Page 46

for everyone—start in a small town and make your mistakes there.” Then, Doll worked in Lethbridge for eight months as a producer, anchor and reporter before moving on to ITV Edmonton (now Global News) where she anchored the weekend broadcast and did live reporting two days a week. Next, she worked for CFRN in Edmonton for three years as the Medical Watch reporter and noon news anchor. When she got offered the five o’clock news desk at CFRN in Calgary, she took it. But, just one year, one month and one day later she was offered the six o’clock news desk with Daryl McIntyre at CTV Edmonton (formerly CFRN), and so she moved north again. From the beginning, Doll had a clear career goal in mind—she wanted to work on a morning show in New York City. “I loved the combination of hard news and interviewing in a morning show. I loved the anchoring positions I had been doing, but interviewing people was my first love,” said Doll. When she got a call from Global News Toronto a year after rejoining CTV Edmonton, it seemed her career was about to make another move in the right direction—except for one thing. “I had met my husband, Stephen Petasky, six weeks earlier. I already knew I would marry him, so that complicated things,” said Doll. 46

Fortunately, CTV Edmonton stepped in and made it worthwhile for Doll to stay. Eighteen months later, in 2005, she and Stephen were married.

Love the Hustle Life as an anchor on the six o’clock news was a more-than-full-time job. It consumed nearly every waking hour. Doll was on the go and plugged in from the moment she woke up at 6am until she got home at 8pm. However, she loved every moment of it. “I got paid for a hobby for twenty years. The paycheque was a bonus,” said Doll. In addition to her time on camera at noon and at six, Doll’s job entailed combing through the day’s stories with McIntyre and the news team to determine what they would cover and how, writing and rewriting stories so they would sound natural in her own voice, filming updates and always being aware of what was happening in the news. She and the team often worked through as many as 55 stories in a few hours. “The day was really busy and full of deadlines. Daryl and I would often debate about what would lead the news and how to cover it. I leaned toward medical news, and he leaned toward political. We always had respect for each other’s ideas,” said Doll.

M OVE U P M AY- A U G U S T 2 0 1 8 | www.moveupmag.com

Family Matters As much as Doll loved her job, after her son Kasha (now 11) and daughter Allegra (now 7) came along, Doll found her priorities shifting. “That hour from six to seven was so special to me, but the hours were long and demanding, and you could never turn it off. I would leave at 7:30 at night, but I was still getting emails and Twitter comments on my hair and wardrobe. I was never present with my children,” said Doll. Four years ago, she stepped away from the news desk to allow her more time with her family as well as to start a consulting and public speaking business under her own brand. She still gets to do work she loves, but now she gets to hang out with her kids after school too. “I work out in the mornings, then I make them breakfast and drive them to school. Then, I go into the office and start the workday. I base my meetings around their schedule. I’m at home when they walk through the door. Leaving the news was the hardest and best decision I’ve ever made,” said Doll. Despite her illustrious career as a journalist and entrepreneur, which also includes her supporting role as Vice-President of her husband’s international company, the Luxus Group, Doll claims motherhood as the accomplishment she is most proud of. “I didn’t consider myself a natural mom. I didn’t want children until Stephen came into my life and

helped me change my thinking. Nothing matches the love and sense of accomplishment I get from being a mother,” said Doll. Wherever she has lived, Doll has tried to recreate the same generous and supportive environment she knew as a child. She currently works with organizations such as the John Cameron Changing Lives Foundation, Glenrose Hospital Courage Gala and Stollery Women’s Network. “I have always believed in giving back through charity work. Life is richer the more time you give away,” said Doll. Thanks to her dedication and philanthropy, she was honoured as Edmonton’s Woman of the Year in 2002 and was recognized as one of the top 100 Albertans at the Alberta Centennial celebrations in 2005. Carrie Doll is the first to credit her small-town roots with helping her have the kind of influence and career she currently enjoys. “I can’t put a value on the upbringing and support I received,” said Doll. “Dream the dream. Don’t be afraid to fail—be afraid not to try.”

Profile for VAULTmedia

Move Up Magazine Issue 18  

In this issue: 6 Celebrity Spotlights: Peace Region in the Public Eye, The Legacy Project, It Takes A Village, GO: Mighty Peace, and more ~...

Move Up Magazine Issue 18  

In this issue: 6 Celebrity Spotlights: Peace Region in the Public Eye, The Legacy Project, It Takes A Village, GO: Mighty Peace, and more ~...

Advertisement