level, in two of the Level two residences, more detailed measurements of the remodeling will be made, including the operational status of improvements.  Every effort will be made to ensure that the data collection plan is as invisible to the residents as possible.  The team will develop an energy analysis model of one of the residences using eQuest, EnergyPlus or another suitable hourly or sub-hourly energy analysis program.  As operating data become available from the building, we will calibrate the simulation model to ensure that its predictions of monthly total energy use and end use match actual performance. Upon completion of modeling, the team will, on a monthly basis, download data from the data acquisition system to assess data quality, calculate energy use at the various levels of the evaluation, and to identify any problems with system operation and/or sensors, and prepare a monthly report providing preliminary analysis of the data,

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including overall system energy use and efficiency. A year-end and a final set of reports will be generated in Months 13 and 25 of the project calendar. Adequacy. Research shows that behavioral intervention has demonstrated great success in changing environmentally-related behaviors such as personal energy use.  The easiest type of behavior to alter with intervention is direct energy-using actions.  Most of our direct energy-using behaviors take place in the home.  Approximately 36% of all electricity in the United States is used in residences, accounting for more than 20% of the total U.S. energy use. A significant amount of this energy can be conserved with a number of relatively easy behavioral changes e.g., using one television at a time, raising the refrigerator temperature, turning off unnecessary lights, turning down thermostat in the winter, using more energy efficient lighting, etc. and serves as an opportunity for reducing energy consumption.   The most common method of residential energy-related behavioral interventions are informational campaigns i.e., advertisements, public service announcements, conservation booklets, brochures, labels, etc.  However, research suggests that information alone is not sufficient to impact change in personal energy consumption, failing as a result of the campaigns doing nothing more than providing information, without taking into account information governing behavior change.  Information on reasons and ways to conserve energy is a more useful conservation strategy.  Incentives are another strategy to impact behavioral changes, but challenges with incentive programs are once the incentive is removed, consumers return to previous levels.  Moreover, incentive programs can be expensive.  While incentive programs can be effective, they are not efficient.  Research suggests a less common, but more promising strategy for energy-related behavior changes is through the presentation of feedback.  Feedback refers to regularly presented, personalized information about energy consumption.  In the case of residential energy use, providing feedback means giving scheduled updates regarding the amount of energy used by one particular residence, the cost of that energy, the environmental effects of that use, or some combination of these. Feedback can be extremely effective in inducing residential energy conservation, showing typical decreases in consumption of between 5-20%. In contrast to informational campaigns, which include only general information regarding the benefits and methods of energy conservation, feedback interventions provide individuals with personalized updates regarding their own energy use. Individuals are more compelled to change their behavior when they are targeted personally than when they are treated simply as members of a group. Feedback sparks conservation by providing individuals with information regarding ways in which they use unnecessary energy as well as affecting the perceived likelihood of achieving a goal, making people more likely to work towards that goal.  It is important to distinguish which factors affect the success of feedback interventions. CRITERIA 3: ROLES, RESPONSIBILITIES, QUALIFICATIONS & CAPABILITIES

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Team. Partners in this application are: Shorebank Enterprise Detroit, City of Detroit, WARM Training Center, DTE Energy, Detroiters Working for Environmental Justice, Next Detroit Neighborhood Initiative, CLEARCorps Detroit, Ferris State University, and O’Brien Construction. Additional Stakeholders – public sector, private sector, DTE/MichCon Energy Optimization , MI SAVES, Detroit Economic Growth Corporation (DEGC), Detroit Investment Fund (DIF), GreenBuild MI, Building Sciences Academy, Private Contractors, Banks, Foreclosure Office, Detroit LISC, Community Development Advocates of Detroit (CDAD), GDNSI, SEMCOG, The Greening of Detroit, Recycle Here!, Community Legal Resources Vacant Property Campaign, ASWD, LTU, Detroit DHS, Detroit Dept. of Planning and Development (home repair, senior home repair programs), DELEG, Corktown Citizens Council, Central Detroit Christian Development Corp., Southwest Solutions, U-SNAP-BAC, Transportation Riders United, Michigan Homebuilders Association, Association of General Contractors   Training & TA. Training and educational activities are based upon existing curricula of WARM Training, DWEJ and CLEAR Corps Detroit. Their field tested consumer education and weatherization education will be the foundation of our marketing messages, behavior change technology work, and all training. Letters of commitment from all partners are included.

Partnership Structure

Project Timetable and Implementation Plan

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Personnel & Organization Qualifications ShoreBank Enterprise Detroit (SED) is a non-profit 501(c)3 community development organization affiliated with ShoreBank Corporation. Created in 1998, SED had a mission of helping revitalize an economically distressed target area in Detroit’s far eastside neighborhoods. For several years, SED provided down payment assistance and credit counseling. In 2001, SED’s small business loan fund began operation and has grown and evolved substantially since then. Now, SED operates throughout the entire City of Detroit, and has originated over $5 million in loans; mostly to small minority owned Detroit based businesses. With funding from the Ford Foundation and the John S. & James L. Knight Foundation, SED launched a new lending program in 2007 targeted towards affordable housing and real estate projects benefiting low and moderate income Detroit neighborhoods. SED has leveraged more than $13 million for Detroit investment. WARM Training Center. The role of WARM Training Center builds on their impressive track record in the promotion of sustainable practices before we even coined that term.  WARM staff will participate in all elements of program design, implementation and marketing efforts.  They bring a strong relationship with the Weatherization Assistance Programs regionally and will be a key media/marketing participant thanks to their investments in web platforms and consumer education efforts outlined above.  DTE Energy (DTE). DTE is a critical axis of the project wheel.  Though they are playing a modest direct role in the project, their commitment to energy efficiency and renewable energy is well-demonstrated.  DTE Energy also brings access to the best data and information on real performance in the region as the provider of gas and electric service to millions of households.  Detroiters Working for Environmental Justice (DWEJ). DWEJ is organized to empower individuals, communities, and community organizations in Southeast Michigan to educate, advocate and organize for cleaner, healthier

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communities and environments. Since 1994, DWEJ has been has been a voice for environmental justice in Michigan. DWEJ Is managing a Department of Labor Pathways out of Poverty Grant for several million dollars. Next Detroit Neighborhood Initiative (NDNI). NDNI), a 501(c)3 nonprofit organization which focuses on the transformation of Detroit neighborhoods through reinforcement, revitalization and redevelopment efforts or initiatives.  Our “on the ground” experience enables us to provide strategic models for safety management, blight remediation, foreclosure prevention and other critical success factors in stabilizing Detroit neighborhoods. Ferris State University (FSU). FSU was founded 1884 in Big Rapids Michigan.  The university is well known as a technical university with a strong focus toward applied research and education.  Well known in the industry in the areas of HVAC engineering and energy auditing Ferris has produced thousands of graduates in the construction field with a strong knowledge of energy efficiency and mechanical systems design.  The college has a long history of applied research in various technical fields and has been performing energy analysis for industry since the 1950’s.  Within the College of Engineering Technology Ferris has established an energy center.  O’Brien Construction Company (O’Brien). Since 1962, O’Brien has provide our owners with a true "teamwork" solution no matter which project delivery system is chosen.  This teamwork approach includes our philosophy of open book accounting and open door communications. Our experience with both private and public work enables us to assist all types of owners from the initial stages of the project to closeout and warranty issues. Partner Experience. The Partners relevant experience includes a broad range of disciplines and competencies: Energy Modeling and Industry Software including EnergyGauge USA, BEopt, WrightSoft, EnergyPlus and others; High-performance Lighting and Miscellaneous Electric Loads; Technical Assistance to Contractors and Remodelers; Implementation of High-performance Building Strategies; Auditing, Certifying, Rating efforts over 50-plus years; Improved Component Design and Installation; Research on the energy use of both Highperformance and mid-performance Buildings; WAP Partners with the city of Detroit and other WAP regional community action agencies; Large-scale project management of remodeling and retrofitting; MI Regional Energy offices; Training and Technical Assistance; Community Lending; Securing Foundations support for community based initiatives; Creation of successful neighborhood engagement campaigns; Program Evaluation and Reporting. Monitoring & Oversight of Work Completed The evaluation component of the project will include: 1) quantitative comparison of “prescriptive approach” to weatherization compared to a “performance path” (this analysis will determine the greater return of a pre and post energy audit as compared to a best practices based upon housing typology for basic, full service and deep retrofit weatherization services); 2) energy conservation and consumption analysis for home with and without

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weatherization kits, basic, full service, and deep retrofit weatherization services. The research design is defined in detail below: For the overall project parameters Ferris State University Energy Center would develop a prescriptive methodology for home performance improvement. This path will be focused on first eliminating the potential for health and safety issues, then implementing prescriptive improvements in a prioritized order. Ferris State University would outline prescriptive methods for energy improvements to be implemented into the larger group of existing homes. These methods will be based on known industry best practices of weatherization and energy improvement. Within the large group of homes we will categorize home types into three sampling groups. These sampling groups will be based on common characteristics of the homes. These homes will be fully analyzed using a performance analysis for the home. This analysis will consist of a complete pre and post improvement analysis of the homes. Including logging and charting of the data. Improvements will then be made to these homes based on the analytical results and monitored over a year long period. The same methodology will be used for a similar sampling type for homes using the prescriptive path. Homes will be identified and categorized into the same sampling groups as the performance path homes. " Ferris State University, Energy Center will conduct an analysis to compare an analytical performance path for home improvement to a structured prescriptive path. This analysis will consist of gathering historical data and determining performance baselines for each of the sample homes along with the demographic data for the household. This study will identify those correlations and form a value relationship comparing a prescriptive and performance method. They will determine if prescriptive best practices can be developed and implemented on a large scale yielding similar energy results to the more costly performance path while eliminating safety issues associated with prescriptive methods. Relevance & Outcomes/Impacts Please see Logic Model (pages 3 to 5). Evaluation of Project Impact: Economic Metrics: 1) Consumer Energy Bill Savings; 2) Jobs Created; 3) Jobs retained; and 4) Total Capital Invested. Energy Metrics: 1) Energy conserved (MM BTU/kWh), 2) Energy intensity per unit of production, 3) Carbon dioxide reductions (metric tons per capita), and 4) Carbon dioxide intensity per unit of production. Environmental Metrics: 1) Green House Gas emissions reduced.

Detroit Go Green Get Green Project (Detroit G4 Project)

14


Roles of Participants Activity/Task Outreach/Marketing

Project Design

Project Management

Project Implementation

Measurement & Verification

Responsible Partner

Outreach through community organizations

DWEJ, WARM, SED

Design marketing messages

DWEJ, WARM, SED, NDNI

Deliver message to target households

DWEJ, WARM, SED

Behavior-Change Campaign Roll-out

DWEJ, WARM, DTE, SED

Design of Standard Operating Procedures

SED, O’Brien

Scale pilot to 5 communities with SOP

SED, O’Brien

Collection and analysis of household data

O’Brien, WARM, DWEJ

Partner/External Communications mgmt.

SED

Quality Assurance/Process Improvement

SED

Regulatory and Award Compliance

SED, O’Brien, DWEJ, CCD

Data collection and reporting on verification

SED, FSU

Facilitate partner and stakeholder meetings

SED

Risk/loss mitigation and liability insurance

SED, WARM, DWEJ

Household Eligibility Assessment

SED, WARM, DWEJ, CCD

Contractor Mobilization/Logistics

O’Brien, WARM, DWEJ, CCD

Audit and Weatherization installations

WARM, DWEJ, O’Brien

Household and Consumer Education

WARM, DWEJ, CCD, NDNI

Customer Support and Follow-up

SED, CCD, DWEJ

Coordination of other incentives

SED, WARM, CCD, DWEJ

Research Design

FSU

Household permissions/releases

SED, WARM, DWEJ, DTE, CCD

Baseline Data

SED, FSU

Analysis of pre- & post-energy consumption

SED, DTE, FSU

Sampling

SED, FSU

Comparative Analysis

FSU

Database development and tracking

SED, FSU, DTE

Detroit Go Green Get Green Project (Detroit G4 Project)

15


Ray M. Waters President Shorebank Enterprise Detroit Managing Director - Detroit Community Loan Fund

Mr. Waters began at SED as the Managing Director of the Detroit Community Loan Fund in October of 2001. On June 1, 2004 he also assumed the title of President ShoreBank Enterprise Detroit. SED and the DCLF provide growth capital to minority owned businesses in Detroit and financing packages for developers working on affordable housing projects in the city. Prior to his involvement with the Detroit Community Loan Fund, he was a Managing Partner of BBC Ventures. In addition to consulting, BBC sought to acquire early stage life science companies to be managed from its' Ann Arbor, Michigan offices. From 1990 - 1999. He served as President of Horizon BIDCO Investment Company, a mezzanine venture fund providing growth capital for companies in Southeastern Michigan Mr. Waters business career also includes over 20 years experience as CEO and owner of three profitable growth companies, two of which were start up ventures. His hands on operating experience included structuring the sale of two of these companies He served for many years on the National Advertising and Franchise Committee of the Hertz Corporation, and the National Distributor Board of the Adolph Coors Company. Mr. Waters has been highly involved in local business communities and organizations. The following is a representative sample of his commitments. Member Past President Past Member Past Member Member

External Advisory Board School of Business Management Eastern Michigan University New Enterprise Forum External Review Board Michigan Economic Development Corp's Michigan Emerging Technology Fund MEDC Governor’s Innovation Council Michigan Venture Capital Association


Arnold L. McIntyre 9571 Courtland Dr. Rockford MI, 49341 616-866-3340 Hm 231-591-5817 Wk 616-292-8183 Cl amcintyre@mcintyrehomes.com

OBJECTIVE

To help facilitate the advancement of the construction and manufacturing industry in areas of: energy efficiency, sustainability, process, project and quality management, continuous improvement and lean systems technologies.

QUALIFICATIOS

Bachelor of Science in Engineering Technology, Master of Science in Engineering Management. Solid understanding of building science, green building principles, quality management and improvement methods. Successful history of implementing high performance and sustainable building technologies. Proven track record in project management and implementing quality and lean process systems. Proficient in a wide variety of tasks. Strong leader, progressive, forward thinker, mechanically minded, competent, energetic with the ability to meet and speak with people easily.

EDUCATIO

Master of Science, Engineering Management, Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo, MI 2003. Bachelor of Science, Agricultural Engineering Technology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 1986.

WORK EXPERIECE

Ferris State University, 1020 Maple Street Big Rapids MI, 49301 2009 – Present Energy Center Coordinator, Lead university initiatives with industry, communities and government in the field of energy efficiencies and sustainability. Involved in research, training and development of energy related projects within the residential and commercial building industry as well as manufacturing industries. Educator to industry regarding building design, improvements and the use of sustainable energies. Green Built Michigan, 501c3, 1627 South Creyts Rd, Lansing MI 48917 2004 – Present Board President, Board chairman of a state wide non profit organization with the objective of educating and certifying the building industry in green building practices. Actively participate in developing and delivering educational programs throughout the state. Regularly publicly speak at regional & state events promoting green building participation. Received and managed DEQ319 grant for the education of low impact development (LID) techniques for the Grand River watershed. American ational Standards Institute committee member in Washington DC. Representing Green Built Michigan. Committee comprised of 42 individuals from across US and was tasked with the development of the National Green Building Standard. ANSI Approval received January 2009.


Approved national instructor of Green Building for Building Professionals and currently working with the NAHB University of Housing developing a national green building training program for homebuilders. Board Member, 2001-2004. Original founding member of board of directors in 2001. McIntyre Builders Inc. 4235A 14 Mile Rd, Rockford Michigan 49341, July 2001 - Present President, Manage activities of design to build home construction company focused on high performance sustainable homes. Produce 10 to 15 single family homes per year with a sales revenue of approximately $3 million. Manage all aspects of design, sales and accounting for home construction business. Implement continuous improvement and quality programs for company. Conduct home performance analysis and oversee Energy Star & Green Built certifications. Constructed first certified green home in the State of Michigan in 2002. Organization is an Energy Star partner and nationally known for green building and high performance home construction. Awards and recognitions received include the National Energy Value Housing Award as awarded by the National Housing Research Center and the US Dept. of Energy, State of Michigan Energy Star Home grant, Business Review Innovation Michigan Award among many others. Electrolux Home Products, 635 W. Charles St, Greenville Michigan 48838. 1995-July 2001 Advanced Manufacturing Engineering Manager, 1996-2001. Managed manufacturing process development group in a high volume integrated manufacturing environment. Lead diverse group of 18 manufacturing, industrial, control and development engineers. Managed projects from concept development to full implementation. Maintained budgets from $100,000 up to $80 million. Specified, negotiated and procured manufacturing equipment worldwide. Utilized management tools such as cost analysis, scheduling, LEAN management, continuous improvement, PFMEA, DFM/DFA, MTTF/ MTTR, ISO9000, ISO14000, value analysis and objectives management. Implemented concepts of modular manufacturing, flexible manufacturing, pull systems, demand flow, setup reduction and error proofing. Leadership individual in a global organization focused on progressive change to satisfy customer requirements and grow market share. Sr. Development Engineer, 1995-1996. Managed individual project segments in high volume appliance manufacturing. Developed, justified, designed and implemented automated manufacturing systems. Determined process needs and specified equipment requirements. Maintained project schedule, cost and performance requirements in order to meet project objectives. Implemented lean manufacturing, flexible manufacturing concepts.


TIMOTHY W. O’BRIEN, P.E. PRESIDENT EDUCATION & LICENSURE • Bachelor’s of Science – Construction Engineering, Lawrence Technological Univ. • Professional Engineer Registered in the State of Michigan • Licensed Builder, State of Michigan EXPERIENCE 2007- Present 1995 - Present 1992 - 1995 1985 - 1992 1983 - 1985 1981 - 1983 1976 - 1981

Sr. VP – O’Brien Edwards Const. Co., Inc. President - O'Brien Construction Co., Inc. Vice President – O’Brien Waterford Construction Project Manager – O’Brien Waterford Construction Estimator – Waterford Construction Co., Inc. Project Engineer – Gearhart Industries, Inc. Laborer/Carpenter – Waterford Construction Co., Inc.

TYPICAL PROJECT EXPERIENCE • • • • • • •

University Groves Homes, NorthStar Development, Gardenview Homes Ph 1, Gardenview Estates Rio Vista Senior Apartments, Co-Operative Services, Inc. Our Saviours Senior Apartments, Westland, Presbyterian Villages, Belleville Senior Apartments, Co-Operative Services, Inc. Waterford Township 2000 Bond Program, (Owners Representative) Milford Police Station–Additions & Renovations (Design/Build),

$ 6,700,000 $ 14,285,000 $ 5,400,000 $ 4,600,000 $ 5,037,000 $ 22,460,000 $ 2,200,000

Tim O’Brien has worked in all facets of construction since beginning his career in 1974. Registered in the State of Michigan as a Professional Engineer, he has served on numerous nonprofit board and committees. Presently he serves as a National Director of the Associated General Contractors of America and is a past president of the Detroit Chapter of the AGC. REFERENCES Mr. Kim Yamasaki, Director of Development Cooperative Services, Inc. Phone: 248-967-4578 Mr. James Pappas, AIA Fusco, Shaffer & Pappas, Inc. Phone: 248-356-3400 Mr. Daniel Redstone, FAIA, NCARB Redstone Architects, Inc. Phone: 248-351-0770


jc s

Jacob Stevens Corvidae jacob@ic.org s 1250 Westport Rd., Ann Arbor, MI 48103 s 734.332.3975

Experience Green Programs Manager, WARM Training Center, Feb. 2004 - present Oversees Green Building Demonstration Center, designs and teaches classes and provides consulting for general public, builders and local governments, presents at numerous conferences, manages volunteer program, provides marketing and development support. LEED Accredited Professional. Adjunct Professor, University of Detroit Mercy School of Architecture, 2007-2008 Taught a class on Ecological Design as a required course for all second year students in the School of Architecture. Co-Founder, EcoVillage Detroit, 2003 - 2007 Grassroots organizing of neighborhood for sustainability, led workshops, created biodiesel carshare business, co-founded national Urban Ecovillage Network. Co-Founder, Sustainable Detroit, 2001 - present Organized and facilitated meetings, initiated and convened three Task Groups, designed and created website. Ongoing development of network continues. Parent, 2001 - present Oversaw crucial development of next generation, organized volunteers, developed education programs, managed finances, mediated conflicts. Freelance Graphic Designer, 1998 - 2006 Designed and created websites, illustrated magazine articles and books, designed brochures, advertisements, posters and flyers for print-media, exhibited environmentally-focused artwork. Board Director, Dancing Rabbit Ecovillage and Land Trust, 1997 - 2009 Created internship program, providing training in sustainable living skills, wrote articles for quarterly newsletter, oversaw land trust restoration efforts. Member, Dancing Rabbit Ecovillage, Rutledge, MO, 1998 - 2000 Got extensive training and experience in meeting and consensus facilitation; managed earthen plastering of strawbale buildings and earthen floor installation; taught classes to college students, gave tours, hosted visitors and interns, taught sustainable living skills, created and oversaw annual fund-raising efforts, co-managed publicity and advertising, edited quarterly newsletter, redesigned website. -- continued on page 2 --


Jacob Stevens Corvidae - Page 2 Volunteer, Citizens for a Better Environment, Chicago, Illinois, 1997 - 1999 Organized resource library, redesigned website for CBE’s three midwest offices, attended GIS training and trained other staff for toxins mapping project. Co-Founder, Fiddler’s Green intentional community, Chicago, Illinois, 1995 - 1997 Hosted meetings, drafted organizational structures, created website and newsletter, researched intentional community movement. Library Assistant, Northwestern University Library, 1994 - 1998 Supervised Reserve Department including 1 other staff member and 30 studentworkers, assisted in library-wide transition to new computer system, taught courses at nationally-known Technology in Learning and Teaching conferences. Administrative Director, Chicago Chamber Musicians, 1992 - 1994 Organized concert preparation for approximately 30 concerts a year, coordinated volunteers, assisted with fund-raising and grant applications. Development Assistant, Kalamazoo Symphony Orchestra, June 1992 - Sept. 1992 Teaching Assistant, Sociology Dept., Kalamazoo College, Sep. 1992 - June 1992 Resident Assistant, Kalamazoo College, Sep. 1989 - Aug. 1991

Education U of M, School of Natural Resources, Environmental Mediation Seminar, Mar. 2007 Dispute Resolution Center, State of Michigan Mediation Training, Nov. 2006 Integral Institute, Integral Sustainability Seminar, Sep. 2006 Kalamazoo College, Kalamazoo, Michigan, Sep. 1988 - June 1992 B.A. in Sociology/Anthropology with honors, cum laude with unofficial concentrations in Math, Art and Women’s Studies.

Related Websites www.warmtraining.org w www.sustainabledetroit.org w www.dancingrabbit.org


ROBERT L. VERESAN, AIA Over 27 years of design and marketing experience, primarily in a large corporate utility environment. Major areas of expertise include all functions of energy efficiency, market development, project evaluation and customer relations. Recognized as a proficient communicator and innovative program developer. Extremely knowledgeable on all construction facets and energy systems for new and existing structures. DTE Energy, Detroit, Michigan Combined gas and electricity utility with over with over 1.3 million gas and 2.2 million electric customers.

2001 to Present

Corporate Builder/Developer Liaison (2001- present) Responsible for the Residential, Commercial and Industrial markets for Detroit Edison’s entire service territory. Point of contact for the building industry that need assistance working with DTE Energy. Economic Development (2001-2004) Marketing Services (2004 – 2005) Customer Connections (2005 – 2006) Design Center of Excellence (2006 – 2007) National Accounts (2007– present) MichCon, Detroit, Michigan Natural Gas utility company serving 1.3 million Michigan families and businesses in over 500 communities.

1998-2001

Marketing Account Manager (1998-2001) Responsible for developing business relationships with architects designing projects in MichCon’s Service territory. · Work with Architects to identify projects in predesigned stages and create new business opportunities. · Organized and conducted seminars promoting new gas and electric technologies including HVAC systems to architects and engineers. Consumers Energy, Jackson, Michigan Combined gas and electricity utility with over six million customers in 68 counties in Michigan.

1981 to 1998

Senior Strategic Marketing Planner (1992 - 1998) Responsible for developing new competitive expansion programs to maximize corporate rate of return. · · · ·

Develop a strategic five-year plan for natural gas territory expansion. Establish a detailed strategy to predict 10-year customer growth. Create a "Strategic Intelligence Room" to identify at-risk townships and opportunities. Produce and submit Testimony & Exhibits to the Michigan Public Service Commission on behalf of Consumers Power Company. · Research and create a corporate "Gas Information Mapping" Marketing direction. Robert L. Veresan, AIA Page Two Facilities Technical Administrator (1991 - 1992) Responsible for all phases of projects and construction for new and existing Metro region buildings. · · · · · · ·

Researched need for future projects and develop construction costs. Created budgets for selected projects. Hired architects and engineers. Developed bid packages. Selected contractors and develop contracts. Supervised all construction phases and approve expenditures. Monitored construction progress with weekly reports.

National Accounts Executive (1990 - 1991)


STEVEN A. OGDEN 5736 Harvard Road Detroit, MI 48224 (313) 570-9411 steveo@heritage-ds.com Experience Executive Director Next Detroit Neighborhood Initiative Detroit, MI

December 2008 – present

A private, non-profit initiative designed to collaborate with the City of Detroit and the philanthropic community to strengthen neighborhoods and improve the quality of life of the residents. My responsibilities include designing and implementing the strategy as a new model for delivering services to the neighborhoods and raising funds to support the initiative. Responsible for a staff of 12. Principal Heritage Development Services, L.L.C. Detroit, MI

April 2006 – present

Founded Heritage Development Services; an experienced, full service real estate development advisory company. I am responsible for the entire business development. We provide specialized pre-development services to public and private real estate developers. Some of these services include the development of an acquisition strategy, the creation of financial pro-forma’s, the research necessary to identify available financing incentives in the market, along with assisting clients throughout the regulatory approval process (i.e. zoning, permitting and the various other designations). Heritage is recognized as a Wayne County certified DBE firm. Vice President, Director of Real Estate & Acquisitions Sterling Group Detroit, MI

July 1997 – May 2006

A Detroit based real estate Development and Management Company. I was a partner in the firm and my responsibilities included new project strategies, project management, along with financial analysis and the due diligence required of each project. Additionally, I was responsible for the day-to-day operations of the real estate portfolio. Executive Director Detroit Revitalization, Inc. Detroit, MI

September 1994 – February 1997

Responsible for the day to day functions of the organization, including, but not limited to planning and budgeting, and preparing corporate plans and budgets. Responsible for controlling the profitability of the organization, ensuring that the company is in compliance with the regulatory and financial reporting requirements of it’s creditors and regulators and for maintaining and developing relationships within the community. Acquired over 225 properties for sale or lease to low and moderate-income families. Loan Officer MCA Mortgage Corporation Southfield, MI

September 1992 – September 1994

As a loan originator for this private mortgage banking concern, I originated and closed over $4 million dollars in loans each year. I was also active in representing the bank at public forums discussing the mortgage application and approval process.


Steven A. Ogden Page 2 of 2

Key Account Manager Proctor & Gamble Distributing Co. Southfield, MI

March 1986 – March 1991

Responsible for the distribution, pricing, marketing and merchandising of the P&G paper products items to a $2 million dollar key account that supplied over 200 grocery retailers throughout the state (Capistar). Conducted P&G recruiting and interviewing efforts on specified college campuses, including conduction recruitment seminars on the campuses.

Education Michigan State University Bachelors of Science in Public Policy East Lansing, MI

September 1981 – December ‘85

Chairperson of the student government Funding Board (Associated Students of Michigan State University). Responsible for administering and distributing student tax dollars to registered student organizations. Responsible for an annual budget of $125,000

Skills / Accomplishments • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Ordained Elder – Calvary Presbyterian Church Harvard University Kennedy School of Government Executive Education Program graduate The Brookings Institution sponsored Council for the U.S. and Italy Young Leaders Program graduate - 2003 Detroit Regional Chamber Leadership Detroit Graduate Class of XXIII Appointee to the City of Detroit Land Bank Authority Appointee to the City of Detroit Board of Zoning Appeals Wayne County Commission Appointee to the Joint Building Authority (JBA) Organized and created startup business ventures Managed and supervised staffs for over 15 years Extensive experience working with various government and regulatory agencies (i.e.: U.S. Housing and Urban Development) Worked as a liaison between the business community and various neighborhood organizations Participated and organized various housing programs and seminars Real Estate sales license

Boards & Committees___________________________________________________ Detroit Land Bank Authority Board Member

April ’09 - present

BOMA Detroit

January ’09 - present

Board of Zoning Appeals Detroit Wayne Joint Building Authority Music Hall Center for the Performing Arts Eastside Emergency Center, Inc. Detroit Discovery Museum Citizens For Better Government Habitat for Humanity Detroit

January ’03 - present February ’06 - present December ’00 – 2005 November ’01 - 2005 June ’02 – 2006 August ’02 – 2005 November ’02 – 2006

References available upon request.


RESUME Mary Sue Schottenfels 14451 Warwick Detroit, MI 48223 313/909.0760 WORK EXPERIENCE 2008-present

Southeastern MI Health Association (SEMHA) Position: Executive Director, CLEARCorps/Detroit Duties: Direct the CLEARCorps/Detroit lead poisoning prevention including staff supervision, management of $2M budget, fund development, strategic planning

1993-2007

Greater Detroit Area Health Council (GDAHC) Positions: Executive Director, CLEARCorps/Detroit Duties: Directed the CLEARCorps/Detroit lead poisoning prevention project; Staff supervision, management of budget, fund development, strategic planning

1992-1993

Detroit Board of Education Position: Consultant Duties: Staffed the Olmstead/Kearney Campaign for School Finance Reform, a state effort to impact school financing issues; mobilized over 50 school districts statewide

1990-1992

County of Wayne, Youth Services Division Position: Consultant, Special Projects Duties: Developed the Community Youth Projectgarnered community support, developed resources, to service an at-risk population of youth, ages 10-14.

1977-1989

Michigan Avenue Community Organization (MACO) Positions: Director Duties: Directed efforts to improve community. Coordinated campaigns, conducted training, coordinated fundraising efforts, managed operations including personnel, benefits, grant reporting

1973-1976

National Lawyers Guild Position: Director, Detroit Chapter Duties: Coordinated all facets of organizational activity including project planning and implementation, Board support, fundraising, and newsletter production.


PUBLIC /COMMUNITY SERVICE 2004-present

CLEARCorps/USA Board of Directors Board Member

1987-present

Grandmont/Rosedale Integrated Neighborhoods Creator/ Chair of successful effort to promote a multi-ethnic Northwest Detroit community. Coordinated conducted media campaigns; hosted media tour.

1989-2002

Grandmont/Rosedale Development Corporation Treasurer and Member, Board of Directors

1988-1992

Northwest Detroit for Better Schools Coordinated successful campaigns for Detroit Board of Education candidates

1985-1988

Grandmont #1 Improvement Association President, 3 terms

1987 1982

AWARDS AND RECOGNITIONS Detroit City Council-Testimonial Resolution Detroit Police Department-Crime Prevention Citation

2005-2010 2009

CERTIFICATIONS Lead Inspector/Risk Assessor; State of Michigan Healthy Homes Specialist, Natl Center for Healthy Housing

1971

EDUCATION Wayne State University, B.A. Sociology Social Work/Community Organizing Curriculum Phi Beta Kappa Society


Donele Wilkins, Executive Director Donele Wilkins has over two decades of experience in occupational and environmental health as an educator, consultant, trainer, administrator and advocate. In 1994, she cofounded and currently serves as the Executive Director of Detroiters Working for Environmental Justice, a non-profit organization addressing urban environmental issues in the City of Detroit. Ms. Wilkins is sought after as a public speaker addressing local and national audiences on topics of community driven sustainable development, environmental justice, and occupational and environmental health advocacy. She has coordinated and organized several conferences and gatherings to highlight the plight of her community. As a consultant, Ms. Wilkins has assisted several community organizations and put them on the correct path toward increasing their capacity to transform their communities. She is a mom of two, which motivates her to change conditions in her community so that they can have a brighter future. With her leadership, DWEJ was able to shut down the Henry Ford Hospital Medical Waste Incinerator. Donele sits on The Detroit Brownfield Redevelopment Authority, Southeast Michigan Council of Governments- transportation advisory committee, Founder and Co-Chair of the National Black Environmental Justice Network, Colin Powell Academy board of education and many other committees and forums. She is the recipient of several awards, fellowships and special recognition for her contribution on behalf of the community.


June 2, 2010 Promoting Sustainable Affordable Communities Since 1981

Ray Waters, President Shorebank Enterprise Detroit 14533 Mack Avenue Detroit, MI 48215 RE: Letter of Support for Shorebank Enterprise Detroit Under DE-FOA-00000309 – Weatherization Assistance Program: Weatherization Innovation Pilot Program Dear Mr. Waters: The WARM Training Center supports the Detroit Go Green Get Green Project (Detroit G4 Project) presented by Shorebank Enterprise Detroit and will work with the project team to assist in transforming Detroit neighborhoods into thriving communities. WARM Training Center is a non-profit organization that promotes the development of resource efficient, affordable, healthy homes and communities through education, training, and technical assistance. WARM's services include: residential energy education, technical assistance, resources, and green jobs training. WARM began in 1981 as a non-profit organization training people in weatherization, construction, and energy conservation. Over the years WARM's roots in energy conservation grew to encompass all aspects of sustainable development. In 2008, WARM became a founding partner of the Southeast Michigan Regional Energy Office, which is a regional coordinator for the Michigan Retrofit Rampup Initiative. WARM will be a key partner in administering and managing the Retrofit Rampup Initiative’s residential program in the City of Detroit. We look forward to having the opportunity to work with your organization to make this a successful Weatherization Innovation Pilot Program. If you have questions or need additional information, do not hesitate to contact me.

Sincerely,

4835 Michigan Ave. Detroit, MI 48210 P: 313.894.1030 F: 313.894.1063 www.warmtraining.org

Jacob Stevens Corvidae, LEED AP Green Programs Manager


1,235

5


June 2, 2010 Ray Waters, President Shorebank Enterprise Detroit 14533 Mack Avenue Detroit, MI 48215 RE: Letter of Support for Shorebank Enterprise Detroit Under DE-FOA-00000309 – Weatherization Assistance Program: Weatherization Innovation Pilot Program Dear Mr. Waters: DWEJ is a supporter of the Detroit Go Green Get Green Project (Detroit G4 Project) presented by Shorebank Enterprise Detroit and will join the team to develop and implement a community based resident engagement campaign, and assist in the provision of training and services for residents in the low-income targeted project areas if the project is funded. Established in 1994, Detroiters Working for Environmental Justice (DWEJ) was formed for the express purpose of addressing the disproportional burdens faced by people of color and low-income residents in environmentally distressed communities. Our vision is that Detroit would become a model sustainable city through green jobs, civic engagement and sustainable development. To that end, we have trained nearly 5,000 through our Community Hazard Awareness Training/Seminars (CHATS) as a member of the Midwest Consortium for Hazardous Waste Worker Training. We have also trained and placed 80 Detroit residents over the last two years through our Green Jobs Training Program. Most recently, we have formed an enterprise arm called Community Environmental Services, LLC, to perform services in energy efficiency, brownfield remediation and green construction. CES is designed to provide on-the-job training in coordination with our training program, as well as to hire Detroit residents for the work of sustainability revitalizing our communities. We look forward to having the opportunity to work with your organization to make this a successful Weatherization Innovation Pilot Program. If you have questions or need additional information, do not hesitate to contact me. Sincerely,

Donele Wilkins Executive Director

4750 Woodward Suite 406. phone(313) 833-3935. Fax (313) 833-3955


Applicant Name: Shorebank Enterprise Detroit

Award Number:

Cumulative Budget

Budget Information - Non Construction Programs OMB Approval No. 0348-0044

Section A - Budget Summary

1.

Estimated Unobligated Funds

New or Revised Budget

Grant Program Function or Activity

Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance Number

Federal

Non-Federal

Federal

Non-Federal

Total

(a)

(b)

(c )

(d)

(e)

(f)

(g)

DE-FOA-0000309

81.042

$2,999,900

$2,999,900

2.

$0

3.

$0

4.

$0

5.

$0

Totals

$0

Section B - Budget Categories 6. Object Class Categories a. Personnel b. Fringe Benefits

$2,999,900

$0

Grant Program, Function or Activity (1) DE-FOA-0000309

(2)

(3)

$2,999,900 Total (5)

(4)

$270,000

$270,000

$41,400

$41,400

c. Travel

$0

d. Equipment

$0

e. Supplies f. Contractual

$162,000

$162,000

$2,446,500

$2,446,500 $0

g. Construction h. Other i. Total Direct Charges (sum of 6a-6h)

$80,000

$80,000

$2,999,900

$0

$0

$0

$0

j. Indirect Charges k. Totals (sum of 6i-6j)

$2,999,900

$2,999,900

$0

$0

$0

$2,999,900 $0

7. Program Income Page 1 of 8

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Section C - Non-Federal Resources (a) Grant Program

(b) Applicant

(c ) State

(d) Other Sources

(e) Totals

8.

$0

9.

$0

10.

$0

11.

$0

12. Total (sum of lines 8 - 11)

$0

$0

$0

$0

Section D - Forecasted Cash Needs Total for 1st Year 13. Federal

1st Quarter

$1,345,700

14. Non-Federal

2nd Quarter

3rd Quarter

4th quarter

$336,425

$336,425

$336,425

$336,425

$336,425

$336,425

$336,425

$336,425

$0

15. Total (sum of lines 13 and 14)

$1,345,700

Section E - Budget Estimates of Federal Funds Needed for Balance of the Project (a) Grant Program

(b) First

16. DE-FOA-0000309

Future Funding Periods (Years) (c ) Second (d) Third

$1,345,700

$1,654,200

$1,345,700

$1,654,200

(e) Fourth

17. 18. 19. 20. Total (sum of lines 16-19) Section F - Other Budget Information 21. Direct Charges

$0

$0

22. Indirect Charges

23. Remarks

Previous Edition Usable

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Page 3 of 8


SHOREBANK ENTERPRISE DETROIT – DETROIT G4 PROJECT Appendix C – Budget Justification Personnel Task # and Title

Position Title

Budget Period 1 Time (Hours)

Pay Rate ($/Hr)

Budget Period 2

Total Budget Period 1

Time (Hours)

Pay Rate ($/Hr)

Total Budget Period 2

Proje ct Total Hours

Project Total Dollars

Rate Basis

Principal Investigator

Project Coord.

2000

$42.50

$85,000

2000

$42.50

$85,000

4000

$170,000

Actual Salary

Compliance

Admin. Assist.

2000

$15.00

$30,000

2000

$15.00

$30,000

4000

$60,000

Actual Salary

Peer Energy Promoters

Technician (4)

2000

$10.00

$20,000

2000

$10.00

$20,000

4000

$40,000

Actual Salary

All Personnel

(6)

6000

$135,000

6000

$135,000

12000

$270,000

Fringe Fringe Benefits include FICA, State Unemployment Insurance, Single Health Coverage @ 18% of salary Position

Budget Period 1

Budget Period 2

Project Total

Proj. Coord.

$85,000 X .18 = $15,300

$85,000 X .18 = $15,300

$30,600

Admin. Assist.

$30,000 X .18 = $ 5,400

$30,000 X .18 = $ 5,400

$10,800

TOTALS

$20,700

$20,700

$41,400

1


SHOREBANK ENTERPRISE DETROIT – DETROIT G4 PROJECT Supplies General Category of Supplies

Qty

Unit Cost

Total Cost

Basis of Cost

Justification of need

Budget Period 1 Weatherization Kits

400

$150

Office Supplies and Photocopying Budget Period 1 Total General Category of Supplies

$60,000

Basic Household EE – light bulbs, caulking,

$12,000

Paper, Copies, Cartridges, Pens

$72,000 Qty

Unit Cost

Total Cost

Basis of Cost

Justification of need

Budget Period 2 Weatherization Kits

600

$150

Budget Period 2 Total

$90,000

Basic Household EE – light bulbs, caulking,

$90,000

Cumulative Supplies Budget Periods 1 and 2 = $162,000

Contractual Sub-Recipient Name/Organization

Purpose/Tasks in SOPO

Budget Period 1 Costs

Budget Period 2 Costs

Budget Period 3 Costs

Project Total

WARM Training

Weatherization Implementation and Consumer Education

$40,000

$43,000

$83,000

O’Brien Construction

Weatherization Project Management

$65,000

$65,000

$130,000

DWEJ

Community Outreach/Engagement and Weatherization

$30,000

$30,000

$60,000

DTE Energy

AMI Equipment, Bill and Data Monitoring

$5,000

$5,000

$ 10,000

Ferris State University

Verification, Monitoring and Impact Analysis

$145,000

$100,000

$245,000

Next Detroit Neighborhood

Neighborhood Celebration Events

$10,000

$10,000

$20,000

ClearCorps

Household Eligibility Assessment and Intake

$12,500

$12,500

$25,000

2


SHOREBANK ENTERPRISE DETROIT – DETROIT G4 PROJECT Vendor Name/Organization

Budget Period 1 Costs

Energy Auditors (8)

Pre and Post-Audit Work on Basic Weatherization Implementation

Sub – Contractors Weatherization – Basic

Budget Period 2 Costs

Budget Period 3 Costs

Project Total

$30,000

$36,000

$66,000

Implementation of Basic Package Weatherization (165)

$340,500

$567,000

$907,500

Sub-Contractors Weatherization – Full Service

Implementation of Full Service Weatherization (50)

$230,000

$270,000

$500,000

Sub-Contractors Weatherization – Deep Retrofit

Implementation of Deep Weatherization (20)

$170,000

$230,000

$400,000

$1,078,000

$1,368,500

$2,446,500

Total Contractual

Other Direct Costs General description

Cost

Basis of Cost

Justification of need

Budget Period 1 Accounting and Auditing

$15,000

Marketing and Community Engagement

$25,000

Budget Period 1 Total

General description

1% of project costs X $3M

Auditing and Accounting Services

$40,000

Cost

Basis of Cost

Justification of need

Budget Period2 Accounting and Auditing

$15,000

Marketing and Community Engagement

$25,000

Budget Period 2 Total

1% of project costs X $3M

Auditing and Accounting Services

$40,000 Cumulative Other Direct Costs Budget Periods 1 and 2: $80,000

3


Appendix D - Project Impact Table Template Project Impact Metrics Q1 Number of low-income units weatherized

Year 1 Q2 Q3

Project Period Year 2 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3

Q4

110

135

180

200

200

210

200

1,235

Total

Weatherization Innovation Federal Funds Expended

$375 ,000

$375 ,000

$375 ,000

$375 ,000

$375 ,000

$375 ,000

$375 ,000

$374 ,900

$2,999,900

Leveraged Funds and In-Kind Resources Expended

$143 ,750

$143 ,750

$143 ,750

$143 ,750

$143 ,750

$143 ,750

$143 ,750

$143 ,750

$1,150,000

Jobs created or retained

6

6

6

6

6

6

6

6

Average annual electricity savings (kWh) achieved per weatherized unit

2,520

Average annual natural gas/oil savings (therms) achieved per weatherized unit Average energy bill reduction per weatherized unit (in $)

600

$840

Average annual emissions reductions (pounds of CO2) per unit weatherized Project Totals Post Project Period, year 1 to 3 Year 1 Year2 Total electricity savings (kWh) Total natural gas/oil savings (therms) Total energy bill reduction (in $) Total emissions reductions (pounds of CO2)

6

21,040

Year3

Total

1,159,200

2,041,200

3,200,400

276,000

486,000

762,000

$64,400

$113,400

$177,800

9,678,400

17,042,400

26,720,800

Explanation of non-federal funding sources Source of Non-Federal Explanation* Funds MI Public Serv. Comm. $550,000 – Low-Income Weatherization from Energy Cos. Private Foundations $600,000 – Eco-Block Funding (Kresge and Ford Foundations)

Note: Savings are based on a baseline assumption of $700 saved per home for the existing weatherization services with a 10% energy savings improvement due to innovations, and a 10% greater uptake of homes due to program innovations.


DOE Wx Innovation Savings crunching GRAND TOTAL Year 1 q1

TOTAL q2

q3

q4

Year 2 q1

TOTAL q2

q3

q4

# of homes weatherized $ Energy Saved baseline $ Energy Saved Innovation $ Energy Saved Total

120 $7,560 $9,240 $16,800

160 $10,080 $12,320 $22,400

180 $11,340 $13,860 $25,200

460 $28,980 $35,420 $64,400

200 $12,600 $15,400 $28,000

200 $12,600 $15,400 $28,000

210 $13,230 $16,170 $29,400

200 $12,600 $15,400 $28,000

810 $51,030 $62,370 $113,400

1270 $80,010 $97,790 $177,800

$ savings from gas $ savings from elec

$11,760 $5,040

$15,680 $6,720

$17,640 $7,560

$45,080 $19,320

$19,600 $8,400

$19,600 $8,400

$20,580 $8,820

$19,600 $8,400

$79,380 $34,020

$124,460 $53,340

302,400 72,000 2,524,800

403,200 96,000 3,366,400

453,600 108,000 3,787,200

1,159,200 276,000 9,678,400

504,000 120,000 4,208,000

504,000 120,000 4,208,000

529,200 126,000 4,418,400

504,000 120,000 4,208,000

2,041,200 486,000 17,042,400

3,200,400 762,000 26,720,800

KWH Therm lbs. CO2

Assumptions: % of new homes reached because of innovation % of energy savings improvement due to behavior and feedback improvements $ baseline of Wx savings % of $ savings from gas % of $ savings from elect

PER HOME new savings baseline Total $ savings $ gas savings $ elec savings CCF gas savings KWH gas savings Therm gas savings Lbs. Co2

0.1 0.1 $700 0.7 0.3

$140 700 $840 $588 $252 588 2,520 600 21,040


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