Issuu on Google+

 

 


JOSEPH  CORNELL  DESIGNER  MANNEQUIN     .      

Joseph  Cornell  had  an  appetite  for  high  and  popular  culture,  

ranging  from  astronomy  and  French  literature,  to  music,  ballet,   opera  and  cinema.  Cornell  referenced  this  in  his  work  in  his   assemblages  and  collages.  Consequently,  I  used  those  luxurious   inspirational  sources  to  create  a  dress  form  for  the  Premier   Designer  department  of  Neiman  Marcus.       The  dress  form  itself  is  a  collage  of  images  that  portray   high  culture,  including  music  scores,  vintage  postage  stamps,   pages  from  French  books,  and  other  images  pertaining  to  French   culture,  such  as  fleur  de  lis.  This  is  relevant  to  the  Premier   Designer  department  at  Neiman  Marcus  because  it  speaks  to  the   store’s  lavish  essence.  French  culture  largely  impacts  high   fashion.  This  is  further  projected  through  the  color  palette  of   pastels  and  neutral  tones,  which  conveys  the  store’s  sense  of   timelessness.  Similarly,  the  scrapbook/collage-­‐like  appearance   creates  a  vintage  quality  that  adheres  to  the  store’s   appreciation  for  the  classics  while  still  adapting  to  what  is   current  in  fashion.  The  dress  forms  are  collaged  by  hand,  and   then  finished  with  mod  podge  matte.        For  the  “head”  of  the  dress  form,  there  is  a  framed  image   of  a  subtle  collage  consisting  of  a  vintage  map,  a  penny,  a   Champaign  glass  with  ice,  a  pair  of  legs,  a  ballerina,  and  a   branch  with  a  parrot  atop  and  a  quote  bubble  that  reads,  “Ce  n’   est  que  dans  vos  rêves,”  which  means  “it  is  only  in  your  dreams.”   This  is  relevant  to  the  artist  because  of  his  signature  “shadow   boxes,”  which  were  considered  to  be  an  escape  or  fantasy,  in  


which  he  often  utilized  found  objects,  ballet  references,  bird   motifs,  a  sense  of  quirkiness.    This  is  also  relevant  to  Neiman   Marcus  because  it  alludes  to  both  the  store’s  unique  heritage  and   its  dash  of  eccentricity.  Stanley  Marcus  was  a  master  marketer   who  realized  the  importance  of  publicity  in  promoting  the  Neiman   Marcus  brand.  It  was  actually  him  who  thought  of  selling  camels,   mummies,  blimps,  and  submarines  as  “his  and  hers”  Christmas  gifts   in  the  legendary  Christmas  Book.       Holding  up  the  dress  form  is  a  simple  wooden  stand  that  is   supported  by  another  type  of  “shadow  box,”  which  encloses  an   intricate  assemblage  of  wooden  pieces  that  resemble  gears  or   inner  mechanics  of  a  machine.  This  hints  at  the  inner  workings  of   the  Neiman  Marcus  brand  as  a  whole,  and  the  idea  that  the   foundation  is  built  around  the  notion  of  being  a  company  with  an   unconventional  approach  to  retailing.      

 


JOSEPH  CORNELL  JUNIOR  MANNEQUIN     .      

While  he  was  an  internationally  renowned  modern  artist,  

Joseph  Cornell  was  first  and  foremost,  a  collector.  He  used   “found  objects”  from  thrift  shops  and  old  books  stores  in  his   assemblages  and  collages.  Consequently,  I  referenced  the  idea  of   using  old  items  to  create  a  dress  form  for  Neiman  Marcus’s  junior   department—which  is  referred  to  as  the  Contemporary  department,   and  is  otherwise  known  as  CUSP  (their  sister  store  which  also  has   standalone  boutiques).      

The  dress  form  itself  is  encrusted  with  a  collage  of  vintage  

buttons.  This  relates  to  the  artist’s  collage  technique  as  well   as  Neiman  Marcus’s  play  on  fashion  materials.  The  color  palette   of  muted  and  neutral  tones  is  relevant  to  the  artist  and  his   usage  of  old  objects  in  an  assemblage  or  collage.  Though  this   vintage  color  scheme  references  Neiman  Marcus’s  sense  of   timelessness,  it  is  still  relevant  to  the  Contemporary  department   and  portrays  a  sense  of  youth.  This  is  depicted  through  the   enlarged  proportions  of  the  buttons,  which  allude  to  a  creative   and  crafty—or  perhaps,  experimental—quality  of  adolescence,  while   still  maintaining  an  essence  of  sophistication  and  class.        

For  the  “head”  of  the  dress  form,  there  is  a  framed  image  of  

a  subtle  collage  consisting  of  a  cosmic  setting  with  a  elongated   fish,  and  a  colorfully  dressed  girl  with  a  cone-­‐shaped  spiral   seashell  for  a  hat,  a  butterfly  for  a  waist  belt,  and  holding  an   illusionary  object  involving  strings  and  a  geometric  and  circular   seashell,  which  also  features  a  star  and  a  moon.  The  dark  quality   creates  a  sense  of  mystery,  which  relates  to  the  artist’s  


personality,  and  which  is  relatable  to  a  more  youthful  customer.   Celestial  motifs  were  also  common  in  the  artist’s  work.  This  is   both  relevant  to  the  artist  and  to  Neiman  Marcus  in  that  it   speaks  to  their  unique  and  quirky  qualities,  as  well  as  the  idea   of  creating  a  fantasy.  Fashion,  especially  at  Neiman  Marcus,  is   meant  to  make  you  dream.  Though  eccentric,  the  collage  can  still   be  appreciated  by  the  more  youthful,  yet  still  sophisticated,   customer  through  its  comical  and  fantastical  composition.       Holding  up  the  dress  form  is  a  simple  wooden  stand  that  is   supported  by  another  type  of  “shadow  box,”  which  encloses  an   intricate  assemblage  of  wooden  pieces  that  resemble  gears  or   inner  mechanics  of  a  machine.  This  hints  at  the  inner  workings  of   the  Neiman  Marcus  brand  as  a  whole,  and  the  idea  that  the   foundation  is  built  around  the  notion  of  being  a  company  with  an   unconventional  approach  to  retailing.      

 



JOSEPH CORNELL DRESS FORMS