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plus » Easy XML, Part 2 » Funky Master Pages, Side 2 » Reviews: Big Picture & Sudoku » Include page position in object styles (yes you can!)

Guide The Eye Communicate more clearly with good visual hierarchy contents

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MAGAZINE

From the Editor

Editorial Editor in Chief Terri Stone, tstone@indesignmag.com Editorial Director David Blatner, david@indesignmag.com Senior Editor Sandee Cohen, sandee@indesignmag.com Contributing Writers Pariah S. Burke, Scott Citron, Jeff Gamet, Bob Levine, Jim Maivald, Jay Nelson, Russell Viers De s i g n & Te c h n o l o g y Design Rufus Deuchler, www.deuchler.net Jennifer Steele, Steele Design Business Director of Advertising & Marketing Jeff Lalier Contact Information www.indesignmag.com/contact.php Subscription Information www.indesignmag.com/purchase.php Published by CreativePro.com, a division of PrintingForLess. com. Copyright ©2008 CreativePro.com. All rights reserved. Reproduction and redistribution prohibited without approval. For more information, contact permissions@indesignmag.com. InDesign Magazine is not endorsed or sponsored by Adobe Systems Incorporated, publisher of InDesign. InDesign is a registered trademark of Adobe Systems Incorporated. All other products and services are trademarks or registered trademarks of their respective owners and are hereby acknowledged. Images: Front cover and page 6–16, copyright Joachim Angeltun. Page 18–23 copyright Holger Gogolin. Both provided by iStockphoto.com.

Tools do matter. If you don’t believe me, try pounding in a nail with a Coke bottle. InDesign is a tool that’s uniquely well-suited for the job of laying out pages, but it’s a little more complicated than a hammer. That’s why we devote most of our pages to helping you uncover the strengths (and work around the occasional weakness) of this tool. However, in this issue, our cover feature leaves software behind. Instead, Scott Citron delves into pure design. The visual hierarchy principles he writes about are as applicable to the neophyte as they are to a long-time artist revisiting the basics. He explains in words and images how balance, rhythm, proportion, dominance, and unity can create a successful design that communicates its message and looks good doing it. Scott follows up that explanation with details on using type and graphics to achieve clear visual hierarchy. It’s timeless information I think you’ll return to whenever you need a reminder of what works. The next two articles in this issue are more traditionally software-focused. Fittingly, they both come with sample files so you can follow along and learn by doing, if you feel like it.

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In part 2 of Jim Maivald’s series on XML, you’ll end the multilanguage workbook project he began in the April/May issue. Then comes David Blatner’s step-by-step tutorial on applying page geometry to object styles. While that may not sound like a party, you’ll want to thank him after you realize how often you’ll use his clever trick. Pariah Burke transforms into DJ Pariah with the InFunk All-Stars to spin up part 2 of his series on mastering master pages. Yes, it’s fun and informative, but I must warn you: Heavy iTunes purchases may be a side effect of reading this InTime column. Speaking of addictions, Bob Levine reviews a Sudoku generator and even sprinkles a few of those brain teasers among his pros and cons. Because this is a PDF, you can fill out the puzzle in Acrobat or go oldschool and print out those pages. If your work involves lots of images, check out Jay Nelson’s BigPicture review. Reliable stalwarts Sandee Cohen (of InQuestion fame) and Jeff Gamet anchor the rest of the issue with valuable advice and heads ups on the newest products in our world. To me, we’ve achieved a very happy mix of design and InDesign. I hope you agree.— Terri Stone

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Table of Contents

The first comprehensive guide to Adobe InDesign that focuses exclusively on the art of template design and production.

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6 Guide the Eye with Visual Hierarchy Scott Citron helps you improve your design with smart use of visual hierarchy.

18 XML Part 2 In part 2 of this series, Jim Maivald shows you how to complete an XML workflow circle. Follow along with the downloadable sample files!

Discover how to translate your great ideas into industrial-strength templates!

25 InStep: Remember Page Position with Object Styles After reading David Blatner’s tutorial, you’ll apply a slew of object styles to your page with one click . Sample files included. 30 InTime: Master Pages, Side 2 Pariah S. Burke knows master pages. After reading this, so will you. It’s super bad! 34 InQuestion Sandee Cohen has the answers to your questions.

Instant InDesignÂŽ Designing templates for fast and efficient page layout (BCSJFM1PXFMM *4#/tQQ

38 InReview: Lightning Brain Sudoku Generator Puzzle master Bob Levine rates free and commercial versions of the puzzle creator.

Save 35% on Instant InDesign at

41 InReview: Badia BigPicture Jay Nelson says this one-trick pony is well worth the cost.

www.adobepress.com. Simply enter coupon code PPT-PBM-1157 at checkout.

45 InBrief: Quick Takes on Helpful Products Jeff Gamet lets you in on new and improved products.

InstantInDesign.com

50 Cartoon Russell Viers and David Blatner ponder plaid.

Check out the NEW companion web site and video podcast!

52 News 53 Calendar and InDesign User Groups 56 InDex Looking for a certain article in earlier issues? Start here!

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by Scott Citron

The

Importance of Visual

Hierarchy

Understanding the language of design is fundamental to being a better designer.

P

icture reading a book or newspaper where all the text is the same size and style. Or browsing a Web site without headers, footers, or body text. How about going to a movie where the camera never moves and the actors maintain the same distance from the lens? An orchestra of only tubas playing the same three notes? If the above scenarios leave you cold, you can appreciate how important visual hierarchy is to

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successful design. Visual hierarchy is a system of organizing objects on a page or screen in a way that communicates the importance of objects in relation to neighboring objects. Although this concept is easy to grasp in theory, many a designer or artist is flummoxed when it comes to effectively using the tools of visual hierarchy. Fortunately, understanding visual hierarchy is easier than you might think, since most of its conventions are already familiar.

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The Elements of Visual Hierarchy In my book, Professional Design Techniques with Adobe Creative Suite 3 (Adobe Press, 2008), I begin by encouraging designers to think like musicians. This means that to get the most from your work, it’s important to understand the harmony of balance, the rhythm of shape, the staccato of tension, and the grace notes of type. By combining balance, rhythm, proportion, dominance, and unity, you organize information into meaningful hierarchies that inform the viewer about the importance of page items. To better understand these concepts, let’s begin by looking at some simple examples.

Figure 1

Balance. Although each is a square, the square in Figure 1 is at rest, while the square in Figure 2 displays tension. But although Figure 1 appears more balanced, is it more graphically interesting?

Figure 2

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Figure 3

Figure 5

Figure 6

Figure 4

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Proportion. Proportion is the visual relationship between objects. Like balance and rhythm, proportion is a fundamental component of visual hierarchy because of its role in telling the viewer what’s important and what’s not. In simplistic terms, things that are big are important, while things that are small are not. In Figure 5, the word “Quiz” is very large, emphasizing the nature of the book. But what about Figure 6? For this cover, I set “Rex Stout”, the author’s name, larger and more prominently than the book’s title. Does this mean the author is more important than the title? Perhaps, but not necessarily. Here we see that the “bigger is more important than smaller” concept doesn’t always apply. In fact, sometimes by making an object smaller, objects gain hierarchical importance, as in Figure 7.

Figure 7

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Rhythm. When we say that a photo or painting has rhythm, typically we’re talking about the way in which the eye flows from one area of the image to another. Rhythm can be smooth or bumpy. In Figure 3, a cover for Ben Pleasants’ play “The Hemingway/Dos Passos Wars,” I established rhythm at the upper left and led the eye downward to the author’s name at the bottom. Helping define the rhythm is the cover’s three-color palette (black, white, red) and the placement of the horizon line in the lower third of the composition. In Figure 4, I experimented with the original design by expanding the color palette and removing the foreground or horizon. Although the design is still pleasing, the simple rhythm of the original, which helped underscore the book’s theme, is now more complex and overwhelms the artwork.

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Figure 8

Figure 10

Figure 9

Unity. The law of unity says that like objects attract and unlike objects repel. Good design often uses unity to establish visual hierarchy. In Figure 10, a jacket I did for a book titled American Homes, I created unity by repeating seven rows of small drawings found inside the book. By grouping the tiny thumbnails together, the illustrations form a unified message that conveys what the book is about. In Figure 11, my cover design for the first issue of InDesign Magazine, the T-square, triangle, and pencil form a unity of style based on their origin as old etchings.

Figure 11

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Dominance. Dominant objects are usually bigger or brighter. They also tend to be front-most in a composition. Figure 8 is an example of conventional design dominance. Here the word “Lotus,” red and larger than any other type on the page, and the red tinted lotus flower dominate against a black background. But as with proportion, you can also achieve a kind of reverse dominance by using a larger object (“Red Wine”) to emphasize a smaller and more important object (“white carpet”), as in Figure 9.

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Understanding the Tools of Visual Hierarchy In general, designers must choose from two groups of tools to create visual hierarchy: type and graphics. Within these groups, variety abounds, so let’s look at some of the choices. Typographic hierarchy. Upper case. Lower case. 72 point. 12 point. Impact Bold. Nuptial Script. Get the point? Simplistic as this sounds, much about using type to create visual hierarchy is a no-brainer: for instance, headlines are big, captions are small. Yet beyond the obvious, how do we as designers know when to use what? With thousands of available fonts and lots of ways to use them, working with type brings many otherwise sturdy designers to their knees. Recently I volunteered to redesign the newsletter for my neighborhood block association. Figure 12 shows a typical issue. To be fair, the original designer was the newsletter’s editor, doing her best to produce a monthly document in Microsoft Word. Notice how the text is mostly set in 12 point Times Roman Bold, stretching across the page in one wide, hard to read, column. Clearly, such a layout is anything but clear. Figure 13 shows my InDesign re-interpretation of the newsletter. The editor wouldn’t allow me to turn the original design upside down completely (as I’d wanted to do), but at least now the information is clear and easy to find, thanks in part to variations in typefaces and weights within each face.

Figure 12

Figure 13

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Figure 14

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But what about less conventional designs, where levels of importance don’t necessarily reveal themselves so obviously? Timothy Samara, in his excellent book, Design Elements: A Graphic Style Manual (Rockport Publishers, 2007) shows how there are a number of ways to indicate the relative importance of information when working with type. Figure 14, which I’ve adapted from an example in Samara’s book, shows nine design variations. In each variation, the most important line or word is signaled by changes in size, weight, alignment, rhythm, and other attributes.

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Figure 15

Figure 15a

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Sometimes design objects, whether typographic or otherwise, command the most attention by where they’re not on the page. In Figure 15, notice where I placed the beginning of the body text. Typically, you’d expect to start reading in the upper left, but here I purposely put the story down and to the lower right. I used the photo illustration of the cherry blossoms to reinforce the fact that this is the spring edition of NuZeen. Doing double duty, the illustration carries your eye rhythmically from left to right across the page to the story’s opening paragraph (Figure 15a). To further punctuate the beginning of the article, I used an orange Futura drop cap to act like a road sign, directing readers where to begin. If you’re thinking, “Aren’t readers smart enough to know where to look?” you might be missing the point. Yes, it’s not too hard to figure out what’s a headline, what’s a subhead, what’s the body text, and what’s a caption, but readers shouldn’t have to think—even for a moment—about where to look or what comes next. Reading, like watching a movie, is an act of faith. Psychologists will tell you that a key ingredient of a good book, story, or movie is that it take control of the experience from the first frame, image, word, or paragraph and transport its audience methodically to the end. In case you question the importance of a clear visual hierarchy, check out Steve Krug’s bestselling book on the subject, Don’t Make Me Think (New Riders, 2005). While it’s focused on the Web, the visual hierarchy advice crosses media.

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Take a look at Figures 16 and 17. In Figure 16, I dumped raw, unformatted text from H.G. Wells’ The War of the Worlds onto a page. Can you imagine reading a book like this? Figure 17 shows the text after I organized it into a simple system of book number, book title, chapter number, and chapter title, followed by the story itself, which identifies its beginning with a four line drop cap. To help signal the beginning of subsequent paragraphs, I used a 1 pica first line indent. Although the content is the same, which version would you rather read? Figure 17

Figure 16

Figure 18

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Graphic hierarchy. When I talk about the hierarchy of graphics, I’m talking about photographs, borders, logos, backgrounds, and other items besides type. (Type can, of course, be a graphic element on its own, but for the sake of this article, I’ll keep them separate.) Figure 18 shows a series of ten frames from one of the classic scenes in The Godfather, directed by Francis Ford Coppolla. Through a carefully orchestrated series of images, Coppolla builds the terrifying montage, masterfully juxtaposing the innocent baptism of his newborn son, Anthony, against the brutal murder of Vegas mobster Mo Green. Coppolla uses a clear and concise vocabulary of wide, medium, and close-up shots to communicate hierarchy in this chilling sequence.

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N o ac w s t u hi s pp fo in ra g : de m o Co

nt

CtrlBridge

Transform your Creative Suite into a workflow system CtrlBridge

It is all there. Bridge (formerly known as the File browser in Photoshop) and Version Cue Server. It comes with your Creative Suite, complimentary, just too few are aware of the fact. And why it is there.

Figure 19

Now we added the missing piece, CtrlBridge. CtrlBridge is a set of plug-ins for your Bridge and Version Cue applications which transforms your platform to a powerful, role based, and task driven workow system.

Figure 20

One word that describes the hierarchy of the scene from The Godfather is contrast. By use of contrast, we can communicate what’s important and what’s not. In simplistic terms, dark-colored objects are heavy, and therefore important. Light-colored objects are light, and less important. Figure 19 demonstrates this principal. Notice that although the two circles are the same size, the black circle dominates the yellow circle. Size, which is a form of contrast, can also determine hierarchy. Figure 20 has the same black and yellow circles. This time, though, the yellow circle is much larger than the black circle. By virtue of its size, the yellow circle is more important than the black circle.

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Figure 21

Figure 23

Figure 22

Position is another way graphics gain importance. In Figure 21, the small black circle is more important than the larger yellow circle because it’s positioned closer to the front of the composition. Yet even though front-most objects typically are most important in a design, this isn’t always the case. Take a look at Figure 22. Here, the smaller yellow circle is more important because the larger black circle is pushed halfway outside the compositional frame. By doing so, the black circle, despite being larger and closer, forces our eye toward the distant smaller yellow circle.

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Now let’s see how the concepts of contrast and position can be used in a real world design. Figure 23 shows a tri-fold brochure I illustrated and designed a few years ago for The InDesign Conference in Amsterdam. If I did my job correctly, your eye should start in the upper left of the front panel and move through the type and graphics towards the back or, better yet, encourage you to open the brochure to reveal the guts of the piece inside. Helping achieve a visual flow are the dotted paths of the butterflies and the way the tulips step down in size from large on the front to smaller on the back.

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Figure 25

Figure 24

Figure 24, a poster I did for Athol Fugard’s antiapartheid play “Blood Knot,” is another example of graphic hierarchy. This time position, contrast, and color all work together to draw the viewer’s attention from the upper left of the illustration, through the main text, down the arm, to the performance information at bottom. Figure 25 is an inside spread from a brochure I did for the Brandeis-Bardin Institute and Brandeis University. It has much more information than the “Blood Knot” poster, so visual hierarchy plays a large part in guiding the reader through the spread. Notice how the underlying grid helps organize the page into information chunks. Which of the principals that we’ve discussed so far do you recognize? With any luck you see rhythm, balance, unity, proportion, and contrast. There may be others, but the point here is that I didn’t start designing with a check list of concepts to cover. If you do, you’re headed for trouble. Instead, you must trust your instincts. How does your design feel? If you’re not sure, put it away. After a day or two, go back and take another look.

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So That’s All There Is? By this time you might be wondering, what’s the big deal? Start at the top left, grab the eye, weave a path down through smaller headlines, subheads, and body text to the bottom of the page, and boom, instant hierarchy! Not so fast, pardner. Although creating visual hierarchy seems formulaic, there is no formula. Ultimately it’s up to you, the designer, to make it work. As Rudolf Arnheim, the great German author, art and film theorist, and perceptual psychologist said, “The least touchable object in the world is the eye.”

Scott Citron is a designer in New York City whose clients include Adobe Systems, Insider Software, Black Dog & Leventhal Publishing, and the American Jewish University. His first book, Professional Design Techniques with Adobe Creative Suite 3, was published at the end of 2007 by Adobe Press. Scott is on the board of the Type Director’s Club, is a member of the Art Director’s Club, and is the chapter head of the New York InDesign Users Group. Scott is also an Adobe Certified Instructor in InDesign, InCopy, Illustrator, and Photoshop CS3.

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Tag,

By Jim Maivald

You’re It!

Part 2: Bringing XML Back Into InDesign In Part 1 of this series, you learned about some of the exciting possibilities of XML and InDesign. You started on a sample project, using XML to create a training workbook in multiple languages. In Part 2, I’ll examine unique advantages of this XML workflow, demonstrate how to edit the English text to create content for the Spanish and French versions, and finally flow these translations into the original document.

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Tag, You’re It: Part 2 XML Document Structure Let’s look at the document you created in Part 1. To reveal the XML structure hiding in the document, open the structured version of your workbook—either the one you created in Part 1, or the file Participant Guide-1. indd, which you can download along with other relevant files from http://downloads.indesignmag.com/ supportfiles/XMLPart2ExampleFiles.zip. If the Structure pane isn’t displayed on the left side of the document window, select View > Structure > Show Structure. You can also summon the Structure pane by clicking the double-headed arrow at the lower left corner of the main InDesign interface, or by clicking the left edge of the InDesign document window. If tag markers are invisible, go to View > Structure > Show Tag Markers. If tagged frames are invisible,

Figure 1. If you don’t reveal the XML structure, there’s no way to tell an XML-based document from one that’s not. XML-based documents look and perform in every way like non-XML InDesign files.

Follow along! Click on this box to download XMLPart2ExampleFiles. zip, which contains all the files for Part 2.

go to View > Structure > Show Tagged Frames. If the Tags panel is invisible, go to Window > Tags. With all the XML structure now visible, you can see which frames and text elements are tagged with XML (Figure 1). In Part 1, you added those XML tags by mapping the Paragraph and Character styles to XML tag names in the Tags panel that had the same names. While it took a little work to manually create the tag names for the first guide, you could then use these same tag names for the other five workbooks in the project. In other words, a little bit of work and planning at the beginning of the project pays off with significant productivity gains later. Trouble with White Space? Zoom in on a text frame—or better yet, open one of the text stories in Story Editor by choosing Edit > Edit in Story Editor. This lets you take a closer look at how the tags were applied within the existing text frames (Figure 2). Notice that the tag markers include not only the text, but also any tabs and paragraph returns within the text. Tabs and paragraph returns are just two of more than a dozen kinds of white space InDesign can produce. As long as these items are within the styled paragraph, they will also be within your XML. However, in some cases, this white space can cause trouble. Certain kinds of spacing and characters are not supported on the Internet or must be created using special coding. For example, there’s no such thing as a tab in HTML. While Web browsers can ignore the extraneous paragraph returns in your XML, you may see strange results with other characters (Figure 3).

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If your XML is being employed outside of InDesign, always test it to discover any problems. In most cases, the XML Export dialog can solve white space issues by remapping the hidden characters to compatible encodings (Figure 4). Fortunately, the XML created from this file will be re-imported into InDesign, where all the spacing and hidden characters are supported and will be reapplied.

Figure 2. When you apply tags to paragraphs by using the mapping feature, InDesign includes all the text as well as the paragraph return itself within the element. These paragraph returns, including any other white space, will also be included in your exported XML.

Figure 3. White space (and other special characters) in InDesign’s XML can cause unexpected results like this one in browsers and other applications. Typically, the strange characters you see mean that there are characters stored in the XML that are incompatible with HTML and can’t be rendered by the browser.

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Figure 4. Many of the white space characters we love to use in InDesign are not supported by some XML workflows. In the XML Export Options dialog this choice will convert, or remap, the characters to encodings that are supported.

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Tag, You’re It: Part 2

Figure 5. The editorial content appears between the opening and closing tag names. That’s the easy part. What you can’t see are all the white space characters in the file, such as paragraph returns, em and en spaces, and break characters. If you want the XML to replace the existing content without an error, it’s crucial that these “invisible” characters remain in the text.

Untagged Graphics As you study how the text on each page was tagged with XML elements, note that the graphics are not tagged. While InDesign has an easy method for tagging text automatically, based on styles, only graphics that are anchored within text are tagged— free-floating graphics are ignored. Of course, that doesn’t prevent you from manually tagging pictures or other objects on your page. To tag a graphic frame, you can select it with the Selection tool and click on a tag in the Tags panel. However, for this project, the fact that these drawings were not tagged suits my purpose because I’ll be using a different method of importing new, translated images. Working with XML Using a text editor such as TextEdit, Notepad, or Text Wrangler, open the English.xml file that you exported in Part 1. (Don’t open it with an XML editor like Oxygen, which could make your file useless.) If you don’t have English.xml, use the file of the same name that’s included in XMLPart2ExampleFiles.zip.

It’s important that your XML match the structure of your layout exactly. If you didn’t export the XML from the document yourself, be sure to use both the XML and the InDesign files in XMLPart2ExampleFiles.zip. Deviations in the structure of either file will cause the XML to fail when it’s re-imported later. Examine the XML code. You’ll notice the key English phrases nested snugly between XML tags (Figure 5). Note that the tag names are the same as the Paragraph and Character styles from the original file. While it’s not strictly necessary to do it this way, it makes it simpler later to remap the data elements back to the correct styling. As you can see in Figure 5, XML doesn’t store any formatting information. The next step is to use File > Save As in the text editor to create two new files: Spanish.xml and French. xml. Of course, this doesn’t create the translation

Figure 6. TextEdit has a tendency to replace your file’s extension with TXT. If this little bit of mischief slips by you, you can change it back in a Finder window.

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Plain Text? XML is described as a plain-text markup language, and it is. When InDesign exports the file, you can open it in any text editor. But that doesn’t mean the file is anywhere close to “plain.” Today’s TXT file is not your mother’s plain-text file. At some point, TXT files gained the ability to store more than just text. That doesn’t mean you can store bold, italic and font information in your files, but TXT files can now store all sorts of characters that would never have made it past the front door in the past. The XML file you exported from InDesign and opened in your text editor may contain letters or characters from dozens of languages from all over the world. That’s good news for all the words that need to use accents and other diacritical marks, such as à, è, í, ñ, ò, and ü. Unfortunately, it may also contain a host of invisible characters. As I mentioned earlier, these invisible characters can cause problems in CS2 and certain workflows. You can’t search and replace for these invisibles, but there are a couple ways of removing them if they’re causing trouble. In CS3, you can select “Remap Break, Whitespace and Special Characters” in the XML Export Options dialog. If you have an older version of InDesign, you can strip out the characters in TextEdit or Notepad by saving the file as 8-bit ASCII text.

(that would be real magic). But saving two files with these names will create the files that you will send to the appropriate translator so they can replace the English content with the equivalent phrases in Spanish and French. When you save each file, be sure the file retains the “XML” file name extension (Figure 6). If the extension does disappear, just add it back to the file in the Finder or Windows Explorer. See the “Plain Text” sidebar for more information.

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Tag, You’re It: Part 2

Figure 7. Word for Windows 2003 and 2007 both allow you to open and edit XML files properly. Unfortunately, none of the Mac versions do. When saving the finished XML, remember to select the Data-only checkbox when saving.

Editing XML Normally, XML editors, such as Oxygen (Mac and Windows) and XMLSpy (Windows only), are an invaluable tool in an XML workflow. For this project, stick with TextEdit (Mac) or Notepad or Microsoft Word 2003 or higher (Windows) (Figure 7). To create the Spanish and French content, your translators will open the appropriate XML file and replace the text in place using one of the programs above. The translators should be careful not to change or delete any of the file’s white space characters, such as tabs and paragraph returns. When complete, they should save the file and send it back so it can be imported into your InDesign layout. There’s no magic here; translating the text is all pretty mundane stuff. But the key aspect to making

the process work is maintaining both the XML markup and the spacing as it was exported from InDesign. But don’t be concerned if the lines in the new files wrap differently when you’re finished. Spanish and French sentences often end up with longer line lengths than their English equivalents. To give you a better feel for what this process would really feel like, I’ve supplied translated xml files in XMLPart2ExampleFiles.zip, which you downloaded earlier. The file names are Spanish.xml and French.xml.

5. Open the Participant Guide within the newly packaged Spanish folder. Add the word “Spanish” to the InDesign file before you open it.

Foreign-Language First Steps Before you begin making the foreign-language versions, there are some preliminary steps to perform.

7. Click on the Root element at the top of the Structure pane to select it. 8. Select File > Import XML.

1. Open the English version of the participant workbook. This must be the same file from which the XML was originally exported. If you try to import XML created by another file the import may not succeed, even when the tagging and structure vary only slightly.

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9. When the Import XML dialog appears, choose Spanish.xml and select the other options shown in Figure 8. Click Open.

2. Select File > Package. Name the folder “Spanish Participant Workbook folder”. 3. Repeat step 2 to create a “French Participant Workbook folder”. Steps 2 and 3 create an identical document collection for each version of the workbook. Do you see the method to my madness yet? 4. Copy the XML translations to the appropriate folder. Foreign-Language Next Steps Let’s continue by making the Spanish Workbook.

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6. Open the Structure pane, if it’s not already visible. Reveal all other XML features as I described in the “XML Document Structure” section. At this moment, the workbook is identical to the original English version. The file and all the graphics have been copied and placed in the Spanish folder.

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Figure 8. Use the options shown to properly import Spanish content.

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Tag, You’re It: Part 2 Replacing Graphics There are two small jobs left. First, let’s replace the graphics with English words and phrases. You could have done this in the XML itself, but instead you’re going to use a more mundane but easier solution. 13. Locate the Spanish Art folder in XMLPart2ExampleFiles.zip. Figure 9. This option makes the Spanish text replace the English copy in place.

Figure 11. Here’s where all the work creating matching tag names in Part 1 comes in handy. When you click the Map by Name button all the tags are mapped to the appropriate Paragraph (and Character) styles.

10. When the XML Import Options dialog appears, select the option shown in Figure 9. Click OK. In only a moment or two, the Spanish content replaces all the English text throughout the book. You may see some of the text disappear from the layout or assume the wrong formatting (Figure 10), but don’t worry. When XML is imported it may not automatically assume the proper Paragraph or Character styles at first. To correct this problem there is a simple fix. 11. Select Map Styles to Tags from the Tags panel or Structure pane menu flyout menu. 12. Click the Map by Name button. All the Tags are mapped automatically to their matching style names (Figure 11). Remember in Part 1 how you created Tag names that matched the Paragraph styles? All that hard work pays off here by enabling you to match the styles and tags with one click. It’s a simpler method, but not mandatory— InDesign also allows you to map the tags and styles together manually when the tag names and paragraph names don’t match.

14. Using the Finder or Windows Explorer, drop the files into the Links folder of their respective workbooks. You’ll notice that Spanish graphics are named identically to the English ones. Have you figured out my little secret? Now that you’ve placed the Spanish graphics in the Links folder for the Spanish workbook, InDesign will take care of the rest of the job. 15. Select Window > Links. After a moment or two, InDesign will report that the linked graphics have changed and need to be updated. 16. Select the graphics in the Links panel that have changed. Select Update Link from the Links panel menu. The logo and other English graphics are then replaced by Spanish-language versions. Figure 10. If the Spanish or French text doesn’t appear on the page in place of the English, you need to map the tags to the appropriate Paragraph styles.

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Keeping Tabs on Tabs While your conversion should now be complete, you may encounter a problem that confounds us: Tabs.

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Tag, You’re It: Part 2 first searching and replacing the tabs with a placeholder character that would not normally appear in your text (or XML code), such as $$ or @@. Then export the content to XML as before to make the changes. When the XML is re-imported, search and replace the placeholders with tabs (Figure 12). Once you’ve replaced the missing tabs and have a final version of the Spanish workbook (Figure 13), repeat steps 5 through 17 with the French version of the workbook. Aside from the tabs issue, it should take you only a few minutes to complete.

Figure 12. InDesign makes it easy to search for a variety of special characters and white space, making a tab workaround tedious but possible.

Or, more precisely, missing tabs. When the XML is imported back into the layout, InDesign occasionally brings in everything correctly except the tabs. The mysterious thing about this is that InDesign did export the tabs. The problem arises when you try to re-import them, whereupon InDesign sometimes strips them out for no good reason. Probably just a bug. Fortunately, it seems to work more often than not—but check your final layout carefully. If you find you do have this problem, you can fix the layout by reviewing each page and manually re-inserting tabs wherever they’re needed. Obviously, this is not a satisfactory answer for long documents, where there may be thousands of tabs in the text. One solution is to recreate the design without using tabs. When that’s impossible, you can work around them by

Worth It for the Right Project XML can save you enormous amounts of time and drudgery when you’re creating a wide variety of data-intensive or specialty documents, like these workbooks. What might have taken you days or weeks without XML can be only a few clicks of the mouse

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❱❱ Did you select the Root or proper parent element in the Structure pane before importing? ❱❱ Do your tag names match the tags names in the structure exactly? (Remember that everything counts, including spelling and case.) ❱❱ Is the tag order in your structure the same as your XML file? ❱❱ Is your XML file well-formed? For example, are you sure all your tags are closed properly and that you didn’t accidentally delete a tag or bracket in the XML file? For this purpose and this purpose only, use XML editors, such as Oxygen and XMLSpy. ❱❱ Does the whitespace stored in the XML match the whitespace in the structure? In other words, look for the tabs, spaces and paragraph returns exported from the original text. Did the XML preserve them properly? ❱❱ Did you select the proper options in the import dialogs?

with it. XML is certainly not for everyone, but for many projects, there’s nothing faster and easier.

Figure 13. Once the tabs are back in the text, the completed Spanish version is a spitting image of the English workbook.

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XML Troubleshooting You followed every step, yet it still didn’t work properly. What’s up? The bad news is that an XML workflow follows the rules very strictly. The good news is that an XML workflow follows the rules very strictly. Unlike HTML and other coding languages, XML won’t let you build a poorly formatted structure that still functions, or one that functions sometimes but not always. XML errors can be extremely trivial and easy to overlook. When your XML import doesn’t work, troubleshoot the problem by following this short checklist:

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Jim Maivald is an artist, graphic designer and writer with over 20 years of experience in the industry. He was editor of Design Graphics World magazine, technical editor of Personal Publishing and is author of Photoshop Complete (2007) and A Designer’s Guide to Adobe InDesign and XML (Adobe Press, 2008). He is an Adobe Certified Expert and Instructor in InDesign, Acrobat, and Dreamweaver. He can be contacted at info@xmlfordesigners.com.

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InStep: Remember Page Position

Remembering Page Position With Object Styles

Object styles don’t usually apply page geometry, but they can with this cool trick

by David Blatner InDesign’s object styles are key to saving time and making your documents more consistent. A single click in the Object Styles panel can apply a host of formatting to one or more selected objects. For example, you can assign a fill color, a stroke style, text frame insets, graphic frame fitting options, and about a hundred other settings to frames and paths. But there’s one thing object styles can’t do, and it drives me crazy: You can’t use object styles to apply page geometry—the position of an object on the page. Applying page geometry could be helpful in a wide range of documents. For instance, you could tell InDesign that every time you assign a “footer” object style to a text frame, it would jump to the bottom of the page in exactly the correct position. Or you could assign a sidebar style and have the object move to the side margin. But alas, you can’t do it. So why am I even bringing it up here? Because there is a way around the limitation. The workaround is based on a simple fact: Although you can’t assign page geometry for a freefloating object, you can assign it for an anchored object! Let’s take a quick look at how to use this trick to create a slider along a numeric indicator. The goal is to create a set of object styles that, when clicked, will move the slider to exactly the correct position on the line.

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Follow Along with the Sample File To help you catch on even more quickly, I’ve created a sample InDesign file that contains all the elements you need to follow along. That file is called “SlideSampleFile. indd” and it’s attached to this PDF. Click on Acrobat’s paper clip icon to find and download the file.

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InStep: Remember Page Position

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 reate the pieces C Before you build any object styles, let’s build the pieces of the puzzle. Here, I’ve created a temperature gauge and a separate object that will act as the slider/indicator. I made these in InDesign using gradients and the Effects panel, but you could make the slider and indicator in Illustrator or Photoshop and import them.

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Anchor the line in the text frame You can anchor any object (or more than one object, if you’ve grouped them first) into a text frame by selecting it with the Selection tool, using Edit > Cut to move it to the clipboard, switching to the Type tool, clicking in the text frame, and choosing Edit > Paste. The result is technically an inline object—a frame or line (or group, or whatever) that InDesign places as though it’s a single character in a story. In this case, you place the indicator object into the text frame as the only character in the story.

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Draw a text frame This workaround relies on the indicator being an anchored object, and you can’t have an anchored object without a text frame. So here I’ve drawn an empty frame. Note that it must be positioned on the page, or on the pasteboard with at least a small portion of it touching the page. However, it doesn’t really matter how large the text frame is; make it big enough for the anchored object now, but you’ll be able to shrink it later.

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Convert to anchored Switch back to the Selection tool, click on the inline indicator line, and then choose Object > Anchored Object > Options. The Position popup menu is set to Inline; change it to Custom. The dialog box is now filled with confusing options. (For the in-depth scoop on those options, see Pariah Burke’s article in the October/November 2005 issue of this magazine.) Here’s all you need to do this time: Set the X Relative To and the Y Relative To pop-up menus both to Page Edge, make sure Prevent Manual Positioning is off, and click OK. Setting these to Page Edge tells InDesign to place the object relative to the page itself, no matter where the text frame is.

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Place the object where you want it After you clicked OK, the anchored object flew outside the text frame (probably to the upperleft corner of the page). But because you Prevent Manual Positioning disabled in the last step, you can now use the Selection tool to drag it anywhere. Here, I’ve dragged it to the beginning position on the slider. I’ve also made the text frame (which holds the anchored object) really small so it’s less distracting. You could drag it off into a page corner, too—just as long as it’s still on the page somewhere.

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Save the position as an object style While the anchored object is selected on the page, open the Object Style panel and choose New Object Style from its flyout menu (or Option/ Alt-click on the New Object Style button). Give the object style a descriptive name—I used “0% position” to indicate where on the slider the line sits. Click the Anchored Object Options pane in the list along the

left side (or press Command/Ctrl-zero). You don’t need to change anything, but I wanted you to see that the page position—where you dragged the object to—is recorded here. Now click OK to save the new style.

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Make more object styles Move the anchored object to another location— here, I’ve held down the Shift key and dragged it to the right until it’s at the 100° position. Save this position as a new object style, then repeat (move then save style) until you have all the positions you want. If you make the object styles out of order, don’t fret: You can drag object styles up and down in the panel to reorder them.

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Change the position After making your object styles, apply them one at a time to the object to see it move around. When I do this, I often find that I made a mistake on one or more of the object styles. Fortunately, you can easily remedy this: Apply the style that has a mistaken location, position the object where it should be (you’ll see a + sign appear next to the style name in the panel), then choose Redefine Style from the Object Styles panel flyout menu.

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The Perfect Complement to InDesign Magazine!

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Give yourself clues The primary downside to setting up your objects and object styles like this is that you may later forget that the document was built this way (or someone else working on the document ill be confused). But if you choose both View > Show Text Threads and Type > Show Hidden Characters, you can see clues to how the document was created (the dashed line indicates where the object is anchored, the Yen symbol indicates an anchored object is present in that frame). You can also add notes in non-

printing text frames (on non-printing layers, or turn on the Non-printing feature in the Attributes panel). These notes will remind you or your colleagues how the file was created.

David Blatner is the Editorial Director of InDesign Magazine, the cohost of InDesignSecrets.com, the program chairman of The InDesign Conference, the co-author of Real World InDesign CS3, and the presenter of lynda.com’s InDesign CS3: Beyond the Basics title.

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InTime: Mastering Master Pages

InTime: Play that Funky Master Page (Side 2) One more time! Get your groove on with the hidden efficiency of working with InDesign master pages.

PARIAH S. Burke Welcome back, fellow funksters, to Side 2 of “Play that Funky Master Page.” Last month’s Side 1 made me feel so nice—good god!—I jumped back, wanted to kiss myself. We went round and round, up and down, all around. Right on, people. Let it all hang out. If you don’t, brothers and sisters, you won’t know what master pages are all about. This month we’re spinning up some groova­ liscious disco cuts that are guaranteed to make you stomp all around.

Let it Whip Grooving along, designing a page, sometimes you realize some or all of the page’s objects are going to be used again on other pages of the document. So, what do you do? Copy and paste them onto every page? Of course not; what a thrill kill having to update every instance of objects should their formatting or positioning need to change. Would you copy all the objects, create and switch to a new master page, and Paste In Place (OPT+CMD+SHIFT+V/ ALT+CTRL+SHIFT+V) onto the master page, and then apply it to the required document pages? Sure, you could do that. But if you want to join the ranks of the InFunk All-Stars, you have to do it all in one beat. In other words: just whip it, baby. Go to the page that should be master and select Save As Master from the Pages panel flyout menu (Figure 1). Let it whip, and InDesign creates a new master page from the current page. The letter code used will be the next in the sequence—A, B, C, and so forth. If the document page you converted to master was already based on a master page, the new master created from it will also be based on that other master page. And that segues us into the next track…

Figure 1: The Pages panel flyout menu.

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InTime: Mastering Master Pages Figure 3 (right): A list of master pages on the Pages panel. At left, using the default naming convention; at right the same document using InDesign’s ability to set custom codes and names.

All Aboard the Master Train All aboard for the party train! Everybody all aboard. Don’t miss that train. Don’t miss the master train! Picture this, baby: You’ve got a complicated long document project—a catalog, technical manual, or something similar. Just about every page in the project needs a folio, a section header, and maybe some other information in the footer or along the outer page edge. Some pages need all of that and a background element. Some pages—maybe the section or chapter opening pages—need the folio and the background element, but not the section header or footer copy. Are you looking at three separate master pages? Definitely. Will the master pages include duplicates of some of the objects? No way. Duplicating objects is the fastest way to complicate your document and make unnecessary work for yourself—whether that’s extra work now or six months down the road when you try to use the one document as the template for another. Duplication of this sort is redundancy, and redundancy is inefficient and time wasting. Rather than duplicate master page elements—or even clone master pages in their entirety with the Duplicate command on the Pages panel flyout menu—link them up like cars in a train—a party train. Just like document pages can be based on master pages, so too can master pages be based on other master pages. The same principles apply—objects on the parent master appear as locked items on the child master; changing an object on a parent forces the child to instantly reflect the same change, and; objects

from the parent master page can be overridden or detached on the child. Choose New Master from the Pages panel flyout menu to access the New Master dialog (Figure 2). Its third field is a dropdown menu presenting other master pages; choose one to base the new master on a preexisting one. Then, any elements you want to display on document pages based on either master need reside on only one master page, so you can make changes to the page number object in only one place. Whatever changes are made to A-Master will automatically apply to B-Master and to all document pages bearing either A or B identifiers. Figure 2: The New Master dialog showing options for one master page based on another.

Need to override or detach some object from A-Master on B-Master? Use the techniques you learned in last month’s InTime column. Want C-Master to pick up common elements from both A and B? Base it on B-Master. Choo choo! Get on board the master train! Rubberband Man This one’s guaranteed to blow your mind so high you won’t come down. InDesign CS3 introduced a funky

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new ability: loading master pages from one document into another. Just like loading up paragraph and character styles from the menus on their respective panels, you can choose Load Master Pages from the flyout menu on the Pages panel, navigate to a pre-existing InDesign document or template, and load some or all of its master pages into the current document. Tear the Roof Off the Sucker One of the biggest downers I’ve encountered is a long document with half a dozen or more master pages all named A-Master, B-Master, C-Master, and so on. How the funk am I supposed to know which master page I need for my next document page? Those Pages panel thumbnails are neat but not very detailed. In Figure 3,

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InTime: Mastering Master Pages

which of the master pages lists is easier to understand and more efficient to work with? Save yourself some confusion and headaches by tearing the roof off master page defaults. When you create a new master page with the New Master command on the Pages panel flyout menu, you’re given two key options (Figure 4). You can customize the Prefix and Name fields to give the master page a useful name. For instance, if I have master pages that individually use 2-, 3-, and 4-column grids, I’d probably set the prefix of the respective masters to be 2col, 3col, and 4col. Then, as I scroll through the document pages, the prefix in the outertop corners of the pages will tell me instantly which master page—which grid—a document page is using. Figure 5: The Pages panel displaying pages from a technical book that utilize logical master page prefixes to organize document structure and page content.

CH, BODY, GL, IDX? You could even then make the page icons smaller, relying on the master page prefixes to communicate their content more productively than large thumbnail icons might (Figure 5). Changing the master page name is highly recommended because it can be significantly longer and more descriptive than the 4-digits allowed by the prefix. However, the name won’t appear in the corner of document page icons. Play It Out Once I was strictly a document page designer. I never had no problems burnin’ down the one-page ads. But then designs around me got to start to feeling so slow, and I decided quickly—yes I did—to disco down and check out the workflow. And they were trackin’, and kernin’, and movin’ to the groovin’. And just when it hit me, somebody turned around and shouted: “Play that funky master page, white boy! Play that funky master page right. Play that funky master page, white boy. Lay down the copy and play that funky master page ‘til you die.” Figure 5: The Pages panel displaying pages from a technical book that use logical master page prefixes to organize document structure and page content.

At first it wasn’t easy, changing page designing minds. And files were getting shaky. I thought I’d have to leave it behind. But now it’s so much better— it’s so much better—I’m funkin’ out in every way. I’ll never lose that feeling—you know I won’t—of how I learned my lesson that day. We’ve now played out the “Play that Funky Master Page” record. Along the way we’ve gotten up, gotten down, and gotten freaky covering some truly funkadelic tricks of working efficiently with master pages. Now I send you out on your own to jump back, kiss yourself, and screech like James Brown: I’ve mastered master pages! Ow! I’ve got soul, and I’m super bad!

Pariah S. Burke is a design and publishing workflow expert bringing creative efficiency into studios, agencies, and publications around the world as principal of workflow:Creative. He is the author of Mastering InDesign CS3 for Print Design and Production (Sybex, 2007); the former technical lead for InDesign, InCopy, Illustrator, and Acrobat to Adobe’s technical support team; a freelance graphic designer; and the publisher of the Web sites Quark VS InDesign. com and Designorati. When not traveling, Pariah lives in Portland, Oregon, where he writes (a lot) and creates (many) publications and projects to empower creative professionals.

Maybe you’re laying out a technical book. You’d probably want different master pages for the front matter, the table of contents pages, chapter/section start pages, main document pages, glossary pages, and index pages. So give yourself a leg up by setting the prefixes for those masters to, respectively: FM, TOC,

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Learn more about Automatication at: www.automatication.com Download a copy of Layout Zone from: www.automatication.com/downloads/LayoutZone.zip

Adobe invites you to view the growing spectrum of plug-ins available to enhance and extend your InDesign experience at: http://store.adobe.com/products/plugins/indesign/main.html Adobe Systems Incorporated 345 Park Avenue San Jose, CA 95110-2704 USA www.adobe.com Adobe, the Adobe logo, and InDesign are either registered trademarks or trademarks of Adobe Systems Incorporated in the United States and/or other countries. All other trademarks are the property of their respective owners. © 2008 Adobe Systems Incorporated. All rights reserved.

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InQuestion: Sandee Cohen

Find a Baseline’s Y Measurement, Round One Corner, Q Apply Master Items to Blank Book Pages, A More Text Variables

By Sandee Cohen

Find the Y Measurement of a Baseline There are times I need to find the Y measurement of the baseline of a line of text. Is there any way I can discover that measurement? —Lynne Bass

InQuestion is a regular column devoted to answering subscribers’ questions about working with InDesign.

Not easily. Turns out that while there are several places where InDesign will recognize where the baseline of text is (align to bottom of frame, first baseline position in a frame, and align to baseline grid), there aren’t any places where you can find the vertical coordinates of the text baseline. Fortunately, I posed this question to my good friend Chuck Weger, the genius behind Elara Systems Inc. It didn’t take Chuck long to come up with a script that not only finds the vertical coordinate of a line of text, it also finds the coordinate for the left position of the character (Figure 1). Once the script has run, you have the option of creating guides for the intersection of the x and y coordinates. And amazingly, it even calculates the vertical point even if a baseline shift has been applied! Chuck has agreed to allow me to distribute the script via InDesign Magazine. You can download the script from http://downloads.indesignmag. com/supportfiles/FindBaseline.jsx.zip . Once you’ve downloaded it, place the file in the InDesign

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application folder > Scripts > Scripts Panel. You can now open the Scripts panel in InDesign, and the script will appear. To run it, click an insertion point in any text, and then double click the name of the script. Figure 1: Chuck Weger’s Find Baseline script allows you to find the Horizontal Offset and Baseline coordinates.

Going Round the Bend I know how to apply the Corner Options to make rounded corners around a rectangle. But is there a way to apply a round corner to just one or two corners of a rectangle?

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One way is to use the CornerEffects script that ships with InDesign. With your object selected, double click the CornerEffects script in the Scripts panel. This opens the CornerEffects dialog box (Figure 2, next page). Choose the Rounded options and set the Offset amount for how much you want

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InQuestion: Sandee Cohen

to round the corner. Then use the Pattern menu to choose which corners should be rounded.

Figure 3: Click with the Pen tool to add a point to the rectangle.

Figure 2: The CornerEffects script opens a dialog box that allows you to round individual points in a rectangle.

Watch Me! Click on the image below to start Sandee’s movie, showing this cool rounded corner frame technique.

Next take the Direct Selection tool and drag the new point over to the corner (Figure 4). Release to place the point over the corner of the bounding box. This causes the corner effect to disappear. Figure 4: Drag with the Direct Selection tool to move the point over to the corner of the bounding box.

The longer I work in this field, the more I am stunned by the sophistication of the questions that come to me. In this case, would have never expected this problem, but you’ve isolated an interesting quandary. Let’s say you have several documents in a book, and each one ends on a right-hand (odd) page. You might want each following document in the book to start on a right-hand page. You don’t have to manually add a left-hand page to the end of each chapter, you just choose Book Page Numbering Options

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The only problem with the script is that while it’s easy to apply, it’s not helpful if you need to change the offset amount or which points you want to modify or if you want to scale the object. That’s when you need to apply a more manual method. The first thing to do is to apply the rounded corner option (or any of the other corner options). Then switch over to the Pen tool and click to add a point a little bit away from the corner that you need to turn off the effect (Figure 3).

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Apply Master Items to Blank Pages in a Book Is there a way to automatically apply master page items to the blank pages of a book? —Laronda Arnold

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InQuestion: Sandee Cohen

from the Book panel menu. Then choose “Continue on next odd page” from the Page Order options (Figure 5). Then click Insert Blank Page to have InDesign automatically to keep the correct number of odd and even pages. This automatically adds a left-hand page to any document in the book that ends on an odd page. It’s a very convenient way to make sure that all the documents in your book start with a right-hand page. However, here’s the wrinkle in this automatic page insertion: The pages that are inserted are always based on no master page. They come in totally blank, which means they won’t have any header or footer information. If you want those blank pages to have a footer for a folio or other master page information, you have to manually drag a master onto those added pages. As far as I can tell, there is no way to automatically tell the Book panel to insert an extra page based on a specific master. Figure 5: The Book Page Numbering Options dialog box allows you to ensure that all new chapters in a book start on an odd or even page, and will insert blank pages if the previous chapter doesn’t end on the correct page.

I’ve never noticed this behavior before because I always add the blank, left-hand page to my chapters manually. Or, if I did allow InDesign to insert the extra page, I would want that page to be totally blank. I don’t want a header or footer to appear on a totally blank page.

Figure 6: The Text Variables dialog box lets you define a new text variable. The New Text Variable dialog box lets you choose a File Name as a variable.

More About Text Variables You recently gave a tip of the week that said you can “define a text variable within InDesign for the File Name of a document.” But you don’t say how or in which menu item to find that option. —Larry Miller

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Sorry, Larry, I should have been a little more specific. What I should have said was, choose Type > Text Variables > Define. This opens the Text Variables dialog box. Click the New button which opens the New Text Variable dialog box. Set the Type menu to File Name. This allows you to define the File Name variable (Figure 6). Check the Include Entire Folder Path to display the entire file name starting from the volume. To insert the text variable that you just defined, choose Type > Text Variables > Insert Variable. The variable you defined will be listed in the submenu.

Sandee Cohen is the only third-party author to have written educational materials for all versions of InDesign. Her latest books are the InDesign CS3 Visual QuickStart Guide and Real World Creative Suite 2.

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AdobeÂŽ InDesignÂŽ and AdobeÂŽ InCopyÂŽ Ten Steps for Building Your InDesign and InCopy Expertise

InDesign User Group. Join a chapter near you! Europe Canada

1. Subscribe to InDesign Magazine at InDesign Magazine for tips and techniques from industry experts. 2. Keep up-to-date on the latest InDesign and InCopy news at InDesignSecrets.com, and InCopySecrets.com, independent websites with expert podcasts, blogs, techniques, and more. 3. Sign up for a free InDesign tip of the week at www.indesignmag.com/idm/tipofweek.html. 4. Check out Total Training for Adobe InDesign CS3 at www.totaltraining.com. 5. Attend a free Creative Suite 3 eSeminar and learn what’s new in InDesign CS3 at www.adobe.com/events 6. Skip over to Lynda.com to try their InDesign and InCopy online training. 7. Tune into Adobe TV, your online video source featuring innovative techniques and tips for getting the most out of Adobe InDesign and InCopy at www.adobe.com/go/adobetv. 8. Visit your local or online bookstore to find InDesign and InCopy books by industry experts, such as David Blatner, Sandee Cohen, Galen Gruman, Deke McClelland, Olav Martin Kvern, and others. 9. Locate Adobe Certified Instructors and Adobe Authorized Training Centers in your area at partners.adobe.com. 10. Check out the next date for the InDesign Conference, a gathering of leading InDesign and InCopy experts, at www.mogo-media.com.

Africa Asia

Caribbean United States Australia

Latin America

Amsterdam t Atlanta t Boston t Brisbane t Costa Rica t Chicago t Dallas t Denver t Detroit Des Moines t Johannesburg t London Los Angeles t Madison t Milwaukee t Minneapolis t Melbourne Munich t Nagoya t New Jersey t New York City t Orlando t Ottawa t Portland t Puerto Rico Reggio Emila t Reno t Rochester t San Francisco t Seattle t Switzerland t Sydney t Tampa Toronto t Vancouver t Washington, D.C. t and growing! The momentum behind InDesign is contagious. As you and other designers, production professionals and print service providers move to InDesign, you may be looking for a knowledgeable community to help make the most of this world-class page layout program. You’re invited to join one of the InDesign User Groups that have formed in major cities in the U.S., Canada, Europe, Central America and Australia, and to visit our website for information about: t t t t t t

6Qcoming meetings and events, notes, presentations, and information from prior meetings 5JQT UVUPSJBMT BOEUSBJOJOHSFTPVSDFT .FNCFSEJTDPVOUTPOCPPLT DPOGFSFODFTBOEUIJSEQBSUZTPGUXBSF 5IJSEQBSUZQMVHJOT 4FSWJDFQSPWJEFSTVQQPSUNBUFSJBMT 8PSMEXJEe resources‌ and more!

Expand your InDesign skills at a meeting near you! w w w.indesignusergroup.com

Adobe, the Adobe logo, InDesign and InCopy are either registered trademarks or trademarks of Adobe Systems Incorporated in the United States and/or other countries. All other trademarks are the property of their respective owners. Š 2006 Adobe Systems Incorporated. All rights reserved.

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InReview: Puzzles & Pictures

By bob levine Lightning Brain Sudoku Generator Rorohiko Ltd. www.rorohiko.com $49; free 20-day demo. Free limited-feature “Lite” version. Mac and Windows; CS, CS2, and CS3 Rating:

Ratings Key

Not worth it even if it’s free

Over the last several years, brain teaser sensation Sudoku has taken the world by storm. Sudoku puzzles are 9x9 tables broken down into 3x3 sections (Figure 1). The puzzle creator fills some of the table cells with numbers 1 through 9; the person trying to solve the puzzle uses logic to fill in the remaining numbers such that all rows, columns and 3x3 sections use each number once and only once. Variations on this theme include larger tables and letters or other symbols in place of numerals. So what does any of this have to do with InDesign? Whether you simply enjoy solving the puzzles or you work with a publication that includes Sudoku, you’ll be happy to hear that there’s a plug-in dedicated to generating Sudoku puzzles within an InDesign layout. Rorohiko, a New Zealand company specializing in InDesign plug-ins and related services, has released Lightning Brain Sudoku Generator as both a commercial and a free version. Once you install the plug-in, you create a square table with 9, 16, or 25 rows and columns, a text frame to hold the difficulty rating, and a duplicate table to hold the solution. Lightning Brain Sudoku Generator adds appropriate information to InDesign’s scripting panel for each object and does the hard work of filling in the numbers.

Not recommended

Average

Exceptionally good A must-have

Easy to Install, Easy to Use As with other Rorohiko plug-ins, Lightning Brain Sudoku Generator requires the installation of APID

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ToolAssistant (formerly called the Active Page Items Runtime) and two additional plug-ins. Installation is as simple as placing the plug-ins inside the Plug-in folder within the InDesign plug-in folder. If you’re using other Rorohiko plug-ins, it’s still a good idea to install the version of APID ToolAssistant that ships with Sudoku generator to ensure you have the latest version. After installation, you’ll see a new top-level menu in InDesign called API. Figure 1: The solution to this puzzle is on page 43.

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InReview: Puzzles & Pictures

To help you get started, the product ships with several templates containing formatted placeholders and a Readme file that explains the process in enough detail that anyone should be able to get up an running in minutes. The Process After reading the instructions, I suggest experimenting with the templates for a bit to get an idea of the process involved. Open any one of them and turn on the Script Label panel (Window > Automation > Script Label). Select the various tables and text frames and you’ll see each has a script label attached to it. These labels are crucial, as they communicate to the plug-in which frames do what. Once you’re comfortable, you can dive in and create your own puzzles. First, drag out a text frame Speak Sudoku To get the most from the plug-in, there are a few terms and definitions you should be familiar with: Difficulty level. This is a numerical choice from 1 to 15 with 1 being the easiest and 15 the hardest. These levels can also be expressed as easy (1-3), moderate (4-6), hard (7-8), or diabolical (>8). Symmetry. This setting determines how the givens (the numbers provided to solve the puzzle) will be distributed. The choices are horizontal, vertical, center, diagonal, and back diagonal (which runs from the top right to the bottom left). Rorohiko’s advice is to choose one or two of these to create the best puzzles.

and insert your placeholder table of 9, 16, or 25 columns and rows. For traditional puzzles, choose 9x9. There are a few simple but very stringent requirements for the placeholder table. In the first row, you must enter the figures to be used for the puzzle. For traditional puzzles this mean the numbers 1 through 9, but you can use any combination of letters, numbers, or even symbols. With the text frame containing the table selected, assign a script label of puzzleBox_1 in the script label panel. Format all cells as you’d like the final puzzle to appear by choosing a fill color for the cells and formatting the text appropriately. Centered vertically and horizontally are the best choices here. Include a thick stroke to delineate the 3x3 sections. If you’d like to have a difficulty-level caption for the puzzle (desirable in Sudoko books but not necessary for a single puzzle) drag out a text frame and type “Difficulty level:” and assign a script label of “difficultyLevelBox_1”. Be sure to leave enough room for the text that will fill that frame. For the solution, create a table with the same dimensions of the puzzle table, shrink its size if you desire, format as you wish but don’t fill in any text. Assign a script label of “solutionBox_1” The solution frame can be anywhere in your document. For a long book of puzzles you can place the solutions in the back of the book or rotate each one 180 degrees and place it on the bottom of the relevant page. For subsequent puzzles and their corresponding difficulty labels and solutions, the script labels would end with _2, _3, and so on.

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Now that the preparation’s out of the way, go to API > Generate Sudoku Puzzles. A dialog box appears informing you how many puzzles there are to be created. Click okay and the process begins. Next, a dialog appears prompting you for difficulty level and symmetry choices. You’ll need to make these choices for every puzzle in your document (Figure 2). Figure 2: You’ll be prompted to make various choices as you go through the puzzle-generation process.

Not too big a deal if you only have a few puzzles but if you’re creating a longer document you’ll want to do a bit more up-front work. This involves simply entering each of those choices directly into the script label panel (Figure 3, next page). This will by-pass the dialogs and you can get a cup of coffee while it does its thing. Once finished (which can take a bit of time), you’ll have finished puzzles, captioned properly, and fully generated solutions. If you forget to create a solution,

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InReview: Puzzles & Pictures

Figure 3:. A formatted template page and the script panel showing entries for the puzzle box, difficulty level and the solution box.

don’t fear. The plug-in plays a fascinating trick to build its puzzles: it automatically builds the finished puzzle (with all the answers in it) and then creates a duplicate table directly on top of the first. The cells in the duplicate table are either filled with None (where the reader is meant to see the number) or Paper (where the player is meant to fill it in). Move the top table to the side and you see the finished puzzle! As already mentioned, you need to label each puzzle individually. So what happens if you decide Figure 4: The solution to this puzzle is on page 43.

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to publish a book with 500 or 1,000 puzzles? Like any other repetitive task in InDesign, it can be scripted. But if you’d rather not write that script, Rorohiko can help. Create your template and contact them for a quote to prepare a custom InDesign template. Passes the Test with Flying Colors The real test of any product is whether it works as advertised and is easy to use. Lightning Brain Sudoku Generator passes both tests. That said, the question you have to answer is, “Do I need this?” If you work with a publication that publishes Sudoku puzzles, or you’re thinking of adding such a feature, the answer is a resounding yes. Even if you just enjoy Sudoku personally, you may find it well worth $49.00 price tag to be able to create an unlimited number of puzzles. If you’re OK with some limitations—such as being able to create 9x9 puzzles using numbers 1 through 9, and solutions that can’t be on a different page—you may want to stick with the free Lite version. To try the commercial option before plunking down your cash, download it as a fully functional demo than runs for 20 days.

Bob Levine is an InDesign CS3 Adobe Certified Expert, a forum leader on the Adobe InDesign Forum (at adobe.com/forums), and a contributing writer for InDesignSecrets.com.

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InReview: Puzzles & Pictures

BigPicture 3.1 Badia Software www.badiasoftware.com $120; demo version available (unstated expiry, some features may be limited) Mac OS X 10.4.2 or higher; CS3 Rating:

Figure 1: My fictional book has pictures in various resolutions and from various sources.

Figure 2: BigPicture’s modal dialog box contains just about every bit of information about your image files you can imagine.

By Jay Nelson Badia Software’s BigPicture provides an interactive window into the world of images used in an InDesign document. If you work a lot with image files, you’ll appreciate BigPicture’s granular level of information about every picture, and the control it gives you over those files. Because it makes use of the Mac OS X file index and Finder, it works only on Macs. To test its features, I created a fictional project that requires many picture files: a book named Likin’ Lichens with Mike Eichen. The pictures of lichens are in various resolutions, from various sources, and may even be placeholders for better photos to come later in the process (Figure 1). As the designer of this book, I want fixes to all the usual picture-related bugaboos that slow down or stop production: ❱❱ files with confusing names I want to change ❱❱ files with incorrect resolutions ❱❱ files that have been scaled (and if so, I want to know by how much) ❱❱ missing files (and if so, I want help finding them)

❱❱ files set to suppress printing ❱❱ files that include fonts or add spot colors not in the project Those are exactly the needs met by BigPicture. To use it, you open your InDesign document, then choose File > BigPicture. The dialog box that opens (Figure 2) is modal—in other words, you can make changes within it, but you can’t return to your document until you dismiss it. This approach is annoying, but not crippling.

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InReview: Puzzles & Pictures

In the list on the right side of the dialog box, BigPicture highlights any photo you selected on your page before you launched the plug-in. The thumbnail preview at the top left shows the area of the highlighted picture that’s inside its frame in InDesign. The white area indicates the cropped area of the picture that’s still available for use, should you need to reposition or resize the picture. Just beneath the thumbnail is a field where you can rename the original picture file. BigPicture will then rename that file on your hard drive and update the link in your InDesign document. Below that field is the selected picture’s metadata. To keep the dialog box width manageable, you can choose which kind of data appears in one Custom column. I chose Effective Resolution so I can instantly see how the scaling of every picture has affected its output resolution. But as you can see at the bottom right of Figure 3 proves, there are many other options. Many other controls and options are hidden under BigPicture’s popup menus. I’ve highlighted a few of my favorites. In the upper left is the directory path to the location of the picture file. It’s an interactive list—if you choose an item in it, that item will open in the Finder. Farther down, note the “Suppress Printout” popup menu that lets you change the printing status directly from within BigPicture. And directly below that are popup menus that will show any fonts or spot colors that are used in an EPS file. Continuing along the top, the Select menu is also tremendously useful. If you discover that a particular

Figure 3: When you’re looking for image inforamation, BigPicture gives you oodles of options.

picture has a problem, you can find all the others that share almost any characteristic with it—a way to filter files according to a particular attribute. The Reveal menu can either take you to where that picture is used in your InDesign document, or take you to the original picture file in the Finder. The Open With menu lets you choose an application to open the picture file for editing. If you edit a picture and save it, BigPicture recognizes the changes immediately. The Update menu updates the link to any selection of modified pictures.

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The Link menu lets you re-link selected pictures to new original picture files, either individually or to an entire folder full of new versions. It’s great for swapping low-resolution pictures with high-res versions. The Link menu also lets you embed a picture file into your InDesign document. The Move menu is particularly useful: You can either move or copy pictures to a new folder, and optionally re-link to them. The Search & Link area at the bottom is probably the most desired picture-related feature in any design application. Once you select a missing picture from the long list above Search & Link, the picture’s file name appears in the Find field. Then when you click the Find button, BigPicture searches all the hard drives attached to your Mac for files by that same name. When you see the one you want, you can either Relink to it, Reveal it in the Finder, or Open the picture file for editing. You can also use the Search & Link field to quickly find a different picture file on your hard drive and re-link an existing picture frame to it. The new

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INTELLIGENT SOFTWARE SOLUTIONS FOR EVERYDAY TASKS

InReview: Puzzles & Pictures

This is the solution to the puzzle on page 38.

picture takes on the scaling, cropping, and other transformations made to the original picture. Pays for Itself BigPicture might be considered a one-trick pony, and my initial knee-jerk reaction to its price of $120 was that it’s about twice as high as it should be. But then my profit-reasoning brain kicked in and I realized that the one trick is very impressive and will save most people many hours of work. If you save just two or three hours of picture-searching madness, you’ll have made money by purchasing this plug-in. I guess that means this purchase is a no-brainer.

Jay Nelson has been the editor and publisher of Design Tools Monthly for 16 years. He’s also the guiding hand behind PlanetQuark. com and, with Jeff Gamet, hosts the Design Tools Weekly podcast.

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Cacidi® LiveMerge LiveMerge allows you to create and re-use design group objects – and totally innovating – receive a live feed of text and images from your mySQL database or text file. Focus on design and layout and let LiveMerge control the content in your document - live updating right in front of your eyes. No need for checking if your document content is up to date, LiveMerge handles that part for you!

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This is the solution to the puzzle on page 40.

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Cacidi® BarCodes Cacidi BarCodes allows you to create barcodes directly in your InDesign document by simply selecting the barcode type and entering your data in the BarCodes palette. The barcode that Cacidi BarCodes creates is a live object allowing you to modify its size, rotate it or add standard attributes such as colors to the barcode. If you change the number of the barcode in the Cacidi BarCodes palette, the barcode will re-create dynamically!

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InBrief: Helpful Products

Quick Takes on Helpful Products Add crop and folds quickly, link data, and manage libraries. Then watch TV and ogle some typefaces!

By Jeff Gamet Putting all the pieces together correctly and making sure everything looks great is the name of the game in the design world, so it’s no surprise that there are plenty of tools to help make sure your InDesign creations are up to snuff. This month I’ll look at plugins that help you put everything together in InDesign, typefaces that improve appearances, and a few resources to keep you in top design form. Soho Gothic Fonts.com, $54/$670 (complete family) www.fonts.com

from that drudgery. It lets you set custom guides and crop marks for bleed, trim and safety areas, and can automatically add time stamps, document name, and color bars to your final output. You can also save your crop setups as presets for use with other InDesign documents.

Gluon’s Cropster ID

Soho Gothic from Fonts.com is a sans serif OpenType Pro font by Sebastian Lester. It was designed to compliment its serif cousin, Soho, but instead of simply cutting bits off to make a sans serif style, Soho Gothic was created from the ground up so all the parts fit together just right. Its modern look is sleek and easy to read, and the seven available weights include complementary italics. Cropster ID Gluon, $109 www.gluon.com Sebastian Lester’s Soho Gothic

Adding mechanical page markings, such as crop and fold marks, to a document isn’t necessarily a big deal, but it can be time consuming. Cropster ID is a plugin for InDesign CS, CS2, and now CS3 that saves you

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InBrief: Helpful Products

DataLinker for InDesign CS3 Teacup Software, $399 www.teacupsoftware.com

Designers Toolbox Designers Toolbox, free www.designerstoolbox.com

Merging the contents of a database with an InDesign document can be a real pain, especially when it comes time to format that data to match the rest of your document. DataLinker for InDesign CS3 makes the process much easier by handling the data linking and formatting for you. It works with text files and ODBCcompliant databases, and it can use GREP to find and format data. It also supports scripting with InDesign’s XML Rules, which could save lots of time if you work with large databases and complex documents.

Just because your boss expects you to know everything doesn’t mean you have to spend your

off hours quizzing yourself on technical print and design details. Try pointing your browser to the Designers Toolbox Web site instead. This site is packed full of the things you need to know before jumping into a layout, such as paper and envelope sizes, folding styles, binding sizes and styles, special

Adobe TV Adobe, free tv.adobe.com Adobe TV sounds a lot like more video on your computer, and that’s pretty much what it is. Unlike most Internet videos, however, Adobe’s channel is actually worth watching. It hosts lots of how-to videos, tutorials, and examples of designers in action. There’s always something to learn, and new content is added all the time. Best of all, you don’t have to download any special application to watch Adobe TV: Just use your favorite Web browser.

Adobe TV

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InBrief: Helpful Products

Eurostyle Next

Lightning Brain ImageLibraryLoader Rorohiko, free www.rorohiko.com

HTML characters, Web banner sizes, and more. It also includes a handy measurement conversion chart with fractional and decimal inches, millimeters, and points. Designers Toolbox

the imperfections and distortions earlier Eurostyle interpretations contained because they aren’t there. Eurostyle Next is as clean and cool as it looks. Badia Printools 5.0 Badia Software, $120 www.badiasoftware.com

Eurostyle Next LInotype, $356 for 15 faces www.linotype.com Eurostyle has been around since the 1960s, but until now it hasn’t had a proper digital treatment that really shows off what made the original so special. Eurostyle Next brings that classic modern look to life, thanks to Akira Kobayashi’s attention to detail. You won’t see

ImageLibraryLoader

Batch printing and problem files go together more often than we like. The team at Badia Software gets that, which is why they developed Badia Printools 5.0 for InDesign CS3. This plug-in can preflight documents before printing; batch-print 5,000 documents with a standardized printer settings configuration; maintain a log of print activity; and output to PDF as well as to output devices. It also can rename output streams without changing document names, which is useful for tracking documents during output.

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InDesign already supports displaying colors in palettes, and ImageLibraryLoader from Rorohiko adds that same capability for images. This free plug-in for

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InBrief: Helpful Products

InDesign CS, CS2, and CS3 lets you display multiple folders worth of images in a single palette, and you can drag images from the palette to your layout. If the images in your selected folder change, it can update to reflect that, too. Think of ImageLibraryLoader as a project-by-project image library manger.

Lightning Brain ImageLibraryLoader

Coffee Service Font Diner, $39 www.fontbros.com

made with fonts from the ‘80s. Coffee Service sports a lowball price: It’s under $40, and the license is good for up to five users.

Retro typefaces done right are a joy to look at, and Coffee Service from Font Diner fits the bill with a side of OpenType goodness. Its stylized look is a perfect throwback to classic 1950s diners, and the automatic ligatures ensure your designs don’t look like they were

Jeff Gamet is a consultant and speaker on graphic-design technologies and Mac OS X. He is a contributing writer for Design Tools Monthly and Layers magazine, and the author of The Designer’s Guide to Mac OS X. For a free issue of Design Tools Monthly, visit www.design-tools.com.

Coffee Service

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THE INDESIGN CONFERENCE THE CREATIVE SUITE CONFERENCE

THE CREATIVE SUITE CONFERENCE

APRIL 29 – MAY 1, 2008 TORONTO, CANADA

MAY 19 –22, 2008 NASHVILLE, TENNESSEE

THE INDESIGN CONFERENCE

JUNE 17–19, 2008 AUCKLAND, NEW ZEALAND

PHOTOSHOP LIVE CREATIVE SUITE LIVE

THE CREATIVE SUITE CONFERENCE THE WEB DESIGN AND DEVELOPER CONFERENCE

AUGUST 25 –29, 2008 MELBOURNE, AUSTRALIA

OCTOBER 13 –17, 2008 ORLANDO, FLORIDA

THE INDESIGN CONFERENCE MASTER CL ASS

NOVEMBER 10 – 14, 2008 SEATTLE, WASHINGTON

(The hard part is deciding which one to attend)

www.mogoevents.com contents

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another cartoon from yabB-adobe-doO. com by Russell Viers with David Blatner

Hey David... I’m trying to create a color swatch in InDesign, but it doesn’t work.

Did you try New Color Swatch in the Swatches Panel?

Yep...no luck! What about the Color Panel and playing with the sliders?

Tried it! EYEDROpPER?

No luck!! What color are you trying to make?

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PLAID!!

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InBrief: Helpful Products

The Blogosphere Erupts Long-time readers will recall that I co-host the InDesignSecrets blog and podcast with Anne-Marie Concecpción, but suddenly it seems as though everyone wants to offer InDesign content! There are a number of other good InDesign blogs and sites popping up around the Web these days, including: ❱❱ Instant InDesign: Gabriel Powell—who brought us the book Instant InDesign: Designing Templates for Fast and Efficient Page Layout—now follows up with a blog with helpful videos movies! ❱❱ CreativeMentor: Australian guru Neil Oliver is offering advice and video tutorials for beginning InDesign users at his new blog. ❱❱ Publicious: I’m enjoying reading this new blog from Mike Rankin, which isn’t strictly about InDesign but still counts, I think. Many other good blogs that have been around for a bit longer, including: ❱❱ TheInDesigner: Michael Murphy’s theInDesigner videocast and blog is a never-ending source of excellent lessons. ❱❱ BackChannel: Tim Cole (Senior InDesign Evangelist at Adobe) offers great insight into the internal workings of InDesign and the InDesign team. ❱❱ Creative Suite Podcast: Okay, this one isn’t just about InDesign, but Terry White does often include good InDesign tips! Now, granted, we’re biased here at InDesign Magazine, but we still think that even with all that awesome content out there, no one is covering

Acrobat 9: A sign of more good things to come?

InDesign as in-depth as this magazine is. So stay tuned and keep those subscriptions alive!—David Blatner

Acrobat 9 + Creative Suite 3.3 = CS4 Coming Soon? Speaking of the blogosphere, much has been said about the soon-to-be-released Acrobat 9, which will be bundled in a paid upgrade to Creative Suite 3.3. Not only does Acrobat 9 include the full Flash player built in (so SWF movies and Flash video will play in all versions of Acrobat, including Reader, without the need for QuickTime), but it has a host of prepress and other “creative professional” features. My favorite is the automatic overprint detection, which invokes overprint preview whenever a PDF file needs it. That means clients will no longer need to manually turn on the overprint preview when you use transparency and spot colors in your InDesign documents.

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It is also interesting to note that Adobe has released public betas of a few products that are quite clearly labeled with the CS4 moniker (including Dreamweaver and Fireworks, though not InDesign). Many commentators have pointed to Adobe’s 18–24 month upgrade cycle, plus the fact that Acrobat has shipped about 5 months before the Creative Suite in the past, plus these public betas… and they’ve started speculating that CS4 is coming before the end of this year. No comment from Adobe, of course, but you know that InDesign Magazine will go deep into all the new features as soon as we can. —David Blatner

New InDesign User Groups One of the best ways to learn InDesign is to join an InDesign User Group. We list all the ones we know of on pages 54–55, but we especially wanted to point out a few groups that are just now starting up. ❱❱ Amsterdam. Started by Instant InDesign author Gabriel Powell, the Amsterdam user group will meet every couple of months to share tips and tricks. ❱❱ Costa Rica. We’re pleased to announce the first user group in Central America, headed by Certified Expert and Instructor Carlos Garro. ❱❱ Reggio Emilia. This Northern Italian town is an easy drive from Bologna, Florence, and a number of other cities that I would love to visit someday (hint, hint). If you’re not near one of those, vsit the InDesign User Group web site for an ever-growing and frequently updated list. —Terri Stone

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Calendar t Special discoun esign available for InD ribers! Magazine subsc

Business Perspectives for Creative Leaders July 27–August 1 New Haven, Connecticut http://www.aiga.org/content.cfm/businessperspectives

Design Remixed: Andrew Sloat New York, New York July 16 http://aigany.org/events/details/7A14/ Join AIGA and Apple for the series, “Pro Sessions: Design Remixed,” and hear how professionals today are redefining their creative process. In this installment, graphic designer and videomaker Andrew Sloat speaks to his multidisciplinary and multimedia experiences. These events are free to all. The InDesign Conference June 17–18, Auckland, New Zealand July 7–9, Tokyo, Japan November 11–13, Seattle http://www.mogo-media.com/conferences/theindesign-conference/ The InDesign Conference is the most important InDesign event in the world! The Seattle conference is a “Master Class” held at the Adobe offices (this is a must-be-there event for trainers and high-end professionals).

Developed by the Yale School of Management and AIGA, ”Business Perspectives for Creative Leaders“ uses case studies, lectures, guest speakers and study groups to give creative leaders a more complete understanding of business and design through the eyes of business executives (i.e., clients). mastering the creative suite Los Angeles: July 31st Washington, D.C.: August 5 Chicago: August 14 http://www.mogoseminars.com Our very own Sandee Cohen is the star of this full-day seminar that covers the individual apps of Adobe’s Creative Suites, plus how they all work together. Catch it in a city near you! Photoshop Live & Creative Suite Live August 25–29 Melbourne, Australia http://www.mogoevents.com The premiere event for designers using Creative Suite. World-renowned experts will deliver in-depth sessions covering print-based, web, and mobile workflows, as well as XML and cross-media solutions.

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M08 Use code IDMM g in when register or nd for the Auckla en er ces at Melbourne conf mogoevents.com

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HOW International Design Awards Entry deadline: September 1 http://www.howdesign.com/ internationaldesignawards/ This global competition accepts entries in print design, photography, illustration, and more.

 o you have a conference, contest, or event for D our calendar? E-mail information to editor@indesignmag.com at least two months prior to event.

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InDesign User Groups

InDesign User Group Meetings Click the name of a chapter to go to its Web site. Please see your chapter Web site or contact the chairperson for meeting dates and locations. For more information about InDesign User Groups, see www.indesignusergroup.com.

United States Atlanta Paul Olmeda atlanta@indesignusergroup.com

Dallas A.J. Wood dallas@indesignusergroup.com

Madison Cathy Palmer madison@indesignusergroup.com

Reno Jim Cooper reno@indesignusergroup.com

Bay Area Mark Atchley sanfrancisco@indesignusergroup.com

Denver* Erica Gamet and Brian Reyman denver@indesignusergroup.com

Milwaukee Terry Rydberg milwaukee@indesignusergroup.com

Rochester Rebecca Shick rochester@indesignusergroup.com

Boston Meg Young boston@indesignusergroup.com

Des Moines Brian Cupp desmoines@indesignusergroup.com

Minneapolis Keith Gilbert minneapolis@indesignusergroup.com

Seattle Steve Laskevitch seattle@indesignusergroup.com

Central New Jersey Alison Cattelona centralnj@indesignusergroup.com

Detroit Donna Gniewek detroit@indesignusergroup.com

New York City Scott Citron newyorkcity@indesignusergroup.com

Tampa Sarah Greenlee Schweiger tampa@indesignusergroup.com

Chicago Jim Maivald chicago@indesignusergroup.com

Indianapolis Debbie Conway indianapolis@indesignusergroup.com

Orlando Edward Feldman orlando@indesignusergroup.com

Washington, D.C. Ken Chaletzky washingtondc@indesignusergroup.com

Cleveland Mari Hulick cleveland@indesignusergroup.com

Los Angeles John Lopez losangeles@indesignusergroup.com

Portland Paul Erdman portland@indesignusergroup.com

* See also www.idugdenver.net

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InDesign User Groups

InDesign User Group Meetings Click the name of a chapter to go to its Web site. Please see your chapter Web site or contact the chairperson for meeting dates and locations. For more information about InDesign User Groups, see www.indesignusergroup.com.

Africa

Canada

Europe

Johannesburg Carla Scholtz johannesburg@indesignusergroup.com

Ottawa Craig Boassaly ottawa@indesignusergroup.com

Amsterdam Gabriel Powell amsterdam@indesignusergroup.com

Asia

Toronto Jason Lisi toronto@indesignusergroup.com

Reggio Emilia, Italy Leonardo Agosti reggioemilia@indesignusergroup.com

Caribbean/Central America

Switzerland Haeme Ulrich switzerland@indesignusergroup.com

Nagoya http://study-room.info/id/ Australia Brisbane Eliot Harper brisbane@indesignusergroup.com Melbourne Tricia Ho melbourne@indesignusergroup.com

Costa Rica Carlos Garro costarica@indesignusergroup.com Puerto Rico José M. Ramos puertorico@indesignusergroup.com

London, UK Tony Harmer london@indesignusergroup.com Munich Wolf Eigner munich@indesignusergroup.com

Sydney Eliot Harper sydney@indesignusergroup.com

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InDex

The InDex Can’t find that article you saw in an earlier issue? Wondering whether we covered that obscure plug-in? Never fear, the InDex is here.

The first issue of InDesign Magazine was published in July 2004. Since then, we’ve cranked out more than a thousand pages on hundreds of related topics. While it’s possible to use Acrobat to simultaneously search all past issues of the magazine for one word or phrase, many readers have clamored for a formal index. The only other issue index we’ve compiled was in 2005. With only six issues under our belts,

we could squeeze the index into a regular issue. But with 24 issues to account for, that’s no longer sensible. Instead, the InDex will live as a PDF you can download for free from our Web site. We’ll update it soon after every issue ships to you, our readers. If you come across a topic you want to know more about, but it’s in an issue you don’t have, you’re not out of luck. We sell individual back issues at www. indesignmag.com/purchase.php. Download the InDesign Magazine InDex here. If the topic you’re looking for isn’t in the InDex, you have one more way to search: that PDF trick I mentioned. To make it work, all of your magazine issue PDFs must be in one folder. Open any issue in Acrobat, then hit ShiftCommand-F (Shift-Control-F on Windows). In the Search window that appears, be sure that you click the radio button that says “All PDF Documents in”, and in the dropdown menu below that, choose the folder in which you placed your magazine issues. You’re on your way to finding anything in any PDF!

Index for issues 1 through 24, July 2004 through July 2008

MAGAZINE

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This PDF Is for Your Eyes Only Please don’t share this PDF with anyone else. Make them buy their own darn magazine! To soften the blow, you can tell them about a special deal: Once they go to www.indesignmag.com/purchase.php and enter the discount code “friend”, they’ll receive a 1-year subscription for $39, or a 2-year subscription for $69.

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IDM 24  

Tijdschrift voor Indesign

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