Page 1

e

J


jennelder

jke314@gmail.com | (615)

¡ 681 ¡ 7938 | 222 E Bland St, Unit 403, Charlotte, NC 28203


“What is important is using one’s talent, intellect and energy in order to gain an appreciation and affection for people and place.” — Samuel Mockbee


table of contents

03


01

architecture

02

graphic design

03

04

bunkier szutki 07 rural stopovers 15 broken regularities 19 a home for all seasons 25 lily of the valley 29

anatomy of a site 39 point, line, plane 43 the dark side of the villa savoye 45

photography study abroad 49 gulf islands national seashore 53


01

architecture


1.1

bunkier szutki

1.2

rural stopovers

1.3

broken regularities

1.4

a home for all seasons

1.5

lily of the valley


1.1 bunkier szutki


professor Dr. George Dodds semester Fall 2016 program Art Museum This project’s program was derived from a competition brief for the existing building but left to manipulation and interpretation of each student. A study of methods of addition was employed with my focus centering on ‘transformation’ within the work of Herzog and de Meuron. The design works with a new path of circulation and improved social spaces for the museum. It makes minimal moves to the existing walls of the building and reroutes the popular cafe to the interior. The most intruding move the design makes is to revitalize the north entrance, forming a courtyard garden space at the corner and using the spiral staircase to connect to a new roof terrace. This entry is a quite beautiful double-height space that at the moment is wedged into a corner and only used as a film 08

exhibit space (and not as an entry). The current museum is overserved with entrances that lack a clear hierarchy. The hope of this design is to integrate this entry into the typical circulation of the museum, thus giving it the proper use and visibility for such a spectacular space. In order to make this possible, an existing wall was replaced with a curtain wall making the spiral staircase visible from the ground level exhibition space. The glass box that extends into the corner garden is a conditioned part of the ground level of the museum. If a guest wishes to, they can continue to the rest of the building, or they can choose to spend time within the garden. However, everyone must at least circulate through the space and re-enter.


09


E

SCAP

ROOF

02 UPPER ADDITION

01 FIRST LEVEL

RY ALLE

G

00 GROUND LEVEL

LERY

GAL

EN

GARD

M

ORIU

AUDIT

-1 LOWER LEVEL

GAL

LERY

CAFE ER

HEAT

IT AMPH

axon showing added amphitheater entry, corner inner garden, and rooftop deck 10


section through glass box addition, corner garden, and rooftop

view from the south looking north 11


section through “grotto,” corner garden and roof addition 14


!

!

!

!

!

!!

! !

!

!

!

!

!

!

! !

!

!

!

!

!

!

! ! !

!

! ! !!

!

!

!

!

! !

! !! !

!

!

! ! !

!

!

!

! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !

!

!

! ! ! !! !

! !!!

!

!

! ! !

!

! !

!

!

! !

!

!

!

! !

!

! ! !

! !

!

!

!

!

! ! !

! ! !

! !

!!

!

! ! ! !

! ! !

!

!

! !

!

!

! ! !

! !

!

!

!

!

!

!

! !

!

!

!

!

!

!

!

!

!

!

!

!

!

!

!

!

! ! !! !

!

! !

!

!

!

!

! !

! ! ! ! !

!

!!

! ! ! !!

!

!

! ! !

! !

!

!

! ! ! !

! ! ! !

!

!! !

!

!

!

! !

! ! ! !! !

! ! !

! ! !

!

! !

!

! !

! ! !

!

!

!

!!

!

!

! !

!

! !

!

! !

!

! ! !

! !

!

!

! !

! !! !

! !

! !

!

! ! ! !

! ! ! ! ! !

!

! !

!! ! !

!

!

! !

!

!

! !

!

!

! ! !

!

!

! !

! !

!

! ! ! !

!

!

!!

! !

! ! !

!

!

!

!

!

!

!

!

!!

!

! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! !

!

!

!

!

!

! !

! !

! ! !! ! !

!

!!

! !

! ! !

!

! !

!

!

!

! !

!

! ! ! !

!

! ! !

!!

!

!

! !

!

!

!

!

!

!

!

!

!

!

! ! !

! !

!

! ! !

!

! ! !

!

!

!! !

!

! ! ! ! !

!

!

!

!

!

!

!

!

!

!

! !

!

!

!

!! !

!

! ! ! ! ! !

!

!

!

!

!

!

! !! ! ! !

! ! ! !

!

! !

!

! ! ! !

! !!

!

!

! !!

!

! !

!

!

!

!

! !

!

!! ! !!! !

! ! ! ! !

!

!

! !! ! !

!

! !

! ! !! ! !! ! !! !! ! ! ! !

! ! !

!

!

!

!!!! !! ! ! ! !

! ! !! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! !!! ! ! ! ! !

! !

!

! ! ! !

! !

! ! !

! ! ! ! !

! ! !

!

!! ! ! !! !

!

! ! ! !

! !! !

!

!

! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! !

!! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! !! ! ! ! !!! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! !!!

! ! ! !

! ! ! ! ! !

! !

!

! ! ! !

!

! ! ! !

!

!

! !

!

!

!

!!!! ! ! !

!

!

!

!

! ! ! ! !

!! !!

!

!

! !

!

!

!

!

!

! ! !

!

!

! !

! ! ! !

!

!

! ! ! !

! ! !! !

! !!

!

!

! ! ! ! !

!

! !

!

! !

!! !!

!

! ! ! ! ! !

! !

!! ! !! !

! ! ! ! !

!

! !

!

!

! ! !

!

!

!

!

!

! !

! ! !

! !! !

! !

! ! !

!

! !

! !

! ! ! !

! ! !

!

!

!!! !!! !

!

!

!

!

!

!

!!

! !

!

!! ! !! !

!

! ! !

!

!

! !

!

!

! ! ! ! !!

!!

! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !!! !

! ! ! !!! ! ! ! ! ! !

!

! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! !!! !! !

! ! ! !

! !

!

!! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !

!

!! !

!

!

!

!

!

!

!

!

!

!

!

! !

!

!

! ! !

! !!

!

!

!! !

!! !! ! !

! !

! ! ! ! ! ! !

!

!

!

!

!

! ! ! ! !

!

!

! !

!

!

!!

!! !

!

!

!

! ! ! ! !

!

! !! !

!

! ! !

!

! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! !

!! !! ! !!

!

!!! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! !!! ! !

!

!

! ! !

! ! ! !

! ! ! ! !

! !

!

! ! ! ! ! !! !! ! ! ! !

!! !

! ! !

! ! !

!

!

! ! ! !

!

!

!

! ! !

! ! ! ! !

!

! ! !! !

!

!

!

!

! !

!

!

!

! ! ! !

!

!

!

!

!

!

!

! !

!

!

! !

!

! !!

! ! ! !

!

!

!

! !

! ! ! !

!

!

!

!

! !

!

!!!

!

!

!

!

! !! ! !

!

!

! ! !

! !

!!! ! !

!

!

! ! !! !!! !! ! ! ! ! !!

! ! !

!

!

!

! ! !

! !!

!! !

! ! !

!

! !

!

! !

! ! !

!

!

! ! ! ! !

! !! !

!

!

! ! ! !

! !!

! ! !

! !

! !

! !

!

!

!

! !

! !! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !

! !

!

! ! ! ! !

!

! !

!

!

!

! ! !

!

!

! ! !

!

!

!! ! ! !!! ! ! !! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! !!! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! !!! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! !! !!!! ! !!!!! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! !! ! !! ! ! !!! ! ! !! ! ! ! !! !!! !!!! !!! !! ! !! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! !! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! !! !! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !!! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !

! ! !!

! !

!

!! ! ! ! ! ! !

!

!

!

!

!

!

! ! ! ! ! !

! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! !!!! ! ! ! !! !! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! !! !!!! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! !

!

!

!

!! !!

!

!!

! !

! !!

!

!

!

!

!

! !

! !

! !

!

!

!

! !

!

! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! !! ! !! ! !! ! ! !! ! !! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! !!

!

!

!

! ! !

!

! ! ! !

! !

!

!! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !!!! ! ! ! ! !! ! !! !! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! !!! !!!! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! !!! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !!!! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! !! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! !! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! !! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !!! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! !! ! !! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !!! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !!! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! !! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !!! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! !! !! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! !! !! ! ! !! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! !!! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! !!! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! !! ! ! ! !! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! !! !! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! !! !! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! !! !! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! !! !! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! !! ! !!! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! !! !! ! ! !!! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !!! ! ! ! ! ! !! !! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! !! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! !! !! ! !! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! !!!! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! !! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !!! ! !! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! !! !! ! ! ! ! !! !!! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! !! ! ! !! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! !! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! !!! !! !! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! !!!! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! !! !!! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! !!!! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! !! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! !!! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !!!! ! ! ! ! !! !! ! ! !! !! ! ! !! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! !!! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! !! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !!! ! ! ! !! !! ! !! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! !!! ! !! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! !! !! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! !! !! ! !! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! !!! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !!! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !!! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! !! ! ! !! ! ! ! !! ! !! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !!! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! !! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !!! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! !! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! !! !! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !!! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! !! ! !! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !!! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! !!! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! !!! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! !! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! !!! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! !! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! !! ! !! !! !! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! !! !!! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !!! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! !!! ! !!! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! !!!! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! !! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! !! ! !! ! !! ! !!! ! ! ! !! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! !! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! !! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !!! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! !! !! ! ! ! ! !! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! !! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! !!!!! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! !! ! ! ! ! !! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !!!! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! !! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !!! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! !! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! !! ! !!! !! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! !!!!! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! !!! ! ! ! !! ! ! !! ! !! ! ! ! !! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! !!! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !!! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !!! !!! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! !! ! !! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! !!! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! !! ! ! !! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! !! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !!!! ! ! ! ! ! ! !!! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! !! ! ! !! !!!!! ! !!! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! !! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! !!! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! !!! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! !!! !! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! !! !!! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! !!! ! !!! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! !!! !! ! !! ! ! !!!!! ! ! ! ! !! ! !! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! !!! ! ! ! ! ! ! !!! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! !! ! ! !!! !! ! !! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! !! ! ! !! ! ! !! !!!! ! !!!!! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! !!! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! !! !! ! !! ! !!! ! ! ! !!!! !! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !!!! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! !! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! !!!! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! !! ! !! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! !!!!! !! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! !!! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! !!! ! ! ! !! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! !! ! !! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !!! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! !! ! ! ! ! !!! ! ! !!!! ! ! ! !! ! !! ! ! !! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! !!!!! !! ! ! ! ! !! ! !! ! !! !!! !! ! !! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! !! ! !! ! ! ! ! !! ! !! ! ! !! ! ! ! !! ! ! !! ! !! ! ! ! ! !

! !

!! !

!

!

!

!

! !

! ! ! !

!!

! !

! !! !

!

! !

! ! ! !

! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !!!

!

!

! !

!

!

! !

!

!!

! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !

!

!

!

!

!! !

!

!

!

! ! ! ! !

!!

!

! ! ! !

!

!

!

!

!

! !

!

!

!

!

! !

! !

!

!

!

! ! !!

!

!

!!

!

!

!

!

!! !

!

!

!

!

!

! !

! ! !!

!! !

!

!

!! !

! !

!

! ! !

!

!!

! !!

!

! !! ! !

!

! !

!

!

!

! ! !

!

!

!

!

!

! ! !

! ! !

!

!

!

! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !

! ! !

!

! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !!

! !

! !

!

!

!

!

! !! ! !

!

!

!

! !

! !! !

!! ! !

! !! ! !! !

!

!

!!! !

! !

!! ! !!

!

! ! !

! ! !

!

! !! !! ! ! ! !! !

! !

!

!

!

! !!

!

!

! ! ! !

! ! !

!! !

!

!

! ! ! ! ! ! ! !

!

!

!

!

!! ! ! ! ! !

!!

!

!

!! ! !

!! !

! !

!

!

! !

!

! !

!

!

! !

! ! !

!

! ! !

! !

!

!

!

! !

!

!

! !! !!! ! ! ! ! !

!

! ! ! !

!! !

! ! ! !

!

!

!

! !

!

!

! !! !

!

!

! ! ! ! !!

!

! ! !

!

!

! !

! !

! !!

!

! !!

!

! !

!!

!

!! ! !

!

!!

!

! !

!

!

! ! !

! !

!! !! ! !

!

!

!

!

! !

! !

! !! ! ! ! ! !

!

!

!!

!

!

!! !! ! ! !

!

!

!

!

!

! !

!

! !

!

!

! !!

!

! !! !

!

!

!

!

! !

!

!

! !

!!

!

! !

!

! !

! !

! !

!

!

! !! !

!

!

!

!

!

!

!! ! !!

!

!

!

!

!

!

! !

!

! !! ! !

!

!! ! !

!

! !

!

!

!

!

! !

! ! !

!

!

!

! ! !

! !

!

! !

!

!

!

!!

!

! ! !

!

!

!

! !

!

! !

! ! !

!

!

!

! !

!

!

!

!

!

! ! ! ! !! !

!

! !!

!

!

!

!

! ! ! !

! ! !

! !

!

!

!

!! !

! !! ! ! !

!

!

! !

!

! ! !

!

!

!

! !! ! !! !

!

!

! !

!

!

!

!

! !

! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! !! !! ! !

!

!

!

!

!

! ! !!

!! ! !

! !

!

! !

!

!

!! !

!

!

! !!

! !

!

!

!

!

!

!

!

1.2 rural stopovers !

!!

!

! ! !

! ! !

! !

!

!

! !

!

!

!

! ! !

! ! ! !

!

! ! !

!

!

!

!

! !

!

!

!

!

!

!

!

!

! ! ! !! ! ! ! !

! !

! !

!

!

!

! ! !

! ! !

!

!

!

!

!!

! ! !

!

!

! ! !! !

!

!

!

! !

! !

!

!

!

!

! ! !! ! !

! !

!

! !

! !

! !

! ! ! ! !

! !

! ! !

! !

! ! !

!

!

!

!

!

!

! !

!

!

!

! !! !! ! !

!

!

!

! ! !! !! !

!

!

!


!

!!

! !! !

!

!

! !

!

!

! ! ! ! ! ! !

! ! ! ! ! ! !

!

!

! ! ! !

! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !

professor Craig Reschke semester Spring 2017 program Conservation

!

! !

!! !

! ! !

! !

!

! ! ! !

!

! !

!

! ! !

! !

!

! ! ! !

!

!

!

! ! ! !

!

! !!

! !

!

!

! !! ! ! !! ! !

! !

! ! ! ! ! ! ! !

!

! !

!

!

! ! ! !! !! !!! ! !

!

! !

! !

! !

!

! ! !

!

! !

!

! ! ! !

!

! ! ! !

!

! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !

! !

! !

! !

!

! !! ! ! ! ! ! !

!

! ! !! ! ! !! !!

!

!

! !

!

!

! ! ! ! !! !

!

! !! ! ! !

!

!! ! ! !! !!

! ! !

!

!

! !

!

!

! !

!

!

! ! ! ! ! !! ! !

! !

!

!

!

!

!

! ! ! ! !

! !

!

! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! !! ! !! ! ! ! ! !! ! !! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! !!!! ! !! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! !!! !!!!! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !!! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! !!!! ! !! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! !!! ! ! ! ! !

! ! ! ! !!

!! ! ! !

! !

!

!

! !

!! !! ! ! ! ! ! !!! ! !! ! ! ! !

!

!! ! ! !! ! ! ! !! !! ! ! ! !! ! !! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! !

! !

!

!

! ! !!!

!! ! ! !

! ! ! ! !!!! ! ! ! ! ! !! !

! ! ! ! ! ! ! !

! ! !

!

!!

! ! ! !

!

!! !

!

!

!

! !

! ! ! !

! ! !

!!

!

!

!

! !

! !

! !

!

!

!

!

! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! !

!

!! ! ! !!

! ! !

!

!

!

!!

! ! ! !

!!

!

!

! !! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! !

! ! ! ! ! !! ! !

!

!!

!

! !!

!

! ! ! !

!

! ! !

!

! ! ! !

! !

!

! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! !! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! !! !! !! ! !! !! ! !! !! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !!! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !!! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !!!! ! ! ! !! !! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! !!! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! !! ! ! ! !! !! ! ! ! !!! ! !! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! !! ! !! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! !! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! !! !!! ! ! ! !! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! !! ! ! ! ! ! !! !! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! !!!! !! ! ! ! !! ! ! !! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! !! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! !! !! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! !! ! !!! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! !! ! !! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !!! ! ! !! ! ! ! !! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! !!! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! !! !!! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! !! ! !!! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !!! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! !!!!!! ! ! ! !! !!! ! ! !! ! !! ! ! !! ! !! !! !! !! ! ! ! ! !! !! !! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! !! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !!!! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! !!! !! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! !! ! ! !! !! ! ! !!!! !! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! !!! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! !! ! !! !! ! ! ! !!! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! !! ! ! !! ! !! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! !! !! ! ! ! !!! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! !! ! !!! ! ! ! ! ! !!! ! !! ! !! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! !!! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! !! ! ! ! !!! ! ! !! ! ! ! !! !! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! !!! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! !! !! ! ! ! !! ! ! !! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! !! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! !!! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! !! ! ! !! ! !!! ! ! ! !!! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! !! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! !! ! !! !!! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! !! ! ! !! ! ! ! !! ! ! !! ! ! !! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! !! !! !!!!! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! !!! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! !! ! ! !! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! !! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !!! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! !! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! !! !! ! ! ! ! !!! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! !!! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !!!! ! ! !! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! !!! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! !! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! !!! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! !! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! !!!! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! !!! ! ! ! ! ! !! !! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! !!! !!! ! !! ! !!! ! !! ! !! ! ! ! ! !! !!! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! !!! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !!!! !!!! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! !! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! !! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! !!! !!! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! !!! ! ! ! !!! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !!! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! !!!! ! ! !! ! ! ! !!!! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! !! ! ! !!!! ! ! !!! ! ! ! ! ! ! !!!! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !!! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! !! ! !! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! !!! ! !!!! ! !! ! ! !! ! !!! !! ! ! !! !! ! !! !! ! ! !! ! ! !!!! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !!! ! ! !! ! ! !! ! !! ! !!!!! ! ! ! ! !!! ! !!!!! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! !!!!! ! ! ! ! !! ! !! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !!! ! !!! !! !!!!!!!!! !! !! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! !! ! !! ! !!!! !!! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! !! ! !! !!! ! !! ! ! ! !

! !!! ! ! !

!

!

!

!

!

! ! !

!

! !

!! ! !

! ! ! !

!

! !

! !

! !

!!

!

! ! ! !!! ! !! !!! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! !

! ! !

! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! !

! ! !

This studio focuses on the Conservation Reserve Program, a federal program that rents farmers’ land for ten to fifteen years to prevent erosion and water damage from big agriculture. While the NPS is a service to the public, giving them access to “untouched land and remarkable recreation opportunities,” the CRP is a service to the public working behind the scenes to improve the ecology of the overall nation. The issue at hand is to what means and end goal is the program preserving and conserving land? If it’s public money that is funding the program should the sites be accessible to visitors? The focus of this design proposal is a driving trail for historic bridges that draws upon migrating warblers who are lacking the proper amount of stopover sites. 16

Additionally, the Maumee River is undergoing a large project to enhance and rehabilitate the riparian buffer following the river to filter it and prevent erosion. Originally, the conceptual idea of centering these trails around bridges was the idea of pairing landscape development with these iconic man-made insertions. Many registered historic places or land markers don’t hold their own in an interstate driven culture. The rural highways define the heart of the country, but simplistically give life to historic persons, events, periods of time, etc. through a road sign and four to five parking spots. CRP has the potential to harness these sites and revolve around them, creating a flexible and always morphing pool of federal land that serves a visible purpose to the local people.


feeds among the tops of trees and shrubs in summer, feeds low in the tree in winter

found where a clear field is becoming woods again; nests at the base of shrubs/grass

above: diagram representing birds’ needs in their habitat right: views from within the habitat 17


berm for audio control

lowland becomes wetland in flooding

river

18

second-growth habitat

elm

alder

hickory

oak

pine

river birch

sycamore

beech

pine-based habitat


1.3 broken regularities


professor Katherine Ambroziak semester Fall 2015 program Volunteer Fire Station As we approached intensive programming for the site and project, students in the class had the opportunity to choose between working with the existing building or designing for new construction and on a different plot within the mission’s site. This design proposal works with the new site, hoping to reserve a space that was reliably accessible and more open to expansion. This decision is defensible for a variety of reasons stemming from the rapid preparation that’s necessary in the operation of a Volunteer Fire Station. The current space stacks vehicles so that they aren’t able to be pulled out immediately. Its location is so nested back in the development of the mission’s campus that it takes a lengthy amount of time to drive back 20

to the main road. This proposal integrates a community center, hoping for the sporadic needs of a rural volunteer station to allow the building to fluctuate between a core piece of community infrastructure and a space for gathering. The thesis of the project is investigating broken regularities, the everyday disruptions of the life of an on-call, volunteer firefighter. The concept of this fire station is that at 6:00am someone could be sitting and enjoying a cup of coffee and reading a newspaper, 6:15am ten people could be throwing on uniforms and pulling out trucks, and at 4:00pm there could be an after school event where children are populating the outdoor seating, as well as the mixed-use area of the station.


key

01 public interaction and display space 02 multipurpose room 03 chief’s office 04 EMS office 05 bays 06 work area 07 eyewash station and chemical shower 08 gear station 09 restrooms 10 mechanical space 11 storage 12 secured storage 13 cot storage

left: massing axon showing exploded water tower structure

21


section through bays looking to elevation of water tower 23


section through bays, community room, and water tank tower 24


1.4 a home for all seasons


professor Krzysztof Bojanowski semester Spring 2016 program High-density Housing

This design was developed during my semester in Krakow, Poland. The studio took time to analyze affordable housing in many different regions and develop personal stances towards urban infill development. Priority was put on density and the ability for the home to fit in a variety of pockets within the city. Because of this, the project was “un-sited.” Initially, the conversation revolved around the “housing crisis” that Poland is undergoing, with many young people breaking from the tradition of living with their parents and deciding to move within the city. It felt like a very personal design problem to solve, as much of the Southeast region is undergoing similar change right now, specifically 26

in Nashville. As we went through the project, importance was placed on the idea of modularity and prefabrication a sense of innovation towards small, affordable homes. We were challenged by how small we could make the home, while still ensuring a quality means of life, an urban neighborhood, and places of public use. This design developed from a single home that revolved around an inner courtyard, to two homes that could share a wall. After that transformation, the final step was to work through the roof form to develop a pod of homes, taking the development to the next level of density while still preserving layers of individual private space, individual outdoor space, and shared spaces for the development.


BEDROOM 1 11 SM

COURT 13 SM

KITCHEN/ DINING 14 SM BATHROOM 5 SM

BEDROOM 2 8 SM

LIVING 14 SM

HALF BATH/ LAUNDRY 5 SM

left: plan of single unit showing modulation; right: diagram showing development of form 27


above left: view from inside of court looking out; above right: bird’s eye view of neighborhood layout; below: section through two units in a pair of four showing rotation of orientation 28


1.5 lily of the valley no. 01


professor Bob French semester Fall 2015 program Commercial partner Daniel Hodge Just before it was slated to be demolished, the building that once stood on this site, “Ross Flats,” was referenced in the Knoxville newspaper as a “lily of the valley,” edifying the importance and value of this place in the downtown core. “Lily of the Valley” is to signify a return to happiness, and that was our conceptual driver as we envisioned what a sustainability center could entail. The goals of the design were prioritizing education through novel applications of customary building technologies, systematic organization of program for maximum public outreach, and minimizing the build-

30

ing footprint while maximizing public, landscaped space. Our priorities worked together to make the building and surrounding landscapes the method for sustainability teaching. The building itself will use practical design strategies to demonstrate that energy efficient buildings do not have to rely on high-end technologies. Additionally, our placement of public spaces and parks will draw in visitors, and our placement of program will ensure it is easy for them to happen into public pieces of the building such as the café, gallery, library, or auditorium.


ground floor plan/lobby level 31


32


33


section through cafe, office, atrium, and library 34


East Elevation (2pm)

0

10

25

The cladding system comes from Crossville, Inc., a longstanding porcelain manufac turer based out of Crossville, Tennessee. They have a variety of color options and sizes and the capabilities of their Sureclad system allow us to affect our vision.

50

-

detail of west elevation entry curtain wall West Elevation (2pm)

35

0

10

25

50


view looking into atrium from third level

detail of atrium connection to exterior wall and roof

Gallerie Omnibus

36


02

graphic design


2.1

anatomy of a site

2.2 point, line, plane 2.3 dark side of the villa savoye


2.1 anatomy of a site


professor Gale Fulton semester Fall 2015 This project’s base goal was to encourage an exploration of ArcGIS through the research and development of data on a park within Knox County. I chose Karns Community Park as the steep elevation was beautiful to study. Through the design of the board, we worked to

40

develop a poster that reflected the site and pulled pertinent statistics out relating to programming and use. To represent the data, we used illustrator graphs and tools. Additionally, it served as a lesson in graphic hierarchy as we were limited to using a monochromatic scheme.


KARNS COMMUNITY PARK Karns provides the area with public ball parks, tennis courts, and a pool as well as a community center that can be rented out for events. Located in the western half of Knox County, the Karns Community Park has an elevation that begins to blend into the greater Appalachian Mountains.

rk

pa

6,446 sf

144,650 sf

zoned activity

paved surface 1,128 sf buildings

(tennis courts, baseball fields, pool)

889,516 sf

open space

distance from park

t

en

nm

iro

nv

ilt e

bu library middle school elementary school

miles 0.0

0.2

0.4

45% 0.6

0.8

1.0

forest open

ets

stre

nt/

me

ve

pa

55%

hy

rap

og

top

308 foot elevation change over

25 acres

overall layout of final poster 41


COMMUNITY PARK

elevation that begins to blend into the greater Appalachian Mountains.

Karns provides the area with public ball parks, tennis courts, and a pool as well as a community center that can be rented 6,446 sf out for events. Located in the western half of Knox paved surface 1,128 sf buildings Park has an County, the Karns Community 144,650 sf zoned activity elevation that begins to blend into (tennis courts, the greater Appalachian baseball fields, pool) Mountains.

rk

pa

889,516 sf

open space

6,446 sf

144,650 sf

zoned activity

paved surface 1,128 sf buildings

(tennis courts, baseball fields, pool)

ilt e

bu

889,516 sf

library

ilt

middle school elementary school

miles 0.0

0.2

0.4

0.6

0.8

t

en

nm

iro

v en

bu distance from park

distance from park

open space

t

en

nm

iro nv

library middle school

45%

elementary school

miles 0.0

1.0

0.2

0.4

0.6

0.8

45%

1.0

forest

forest

open

pa

open

55% hy

rap

og

top

ets

stre

t/ en

m

ve

pa

55%

42

ts

ree

t/st

en

m ve


2.2 point, line, plane

A PLANE IS A FLAT SURFACE EXTENDING IN

height and W I D T H.

43


professor Diane Fox semester Fall 2016 This project began with a reading about points, lines, and planes, concluding with each student choosing a sentence to represent through type. The initial step was to find high quality imagery that represents the statement in some way. The statement I designed with was “a plane is a flat surface extending in height and width.” This image originally caught my eye as an option not only because I was able to travel here during my time in Europe, but because the contrasting movement within it. The building is so heavy and massive, countered with a blurring car flying by in front

44

of it. The horizontality of the image is also defining, but the vertical, allglass facade and columns counteract this, as well as the perspective of the roof structure gliding into the distance. The type reflects the image by matching proportions of the elevation, ending with an italicized word to highlight the movement of the car. Additionally, the first line’s weight matches the heaviness of the roof plane while the thin character of “height and” follows the mullions of the windows. “Width” sits as an object at the bottom page, mimicking the car’s role in balancing the image.


2.3 dark side of the villa savoye

THE DARK SIDE OF THE VILLA SAVOYE ARCHITECT LE CORBUSIER WRITTEN BY GRAHAM MCKAY

45

class could only bathe in a tub in front of the kitchen fire, servants performed the roles that pipes and conduits have today, transporting hot and cold water throughout the building, maintaining and lighting the lamps, and carrying away waste. Servants also isolated the household as a class unit within society since they performed necessary tasks such as shopping by going to the markets and dealing with cart vendors for milk, bread, vegetables, meat and fish. The physical and social separation of classes inside the house replicated the physical and social separation of the house from other classes in the city. While Le Corbusier correctly identified city-centre apartments with views as the desirable property of the future, he nevertheless designed 19th century notions of social segregation into not only his urban plans, but also his private houses

19th and early 20th notions of an Ideal City separating the functions of the city also happened to separate the classes within it. During the Industrial Revolution, the upper classes built townhouses in the cities but still anchored themselves in the countryside. The new middle class built their townhouses in locations such as Belgravia, Paddington and Kensington to separate themselves and their new wealth from the docks, mills and railways that were the source of it – and where the workers lived. Inside the larger townhouses there was a similar separation of function and class, with servants having their own working spaces, stairs and living quarters. Servants also enabled functions within the building to be separated. Whereas the lower

such as the Villa Stein (1926-7) and Villa Savoye (1928-9), two buildings commonly regarded as seminal works of the Modern movement. These two villas represent Le Corbusier’s interpretation of the building element of functional structure juxtaposed with the human element of a functional plan providing light and space. In both of these villas, the plans separate functions and as a consequence the people performing those functions. Light and space being the new indicators of status, the servants’ quarters are on the ground floor where there’s less of both. At first glance, the Villa Savoye appears the more informal of the two. The servants’ domain is again the ground floor. There is also a basement that, being the realm of servants and machinery, is devoid of both light and architectural invention.

Published plans of it are rare. The ground floor contains the boundary between the two domains and this boundary is no less definite for being intangible. Although the servants’ stairs are displayed as a sculptural shape in the lobby and can be used by anyone in the house, they are off-axis and second option to the ramp directly in front and which is clearly not intended for use by servants. The fact that the servants’ corridor and stairs are open to the hallway should in theory increase the possibility of the paths of servants and served paths crossing. This would, after all, be hardly surprising in a summer house for two residents, two guests and a staff of four (comprising a chauffeur, cook, maid, and housemaid). But this does not turn out to be the case. The lobby symbolizes interaction but does nothing to encourage it. Consider

title page: elevation of the villa as you move through the trees and approach from the road far left: kitchen space where servants would prepare meals for the owner

“This aesthetic ostensibly generated from function, light and space was perfectly capable of identifying and separating social classes and who was to benefit from the aesthetic.”

second from the left: living room space which is grandiose in its ability to not only visually, but literally, connect to the adjoining roof terrace


professor Diane Fox semester Fall 2016

“Although the servants’ stairs are displayed as a sculptural shape in the lobby and can be used by anyone in the house, they are off-axis and second option to the ramp directly in front and which is clearly not intended for use by servants.”

second from the right: living room space with adjoining roof terrace, curtain wall windows can open up and connect the two spaces far right: upstairs bathroom which is clearly designed for leisure and less for the functional necessity of bathing

what happens when a car carrying Madame and/or her guests arrives. The maid, on-call in her room, either sees or hears the car coming up the driveway and goes to the front door to meet it. The chauffeur stops the car outside the front door which is now being opened by the maid who is ready to take coats and hats. While the owners and guests are going up the promenade architecturale, the maid goes down the stairs to give the coats to the housemaid who will hang them and dry them if necessary. (There is no closet in the hallway.) The maid then goes up the stairs to either await or relay instructions for the

cook. Those are busy stairs. Depending on what the guests are doing, the chauffeur either leaves the car where it is and stays on-call, or parks it. In either case, he goes to his room via its outside door. This is not for his convenience. When the guests come to leave, the maid will be waiting with the coats, and hats will have been placed on the ledge by the door. The chauffeur will not have reached the car via the hallway and front door as his room has no internal door. This is either so he can’t fraternize with the female servants, or so he won’t let cold air into the hallway for the guests descending the ramp. To many,

To begin this assignment, we chose an architect in whom to focus our design. I chose Le Corbusier and an article analyzing the programmatic division of servant versus served spaces within the Villa Savoye. Similarly, the layout of the spreads looks to evoke this division. This begins with the image of the separate circulation on the title page, and continues with the original photography of the

the placement of a wash-basin in the lobby underneath the ramp has been a source of mystery in terms of plumbing and function, but not in terms of class. Since the maid is the only member of staff who crosses that unseen boundary, it is for her and her alone to wash her hands after she has put down her book or sewing or whatever she was doing in her room and before she enters the house proper. This aesthetic ostensibly generated from function, light and space was perfectly capable of identifying and separating social classes and who was to benefit from the aesthetic.

46

home that show distinct differentiation in user and function. I chose Le Corbusier because I have always had a distinct interest in his work and theory, dating back to research projects and precedents in my first year of architecture school. I felt his architecture would fit this project well, defining clear spaces and reflecting a sense of clean-cut modernity.


03

photography


3.1

study abroad

3.2 gulf islands national seashore


3.1 study abroad


captured Spring 2016 location Italy, Switzerland, Poland

All of these images were taken while I was studying abroad the spring of 2016. I was enrolled in a program at Politechnika Krakowska in Krakow, Poland for the extent of the semester (March through June), but I took a trip through Switzerland and Italy the two weeks prior to studying. Travels through-

50

out the semester included multiple professor-led trips through Central Europe, Poland, Germany, and the Baltic States. Obviously, a joy of travel photography is capturing the people and culture of the places. I was captivated by combining this study with scale, light, and historic patina.


51


52


3.2 gulf islands national seashore


captured Summer 2015 location Pensacola, Florida

One summer, my internship was with the National Park Service, working at the Gulf Islands National Seashore’s Florida location under the cultural resource director. This position included archival work and digital logging of many of the historical images and items. It also included historic building documentation and photography. Since I was an architecture student, the director decided to record

54

several of the buildings that would be officially measured and drawn by the Historic American Building Society (HABS). Additionally, all of the historic structures and buildings are supposed to be photographed one to two times a year so there’s a catalog to reference. These images were from my photo documentation process and show Fort Barrancas and Fort Pickens.


55


56


th ank you!


jennelder

jke314@gmail.com | (615) ¡ 681 ¡ 7938 | 222 E Bland Street, Unit 403, Charlotte, NC 28203


“We owe it to the fields that our houses will not be the inferiors of the virgin land they have replaced. We owe it to the worms and the trees that the buildings we cover them with will stand as promises of the highest and most intelligent kinds of happiness.� — Alain de Botton, The Architecture of Happiness


Jenn Elder Portfolio  

University of Tennessee Bachelor of Architecture 2017 graduate.

Jenn Elder Portfolio  

University of Tennessee Bachelor of Architecture 2017 graduate.

Advertisement