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JENA Biondolilo

LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE PORTFOLIO


Jena Biondolilo 3724 E. Nichols Avenue Centennial, CO 80122 jenarb@ksu.edu

Kansas State University


Analyzing the Benefits of Reducing Parking Kansas City Riverfront Arapahoe Square Revitalization Professional Experience Free Hand Drawing

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analyzing the benefits of reducing parking


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analyzing public transit...

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Land Use

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Churches

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Climate change and declining ecological health of urban environments are global issues of growing concern. For my Master’s report I looked at how these issues can be mitigated through improving public transportation and decreasing parking. Manhattan, Kansas was used to illustrate how improvements to public transportation can reduce parking demand and how excess parking can be transformed into green space to improve the ecological health of the city. First, Manhattan’s existing bus system was analyzed using ArcGIS. The quarter mile radius around each bus stop represents walking distance. Layering the bus stop buffers with land use and points of interest revealed holes in the existing transit system. There are several residential areas and a few commercial areas and points of interest that are lacking access to the bus system.

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C-6Stops Proposed I-3 Route Proposed

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Miles Miles 2 2

KSU Campus R-S C-2 C-3

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KSU Campus

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Bus Stop Bus Route

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Land Use Commercial Industrial Residential KSU Campus C-2 C-3 C-4 C-5 C-6 I-3 I-4 I-5 LM-SC R R-1 R-2 R-3 R-4 R-5 R-M R-S


Current Student Service

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Bus Stop Bus Route City Boundary Campus

Need for Access to Campus Low Need

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Campus parking demand exceeds supply by approximately 2,500 spots. It is important to increase student ridership to reduce demand for parking on campus. ArcGIS was used to determine which areas are lacking access to campus. Factors included in the analysis were rented units per square mile, median age, bus stop buffers and a campus buffer.

Improved Student Service

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Proposed Stop

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Bus Stop Bus Route Proposed Route City Boundary Campus

access to campus

Proposed improvements to transit include one new route, eleven additional bus stops, and increased fixed cost options. The improved transit plan fills in holes in the existing system and provides better service to students. It is estimated that the proposed changes would double the ridership of Manhattan’s bus system.

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building Roads Suitability Low Suitablility

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Highland Ridge

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Village Plaza Farmers’ Market building building

Roads Suitability

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Parking Analysis 1

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To determine which parking areas should be Suitability converted Miles High 2 to green space, a suitability analysis was done using ArcGIS. Factors used were parking use, proximity to bus stops, lot size, flood zones and drainage points.


Farmers’ Market Lots The proposed design has eight times more green space than the existing site. It includes two bioswales to collect runoff from the site and 29 additional trees to provide shade to vendors and users of the farmers’ market. Ray’s Apple Mart

small businesses

bioswale

It is estimated that with improved public transit and parking planning, at least 30% and up to 40% of Manhattan’s parking could be eliminated.Converting excess parking into green space would reduce stormwater runoff, decrease local air tempertures, and mitigate carbon and other air pollutants.

bioswale

tree planter

runnel Lin

ear

Tra il

Linear Trail entrance detention basin

vacant spaces

Four sites were chosen to redesign in detail to show how converting approximately 30% of a parking lot to green space can have significant ecological benefits. The sites were chosen based on the suitability map made in ArcGIS and other factors. The site shown here is the farmers’ market parking lot located in down town Manhattan, Kansas.

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rethinking parking design...

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calculating ecologic benefits... Permeable Surfaces

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Parking Spots

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Annual Runoff

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Number of Trees

Existing Site The existing site contains hardly any green space or trees.

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Permeable Surfaces

30%

Parking Spots

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Annual Runoff

0.5 ac-ft

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Number of Trees

30 Proposed Site The proposed design significantly increases green space and tree cover.

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The bioswales on site can hold half of the total runoff volume for a one year, one hour storm. During larger storm events, excess runoff will overflow into the existing storm drain at the southwest corner of the site. The additional 29 trees will store 5-7 tons of carbon annually (Nowak and Crane 2002). This is equal to savings of approximately $130 (Nowak 2004). It is estimated that the increased tree density will lead to a reduction in local average maximum air temperatures by nearly 4째C. This could lead to A/C energy savings of almost $3000 over the lifespan of the trees (Akbari 2002). The estimated smog saving of planting 29 additional trees is estimated to be nearly $4500 (Akbari 2002).

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kansas city riverfront


graphic courtesy of Dan Strandell

Bus route

GDAP short term plan

Rail lines

Live

GDAP long term plan

Missouri river

Work

MetroGreen proposal

Major barrier

Play

MetroGreen built plan

Disconnect

Low activity/ investment

Park/ open space

Roads

Neutral areas

Activity center

Moderate activity/ investment

Major pedestrian barrier

High activity/ investment

Separate Live, Work and Play

Lack of Pedestrian Connections

GIS data and information gathered on site was used to study the disconnect between live, work, and play.

Several large freeways cut through downtown, dividing the city and decreasing pedestrian accessibility.

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Disconnect between Downtown and the Riverfront The rail lines separate the riverfront from downtown.


innovative solutions to urban dilemmas... Guiding Strategy Cap the rail lines to increase access to the riverfront

Rail lines Missouri river Capped area graphic courtesy of Dan Strandell

Train Tunnels

Framework Plan Mixed use development and green corridors atop the capping

Rail lines Missouri river Green space Pedestrian circulation Commercial Residential graphic courtesy of Dan Strandell

Mixed use

The Kansas City Riverfront was a two month project during the summer of 2011. The first month focused on site analysis at the city wide scale and the development of a series of analysis maps. For the second month of the project I joined two students to reinvision the Kansas City Riverfront. The main dilemma identified is the disconnect between the riverfront and downtown Kansas City due to several rail lines cutting through the site. To improve connectivity and bring revenue to the site, we proposed to cap the rail lines and develop a mixed use corridor on top of them. One of the main features of the design is a wide pedestrian promenade along the river that is lined with shops and restaurants to the south and steps down to a riverfront park to the north.

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Pedestrian Promenade Adobe Photoshop


arapahoe square revitalization


working as a team from conceptual ideas to detailed planning...

Conceptual Framework

Preliminary Land Use

Detailed Land Use

Broadway remains as the main thoroughfare through the site while 21st Street becomes a festival street. The area surrounding the intersection of these main streets becomes a cluster of open community spaces.

The proposed land use blends the high density, central business district to the west with the low density residential to the east.

The preliminary land use plan continued to be developed and refined all the way down to the parcel scale.

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Master Plan The master plan for Arapahoe Square strives to save as many existing buildings as possible while increasing usable public space.

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A Low income housing B Row homes

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C Multi-family housing D Sculpture garden E Festival street F

Mixed use building

G Large activity park H Synapse Park (focus area) I

Economic assistance center

J Office building K Library

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M Urban big box K Parking garage

Arapahoe Square Revitalization was a semester long urban design project located in downtown Denver, Colorado. During my third year I worked with a multidisciplinary group of students to complete the master plan, detailed land use, and street typologies. I then chose a specific site to design in detail. My specific site, Synapse Park, is a triangular park adjacent to a library and community center.

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exploring design process...

Concept

Sketching

Modeling

I developed a sketch to help define the design of the site both spatially and conceptually.

I created a series of small plans and elevations to work through the site design.

I also created a series of study models to help develope the topography on site.

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Synapse Park The park includes sculptural elements such a metal trees and oversized books that can be used for seating.

Outdoor Table These tables are located on the patio at the entrance to the community center.

The concept for Synapse Park came from a study of the site’s potential users. The park will attract many different types of people that come from a variety of families, backgrounds, and levels of education. I chose to focus my design around the idea of ‘imagination,’ something that everyone has. I delineated three nodes within my park and an organic ribbon representing a stream of imaginative thought that intersects each node. Several sculptural elements were also included in the design to inspire imagination.

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Carolina Reserve I worked on this project throughout the summer and gained experience with different stages of a project.


design development to construction documentation... Wall Detail This detail of a unique decorative wall was done in AutoCad Civil 3D.

In the summer of 2012 I had the opportunity to intern at Merrick & Company in Charlotte, North Caroline for nine weeks. During my internship, I worked on a variety of tasks for several different projects including planting plans, construction documents, and renderings. I learned to work through the different stages of projects and became comfortable communicating in a professional environment. This internship provided me with the skills and knowledge to be successfull in full time posistion at a professional firm.

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free hand drawing


sketches from china...

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water colors from italy...

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Thank you!


JENA Biondolilo EDUCATION

Master of Landscape Architecture Kansas State University May 2013

College of Architecture, Planning, and Design

International Studies

Centro Studi, Italy January - May 2012 Ancient to Avant Garde, China June 2011

SKILLS

Software

AutoCAD Civil 3D, Adobe Photoshop, Adobe Illustrator, Adobe InDesign, ArcGIS, SketchUp

Hand Graphics

Graphite and ink sketching, marker, colored pencil, watercolor, oil and acrylic paint

PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE

Landscape Architecture Intern Merrick & Company June - August 2012

Duties: construction documentation, planting design, digital rendering, participated in meetings and site visits

Design Coordinator

Centennial Property Maintenance May - August 2010 Duties: met with clients, designed small scale residential landscapes, oversaw construction

AWARDS & LEADERSHIP

ASLA Central States Student Merit Award 2012

Analysis and Planning category for City Ecologies (collective work from an urban planning studio)

Ambassador and Mentor Program 2009 - Present

College of Architecture, Planning, and Design, Kansas State University

Design Days team leader 2011, 2012

Landscape Architecture, Regional and Community Planning department


Jena Biondolilo 3725 E. Nichols Avenue Centennial, CO 80122 jenarb@ksu.edu

Kansas State University


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