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DESIGN LOG


JENNA STEINBECK 2011 // 2012

DESIGN LOG Design Concept ARCH 601: Material Study.............................................................. 2 ARCH 602 : Event / Line / Surface................................................ 8 Design Context ARCH 602: Peck Slip Elementary School....................................... 14 ARCH 601: Urban Landskate.......................................................... 22 Representation ARCH 612: Brooklyn Promenade Bridge........................................ 32 ARCH 611: Media Events............................................................... 36 ARCH 611: Media Fundamentals................................................... 38 Generation ARCH 612: Bridge of Aspiration Animated..................................... 42 ARCH 611: Applied Concepts..................................................... 48

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2


DESIGN CONCEPT 3


ARCH 601: MATERIAL STUDY PROFESSOR: STEPHANIE BAYARD

The introductory studio project of the first semester is a material study that involves developing a ‘smart’ unit or component that when multiplied and aggregated, changes the physical properties of the of the material which it is made of. For example, turning rigidity into fluidity or transforming opacity into transparency. After experimenting with many materials, the final aggregation was composed of white bristol paper similar to heavy card stock. This material is both opaque and flexible so in order to be successful, the final composition should have a rigid quality and achieve a sense of transparency. In addition to changing the physical qualities, the field of units should also indicate a gradient change. This could be a gradient of density, scale or three dimensionality. In this particular field, the units gradually change scale in width (but not length). As a result, the aggregation becomes denser as the units get thinner. Tools Used: Physical Model: AutoCAD, Laser Cutter, Exacto Knife Computer Model: Rhino, V-Ray for Rhino Execution: Physical Model: Rigidity in the physical model was achieved by scoring, folding and attaching the paper to itself with a slit and tab system. This creates a compartment that is self containing and strong. The compartment also serves as a portal through which one can look though. This feature gives the field a transparent quality when held at eye level. Computer Model: The same three dimensional shape is achieved using the following commands in Rhino. -Polyline -PlanarSrf -Rotate3D -Copy -OffsetSrf (for thickness quality)

A. Unit construction diagram modeled in Rhino and made into lines (Make2D). Line work is then exported as an Adobe Illustrator file. In Illustrator, line type and thickness are edited to produce a drawing with graphic clarity. B. Photograph of physical model placed on a transparent surface with artificial light placed underneath.

A

4


B

5


Section Drawings: Instead of spending many hours drawing sections of a project in AutoCAD, one can produce similar line work rather quickly by using a combination of both Rhino and Illustrator. Once the Rhino model is complete, the following steps are performed: CutPlane - select objects and draw beginning and end of cut plane. Section - select objects and draw section line in the same location as the cut plane. Doing this allows the section line to be separate from the line work beyond. Always put this on a separate layer. Trim - Select cut plane as trimming object then trim all objects on the opposite side of the desired line work beyond. Make2D - Navigate to the viewport that shows the section cut correctly and select the now half model. Select objects and type Make2D. Export line work to Illustrator for further editing.

A. Section cut through computer model produced by the steps listed above. Rhino and Illustrator used. B. Density diagram taken from the computer model of the aggregation. As the unit gets thinner towards the top, the field gets denser and more compact. Rhino and Illustrator used. C. Photograph of physical model in natural light. D. Photograph of physical model in natural light.

A

6


B

C

D

7


ARCH 602: EVENT / LINE / SURFACE PROFESSOR: PHIL PARKER

Illuminated Play: This diagram is showing the movements of a group of bodies as they play on light fixtures embedded in the ground. In this particular case, this is not an event between bodies and another surface, but rather an event in which the body becomes the surface. The primary force causing movement among these bodies is the pulsation of the fixtures as they turn off and on over a period of time. The light is acting as an attractor and when the bodies move to it by way of a vector, a boundary is created as the light hits the skin. This boundary is captured in several frames so as to show how the boundary deforms in the few moments a body is standing directly on a fixture before moving to the next. The movement vectors are represented with dotted lines and the light boundaries are represented with solid lines of varying weight with the heaviest being the last position the body was in before stepping away. Pulsating Force Applied: The forces applied to the surface can be traced back to Illuminated Play. The surface, oriented vertically, is acted upon by two types of air fields and one type of constraint. The first air field comes from below and is imitating pulsating light that is driving the movement of the bodies.

A. Photo collage of event B. Line diagram of Illuminated Play C. Diagram of applied forces

A

8


B

C FRAMES 1-150

FRAMES 151-250

FRAMES 251-350

FRAMES 351-400

FRAMES 400-420

9


The second air field comes from above and serves as the weight of the child when standing on a fixture. This occurs slightly after the first force due to reaction time. When the first force is operating at zero magnitude, the second force also operates at zero and third operation comes into play. Point constraints are applied to selected vertices creating creases in the surface. This action serves to act as the lateral movement of the bodies when moving to another light. Zig-Zag Aperture: When the event forces are applied to the membrane, unique qualities are produced that create continuities and difference within the previously planar surface. Because of the lines inscribed and the strategic placement of tears throughout, aperture and planar shift in opposite directions occur and create opportunity for in, along and through. When the membrane creases due to the point constraint, this creates lines running in the surface from one end to another. Aperture is created when the application of the air fields creates compression in the surface and is forced to split open at the tears. Views through the membrane come into existence. Because of these compressive forces, lines running along the surface shift from one direction to the next; zig-zagging left and right or up and down if the surface is horizontal.

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DESIGN CONTEXT 9 13


ARCH 602: PECK SLIP ELEMENTARY SCHOOL PROFESSOR: PHIL PARKER

Multiplicity In Education: Education can be described has being a system of multiple relationships interacting simultaneously to stimulate knowledge within an individual. In a typical Montessori classroom, different activities, social exchanges and learning opportunities are all occurring at the same instant. Work can be done individually, in pairs, or in larger groups. There are student to student relationships as well as student to teacher relationships. All of the different learning exercises can be performed on multiple kinds of surfaces existing within the same space. Different learning styles are fostered in this type of environment. A student can be solely engaged in their work but if one chooses, the environment provides the opportunity for observation of others as a learning tool. Reflective Site: Peck Slip is located within a context that is rich in history, social exchange and varied building use. With multiple kinds of commercial establishments nearby, Peck Slip is given a peculiar physicality that shifts when day becomes night. Because storefronts are lining the streets, two very different qualities are observed. During the day, glazing emits a reflection of the surrounding area and transparency is minimal. However, the reflective qualities of the glass create images of views that otherwise are not visible by the naked eye. As night begins to fall, a shift in the physicality occurs and the streets become illuminated. Lights in the storefronts are left on and the transparent quality reveals new information.

A. Site Section B. Education Diagram C. Site Diagram

A

14


B

C

15


16


17


Continuity and Structure: Two types of connections are present when aggregating the surface. The first is a similar end connection in which one end of a surface is connected to the similar end of another surface. This allows for the continuation of movement along multiple surfaces. The second connection used is a bottom to top connection that is performed by stacking a surface on top of another. This connection produces a structural quality when the “in” of one surface meets the “in” of another. Pockets and Aperture of Various Scales: The strands of continuity that brings surface, site and education together is the idea of pockets and apertures at various scales oriented in such a way that views of various scales are achieved. A single surface is populated by pockets and apertures of different sizes and then when aggregated, an even larger pocket and view to the surrounding context is created. These pockets or spaces allow for different activities to take place while the apertures provide a connection from one pocket to another. While there may not be physical connection from one space to the next (direct circulation) there is still the visual connection and the power of observation in education is achieved. Drawing the Connection: Drawings of the school are produced in such a way that ideas about surface, site and education are described. In both the plan and the section, it is crucial that pockets of varying scale are clearly visible. This is achieved by using high contrast between solid wall and open space and overlaid renderings to dictate what is inside and outside.

A. Views of varying scale diagram B. First level plan with site diagram overlaid

A

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B

ENTRY

FIRST LEVEL CAFE

PEDESTRIAN THOUROUGHFARE / OUTDOOR GATHERING SPACE

RECEPTION SPACE

PERFORMACE SPACE

RESTROOMS / CUBBIES

INDOOR RECREATION

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Overlaying Diagrams: In order to carry the connections between surface, site and schooling into two dimensional drawings, the diagrams from earlier studies are overlaid in the plan and section to give another level of information and to inform how spaces were created. Overlaid on the first level plan is the site diagram showing the angles of reflection. This shows how orientation of the spaces are organized in such a way that views of the store front will reveal a reflection that may not be visible from that specific location. Similarly in the section, the lines of views that were created in the three dimensional model are transposed onto the section to show the types of views achieved from each pocket. Modeling the Connection: It’s in the digital model that the aggregation comes to life. Structure as well as enclosure is explored and scale is recognized. It is with the digital model that the thinking about education, surface and site become proven. Modeling three dimensional circulation paths and three dimensional vantage points from the various scaled pockets verifies that the aggregation is working in terms of the thinking about education and site. When the digital model is materialized through the use of a 3D printer, the way in which the model is structured becomes apparent.

A. Second, third and fourth level floor plans B. Northeast elevation C. Rendering of cafe courtyard

A

LEARNING SPACE

SECOND LEVEL CAFE

TERRACE LARGE GATHERING SPACE

LIBRARY

LEARNING SPACE

ENTRY / MAIN OFFICE

EXTERIOR LEARNING SPACE

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B

C

EXTERIOR LEARNING SPACE

LEARNING SPACE

LEARNING SPACE

EXTERIOR LEARNING SPACE

LEARNING SPACE LEARNING SPACE EXTERIOR LEARNING SPACE EXTERIOR LEARNING SPACE

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ARCH 601: URBAN LANDSKATE PROFESSOR: STEPHANIE BAYARD

The final studio project is a continuation of the material study performed in the first half of the semester. The idea is to apply the concepts found in the material study to a physical context in New York City. The program is a facility for one indoor activity and one outdoor activity. The site located at the intersection of the FDR, 23rd St. and the East River, provides a unique canvas for a skate park / yoga studio. The existing skinny wedge of concrete sandwiched between the FDR and the water allows for exploration of the edge condition. The landscape begins to play a substantial role in the project in order to break the vertical nature of the existing site. The facility becomes a location in which two contrasting activities can coexist. Skateboarders feel at home in the already urban context and the yoga studios are designed to provide a peaceful environment with views of the sky. Tools Used: Rhino, Illustrator, Photoshop, V-Ray for Rhino, InDesign, Exacto Knife, Glue

A

A. Diagram of the site analysis. Focuses on various boundaries that currently exist on the site. They include visual, physical and noise. B. Landscape Plan. Drawn in AutoCAD. Line weights and types edited in Illustrator.

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NOISE VISUAL PHYSICAL


B

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25


Presentation Notes: The following notes were taken prior to the final presentation. They were discussed in order of appearance. 2 Goals: -To design a program where two contrasting activities can coexist. Skateboarding is fast, exciting and dangerous. Yoga is slow and relaxing. - To break the vertical nature of the site and the surrounding context by taking advantage of the directional characteristics of my previous material study. Form: Unit was blown up to a scale so that each enclosure becomes inhabitable space. Since that only leaves a total of four units, the landscape needs to be addressed in a way that mimics the field qualities of the original material study. To achieve this, unfold the original unit so it becomes a surface. Original geometry is still evident. Some of the folds are exaggerated to provide a surface for skateboarding.

A. Building section showing views from the yoga studio. Template lines taken from the section technique in Rhino then imported into AutoCAD for a more detailed version to be drawn. Lines are then opened in Illustrator for further editing and the addition of figures. B. Rendered view from under the FDR. V-ray for Rhino used as rendering engine. Ground materials applied in Photoshop. Vector people added in Illustrator. C. Rendered view of skate park. V-ray for Rhino used as rendering engine. Ground materials applied in Photoshop. Vector people added in Illustrator.

A

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B B

C

C

27


Notes Continued: Landscape: Because the building is rather simple. The landscape needs to be much more developed. To do this, a gradient of materials is applied that responds to the program and circulation about the facility. - The skate park is smooth concrete - Pedestrian paths are pervious concrete - Where pedestrians walk through the buildings, material changes to wood. This also emphasizes breaking of the vertical boundaries - Vegetation is toward the outer edges and dispersed somewhat throughout. Activities: Because the two sports are very contrasting, the yoga studios that need more privacy are located on the second level and skateboarding is practiced in the more public areas (by the cafe). The skateboard surface is also slightly below grade in several places to allow for easy viewing from the cafe deck and the bike path. Yoga is typically not an activity viewed by spectators. To counteract this, the yoga participants have views of their own. Because of the tiered floor system, every location in the room has a view of the sky.

A. Site section showing variation in landscape elevation. Template lines taken from the section technique in Rhino then imported into AutoCAD for a more detailed version to be drawn. Lines are then opened in Illustrator for further editing and the addition of figures. B. Rendered bird eye view of overall site. V-ray for Rhino used as rendering engine. Trees added in Photoshop. C. First floor plan. Drawn in AutoCAD.

A

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B

C

LOCKER ROOM

CAFE

ADMIN BOARD / YOGA RENTAL

RESTROOM

RESTROOM

LOCKER ROOM

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REPRESENTATION 31


ARCH 612: BROOKLYN PROMENADE BRIDGE PROFESSOR: BEN MARTINSON

The second segment of Advanced Multimedia primarily focuses on the student’s ability to generate compelling drawings in order to represent a design project in the best possible way. This is done by focusing on varied linework, areas of tone, contrasting fills and the effective use of white space. As a secondary learning objective, the student is required to use the combination of Rhino and Grasshopper in order to further their understanding of those particular programs. The assignment is to design a pedestrian bridge that links the Brooklyn Promenade to the newly constructed Brooklyn Bridge Park located on the East River water front. Considering that the programs used are Rhino and Grasshopper, the bridge is to be composed of a parametric system that is both complex and structural. Tools Used: Rhino, Grasshopper, Vray, Maya, AutoCAD, Illustrator Execution: - After the initial design is conceptualized, import AutoCAD construction lines into the Rhino site model. Use these lines to draw three dimensional curves to scale. -From the three dimensional curves, Loft between them to make surfaces. Use the OffsetSrf command to offset each surface so that there are two surfaces some distance apart from each other. -In Rhino, model the desired geometric shape that will be used to fill the gap between two surfaces with the aid of the Grasshopper script. -Draw a single curve for the railing and use the appropriate Grasshopper script to complete. A. West Elevation. Combination of line drawing and renderings. Rendering of bridge generated with VRay. Rendering of buildings generated in Maya. B. Site Plan. Line drawing generated with AutoCAD and Adobe Illustrator. Rendering of canopy generated with Vray and edited in Adobe Illustrator.

A

32


 

B

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ARCH 611: MEDIA EVENTS PROFESSOR: PHIL PARKER

The last section of the ARCH 611 course is titled Media Events and is the only portion of the course that does not require the use of a computer. The three week session involved a series of discussions that primarily focus on the architectural drawing and diagram. Because architecture can not exist without informative architectural drawings, this portion of the course is just as important as learning the techniques required to produce drawings. The way in which one represents the work produced is half of the battle. If a designer knows how to produce magnificent work but does a poor job of representing it, their efforts will go unnoticed. Along with the discussions, students are also required to produce a series of pieces that represent time in some fashion. The goal of the final product is not to be able to recognize how the work was produced. This particular series of drawings shown were produced by allowing dyed ice cubes to melt on a sheet of paper. The difference between them is the method used to dry the water that was melting. The images on the far right are line drawings that trace the patterns of the water stains. Each drying method produces a unique result.

A. Drying method: Natural ocean sponge. Corresponding line work adjacent. B. Drying method: Hair dryer Corresponding line work adjacent. C. Drying method: Tilting paper back and forth allowing water to disperse. Corresponding line work adjacent.

36


A

B

C

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ARCH 611: MEDIA FUNDAMENTALS PROFESSOR: BEN MARTINSON

Media Fundamentals is the introductory computer portion of ARCH 611: Computer I Multimedia. Many techniques are used to produce a final annotative line drawing of multiple section cuts through a light bulb. The goal of this section is introduce several computer programs that will be used throughout the duration of the graduate program at Pratt. Tools Used: Digital Camera, Photoshop, Maya, Rhino, Illustrator Execution: - Take photograph of a physical light bulb and use masks in Photoshop to hide the background. Save as TIFF file. - Bring photo into Maya’s top camera view. - With the technique of polygon or ‘box’ modeling, begin to compose the basic form of the light bulb. Sculpt the polygon shapes. This model was mostly sculpted with: - Insert Edge Loop - Extrude - Scale - Move - Combine - Once model of light bulb is complete, section cuts are taken. This is done with the use of a script titled TOI_ PolySection. Convert polygons to smooth mesh preview before beginning section cuts. - Export line work as .IGES - Open line work in Rhino and Join all curves. - Make2D and export to Illustrator for line type and line thickness editing. Three line weights and three line types must be used.

A A. Rendering of Maya light bulb model. Maya Mental Ray rendering engine used with Mia_material_x_passes . B. Overlay drawing of every section cut taken. C. Exterior bulb D. Interior bulb E. Interior wiring

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B

C

D

39


40


GENERATION 41


ARCH 612: BRIDGE OF ASPIRATION ANIMATED PROFESSOR: CHRIS KRONER

The first segment of the course is designed to act as a continuation of the first semester’s introduction to animation techniques. In order to further the students knowledge of animation in architecture, the assignment is to select an already existing bridge, dissect it into it’s functional parts and then investigate possibilities for morphological behavior. The final form of representation is a two minute long animation with audio in High Definition format. The bridge shown here is named the Bridge of Aspiration designed by Wilkinson Eyre Architects for the Royal Ballet School in London, England. Composed of twenty-three frames separated by glazing, the unusual form of the bridge is generated by rotating each of the frames by about four degrees relative to its neighbor This in turn forms a 90 degree total twist over the span of the bridge. The bridge is also skewed in plan with a slope in elevation, resulting in complex three dimensional geometry and a supporting beam of constantly varying cross-sections. Tools Used: AutoCAD, Maya, Maya Mental Ray, After Effects, Photoshop

A. Two dimensional drawing of several cross sections taken at incremental cuts, This drawing shows how the cross section is constantly changing as the frames rotate. B. Technical drawing of main cross sections and cross-cross cuts that emphasise the many parts and materials that compose the Bridge of Aspiration.

A

42


B

Aluminum Frame Wood Cladding Glazing LED Light Fixture

Floor Trim piece Wood Floor Deck Resilient Subfloor Alumiinum Spine Beam

Alumiinum Spine Beam Aluminum Frame Wood Cladding Glazing

43


Execution: - By looking at a compilation of images and drawings of the existing structure, determine the critical components that will need to be modeled. Begin by drawings sections of these components in AutoCAD and Import these sections into Maya. -Once imported, begin to form three dimensional geometry of the cross section by Offsetting, Lofting and Extruding. Parenting and Grouping is crucial. -Once the section is completely modeled and working correctly in terms of joint systems and translation, create a Motion Path (curve) that starts from the corner of that section down to where that same corner would be if the frame rotated ninety degrees across a span of twentyfour frames. Use Animation Snapshot that consists of twenty-four frames as a template. Duplicate Special the frame in each of the twenty-four positions and Attach to Motion Path each of the duplicated frames. Now that each frame is attached to the motion path, any deformer that is applied to the motion path will affect the frames as a single unit. -When setting up animation sequences, make several different files that each contain different parts of the animation. Make sure that each series of frames has it’s own labeled folder. -Using Adobe After Effect, stitch together the finished sequences. Use opacities, text and Audio to create a polished and professional animation. -To create a morphological drawing that captures the movement of the animation in a still image, select crucial image frames that show a noticeable difference in the movement of the object. In Photoshop, overlay the images on top of one another in order. Starting with the bottom image, progress the opacity of each image and experiment with the Darken and Multiply setting until the desired effect is achieved. A. Morphological drawing produced by overlaying mental ray renderings in Photoshop. Tick marks show the magnitude of the sine wave deformer running though the bridge over a period of time. B. Morphological drawing produced by overlaying mental ray renderings as well as contour renderings.

 

 

44

 

A


 

 

 

B

45


46


47


ARCH 611: APPLIED CONCEPTS PROFESSOR: CHRIS WHITELAW

Applied Concepts is the second computer portion of ARCH 611: Computer 1 Multimedia. After learning the fundamentals of Maya modeling in the first section, the exercises transition into a more intermediate level and require an understanding of curves and NURB surfaces. Through the six week duration of the course, the focus is set on creating units using patch modeling techniques and tiling them to produce a variation of screens or walls. Depending on the exercise, the screens are either uniform throughout, or show a gradient of some sort. Various rendering techniques are also explored. Tools Used: Maya, Hardware Render Buffer, Maya Software, Maya Vector Render, Maya Mental Ray Execution: Basic Techniques - Draw Curves - Loft Note: To loft between two curves, each must have the same number of control vertices. - Bridge - Birail - Extrude - Mirror Geometry

A

A. Erwin Hauer Design I screen composed of an A/B system where B is the same as A only rotated 90 degrees. Placement is derived from flipping a coin 49 times and recording the result on a 7 x 7 grid. Maya Hardware Render Buffer used with the wire frame setting. B. Honeycomb grid deformed by extrude and mirror geometry commands. Maya Mental Ray render used with car paint material applied. C. Erwin Hauer Design 3 screen. Maya Software Render used with X-Ray shader material applied.

48


B

49


Blend Screen This exercise builds on the Erwin Hauer tiling that was performed in the previous two weeks only this time, a little more creativity is required. The 7 x 7 grid remains as the starting point, but instead of being limited to an A/B system, an algorithmic system of seven numerical values between 0 and 1 will be used to create a blended field. An Erwin Hauer model of choice is used and with the application of the blendshape tool and keyframing, a blended transformation is created among a base unit and two deformed targets. Tools Used: Excel, Maya, Illustrator Execution: - In Excel, create a 7 x 7 spread sheet showing a numerical value system of 7 different values. At least 3 values must be random. - In Maya, copy the original unit twice and deform each in some way. Note: in order to blendshape correctly the base and targets must have the same number of faces. No geometry can be added or subtracted. - Select the blenshape tool under the create deformers menu. Select the targets first and then the base. A blendshape is now created. It is found in the channel box and the attribute editor of the base unit. - Now to match the blendshape with the table values, input the desired value in the target line in the channel box. Right click and select key selected. - Copy the base and repeat the previous step 6 more times until all values are represented. Make the screen based on the table of values.

A. Graphical representation of each numerical value and its respected unit variation. B. Blended screen. Maya Vector Render used. Edited in Illustrator.

A 0.00

50

0.13

0.25

0.50

0.75

0.88

1.00


B

51


Unique Unit The final exercise of Applied Concept is to create a unit that requires techniques learned throughout the six week session. Each week is built on top of the last and this final project applies most if not all of what is learned. The final product includes: - Unique unit (Maya model) - Field of unique units with blendshape (Maya model) - Animation of blendshape in motion - 3D Print of unique unit Tools Used: Maya, Maya Mental Ray, Photoshop, Quicktime, Rhino, Z Print Execution: Animation - Create unit in Maya with patch modeling techniques - Copy unit and deform. Create blendshape. - Apply an attractor to base unit so that the blendshape can be controlled by the distance the attractor is from the unit. - Duplicate special the unit with the attractor until a field condition is achieved. - Create NURBS plane as big as the field. Duplicate plane and deform. Blendshape the two planes. - Create a lattice around units. Select polygons only. - Wrap lattice to base plane (select lattice first). - Move the slider of base plane blendshape to see the entire field of units deform. -Create animation by keyframing in Maya - Render image sequence with Mental Ray rendering engine (550 frames). Save as TIFF files. - Open frames in Photoshop as an image sequence. Add name if desired. Export as .MOV. - Open .MOV file in Quicktime and enjoy. 3D Print - Export Maya model as .OBJ - Open in Rhino and scale down to desired size (must fit in 8x10x8 cube) - OffsetMesh to create a shell. This particular model did not require one. It is solid throughout. - Export as .STL file. The model is now ready to send to the print lab.

A. Individual unit. Mental Ray rendering used with car paint material. B. Animation sequence

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Design Log  

A compilation of projects from the first year in the graduate program at Pratt Institute. Project descriptions and execution techniqhes incl...

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