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JENA TERESA HAMMOND portfolio of selected works


STUDIO PROJECTS

01 | BIODIVERSITY PAVILION 02 | SHIFTED HOME 03 | MORGAN’S POINT CEMETERY CHAPEL 04 | HOCHWILDEHAUS

PERSONAL PROJECTS BUILT WORK

05 | MISCELLANEOUS PROJECTS 06 | HOLLY GARDENS MOBILE TOOL SHED 07 | ONE WALL MOVED

JENA TERESA HAMMOND


01 | BIODIVERSITY PAVILION site MARIN HEADLANDS, CA instructor RENE DAVIDS year 2007

This pavilion is designed to be placed in the Marin Headlands in Northern California. The Marin Headlands is home to the existing Marine Mammal Center and a diversity of marine wildlife and plant life. This project is designed for a combination of the two, to allow visitors to experience these features of the Headlands close-up. The structure appears to emerge from the ground and disappear into an on-site lake. A punctured canvas fabric is stretched and folded over a steel frame. The punctured canvas allows dappled light to penetrate the space. The light and shadows created mimic the atmosphere of walking through a forest. The paths diverge around a small pool that houses two swimming seals. Visitors are able to view and interact with the seals above the water level as well as below, seeing them at eye-level.


Sections


Circulation Diagram


02 | SHIFTED HOME site program instructor year

2510 DEVONSHIRE DR, AUSTIN, TX HABITAT FOR HUMANITY COMPETITION VINCENT SNYDER 2012 This project design is centered around a shift. The design process involved taking a regular form - the rectangular prism - carving a sloped roof to match contextual building typology, and then shifting the volume along the ridge axis. The two volumes created are then adhered together using a 3-foot thick wall element. Originally, the wall was intended to separate program - the two smaller bedrooms, with their shared, guest bath separated from the main living space and the master suite. As the project developed, however, the wall became more embedded into the spaces. Each of the main spaces cling onto the wall by carving their own nook into it. The kitchen is completely contained within the wall, which anchors the dining and living spaces to it. In two of the bedrooms, the nook acts as a cavity for the bed to sit. This cavity could change purpose, however, and host a writing desk, vanity, shelves or be enclosed to contain a closet. In the master bathroom, the bathtub also sits within the wall to frame this element.

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There are two main openings in the wall. One, modest opening to the west bedroom wing and a larger opening to the outdoor deck. This larger opening allows the covered deck to perform as valuable outdoor living space, allowing the living room to expand. The wall is tucked 3-feet under the roof, and a 6-inch wall is erected, sheeted in polycarbonate. This polycarbonate clerestory allows light from outdoors and adjacent spaces to fill the rooms and highlight the wall. The top of the wall is also inset 6 inches, to hide uplighting that would wash the ceiling in light, as well as reflect off of the polycarbonate at night.

W/D

The chosen site also allows for the master suite to sink several feet below the level of the rest of the house. This creates higher ceilings, a more pronounced framed wall, as well as a threshold between the master suite and the main living space. This also allows for customization based on site. The master suite could remain level on a flat site, or be lowered to respond to topographical changes.

Plan

3/32� = 1’


Building Section

1/8” = 1’


03 | MORGAN’S POINT site MORGAN’S POINT CEMETERY, HOUSTON, TX program CEMETERY CHAPEL & PORT OFFICE partner LAURA EDWARDS instructor FRANCISCO GOMES year 2013 Surrounded by the Port of Houston on all sides, this small, historic cemetery fights to maintain its borders. Prompted by the violent cuts the port has enacted on this small town, the design of the cemetery chapel seeks to bring solace to the cemetery visitors as well as make a definitive statement against the port. The port’s new office building takes the brunt of the force the chapel has placed on it and allows itself to be cut in return. These two buildings co-exist, and where the cut has taken place, new open, green space appears. Though, each one is only able to experience it from a distance.


PORT OF HOUSTON, TEXAS

POST PANAMAX LIMINAL


A1.02 PLAN Scale 1/8" = 1'-0"

PORT OF HOUSTON, TEXAS

POST PANAMAX LIMINAL PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK STUDENT PRODUCT

Plan


PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK STUDENT PRODUCT

Section


04 | HOCHWILDEHAUS site HOCHWILDEHAUS, AUSTRIAN ALPS program NET-ZERO ENERGY HUT FOR ALPINE HIKERS instructor PETRA LIEDL year 2013

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK STUDENT PRODUCT

The German Alpine Association charged us to design an energy efficient Alpine Hut to provide sleeping quarters and meals for 25 hikers. Snugly situated in the Austrian Alps, near the Italian border, this hut will take the place of the original Hochwildehaus built in the 1920s. The stone from the existing hut will be harvested upon demolition to provide the foundation and energy storage for the new hut.

PRODUCED BY AN AUT

NT PRODUCT

The proposed hut is organized around this thick stone wall which run the length of the building. Its first purpose is to store the thermal energy converted from solar radiation collected on the expansive Southwest facing roof. As the wall heats up throughout the day, it will retain the thermal energy and continue releasing heat into the spaces throughout the night.

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AN AUTODESK STUDENT PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODES


The secondary purpose of the thick stone wall is to organize circulation. All of the rooms and spaces are accessed from this dark, rich corridor. The wall is insulated on the corridor side, so that the transition space remains cool, providing a variation in temperature. The entrance to the hut is in the center of the façade, with the host’s quarters and kitchen on the western wing, and the guests living and modest bedrooms to the east. This separation allows the host to close off electricity to the guest wing when all rooms are vacant.

PRODUCED BY AN AUT

NT PRODUCT

The hut is designed to be prefabricated of laminated wood, clad in thermally modified ash which is a plentiful local wood. The richness of the wood, juxtaposed with the roughness of the stone serves as a retreat for the senses from the overwhelming nature of hiking in the Alps.

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PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK STUDENT PRODUCT

PR

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05 | MISCELLANEOUS PROJECTS HEADBOARD FROM RECLAIMED WOOD AND STEEL


3D PRINTED VASE FROM RHINO & REVIT


Rome, Italy

Forbidden City, BeiJing, China


Holly Gardens 06 | HOLLY GARDENS MOBILE TOOL SHED

A Public Interest Design Initiative

¡Involucrarse! / Get involved!

Contáctenos a / Contact us at

site HOLLY NEIGHBORHOOD, AUSTIN, TX team ELIZABETH DeREGT, LAURA EDWARDS, EDEN LEW & NATALIE RAMIREZ instructor FRANCISCO GOMES & STEVEN MOORE year 2012

HollyNeighborhood.PID@gmail.com 916.432.0531

Part of the Public Interest Design summer program, this mobile garden shed was designed and built for the Holly Neighborhood in East Austin to support the mission of the Holly Neighbors Helping Neighbors group. The mobile garden shed contains tools, seeds, starter plants, planting guides and educational material as well as a contact list for resources. The idea is that the trailer will move around the neighborhood to support the start or maintenance of gardens.

The Holly Gardens program allows residents to plant and maintain new floral and vegetable gardens. By providing a mobile tool shed and a network of neighborhood volunteers, the program allows community members to help one another create new gardens around the community.

Contact us at HollyNeighborhood.PID@gmail.com 916.432.0531

The ultimate purpose of this project is not to have a beautiful tool shed, get positive feedback from community members, or have people thinking that we are doing good in the neighborhood. The ultimate purpose is to connect neighbors, to bring people out of their homes, and into each other’s lives. It is not the trailer that will directly affect this change, but it will help facilitate activities upon which relationships, connections, and networks may be built. That is my hope for the mobile tool shed, and some day I hope that the trailer becomes a symbol of this network. new garden planters

agave pups to be given new homes


SCALE: 1/4” = 1’ construction documents

model and presentation at the Veterans Parade

scale: 1/4” = 1’

construction documents


07 | ONE WALL MOVED site SOUTH TEXAS BOTANICAL GARDENS & NATURE CENTER team ELIZABETH DeREGT, LAURA EDWARDS, WILSON HACK, JON HANDZO, JACLYN HENSY, JESSICA PAINTER, MOLLY PURNELL, DAVID SCHNEIDER, GREG STREET & TRISTAN WALKER instructor COLEMAN COKER year 2012 At the outer edge of the South Texas Botanical Gardens, an architectural intervention attempts to connect the environmental conditions of this harsh landscape: creek, wetland, marsh, and meadow. The project continues the language of a series of wayfinders that exist on the site, leading the patron from the main facilities to this untamed edge. The intervention is a simple move in the landscape; it is comprised of the wayfinding wall, a walking platform, stadium seats and steps, a second wayfinding wall in the marsh, and a viewing bench. The steps are marked by the water levels in the wetland as rain and flooding pass water through the area. To reach the second wall and the bench, the patron must pass through the wetland. After this journey the patron is rewarded with bucolic views to the creek and a prime spot to watch the seasonal bird flights above.


- N Section 4” = 1’

North - South Section

3/16” = 1’


MEADOW

WALKING PATH

CLEARING

WETLAND

OUTDOOR ROOM

OSO CREEK

S - N Site Section 3/16” = 1’

Long Section

1/32” = 1’



Jena Hammond portfolio