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A LUXURIOUS GETAWAY WORTH R56 700

SOUTH

AFRICA

WIN

W W W. E L L E . C O . Z A

BEAUTY’S NEW LOOK

NATURAL AND NURTURED ë

STARRING ROSIE HUNTINGTON-WHITELEY

WINTER BUYS

COSY KNITS AND COATS

PERIODS STILL TABOO

WE ASK WHY

JUNE 2015 R37 (VAT INCL) OTHER COUNTRIES R32.95 (EXCL TAXES)

AFRICA REPORT WOMEN ON THE FRONT LINE RELATIONSHIPS

DOES AGE MATTER?

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Fashion What’s new #ELLEFashionCupboard One to watch Drotsky Guest style reporter The book that changed my life Athi-Patra Ruga Culture crunch Some of Africa’s June/July events Beauty Set the canvas Top country spas #ELLEBeautyCloset

SHOPPING 36 40 41

Shopping the trends Workshop Side-slit tunic Decoded Rolex

BEAUTY 116 117

ON THE COVER 44

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Rosie HuntingtonWhiteley Our cover star Frontline women Reporting on conflict zones Winter fashion: coats and knits WIN a luxurious weekend away Beat the chill

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Editor’s letter Contributors Masthead Cover behind the scenes ELLE digital Address book Subscribe Horoscopes ELLE Club Last word

Best buys If this bottle could talk Tried & tested Body scrubs My weekend in products Wellbeing Forest bathing

LIFESTYLE 126 130 134 136 138

Room for two Travel Passage To India Menu Pork belly ramen Inside Word ELLE Gear Opel Adam

FEATURES 56 58 62 66

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Age gap – could it be just a number? Chris Pine: Hollywood’s Prince Charming Living with narcolepsy Talking about periods: still taboo

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Fashion Closer Than Close ON THE COVER Rosie Huntington-Whiteley photographed by Kai Z Feng. Fashion: Anne-Marie Curtis; hair: Jen Atkins at The Wall Group; manicure: Carla Kay for Cloutier Remix; LA production: Barbie Duarte at 3 Star Productions; with thanks to Milk Studios; Rosie wears: Silk dress, leather and silk shoes and silk socks, all Prada

Fashion On the radar

@ ELLEmagazineSA

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EDITOR'S LETTER

R U N N I N G W I T H B E A U T I F U L W O LV E S

TA L K T O M E

@emiliegambade

@EmilieGambade

When we started to work on this issue, based on the theme ‘Wild and Natural Beauty’, I was wondering how best we could speak about the fascinating, emotional, deeply subjective and at times controversial topic of beauty without quickly getting stranded in a sea of clichés, resulting in bland, oft-repeated advice. The very idea of what’s beautiful is too often squeezed into predetermined boxes, qualities of which are then defended with equally unthinking ferocity. And yet absolute beauty – a combination of qualities, such as shape, colour, or form, that pleases our aesthetic senses, especially sight, according to the Oxford Dictionary – is still very much an elusive concept. To most of us, it remains a multifaceted, personal matter that depends on too many elements to be defined once for all. I still remember how, in school, it repeatedly filled the subject section of my philosophy examination papers, ‘Can one be indifferent to beauty?’ ‘Is there a privilege in beauty?’ ‘Is beauty essential to life?’ leaving us all in a state of wonder, looking desperately for some clever answer to a profoundly difficult question. To this day, I still believe that beauty is, in the most fabulous way possible, impalpable, indescribable, something that catches the sight and the heart, changes with time and is, of course, absolutely personal. This wouldn’t get me far in the philosophical debate, but knowing that beauty is, really, in the eye of the beholder, is sometimes ridiculously comforting. Years ago, a dear friend of mine gave me a book called Women Who Run With the Wolves – Contacting the Power of the Wild Woman. In it, the author, Dr Clarissa Pinkola Estés, reveals stories and fairy tales from different cultures around the globe that depict a woman’s psyche; through clever analogies and kind-hearted accounts, she encourages women to reconnect with ‘the fierce, healthy, visionary attributes of [their] instinctual nature’. The intercultural fables give us keys to open the doors to our hopefully complex minds, understand how we can be culturally programmed to think and often act in a certain way, and how to unlock our inner power and confidence to be fully, wholeheartedly ‘women’. Estés asks: ‘So why … do women keep trying to bend and fold themselves into shapes that are not theirs? I must say, from years of clinical observation of this problem, that most of the time it is not because of deep-seated masochism or a malignant dedication to self-destruction or anything of that nature. More often it is because the woman simply doesn't know any better. She is unmothered.’ Let it be that this issue of ELLE will allow you to find, in your own way, an image of beauty that makes you happy, without bending or folding. Let it be that this issue makes you know better: you are beautiful, you are strong, you are yourself.

PHOTOGRAPH: NIQUITA BENTO

Dear You,

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DF Armani Code Homme FPFC Advert - ELLE APRIL - Size: 210W x 275H


CREATIVE SPACE In this issue of ELLE we are celebrating all things natural, nurturing and beautifying, and we asked two of our contributors about natural beauty and escaping our fast-paced lives @Phetha_G

@Phetha_G

@ emmamenteath

@emmajanementeath


© F.L.C. / ADAGP, PARIS, 2015 I © DB - ADAGP, PARIS 2015 I © MAMO

V I C TO R I A & A L F R E D WAT E R F R O N T, C A P E TO W N - H Y D E PA R K , J O H A N N E S B U R G

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EDITOR EMILIE GAMBADE emilie@elle.co.za

@EmilieGambade

ART ART DIRECTOR Veronica Exter veronica@elle.co.za SENIOR DESIGNER Jo Youens jo@elle.co.za JUNIOR DESIGNER Bonolo Ramathebane elle@elle.co.za EDITORIAL ASSISTANT EDITOR PRINT Tidi Benbenisti tidi@elle.co.za ASSISTANT EDITOR DIGITAL Holly Meadows holly@elle.co.za CHIEF COPY EDITOR Deborah Rudman deborah@elle.co.za FASHION SENIOR FASHION EDITOR Tarryn Oppel tarryn@elle.co.za JUNIOR FASHION EDITOR Nicole Newman nicole@elle.co.za FASHION & FEATURES ASSISTANT Ntombenhle Shezi ntombenhle@elle.co.za CREATIVE ASSISTANT Niquita Bento niquita@elle.co.za INTERNS Michelle van der Westhuizen, Phethagatso Motumi, Ayanda Molefe, Boipelo Chababa, Jabulile Sopete, Jaime Waddington, Sarah Hilton-Barber BEAUTY JUNIOR BEAUTY EDITOR Maybe Corpaci maybe@elle.co.za BEAUTY INTERN Eeden la Grange

READ

ADVERTISING ADVERTISING PRODUCTION CO-ORDINATOR Naazneen Baulackey naazneen@elle.co.za SENIOR ACCOUNT MANAGER (JHB) Beverly Mwallo beverly@elle.co.za 011 801 9171 ACCOUNTS MANAGERS (JHB) Thalia Pallotta tpp@futurejhb.co.za 011 485 3378 Jessica Fairman jess@elle.co.za 011 801 9077 Tania Minnaar tania@elle.co.za 011 801 9171 ACCOUNTS MANAGER (CPT) Jacelize du Preez jacelize.olivetree@gmail.com 021 045 0124

@emiliegambade

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DISTRIBUTION BY RNA, Bianca Davis 011 248 3607 PRINTED BY CTP Cape Town REPRODUCTION BY Hirt & Carter, Cape Town TRADEMARK NOTICE The ELLE trademark and logo are owned in Canada by France-Canada Editions et Publications, Inc. and in the rest of the world by Hachette Filipacchi Presse (France), each LAGARDERE ACTIVE Group companies. ELLE is used under licence from the trademark owners.

LAGARDÈRE ACTIVE CHAIRMAN AND CEO LAGARDÈRE ACTIVE Denis Olivennes CEO ELLE FRANCE & INTERNATIONAL Constance Benqué CEO ELLE INTERNATIONAL Fabrice A Plaquevent CEO ELLE INTERNATIONAL media licences François Coruzzi BRAND MANAGEMENT OF ELLE Françoise-Marie Santucci SVP/INTERNATIONAL DIRECTOR OF ELLE Valéria Bessolo Llopiz SVP/DIRECTOR OF INTERNATIONAL MEDIA LICENSES, DIGITAL DEVELOPMENT & SYNDICATION Mickael Berret ELLE INTERNATIONAL PRODUCTIONS Charlotte Deffe, Virginie Dolata DEPUTY SYNDICATION TEAM MANAGER Thérèse Genevois SYNDICATION COORDINATOR Olivia Ciardi COPYRIGHTS MANAGER & DIGITAL SYNDICATION Séverine Laporte www.ellearoundtheworld.com INTERNATIONAL AD SALES HOUSE: LAGARDÈRE GLOBAL ADVERTISING CEO Claudio Piovesana claudio.piovesana@lagardere-active.com Lagardère Global Advertising POSTAL 124 RUE DANTON, 92300 LEVALLOIS-PERRET, FRANCE

WORLD’S LEADING FASHION MAGAZINE – 44 INTERNATIONAL EDITIONS Argentina - Australia - Belgium - Brazil - Bulgaria - Canada - China - Croatia - Czech Republic - Denmark - France - Finland - Germany - Greece - Hong Kong - Hungary - India - Indonesia - Italy - Japan - Korea - Mexico - Norway - Oriental - Poland - Portugal - Quebec - Romania - Russia - Serbia - Singapore - Slovenia - South Africa - Spain - Sweden - Taiwan - Thailand The Netherlands - Turkey - Ukraine - UK - US - Vietnam

ELLE (ISSN 1025-9791) June 2015. Editorial contributions are welcome and should be sent to The Editor, ELLE, PO Box 15793, Vlaeberg 8018. All due care will be taken with material submitted, but the magazine and publishers cannot be held responsible for loss or damage. ELLE assumes no responsibility to return unsolicited editorial, graphic or other material. All rights in letters and unsolicited editorial and graphic material will be treated as unconditionally assigned for publication and copyright purposes and material will be subject to ELLE’s unrestricted right to edit and comment editorially. ELLE is fully protected by copyright and nothing may be reprinted in whole or part without written permission from the publisher. While reasonable precautions have been taken to ensure the accuracy of advice and information given to readers, the editor, publisher and proprietor cannot accept responsibility for any damage or inconvenience that may arise therefrom.

Contributors Masthead.indd 2

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Elegance is an attitude Kate Winslet

Conquest Classic

Longines_HQ • Visual: KW4_CC6 • Magazine: ELLE_South_Africa May_June (CH) •


BEHIND THE SCENES

UNCOVERED ROSIE HUNTINGTON-WHITELEY two days, two locations: a rented house in Bel Air and Milk Studios

The cover by numbers

green juice upon arrival for the cover star

suitcases of clothes, including Prada, Miu Miu and Gucci

start of the shoot on day 1

She’s been called the epitome of an English country rose. Blessed with a fresh and unpretentious beauty – with a natural pout, that enviable English skin – clearly healthy and filled with a zest for life, Rosie HuntingtonWhiteley, as shot for ELLE UK, is the perfect choice for the cover of our Natural and Wild Beauty issue. From dance workouts at the gym to Pilates and yoga sessions, this modelactress aficionado makes keeping healthy look like fun. Add to the success recipe a dose of serious ambition, and Rosie is our #OneToWatch of the month! Emilie Gambade

necklaces from the likes of Eddie Borgo and Chanel

pairs of shoes

PHOTOGRAPHS: KAI Z FENG, SUPPLIED

pairs of earrings from the likes of Maria Black & Prada

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DIGITAL SOUTH

AFRICA

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WIN

A LUXURIOUS GETAWAY WORTH R56 700

W W W. E L L E . C O . Z A

BEAUTY’S NEW LOOK

NATURAL AND NURTURED ë

WINTER BUYS

T H E W O R L D’S B I G G E S T- S E L L I N G FA S H I O N M A G A Z I N E

COSY KNITS AND COATS

®

PERIODS STILL TABOO

WE ASK WHY

V O L .20

JUNE 2015 R37 (VAT INCL) OTHER COUNTRIES R32.95 (EXCL TAXES)

N O.0 3 E L L E .C O. Z A ELLE June Cover Rosie.indd 1

WIN

STARRING ROSIE HUNTINGTON-WHITELEY

AFRICA REPORT WOMEN ON THE FRONT LINE RELATIONSHIPS

With each issue we’re giving away perfume to the best #ELLESelfie. Win 1 X 30ml BOSS JOUR, 1 X 30ml BOSS MA VIE or 1 X 50ML BOSS NUIT fragrance.

DOES AGE MATTER? 2015/04/30 11:13 AM

TOP @ELLEMAGAZINESA INSTAGRAM POSTS

#ELLESELFIE Tweet or Instagram us your June issue #ELLESelfie to @ELLEMagazineSA and we’ll publish the best on ELLE.co.za

Thank you for giving us one more reason to celebrate! 226 likes Our editor @emiliegambade on set shooting for the 2015 Fashion Revolution Campaign #behindthescenes 145 likes What a wonderful table setting! #MIMCOSS15 new collection launch lunch @_Mimco 207 likes The most exquisite orchids just arrived in the ELLE office from #VinceCamutoSA How stunning? 151 likes

@boipelo_jean

#ASKELLE

Beautiful illustrations of our April beauty story In Character by @ana_kuni 215 likes Beauty essentials on set #JuneIssue #ELLEBeauty 202 likes

@Miss_Zeanhle: How do you build long-lasting connections and friendships while working as an ELLE fashion intern? B: With any friendship, trust and being supportive goes a long way in creating connections. ELLE Belles work as a tight unit and rely on one other, trust is at the core of it all, even as an intern.

MUST WATCH! Behind-the-scenes video, on set at our June issue knitwear shoot

@MissLesegoS: How has @ELLEmagazineSA contributed to growing talent via their fashion internship? B: Besides being exposed to international best practices in the industry regardless of your talent, I would say diligence and attention to detail is a lesson best learnt at ELLE. @Karyschka: How do you decide what to wear every day? And are the horror stories true about being a fashion intern? B: LOL a tough question. I would say I use the well-known outfit algorithm (weather + mood + trend + what haven’t I worn yet?) * Horror stories were created to scare, not to teach; we intern to learn. T W E E T

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Who’s in the hot seat this month? Fashion intern Boipelo Jean Chababa answers your tweets.

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GUESS.COM A R T D I R : PAU L M A R C I A N O P H : P Ü L M A N N S

G U E S S ? © 2 015


HERE’S YOUR CHANCE TO KICK-START YOUR FASHION CAREER WITH ELLE AND MRP

CALL

FOR

ENTRY

Do you have the creativity, passion, vision and business acumen to join the fast-evolving African fashion industry? Are you an emerging talent ready to elevate your brand to new heights of creativity and reach?

Calling all rising design talent to enter our annual ELLE Rising Star Design Award competition in association with MRP. For full competition details, prizes as well as more info on how to enter the 2015 competition, go to ELLE.co.za today.

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PHOTOGRAPHY: KRISTIN-LEE MOOLMAN; SENIOR FASHION EDITOR: TARRYN OPPEL

THE ELLE RISING STAR DESIGN AWARD COMPETITION IS BACK.

2015/04/30 4:21 PM


THAKOON

THAKOON

BURBERRY PRORSUM

DIANE VON FURSTENBE

DOLCE & GABBANA

OUR EDIT OF THIS SEASON’S HOTTEST FASHION AND BEAUTY TRENDS

DIANE VON FURSTENBERG

DIANE VON FURSTENBERG

Winter blooms, fallen leaves, rain clouds and the earth’s most natural textures – the sunshine lost is our gain

BURBERRY PRORSUM

IMAGES: PICTURENET / COMPILED BY: TARRYN OPPEL

N AT U R E ’ S CHOICE


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Time to wrap ourselves in the chunkiest knitwear. Here we highlight our favourite wool accessories from rising designers and take to the runway for some cosy couture inspiration

CALVIN KLEIN

HERMÈS

GIVENCHY

STELLA McCARTNEY

CALVIN KLEIN

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Quick fire with Nicholas Coutts What’s the biggest challenge when producing a scarf? Finding unique and interesting materials to work with. Also the time constraint – hand-woven items can be very time-consuming, but the end result is very rewarding. How long does it take to produce one scarf? Two to three days. Which design is your favourite? The one I made for Jackie Burger. The colouring was charcoal and grey and made with saggy mohair wool. If you could see anyone wearing your scarves, who would it be? A strong confident woman who isn’t afraid to stand out, someone like Solange Knowles. How much does a scarf retail for? From R1 500 to R4 000. The one pictured (left) is R2  350.

BAG THIS! Quick fire with Tamara Chérie

From top Shaggy knit, R1 399, Anna Scott Ribbed knit, R3 000, Replay Peplum knit, R1 699, Ted Baker at Stuttafords Pastel knit, R759, Zara Cable knit, R599, Old Khaki Monochrome knit, R799, Mango

What’s the biggest challenge when producing a bag? Ensuring the high quality of leather workmanship. What is your favourite colourway? Deep navy – it’s timeless and complements all outfits beautifully. It’s a great colour for an investment piece. If you could see one person wearing your knit bag, who would it be? Actress Diane Kruger. How long does it take to produce one bag? The handmade process of felting merino lambswool and kid mohair into finished yarn is quite a lengthy one, involving many steps to obtain the finished material. Everything, including the knitting, lining and leatherwork? All in all, seven working days. How much does it retail for? The bag retails at R7 800 and comes in a beautiful storage bag to keep your purchase in the best condition.

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GIVENCHY CALVIN KLEIN

As the season changes, we look to the trees where designers have clearly looked too – say hello to the tones of the times

VALENTINO

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TO THE LE AVES


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From left to right: R4 600, Ted Baker at Stuttafords R1  500, Jorge at Stuttafords R2 299, Express R2 799, Witchery 21 @ ELLEmagazineSA

STELLA McCARTNEY

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ISABEL MARANT

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Somewhere on the greyscale is where we love our coats to be – think thunderstorms and overcast weather for cover-up inspiration


Decosprint satchel R2 999; Origami tote R2 999

Hover mini sling R799

FROM THE

#ELLEFASHION CUPBOARD MIMCO

Luxury brand MIMCO is renowned for its high-fashion bags and accessories

SENIOR FASHION EDITOR: TARRYN OPPEL / CREATIVE ASSISTANT AND PHOTOGRAPHS: NIQUITA BENTO

This iconic Australian label offers exclusivity in design. We now welcome a new world from MIMCO entitled Code: Afriquette – a world with an ancient global clashing aesthetic. A world where futurist elements meet historic tribal. A place of dynamic silhouettes, prints and colour. Accessible luxury, with unique touches, for women who want to dress up, explore and play.

Kinetica circle hip, R1 999 Mechanica circle bag, R2 999

Limited edition Automaton tote R3 999

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Luxathon hardcase, R1 299

Tribeatle pouch, R999

Decomania day bag, R2 999

SENIOR FASHION EDITOR: TARRYN OPPEL / CREATIVE ASSISTANT AND PHOTOGRAPHS: NIQUITA BENTO

Decomania mini bag, R1 699

.CO.ZA

Go online for our 5 MIMCO bags of the day

‘It is truly an exciting mash-up of intricate details and bold aesthetics. The collection is vibrant, leaving no room for simplicity; it’s complex, yet so strikingly modern.’

Get a Mim pouch free when you spend R600 or more at a MIMCO store (valued at R399)

TARRYN OPPEL

SENIOR FASHION EDITOR

* EXCLUSIVE TO ELLE READERS

Launchina hardcase, R1 299

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Drotsky Not influenced by seasons or trends, designer Elaine Du Plessis is forging her fashion future by taking elements from her past. Nicole Newman explores what makes up her creative consciousness

When women of all ages emerged from the wings of the studio space at the launch of Jackie Burger’s Salon 58, silence fell over the crowd. Gliding out while Lindiwe Suttle sang to the music of an accordion player, they radiated poise, elegance and beauty. The women were all dressed in garments that captured our attention at first glance. Hand-pleated skirts, off-the-shoulder pinstripe pantsuits and full dresses all took a turn. These designs were Drotsky. A name few people had heard before and now one that many can’t stop talking about. Drotsky is local designer Elaine Du Plessis’s newest venture – and she has big plans for the label. ‘I want to slow things down from the design perspective and not rush along with seasons and collections. I want to get to know the women I am designing for and grow a sustainable business based not just on trends but on longevity,’ she says. Du Plessis spent her childhood in the workroom of her great-grandmother, surrounded by boxes of trims and bottles of buttons. The unusual name for her creative outlet is, in fact, her great-grandmother’s surname; she had escaped from Poland and supported her family by making clothes. ‘I have all these photo albums of dresses she made from the 1930s to the 1990s.

I treasure them not only because they were hers but also because they are a fascinating record of fashion styles in South Africa over those decades.’ In her final year of studying fashion design at the Tshwane University of Technology, Du Plessis, along with a group of classmates, created a menswear label that was chosen to show at South Africa Fashion Week in 2005. Drotsky stretches beyond a collection or a brand – it is a platform through which Du Plessis intends to express all of her interests. ‘Today it might be a vintage look and tomorrow it might be something minimal. The collection will form its own story over time but at the moment I’m creating individual pieces I love that speak to the individual women they are created for.’ Although she dreams of one day being a hermitic ceramicist, playing the harmonica in a cottage in the Karoo, she won’t be doing this any time soon: Drotsky is her priority. When asked who is her favourite international designer, she barely hesitates before naming Phoebe Philo, who she admires for being sensitive and intelligent and ‘seems to know where everyone is headed before they do’. We will be keeping a close eye on Drotsky in the future – Elaine Du Plessis could well follow in the footsteps of her role model.

IMAGES: SUPPLIED

.CO.ZA

GO ONLINE

to see inside Elaine Du Plessis’s studio 24 @ ELLEmagazineSA

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Elijah Semosa of online African fashion platform Urban Fashion Lifestyle snaps the coolest style on the city streets €Neema Nouse, 22 Psychologist, Joburg @neemanouse, @neemanouse

| Thando Zisimelance, 29 Fashion Designer, Pretoria @nothandozi thandozisimelane

}Hazel Klaas, 17 Student, Joburg @hazelklaas

€Xiluva Nyathi, 23 Student, Joburg , @xiluks @xiluks_retro

€Andile Twala, 21 Fashion Design Student, Pretoria @iamsaggitarius

COMPILED BY: NIQUITA BENTO / ELIJAH SEMOSA

@UFL_AFRICA; URBANFASHIONLIFESTYLE.COM

~Yaone Refentse, 19 Fashion Design Student, Joburg @yaone_refentse @ya1_an_only

|Yaone Refentse (see above left)

We invite you to try your hand at being an ELLE guest Style Reporter. For info, email Tidi@elle.co.za

|Thabiso Maglosa, 23 Fashion Designer, Bloemfontein

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GO TO ELLE.CO.ZA for 5 minutes with Elijah Semosa

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Gertie Williams (centre) in 1956

CH A N G ED MY LI FE AT H I - PAT R A R U GA

Each month, we invite prominent people to tell us about their most powerful reads. Here, the 2015 Standard Bank Young Artist for Performance Art, Athi-Patra Ruga, shares with us what kept him turning the pages… Defiant Desire: Gay and Lesbian Lives in South Africa. It was compiled by Mark Gevisser and Edwin Cameron.

If I remember correctly, she was arrested for stealing her grandpa’s clothes, as she had to dress as a man to find work in 1950s Cape Town. That perspective was probably my first sign of maturity.

How old were you when you discovered it?

Did the anthology influence your views?

It was in 1996: I was 12 years old and had been an avid reader for some years. I discovered it in the East London Central Library, where I used to go for chess practice. I’m sure that it was my curiosity about queer culture that made me relate to this anthology of local experience.

It gave me a sense of history and belonging, and it presented me with a wide selection of characters and heroes. It led to the destruction of the idea that being gay is ‘unAfrican’, as, for the first time, I was introduced to a cross-section of South African stories from the whole ‘rainbow’: black, urban stories presented in a sophisticated manner.

Was there a particular character who grabbed your imagination?

Is there a contribution in it that left a lasting impression on you?

The story of Gertie Williams caught my attention. A member of a gang, the Flying Tigers, Gertie had the most fascinating jobs, including caddy, ‘garden boy’, trawler fisherman and more. For me, a young boy growing up in an industrial town, her story was a source of colour and fantasy.

An essay by activist Zackie Achmat entitled ‘My Childhood as an Adult Molester – a Salt River Moffie’. I just believed it was the most badass title for anything! I remember it still, because I use it as a mantra for a phase in life.

What emotions did it inspire in you?

In retrospect, I know that it nudged me towards a desire to bear witness to my times. I believe that artistic expression of any form carries that responsibility.

How did you come across it?

Gertie [somehow] embodied various aspects of all the women who had raised me until that point, from her sexual orientation to her vices and style.

OTHER BOOKS ON MY PERSONAL SHORT LIST Frontiers: The Epic of South Africa’s Creation and the Tragedy of the Xhosa People by Noel Mostert. It took me four years to finish and it’s a priceless historical piece. The Designer Scam by Colin McDowell … an eye-opening indictment of the fashion world in 1994. It somehow still rings true after all these years.

PHOTOGRAPHS: SUPPLIED

What’s the name of the book?

Can you sum up its effect on you in a few words?

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YOUR GUIDE TO THE HOT TEST HAPPENINGS IN AFRICA 07.06.15 – 08.06.15

CAPE TOWN

CELEBRATE LIFE FESTIVAL

14.06.15 – 18.06.15

MOROCCO

GNAOUA WORLD MUSIC FESTIVAL 05.06.15 – 07.06.15

REUNION

SAKIFO MUSIK FESTIVAL

0 0 1 Everything holistic and healthy, from workshops and

demonstrations to food and yoga-belly dancing, will be available at this festival, which celebrates conscious living. The eclectic line-up promises entertainment, life-enhancing options and various products and services to feed your soul. Celebratelife.co.za

0 0 2 Morocco’s biggest summer festival will let you lose yourself in dance and sounds. Celebrating the ancestral contribution of mystical Gnaoua musicians together with international performers will make the fascinating festival explode with life. And there’s usually an impromptu jam session. Festival-gnaoua.net/en/

0 0 3 Vibrant and eclectic, this famous festival on the Indian Ocean island promises a great musical weekend. With genres from pop and rock to jazz and traditional music, there’ll be something for all fans visiting St Pierre. So get out your French dictionary and buy a ticket – this festival will be unforgettable. Sakifo.com/festival

29.05.15 – 28.06.15

JOBURG

TREVOR NOAH LOST IN TRANSLATION

27.06.15 – 28.06.15

KENYA

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NAIROBI ART AND BEER FESTIVAL

29.05.15 – 06.06.15

JOBURG

MAFIKIZOLO HOMECOMING – OUR STORY

0 0 4 Star of Daywalker and soon The Daily Show, our favourite funny guy is back for another tour of South Africa. This time, he brings his comedic timing to tales of his experiences abroad. To secure your seat, visit Computicket or Trevornoah.com

0 0 5 Arts and craft beer come together in a creation of genre. Artists and innovators put their best brush stroke forward in exhibitions, live performances and fashion shows together with brewers and microbrewers to mix and match with intercultural cuisine. Artandbeerfest.co.ke

0 0 6 With a music career spanning almost 20 years, various

awards, a bus stop feature at every wedding and a spectacular fan base, Mafikizolo tells its story through music and narrative, as special guests share their tales of how the group came about. Book at Computicket.

FILMS TO WATCH THIS MONTH: MAN + SUPERMAN (13 JUNE)

In this film adaptation of George Bernard Shaw’s play, Ralph Fiennes plays the radical Jack Tanner, a known bachelor tied down to the heiress Ann (Indira Varmer). Shrugging off vows he took to be wed, Turner flees to Spain and when faced with The Devil himself, begins to question what it means to be a man.

BLACK SEA (19 JUNE)

This nail-biting thriller stars Jude Law as Submarine Captain Robinson, who puts together a team of the best and the baddest misfits to find a rumoured ship of gold in the Black Sea. With the lustrous bars split evenly between them, things take a turn for the worse once they realise that the more people ‘abandon ship’, the more they can gain.

MAGIC MIKE XXL (3 JULY)

Back and shaking it off for another instalment, this sequel resumes three years after Mike (Channing Tatum) leaves the stripper life. His journey takes him back to Myrtle Beach for a final blowout performance. Expect slick dance moves and the sounds of women cheering (not only on-screen).

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1. Clarins Daily Energizer Cleansing Gel, R125 for 75ml 2. Nivea Q10 Plus Anti-Wrinkle Energising Day Cream SPF 15, R109

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1. Chanel Lumière D’été Illuminating Powder, R870 2. MAC Prep + Prime Natural Radiance Base Lumière, R420

‘Apply just enough foundation working from the outside in – this will give you a matte finish all round, but will leave the t-zone looking a little lighter and glowy.’ Lucoh Mhlongo, Elizabeth Arden National Make-up Artist

1. Elizabeth Arden Flawless Finish Perfectly Satin 24HR Makeup Broad Spectrum Sunscreen SPF 15, R365 2. Clinique Chubby Stick Sculpting Contour, R280 each

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1. Inglot Multi Colour Highlighter in #88, R299 2. Smashbox L.A. Lights Lip & Cheek Colour in Venice Beach Bronze, R320

LAID-BACK ALLURE

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to get the laid-back-allure look

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A new hairstyle is the easiest way to introduce change into your everyday look: for the cold season, surprisingly, fresh-from-thesea waves are a must. Treat damp hair with a volumising mousse or curl enhancer to ensure a lasting effect. Create the coils you want by tonging your hair into loose waves and, to set the look, use a strong hairspray. Mermaid waves have never looked better sported with coats and scarves! 1. Kérastase Fix Fabulous Precise Fixing Spray, R295 2. Kevin Murphy Motion Lotion Curl Enhancing Lotion, R350 3. ghd Curve Wand, R1 899

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A B LO O M S PA R E T R E AT , CULLINAN If what you’re after is maximum relaxation engulfed by the beauty of nature, the Abloom Spa Retreat is the place for you. The Spa uses only the best natural African products, and treatments take place in the privacy of your own room if you are staying at the lodge.

N AT U R E ’ S N U R TU R E From faraway forests to secluded treatment rooms with breathtaking views, we present South African’s natureimmersed spas for self-indulgence you can feel good about

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for our list of top city spa breaks

TOP TREATMENT: Using a combination of light stretching techniques and specially designed facial and body dumbbells to relax and de-stress the body, the Full Body African Wood Massage, R660 for 90 minutes, will relax and restore the body while leaving skin soft and nourished. Abloom.co.za

B U S H M A N S K LO O F S PA , C L A N W I L L I A M Tucked into an ecological oasis in the Cederberg, where the surroundings themselves are therapeutic, the Bushmans Kloof Spa is a true sanctuary. Let go and lose yourself in the Western Cape’s beautiful landscape. TOP TREATMENT: A holistic journey that targets all areas of the body, based on ancient African traditions, the aromatic power of fynbos and wild rooibos mixed with healing plant oils. The Cederberg ‘Soul’ution, R1 200 for 90 minutes, is real indulgence. The best part? It’s done in the secluded reserve’s scenic riverside. Bushmanskloof.co.za

B A B Y LO N S TO R E N G A R D E N S PA , D R A K E N ST E I N VA L L E Y The beautiful gardens of the Babylonstoren farm in the Cape Winelands is the home of an intimate and tranquil Spa, whose philosophy goes hand in hand with the rhythm of the seasons. The perfect getaway for a weekend not far from the city. TOP TREATMENT: In a marble Turkish bath, The Private Hammam Water Ritual, R1 290 for 60 minutes. The treatment includes a full body exfoliation, dynamic flexing, a body, head and scalp massage – crowned by a nature’s feast from the Babylonstoren vegetable garden. Babylonstoren.com

PIETERMARITZBURG Perfectly located to help you forget time and reality, Karkloof Safari Spa is a destination that radiates luxe tranquillity. The 17 spacious treatment rooms boast wonderful views over the wild African bush and surrounding garden – harmony of the senses is assured. TOP TREATMENT: A package including multiple treatments is highly recommended. We love the idea of the Chaokao Journey option, R3 000, a whole day filled with coconut-based treatments aimed at preparing the skin for the winter months by increasing moisture levels and suppleness. Karkloofsafarispa.com

TEXT: MAYBE CORPACI / PHOTOGRAPHS: SUPPLIED

K A R K LO O F S A F A R I S PA ,

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THE MINIMALIST Filled with African and Amazonian botanicals to refresh and hydrate, these moisturisers shield skin from environmental effects and ensure plumped, radiant skin. Keep them in the fridge for the ultimate cooling effect. BOTANē Skin Actives Daily Revival R465 for 100ml, and Skin Actives Peptide Serum R575 for 25ml

THE NEW-IN The famous local franchise recently launched a new Skincare Collection suitable for all skin types. Get ready for an at home-salon experience at an affordable price point.

FROM THE

Sorbet Salon Skin Facial Tissue Oil R160 and Hydro Skin Day Cream R155

#ELLEBEAUTY CLOSET

THE NOT-SO-ORDINARY The Ordinary Skincare Company range boasts with moisturising, antiinflammatory and anti-oxidants effects on even the most sensitive skin. What sets the products apart from the rest? They contain no perfume, preservatives, emulsifiers, petrochemicals, heavy metals, essential oils or mineral oils. Ordinary Eye Gel R450 and Moisturising Balm, R328

THE COMPACT With packaging that is beautifully hand-crafted and wild ingredients that are hand-harvested in remote areas of southern Africa, Rain’s products are pure nature in a jar. What’s there not to love? Rain Biologie Cuticle Balm, R69, Rain Bee Essential Beeswax + Shea Body Polish, R85, and Rain Black Amber Hand Lotion, R69

COMPILED BY: MAYBE CORPACI / EDITORIAL ASSISTANT: LAUREN DE BEER / PHOTOGRAPHS: NIQUITA BENTO

From anti-ageing elixirs and cuticle balms to body polishes and eye gels, these local products have one thing in common: the ability to quench your skin’s thirst

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ENTRIES OPEN Calling all aspiring South African businesswomen! The 2015 ELLE Boss Award in partnership with the Veuve Clicquot Business Woman Award is open for entries. We wish to empower women, encourage female creativity, highlight entrepreneurial spirit and acknowledge corporate managerial skills and responsibility. WHO IS SHE? • Natural leader in business • Entrepreneurial and creative • Not afraid of hard work • Business-minded • Confident • Strong and determined • Humble • Intuitive and follows her instinct • Social-media savvy • Risk taker • Always challenges the norm • In control of her finances • Not afraid to ask • Thinks out of the box • Never gives up

Could you be the next ELLE BOSS? In partnership with the Veuve Clicquot Business Woman Award, we are searching for women matching the ENTREPRENEUR or CORPORATE category. You can either self-nominate, with a mentor or manager seconding your application. Or you can nominate someone else, as long as they have given consent.

E N T R I E S C L O S E 1 5 J U LY 2 0 1 5 G O TO E L L E .C O. Z A TO E N T E R & S U B M I T T H E E L L E B O S S D I G I TA L E N T RY FO R M Terms & conditions apply

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1. Leather shirt, R13 999, Isabel Marant at Studio 8 2.Slogan top, R299, Mango 3. Colour-blocked knit, R1 899, Jigsaw 4. Denim shirt, R699, Mango 5. Court heels, R1 499, Aldo 6. Bomber jacket, R1 199, Topshop 7. Checked shirt, R799, Mango 8. Trousers, R550, Old Khaki 9. Slogan sweater, R1 799, Calvin Klein 10. Faux-leather miniskirt, R699, Guess 11. Beanie with mesh, R49.99, MRP 12. Top-handle bag, R49 000, Louis Vuitton 13. Wedged boots, R1 399, Zara 14. Spectacles, R2 150, Just Cavalli at SDM Eyewear 15. Sneakers, R1 400, Reebok

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1. Dress, R999, Zara 2. Felt hat, R390, Tessa Design 3. Knit cardigan, R499, Old Khaki 4. Lace bra, R439, Topshop 5. Peplum knit, R1 699, Ted Baker at Stuttafords 6. Oversized knit, R599, Cotton On 7. Lace pants, R449, Forever 21 8. Studded bag, R759, Zara 9. Pleated skirt, R5 795, Hugo Boss 10. Lilac mesh top, R479, River Island 11. Knit vest, R350, Second Time Around 12. Mary-Jane heels, R899, Topshop 13. Knee-high boots, R1 399, Zara 14. Studded courts, R9 000, Gucci 15. Sunglasses, R2 749, Retrosuperfuture

Sheer separates, soft colours and lovely hints of lace give femininity a newfound freedom – add suede and make it modern

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cool Stick with simple silhouettes and you’ll never stray from the fashion path – graphic shapes (think circles and stripes) give these pieces added effect

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for our top 10 coats

1. Oversized knit, R799, Jo Borkett 2. Trousers, R589, Topshop 3. Sunglasses, R4 140, Gucci at Safilo 4. Shirt, R10 690, Burberry 5. Sleeveless blazer, R1 399, Mango 6. Hi-top sneakers, R850, Superga 7. Trousers, R8 390, Burberry 8. Boxy top, R799, Mango 9. Colour-blocked bag, R779, River Island 10. Knit, R300, Kelso at Edgars 11. Striped top, R799, Jigsaw 12. Wide-legged pants, R4 380, Max Mara 13. Block-heeled sandals, R1 199, River Island 14. Ankle boots, R1 599, Aldo 15. Brogues, R899, Zara

IMAGES: NIQUITA BENTO / SENIOR FASHION EDITOR: TARRYN OPPEL / JUNIOR FASHION EDITOR: NICOLE NEWMAN / FASHION INTERN: MICHELLE VAN DER WESTHUIZENN AND BOIPELO CHABABA

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to see how street-style stars wear the widebrimmed hat

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felt hat Blend into the season with a felt hat in autumn hues – this accessory always comes out on top

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You’ve seen it in the stores but possibly weren’t sure what it was – a dress? A top? A little bit of both? It’s a side-slit tunic and it’s the newest item on our It list. Here’s how this versatile separate can be worn

GO TO ELLE.CO.ZA

to see how the ELLE team wear side-slit tunics

The knitted side-slit tunic is a piece that every woman should have in her wardrobe come winter. The knitwear will keep you warm while the slits give a playful feel to covering up for the season ahead. Side-slitted knitwear comes in all shapes and styles. Pair a long-sleeved knit with a high-waisted midi-skirt. If you’re willing to take more of a risk, pair a sleeveless side-slit tunic with a pair of culottes, allowing some skin to show and playing with a balance of volume.

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Layering with different textures and lengths is what gives this piece street-style appeal. With clean lines and edgy detailing, Susie Lau (right) shows that she is on top of the trend as she pairs her oversized top with structured shorts. Side-slits can extend from tunics into sheer shirts. If a slit shirt is your separate of choice, layer it with a boxy top and avoid showing too much skin. Another street-style star who updated this look is Australian blogger Nicole Warne (above). Opting for an off-the-shoulder structured top and pairing it with structured trousers in the same pattern, Warne shows she knows how to make a statement but still keep her look classic.

Take this separate to the office by wearing it over a crisp white shirt to create an unexpected, yet still appropriate, workwear style. Forget all the notions of bright colours being a no-no at the office and diversify your look. Take cues from Céline and Stella McCartney Spring/Summer 2015: the secret to pulling off a bright side-slit tunic is to pair it with neutral tailored pants or a structured pencil skirt. The side-slit tunic is a statement all on its own, so keep your other separates minimal.

T H E S I D E - S L I T T U N I C I S A S TAT E M E N T A L L O N I T S O W N

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KNIT SLIT

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DECODED

mastering the mechanics One man’s dream for watch perfection created the Rolex empire, which expands with each tick of time and technology ROLEX E L E M E N TA L PROTECTION The hermetically sealed Oyster case made Rolex the first waterproof and dustproof watch in 1926.

A WAY WITH WORDS Creator Hans Wilsdorf strived to find a name that could be easily pronounced in any language. He believed that the word Rolex is how a watch would sound when it was being wound.

COMPILED BY: NTOMBENHLE SHEZI AND PHETHAGATSO MOTUMI PHOTOGRAPHS: SUPPLIED

WORTH ITS WEIGHT IN GOLD An in-house foundry preps all the gold and platinum used in the manufacturing. About 24k gold is turned into 18k yellow, white or Rolex’s bespoke non-fading Everose gold.

JETSETTER Rolex’s 2012 Oyster Perpetual Sky-Dweller offers an annual calendar and dual time zones for the working traveller – it will never leave you behind. HANDIWORK Each Rolex watch is assembled by hand in the Swiss factory, and is tested to ensure no air leaks or glitches are found on the case or crystal.

THE WRIST AND THE REASON Rolex was the first watch company to prove the precision of the wristwatch. It remains the prototype of every leather or copper gold watch you see today.

SYMPHONY OF SIMPLICITY IN 2000, POWERED BY CALIBRE 4130, ITS HIGH-PERFORMANCE M E C H A N I C A L C H R O N O G R A P H M O V E M E N T, R O L E X I N C O R P O R A T E D JUST 290 COMPONENTS FOR THE COSMOGRAPH DAYTONA.

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MAKING IDEAS FOR CHANGE HAPPEN

and financial services are the enablers of economic growth and offer a lifeline to those entrepreneurs or small-business owners looking to make things happen for the betterment of society. South Africa’s economic development and growth hinges on the ability of the private and public sectors to find solutions to the socioeconomic challenges we face every day – and who better to form a team than the brightest creative minds in South Africa, along with the green and caring bank. The beneficiaries of this combination of bright ideas, creative solutions and sound implementation will be the people of South Africa.

Nedbank signed up as the banking partner for the Design Indaba held in Cape Town earlier this year. Arguably the pre-eminent global design, creativity and innovation conference and expo in the world, the Design Indaba epitomises what it means to be at the cutting edge of innovation – not innovation merely for the sake of innovation, but innovation with a purpose. Each year the Design Indaba event gains impetus, assembling some of the world’s most pioneering and perceptive creative minds. Nedbank chose to partner with the Design Indaba because they have the desire not only to be a part of the creative conversation, but also the solution. Banking

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A small idea can make a big difference. Nedbank believes in the power of creativity and its ability to create meaningful change. That is why we are proud to be the banking partner of the Design Indaba for the next three years. Just like the Design Indaba, we want to inspire change. But even more importantly, we want to make ideas happen for a better future. #ThingsThatReallyMatter

nedbank.co.za

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Nedbank Limited Reg No 1951/000009/06. Authorised financial services and registered credit provider (NCRCP16).

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COVER

THE BUSINESS OF THE

For a model and entrepreneur, peak fitness is a must. Strong, lean and happy is Rosie Huntington-Whiteley’s aim – and she knows just how to get there. ELLE UK’s Kate Williams joins her to find out how it’s done 44 @ ELLEmagazineSA

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COVER My workout partner for the day, Rosie Huntington-Whiteley, is sitting on the floor, stretching her mile-long legs and looking resplendent in a black sports bra, leggings and Nike trainers. She smiles and asks: ‘Are you ready to sweat?’ Simone De La Rue, our trainer, must read the fear on my face, and offers this reassurance: ‘I think it’s good to do something humbling every day.’ I nod – I’ve no doubt that this will humble me for the month. Probably even the year. I’m here to find out what a supermodel does in the gym; if a certain kind of body is the product of a certain mindset. Simone cranks the music, and tells us that we’ll start with the mini-trampoline. ‘This is the part that makes me feel like I’m going to be sick,’ Rosie says. I grimace. ‘Simone’s workouts are probably the toughest I’ve done,’ she adds. ‘But I feel so much better and I’ve seen results really quickly.’ Simone is an ex-dancer and her New York and LA studios, Body By Simone, are havens for those who have to look good for a living. (On the way out, Rosie spots fellow model Abbey Lee and shouts hello. Simone also trains Anne Hathaway and Naomi Watts.) Her clients want a dancer’s body, signified by long, lean muscles. As Simone says: ‘How do you get a dancer’s body? It’s not rocket science: You dance.’ So we do. For an hour, I follow Rosie and Simone through dance-based cardio intervals interspersed with strengthening exercises. ‘We’re moving away from traditional gym machines, and instead just using your own body weight,’ Simone explains. ‘And we’re making it fun.’ Rosie’s workout targets the areas all women want to tone: hips, thighs, bum, abs and upper arms. On the mini-trampoline, we alternate between simple bouncing, high-knee sprints and moves where we touch our elbows to our knees. Then, on the ground, we skip rope at top speed, and do sets of jumping jacks and synchronised hops. Floor exercises have an emphasis – always – on strengthening the core. During a series that combines tough glutetoning leg-lifts with push-ups, I momentarily give up and just lie on the floor. Rosie also collapses and lets out a long: ‘Ooooofffff.’ Simone’s philosophy is that women never need to lift more than 2kg, and should instead

focus on doing more repetitions with lower weights and leveraging the resistance of the body. I’m happy to strap on 0.5kg wrist weights (so light! So easy!), but after an interval that includes wrist and shoulder rotations, my arms are on fire. There’s the plank, everyone’s (least) favourite, to which Simone adds obliquestrengthening dips: keeping your core tight while rotating your entire body so that each hip almost touches the ground. These are not fun. Meghan Trainor’s All About That Bass comes on, and we move to glute exercises on the ballet barre. We drape our arms over the barre and lean forward for a series of leg lifts that Simone makes sure are precise and perfect (‘Flex your foot! Higher! Higher!). We do dips, bending to cross one leg behind us before kicking out to the side with a gracefully pointed toe. It takes one of these to make me realise I must move down the barre, way down, because with her height of 1.75m, Rosie’s legs are so long that I get smacked in the head with a trainer. Next, we move into a series of jumps, crossing our feet and tapping our heels in time to the music. Then, before I know it, it’s time to stretch and we’re done. ‘This regime works for Rosie because dancers and models want a similar physique: beautiful, elongated, sexy muscles,’ Simone explains. Those of us who aren’t dancers or models wouldn’t say no to that, either. By the end of the workout, we’re both dripping with sweat. ‘Sometimes, I’m more inclined to do yoga or Pilates, but this is addictive,’ Rosie says. ‘The music’s blasting and everyone’s in a good mood.’ The myth goes that models live off Diet Coke and Marlboro Lights, and so only require a workout that consists of jumping the velvet rope at club openings. This definitely does not hold true for Rosie. ‘Rosie is supermotivated and, obviously, she has to be. When you’re getting paid to look a certain way, it’s a responsibility,’ says Simone. Rosie takes her workouts as seriously as she takes her career – and this attitude is precisely why she has her career.

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COVER

White wool jacket and matching trousers, both Giorgio Armani; white straw hat, Gigi Burris

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GO ONLINE

for Rosie Huntington-Whiteley by numbers

At 27, Rosie is an entrepreneur, an actress and one of the most successful models in the world. It’s all due (of course) to the genetic good fortune of those legs and perfectly pouted lips, but also to an incredible work ethic. The drive I just witnessed in the gym is applied in equal measure to her business ventures. First came the fashion collaboration – her bestselling Rosie for Autograph range of lingerie and sleepwear for Marks & Spencer – and now she is branching into beauty and homeware, with the Rosie for Autograph perfume, home fragrance and candle. It all adds up to a hectic schedule – Rosie calculates that, in the past year alone, she spent more than 350 hours on a plane. ‘I’m not very good at turning down work,’ she says. ‘You have to make hay while the sun shines. Work is a huge priority in my life, because I know that, someday, it won’t be.’ Exercise is part and parcel of that. As anyone who has ever embarked upon a fitness regime will testify, motivation is what you need. For Rosie, exercise was how she made sense of the demands her modelling career made of her body: ‘I tried to diet, and it never really worked out for me. I was always getting bad advice from all over and, in the end, I picked up exercise, and I started to enjoy that.’ So, while all areas of her business remain inextricably linked to her body, working out remains a key part of her plan. ‘I definitely have a better idea of where I want to be in five and 10 years, and I think that’s important,’ she says. ‘I don’t believe anybody who is successful doesn’t have a strategic plan. Sometimes I read interviews with girls and they’re like, “Oh, I just take it as it comes,” and I’m like, “That’s bullsh*t!” It takes so much that there has to be a big picture.’ She tells the story of meeting a younger model at a casting who was shocked to learn that Rosie had been modelling for years and hadn’t found a rich husband yet. ‘That’s never been it for me,’ says Rosie. ‘I’m ambitious. I love to work; it makes me feel good. I like to make something of my own. It’s a huge opportunity, so it’s like: “What can I build from this for when I don’t want the limelight any more?”’ What she is building is Rosie the brand. She says that her Rosie for Autograph line is: ‘The

most fulfilling thing I’ve done in my career. I love making executive decisions at the same time as being really creative.’ The love affair is mutual, with Marks & Spencer’s Director of Lingerie and Beauty, Jo Jenkins, enthusing: ‘Rosie is one of the most inspiring young women in business I have ever worked with.’ The new fragrance line is based on the idea of the country rose garden, and involved Rosie travelling to New York to work with a renowned nose, and to a rose harvest in Grasse on the French Riviera. ‘I get a kick out of making a product that’s beautifully appealing, affordable and relatable. I get much more enthusiastic about appealing to real women than to “the circle”, shall we say?’ Rosie alludes to this a lot – a knowingness about the surreal world she lives in, and a desire not to be a stereotypical model. She cooks simply at home so she can splurge at restaurants, because, ‘I never want to be that girl pushing around a salad and looking miserable.’ A typical day’s food is: ‘Eggs in the morning with a green juice, toast and coffee, followed by salads with protein like salmon or chicken. I lay off carbs the night before a shoot – I make sure I’m always ready to go.’ For Rosie, it’s clearly about the work, not the perks – and that’s where the motivation for her muscle-scorching workouts come from. Her eyes are on the prize.

TPHOTOGRAPHS: KAI Z FENG / FASHION: ANNE-MARIE CURTIS / HAIR: JEN ATKIN AT THE WALL GROUP / MANICURE: CARLA KAY FOR CLOUTIER REMIX LA / PRODUCTION: BARBIE DUARTE AT 3 STAR PRODUCTIONS / WITH THANKS TO MILK STUDIOS

COVER

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TPHOTOGRAPHS: KAI Z FENG / FASHION: ANNE-MARIE CURTIS / HAIR: JEN ATKIN AT THE WALL GROUP / MANICURE: CARLA KAY FOR CLOUTIER REMIX LA / PRODUCTION: BARBIE DUARTE AT 3 STAR PRODUCTIONS / WITH THANKS TO MILK STUDIOS

COVER

Suede shirt, cotton top, suede trousers, all Chanel; suede sandals, Pierre Hardy; gold and diamond ring, Sophie Billie Brahe

@ ELLEmagazineSA

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REPORT

WOMENin

WOMEN

SOCIETY

ON THE

FRONT LINE As war continues in Somalia and extremist attacks plague Kenya and Nigeria, Holly Meadows gets to know the women reporting from the maledominated conflict zones in Africa

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REPORT

One of the first memories of being in the field that Al Jazeera English reporter Haru Mutasa has is the sexism she endured from her subjects. ‘I remember being ignored by the people who I was meant to be interviewing. They thought that because I was so young and was often the only woman on the team, I couldn’t be anyone they needed to greet.’ Mutasa started out as a journalist in 2005, freshly graduated from Rhodes University, and was recruited by Al Jazeera when she was based in Nairobi, Kenya. Now based in South Africa, Mutasa has covered many African conflicts, including the post-election violence in Kenya in 2007, and the 2008 battle of N’Djamena, when French soldiers left her behind in an evacuated hotel utasa as the rebels closed in on the Haru M presidential palace. Being firm, compassionate, respectful and patient are some of the qualities Mutasa learnt would get her far. With time and experience she began to be taken seriously and earn the respect of her colleagues. Her proudest piece of work was covering the Ivory Coast civil war in 2011: all the borders and airports were closed but Mutasa and her colleagues, cameraman Austin Gundani and producer Gladys Njoroge, snuck in across the border with Ghana and spent an entire month there. Mutasa found that being an African woman helped her escape lifethreatening situations. ‘We had to go through many rebel-manned check points and at one a woman came up to the car and warned us not to go any further because the road was not safe. She admitted that the only reason she warned us was because we were women and when she saw us she “saw her daughters”.’

‘ U LT I M AT E LY I ’ D L I K E TO S E E M O R E A F R I C A N S F R O M A F R I C A … T E L L I N G O U R O W N S TO R I E S , B EC A U S E I T ’S O U R H O M E . N O O N E C A N T E L L O U R S TO R I E S B E T T E R THAN WE CAN’ Mutasa and her team saw things in Ivory Coast that no one should ever have to see, risked their lives on several occasions and negotiated with heavily armed young men high on drugs. But they managed to survive and tell an important story, and it’s this that keeps Mutasa going. The feeling of being part of the only team in the world to cover a conflict first-hand is one of the reasons she hasn’t thrown in the towel on risky reporting. Today, she notes, while the people she works with might take her seriously, society at large still seems to question the credibility of a female reporter. ‘Women get much more slack from viewers, male and female. You can do a great report on conflict in South Sudan and all someone will comment on online is why your hair was messy,’ she says. She believes we still have a long way to go before women will be the norm in her industry. But it’s not only gender inequality that’s an issue: ‘Ultimately I’d like to see more Africans from Africa … telling our own stories, because it’s our home. No one can tell our stories better than we can.’ British-born journalist Jessica Hatcher also seeks to address imbalances in the industry, but in a different way: her reporting often tries to lift the lid on the people and narratives that wouldn’t usually make the news. She also enjoys engaging readers who don’t have a prior interest in this part of the world and telling stories about everyday lives, such as the female national running team in Mogadishu, a year after the Somalia capital was liberated from Islamist militants.

Jessica Hatcher (below left) at the African Union military base in Mogadishu, Somalia, February 2012. (Photograph: Phil Moore) Hatcher (below) climbing Mount Nyiragongo, an active stratovolcano in Eastern DRC, weeks before it reopened to tourists following closure due to a rebel insurgency, September 2014. (Photograph: Phil Moore)

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REPORT ‘ I LOV E F I N D I N G T H E S E “ S U P E R W O M A N N A R R AT I V E S ” , S O M E O F W H I C H YO U ’ D T H I N K C O U L D O N LY E X I S T I N F I C T I O N ’

Jessica Hatcher writes notes on top of Mount Nyiragongo, 2014. (Photograph: Phil Moore)

Hatcher’s first year as a journalist was fairly calamitous. Reporting celebrity gossip for the London Evening Standard she once interviewed Jared Leto thinking he was Daniel (Harry Potter) Radcliffe. One day a fellow journalist suggested Hatcher meet one of the editors at the Daily Mail and advised her to wear a kneelength skirt, pearls and minimal make-up, and never to look a senior male editor in the eye. ‘I fear she was only half-joking. I did not make it into the Daily Mail office,’ says Hatcher. ‘I left London soon afterwards.’ Although she has never noticed any kind of gender-based discrimination by an editor, she is aware of the gender bias in the industry – 78 percent of front-page articles in UK newspapers in 2012 were written by men, according to The Guardian. ‘Faced with this, I feel like the most constructive thing I can do is put my head down and get on with my job,’ she says. That, and turning the notion of incongruity between being a woman and a conflict-zone journalist on its head. Hatcher started working in East Africa by chance, after getting an assignment to write about rhino poaching in Kenya for the Telegraph magazine. It then took her a few years of experimenting with different forms to realise that she wanted to focus on writing narrative, character-driven accounts. She has covered the 2012-13 rebellion in the Democratic Republic of Congo for Time and documented the legacy of a long war in Guinea-Bissau that has left it vulnerable to the transatlantic drugs trade. But it’s her work with women that she’s the most proud of, in countries where women are doing remarkable things in difficult circumstances.

For example, she gave a voice to women in eastern Congo who had been sexually abused by female members of an armed group. The women had never told their stories to anyone before, and aid workers didn’t want to know about it, because their aid programmes were geared to treating victims of male-perpetrated sexual violence. ‘As one cynic told me, for fundraisers, a place where women rape is a hard sell. For women to be perpetrators would have contradicted their [aid programme] rhetoric.’ Then there was her story of a group of elderly Catholic nuns living in Malakal in South Sudan, whose home was literally on the front line in the war between rebel and government forces. And her report of a Somali activist in her late 60s, Fatima Jibrell, who has spent two decades fighting the charcoal trade that has decimated Somalia’s trees. ‘I love finding these “superwoman narratives”, some of which you’d think could only exist in fiction,’ she says. You might say that West Africa Correspondent for Al Jazeera English television, Yvonne Ndege, is something of a superwoman herself. Ndege balances life as a full-time reporter based in Abuja, Nigeria, with being a mother to her eight-month old daughter Safari Dahlia. Safari lives on a finely tuned schedule; sleep, meals and activities are all timed so that Ndege can be with her as much as possible. Being a mother has made her twice as efficient in prepping her work, because time is so much more precious when you have a little one to consider. ‘It’s possible to be a mother and still cover conflict and war,’ she says. ‘And still love your baby and be there for your family.’ In 2010 she received the United Nations Correspondents’ Association Award for Journalism for her coverage of war and conflict in Congo, particularly its effects on girls and women. She has reported on the conflict in northern Uganda and extensively covered the conflict in Nigeria’s oil-rich Niger Delta. Perhaps her most notable body of work is her coverage for Al Jazeera of the Islamist Boko Haram insurgency in the north-east of Nigeria. In 2009 she was the first international journalist to enter Maiduguri, the capital of Borno state, which has been at the heart of

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REPORT

Yvonne

Ndege

crisis and violence. It’s where Boko Haram’s leader Mohammed Yusuf was killed by Nigerian security forces, an incident that sparked six years of conflict. Ndege has been covering the crisis every day since then, reporting on some 13 000 deaths and 1.2-million people displaced. In April 2014, she broke the story when more than 200 schoolgirls were kidnapped from Chibok, constantly doing follow-up reports until she went on maternity leave last year. Ndege believes that her ability to embed herself with the Nigerian military fighting Boko Haram, and gain access to and interview young girls who escaped death, is largely due to the fact that she’s a woman. ‘Women get greater access [to] report conflict and war. And access is at the core of what journalists do. In my experience, government officials, the military, militants and insurgents, victims of conflict and war – you name it, the full spectrum of people you meet in conflict situations – are more open to giving access to women and talking to women. They trust women more.’ Consequently, in her opinion, women sometimes do a better job than men. ‘We hear a broader spectrum of voices when a woman is reporting on the front line,’ she says. Her hope is that in the future the news business will change to make it easier for women to enjoy reporting war, but at the same time be able to have a full family life. ‘We need more flexible working hours, job-sharing, and childcare facilities in the workplace,’ she says. Born and raised in Bulawayo, Zimbabwe, Robyn Kriel is the East Africa Bureau Chief for eNCA, based in Nairobi. She might not have a child, but she has found that a group of

friends and a supportive family have helped her balance her work-personal life. Her mother was a journalist during the civil war in Zimbabwe and has remained an empathetic presence, as have her family and friends, who forgive her when she drops out of plans at the last minute or doesn’t answer a call for days because she’s in the middle of a breaking-news story. In the three years she has lived in Kenya she has covered the Mpeketoni massacre, the attack on the Westgate Mall and the recent Garissa University College attack, where about 150 students were killed. She has also spent a month in Helmand Province, Afghanistan, embedded with US Marines in incredibly challenging situations – where she could not take a shower for weeks and where the only toilets were plastic bags. Back in 2007, Kriel was covering a women’s protest march in Zimbabwe when riot police saw her filming and confiscated her camera, beating her to the ground. ‘Then they threw me into the back of their police van and I landed on my knees. I was so scared I actually wet my pants a little bit… There were a number of women beaten that day. I did an interview with a woman the next day who had been horrifically beaten on her breasts – she had huge purple bruises. I felt very violated and was angry for a long time after that.’ Yet being a woman in the field has benefited her, because she has been able to report on the plight of women who would not have felt comfortable talking to a man. ‘People often think that a war zone is a place where only men go, but it’s not true. There are women who are caught

Robyn Kriel (below) interviewing a security expert overlooking the Westgate Mall in Nairobi; using a satellite phone in Goma, DRC; with her cameraman, Meshack Dube, reporting from Mogadishu

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Middle East Bureau Chief for Russia Today, Paula Slier, on the front line

.CO.ZA

GO ONLINE

for a Q&A with renowned photojournalists Lynsey Addario and Alixandra Fazzina

in the conflict, and in many cases women are fighting alongside the men.’ On occasion, her gender hampers her ability to report: if men on the front line haven’t seen a woman in a long time, they are sometimes too shy to talk. Once in Afghanistan a young US Marine told Kriel that ‘he smelled [her] from across the camp’ – then ran away in horror because of what he’d inadvertently said. Access to a story is a highly contested space among journalists. What irks Kriel is when female reporters are accused of using their looks or bodies to get access to stories. ‘Because guess what? Even if I were drop-dead gorgeous, I would still have to carry the equipment, and walk for kilometres in the blazing sun, sweating, in 100 percent humidity, and not shower for days – in horrible, dangerous and extremely sad situations. I still have to have a brain and be able to write and make sense of whatever scene is unfolding around me, no matter how great my hair looks.’ South African-born Paula Slier, now Middle East Bureau Chief for Russia Today, points out that there are more female journalists today than ever before, although not in positions of power – and certainly not on the front line. A survey at Le Monde newspaper found that women are cited seven times less often than men as sources in articles; so there needs to be a conscious effort to tell the female experience in news stories. ‘I often find that in war, while the men act all brave, brandishing guns and shouting about victory, it’s their wives and mothers who provide a more rational voice – speaking about the need for peace,’ she says. Women view things differently, and this influences the way they report on the world. Research also shows that while men tend to focus on numbers, military and war tactics, women correspondents often provide more ‘human’ stories – reports about how ordinary civilians are affected by war, says Slier. She has spent months in Cairo reporting for RT, mostly from Tahrir Square, the epicentre

of the Egyptian revolution. At that time it was particularly dangerous for women reporters and Slier couldn’t walk around unless accompanied by a man. Later in 2011, she reported from Libya, covering the civil war and the ousting of then President Muammar Gaddafi. She was there for almost two months and was listed as a finalist in the TEFI award (the ‘Emmys’ of Russia) for a live report she delivered while under gunfire in the capital, Tripoli. She has also reported from Algeria for several clients including CNN and Reuters Africa. One particularly moving story she covered was about a group of 52 children who’d been found living in the mountains with their mothers after their fathers had been killed by the Algerian army. The children had never seen a toothbrush before or slept on a mattress. When the girls were given Barbie dolls to play with, the first thing they did was cover their faces with a scarf. On the whole, Slier finds the advantages of being a woman on the front line far outweigh the negatives. ‘I can often – just with a smile or a polite “please” – get an interview that wouldn’t be so easy to come by if I were a man.’ She has also found that when tensions are running high, just the presence of a woman can reduce a potentially explosive situation. ‘It’s almost as if men suddenly remember to behave when there’s a woman around!’ Navigating conservative and patriarchal cultures as a female outsider has led to her being seen almost as a third sex, ‘an androgynous entity that flits between both worlds – chatting with women in their kitchen one moment and then eating with their mujahideen husbands in the sitting room the next. I doubt a male colleague would be welcomed into the kitchen,’ she says. For Slier, who left the SABC and used her savings to buy a digital video camera, then arrived in Ramallah in time to report on Yasser Arafat’s funeral, it was clear that if she wanted chances at the big stories, she would need to make it happen herself. ‘I meet wonderfully capable young women who hold themselves back because they lack confidence. I think as women we need to take more chances,’ she says. The biggest stereotype she’s overcome? The idea that a war zone is not the place for a woman, and that women can’t handle the stress and demands of the job. But, gender aside, Slier’s most cherished hope for the future is that one day women like her will be able to call themselves ‘peace correspondents’ instead of ‘war correspondents’.

COMPILED BY: HOLLY MEADOWS / PHOTOGRAPHS: SUPPLIED

REPORT

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S TO R E S: J O H A N N E S B U R G : S A N DTO N C I T Y 0 1 1 78 4- 0 5 6 1 • M E L R O S E A R C H 0 1 1 6 8 4- 2 0 1 0 C A P E TO W N : V& A WAT E R F R O N T 0 2 1 4 2 1 - 9 1 7 7

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RELATIONSHIPS

Mind the (age) gap

When I was 21, I dated an older man; let’s call him ‘T’. I was intrigued by the fact he represented everything I wanted to become. Fast approaching 40, he was a journalist and writer – something I dreamt of being myself; he listened to good ‘grown-up music’ and introduced me to genres I had never heard of before, like bossa nova. He had a collection of old-school films featuring the likes of Humphrey Bogart. He was an avid fan of Woody Allen movies. He taught me a thing or two about different wine varietals (a far cry from the cheap boxed Pick n Pay wine that had a prominent place in my fridge). He was quirky and smart,

and at the beginning these things were all that mattered to me. Throughout my young life, I’d been told that I was mature beyond my years, something I delusionally believed could apply equally to this relationship. My friend Sarah*, 31, a researcher from Johannesburg, had a similar experience when she was younger. She met George* at university while doing her masters. ‘I worked part-time in a bar and he would come in with his friends every weekend to watch football. We were both terrible flirts and after about six months of making eyes at each other and

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PHOTOGRAPHS: GETTY IMAGES / GALLO IMAGES

Ntombenhle Shezi shares her account of having dated an older man , and wonders whether the idea that age is just a number is really true


PHOTOGRAPHS: GETTY IMAGES / GALLO IMAGES

RELATIONSHIPS

he referring to me as his girl?) or patronising (as in young girl, which technically I was). Much more was lost in translation, including feelings and emotions. If he stayed out of touch for a while, I became angry, but there was simply no room to have a conversation about it. Some of my friends were convinced he was only with me because he was afraid to be with someone his own age who could intimidate him and call him out on his issues. And while I believed that other people’s opinions did not matter, my family and friends were concerned and vocal about the fact that they never saw the two of us together. Thinking about it now, I realise I never met his friends or family either. Possibly we were both embarrassed about being with each other – another reason why it could not work. This is not to say that all young-woman-older-man relationships are doomed. Or younger-man-older-woman relationships, for that matter. Just like anything else, some things work for certain people and others don’t. Love is the X factor that pays no attention to the age gap, or to differences in race or creed. (And the age gap possibly loses some of its impact in later life too – the difference seems more noticeable when you’re 20 and he’s 40 than when there’s a 40-and-60 gap.) When I discussed this with Rachel, a 24-year-old .CO.ZA primary school teacher, whose partner, Sam*, is 18 years her senior, she suggested I think about it in terms of friendships and friend groups. ‘Just because someone is older or younger doesn’t mean that you GO ONLINE for intergenerational don’t have common ground or interests. Look celeb relationships at work colleagues: it’s very seldom you work at a place where everyone is in the same age bracket, but you usually form relationships there – professional, social and sometimes romantic. Do you think about age when forming those relationships?’ She acknowledges that she and Sam have had very different life experiences, but the support of friends and family has made it easier for them. For Sam, it’s helpful that they have common interests and share a robust sense of humour. Honesty, trust, communication and being each other’s best friend combine to make their relationship work. For me, the allure of being with someone so much older wore off after a year. T later admitted that he’d wanted to settle down and have children – which made me realise how little we knew each other. While I wouldn’t rule out the possibility of being with someone significantly older again, at that time of my life I needed to grow and understand myself and my own needs far more. I still like bossa nova; I generally enjoy Woody Allen movies (though not necessarily the man). I appreciate being able to pay for dinner dates sometimes. But I also appreciate it when a guy takes care of things. Age gap? Maybe it’s all a matter of perspective.

exchanging ridiculous banter across the bar, I went around to the other side of the bar and asked him out. He came to a party with me that night. I was 25 and a couple of months later he celebrated his 40th birthday.’ At first she admits to not caring about his age – or, rather, neither of them had the courage to ask the other how old they were. But by the fourth or fifth date, when the question finally came up, Sarah says she was full of the naivety of young love – the type that convinces you that the only way to love is to throw yourself in wholeheartedly. ‘I remember him telling me that I should think about it a little more; that this really was a big deal and that I could walk away now,’ she says. Looking back, she realises that he was always more aware of it, and less okay with it, than she was. ‘I think it’s harder for the older person, because they know more, they’ve seen stuff play out and they know the other person doesn’t know that. For the older person, youth is equal parts enticing and intimidating,’ she adds. While I was not in the relationship for financial reasons, the reality is that being a student, and dating someone who’d had years to build and establish his life and career, came with its own issues. I had always prided myself on being independent; being unable to pay for dates and dinners with him was disempowering. I was a broke student and he was a man with his own car, house and debts. It mattered to me that I could not bring anything to the table. Regardless of what people say, money can be powerful. I realise now that this was one of the reasons why things between us fell apart. For some people, the money factor works in reverse. Lindsay, 33, an operations manager, says she was enticed by the idea of an older man giving her a comfortable life. When she was 24, she met a man who was eight years older. She viewed him as a self-starter, he was a doctor who owned an organic farm … perfect on paper. ‘I was just starting out and trying to find my feet in my career and was swayed by the idea of the stability that came with being with a guy who was financially secure,’ she says. Although friends were accepting of their relationship, her mother wasn’t. She disapproved of him and warned Lindsay against his domineering behaviour. It wasn’t long before he grew possessive. ‘I remember one incident when he bought me a vintage Porsche, which I wouldn’t accept. He then used to drive around in it, following me. I would get home in the evenings only to find him lurking in the bushes. I eventually had to ask my dad to intervene as my safety was being compromised. It was so embarrassing: my dad had to have a man-to-man conversation with him about leaving me alone, and I had to admit to my parents that they were right.’ Of course, not every older man will control you or try to buy your love. But not being on the same page can be a huge problem. Understanding each other is important when you choose to be with someone, which was something myself and T did not. References were often lost or misinterpreted. When I referred to him as ‘dude’, he felt uncomfortable, while I wasn’t sure whether his calling me ‘girl’ was some kind of old-school chivalry (was

* Name has been changed

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MAN

A WELL-

SUITED MAN

Chris Pine, 34, TV actor, film star and now the face of Armani Code, talks to ELLE about scent, seduction and celebrity

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MAN

What is seduction for you?

I think it’s an understanding of the other person. A desire to know what they want and what would make them happy. What would you never do to seduce a woman? Try too hard to impress. What attracts you to a woman? What pushes you away?

Confidence and humour are attractive; never arrogance. How would you define masculinity?

Strength that comes with being comfortable in one’s own skin. What do you think is a man’s most powerful weapon?

That’s a difficult one … but I’d say intelligence, selfawareness and the ability to laugh at yourself. What is your idea of elegance?

Confidence. Simplicity. Craftsmanship. Detail work that can be appreciated by the connoisseur but is never garish or flashy.

Chris Pine has a career resumé that reflects more than a little perseverance and dedication. After all, he’s been on the Hollywood scene since 2004, and has immersed himself in a variety of roles on TV and the big screen. This Los Angeles-born actor has been a spaceship captain, a soldier, an action hero and, not surprisingly, a prince of hearts. He is possibly best known for his role as James T. Kirk – portrayed in the long-running TV series Star Trek by William Shatner – in the 2009 film, as well as its sequel. But before that, he caught audiences’ attention playing opposite Anne Hathaway in The Princess Diaries 2: Royal Engagement (2004), which was followed by Just My Luck in 2006, Smokin’ Aces in 2007, Unstoppable in 2010 and This Means War in 2012. The pace of his career accelerated in 2014, when he completed three movies: Horrible Bosses 2, with Jennifer Aniston; Jack Ryan: Shadow Recruit; and Into The Woods (there’s that princely role) in which he was cast alongside Meryl Streep. So his acting chops are unquestionable. He is good-looking, too, of course – rated as one of the Sexiest Men Alive by People Magazine and one of the best-dressed stars by GQ. But along with all this, it’s probably his urbane demeanour and smooth sense of style that clinched his selection to front the Armani Code fragrance campaign. And he seems to be the perfect fit. We wanted to know more…

What do you think of the Armani Code commercial?

It’s beautiful. Andrew Dominik and [cinematographer] Darius Khondji created such a specific, mid-century feel, a bit futurist and with an architecture that could be straight out of Bertolucci’s The Conformist. The clean lines of Mr Armani’s clothes fit the bigger visual perfectly. There’s a wonderful wash of blue to the film as well, which I think adds just the right sense of mystery. Why did you want to work with Andrew Dominik?

I’ve been a fan of Andrew’s work for a while. I thought what he did with The Assassination of Jesse James by the Coward Robert Ford in 2007 was remarkable. He has a deep appreciation of actors and loves the interaction and the process of creating the smaller moments on screen.

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MAN How does filming in Los Angeles help you to create different characters?

I love LA for the diversity it offers. It’s a cultural melting pot. And it has, for obvious reasons, a certain appeal for people who seek to reinvent themselves. It’s that spirit of invention and reinvention that undoubtedly leaves its mark somewhere in our film.

Is it Chris Pine the actor or Chris Pine the person who we are seeing in this campaign?

In general, what is your relationship with fragrances?

Like in any performance there is a bit of both, I suppose. For the commercial, Andrew and I came up with an idea of who this gentleman was, exiting the hotel on his way through a revolving door when he catches sight of this extraordinary woman. But the camera is an incredible thing and no matter how much you may think of disappearing, it inevitably captures something of who you are at that moment in time. Brigitte Lacombe, who did the portraits, has an incredible quality about her: an ability to create a calm and peaceful environment in which I felt comfortable and, ironically, at home.

Fragrances, as with clothes, say lots about a person. It’s a part of how one presents oneself to the world. I’m very particular; when I find something I like, whether it be a suit or a cologne, I tend to stick with it. Less is more when it comes to a fragrance. You want it to feel close to the skin as if it’s an extension of you, of who you are. Just like a well-tailored suit, a cologne must ‘fit’ just right.

I’ve had a great time and been very fortunate to have worked with some of the best talents in our business. Rob Marshall’s Into The Woods had a terrific ensemble – Meryl Streep, Johnny Depp, Anna Kendrick, Emily Blunt, Tracy Ullman, among others. I played a somewhat dim but, hopefully, lovable Prince Charming. Jack Ryan was directed by Kenneth Branagh. I had a chance to work opposite him as well and spar with Kevin Costner and kiss the beautiful Keira Knightley. Not a bad day at work. And there was Horrible Bosses 2 with Jason Bateman, Jason Sudeikis, Jennifer Aniston…

What was the best part of the shoot?

The opportunity to work with such gifted artists. I was wearing Armani, I was being directed by Andrew Dominik, being shot by Darius Khondji, and had a chance to talk photography with Brigitte Lacombe. Which scene was the most difficult for you?

Definitely the first scene with the revolving door. I know it was very difficult for Andrew to get this shot, because he was looking for a particular mood, but it was a joy for me. I loved the beautiful architecture of the scene and how Andrew and Darius captured it.

So how do you manage your growing fame?

I enjoy it as much as possible. I laugh at it as much as possible. And I take care to remember how fortunate I am. I have a great family and great friends and as long as my bedrock is there, I think I’ll be all right.

Which Armani outfits from the shoot would you like to keep?

I loved the tux, top button of the shirt undone, bowtie undone. The drape and material, the detail work, were exceptional. But perhaps most of all, I loved the story it told.

COMPILED BY: DEBORAH RUDMAN / PHOTOGRAPHS: SUPPLIED

You are considered to be an up-and-comer on the Hollywood A-List scene – tell us more.

What is the difference between shooting a fragrance commercial and a film?

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Well, certainly the speed at which you shoot. A film can take anywhere from one to six months, depending on the size. We only had two days to shoot our commercial, so Andrew and his team had to come in fully prepared (and they were) and know exactly what they wanted to get. But, just like it is with a longer format, you are trying to tell a story. You play a character and tell the story as best you can.

60 @ ELLEmagazineSA

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MEMOIR

A combination neurological condition has made Joanne de la Motte realise that ‘falling down laughing’ is no laughing matter…

I

Then I realised that something else was happening too. I loved office banter and laughing with the others, but noticed that every time I giggled, my knees would buckle as though I had been kicked and I’d fall to my knees. If I was holding a cup of tea and started laughing, or got a fright, I would drop the cup. My neck would give out, my head would fall back or forward like a rag doll’s. I was in my mid-twenties and suddenly felt like I was losing control of my body whenever I experienced any strong emotion. There were corridors in the office and if somebody came around a corner and startled me, I would scream loud enough to send the other person into a state of shock, and I’d slowly slide down the nearest wall, breathless, unable to speak. It was my mother who diagnosed me. She had watched a programme on TV about narcolepsy and cataplexy, and recognised my symptoms. Later that month, I visited a neurosurgeon who confirmed my mother’s findings. Cataplexy is the cardinal symptom of narcolepsy and affects roughly 70 percent of people who have narcolepsy. It’s a debilitating condition in which a person suddenly feels weak and collapses at times of strong emotion such as anger, fear, joy or surprise. Attacks are brief, most lasting from a few seconds to a couple of minutes. With any heightened emotion, this attack typically involves your knees buckling, loss of muscle tone in your wrists, your jaw dropping so you are unable to talk and neck weakness. I remember once falling sideways on the couch when I laughed and my mother, dismayed, saying, ‘Come on Jo. Sit up.’ As if! So, as it turned out, it was all in my head. Literally. At some point, I had started to lose brain cells – a very specific group of cells, a brain protein called hypocretin, tucked away in the almond-sized hypothalamus region deep in the centre of the brain. No one knows exactly why these cells disappear

f people ask, I tell them I have cataplexy. ‘Cata-what?’ is the usual reaction. ‘It’s linked to narcolepsy,’ I say, ‘which I have too.’ Some people don’t know what that is either, and so I say to them, ‘You know – those people who sometimes fall asleep in their soup.’ Well I’ve never fallen into my gazpacho, but I suffer from both conditions. In 2004, I started working in women’s fashion magazines. I had returned from four years of being based in London, working, travelling and exploring the world after I completed my Fine Arts degree at the University of Cape Town. I started experiencing excessive daytime sleepiness, or narcolepsy. I’d get a full night’s sleep, eat a good breakfast, have coffee, but be fighting my eyelids at my desk from 10am. I would retreat to the office toilet cubicle, putting down the seat and resting my head in my hands, just so I could close my eyes. Fatigue never hit when I was out at dinner or a bar, but my daytime need to doze was overwhelming. Daytime driving for longer than 20 minutes was a challenge. If I had to drive longer than that, I would get a burning sensation behind my eyes, have to open the window, turn the music up, and fight my eyelids. I’d scream in the car to try and wake myself up, and out of pure frustration at what was happening and at my lack of control. It’s been said that an average person would have to stay awake for 48 to 72 hours straight before they would feel the same violent call to sleep I experienced daily. And so I developed a series of tactics. I ran cold water over my face and dabbed the back of my neck, I used face-water spray at my desk, and slapped myself, hard, across the face, in a way that was almost satisfying, not because it woke me up, but because it released the frustration and rage for lacking control and discipline, for being unable to perform the simplest of simple tasks – just staying awake.

63 @ ELLEmagazineSA

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MEMOIR

– whether it’s an autoimmune reaction, mixed-up signals, or my brain mistakenly attacking itself. What is known is that these hypocretin cells are somehow integral to the proper functioning of the sleep/wake cycle. Researchers think narcolepsy is an autoimmune neurological disorder. People with narcolepsy lack a brain chemical that controls sleep patterns, and when we drift off, we go directly into REM sleep, which blurs the boundaries between dreaming and consciousness. (Non-narcoleptics cycle through four other sleep stages before reaching REM sleep 60 to 90 minutes after dozing off.) The cataplexy isn’t fainting or epilepsy but an aspect of dream sleep, paralysis, happening while I’m completely conscious, probably due to the action of brain cells that have somehow been damaged. The condition can take 10 to 15 years to diagnose, even though many people worldwide have narcolepsy – about as many as have MS. There is no known way to replace or mimic the cells that regulate the proper functioning of the sleep/wake cycle. I dated a guy many years ago who told me that he ‘tolerated’ my falling asleep while he was driving.

I become breathless, dizzy and my body physically tingles. It feels like my heart is literally breaking. It’s not painful, but it’s extremely uncomfortable. When I have something to tell someone, the same thing happens. My heart feels like it’s going to explode, I become breathless, I can’t speak and my body collapses. Being unable to finish what I want to say, because I’m so overwhelmed with emotion, also makes me the worst joke-teller in the world. Dinner’s been served, we’re on to dessert and I still haven’t delivered the punchline. But as much as this may sound a bit tough, it isn’t really, any more. I’ve learnt that it is important for me to eat well, to exercise … to be kind to my body. I try to get eight or nine hours of sleep each night so that I can function every day in the best way possible. Sleepiness will never be the pleasant state that it could be, in the right circumstances, but I’ve stopped fighting it. I’ve realised that the special tactics to stay awake don’t work. I’ve learnt that the weight on my skull is not to be ignored, and that sleep always wins, which makes the game much easier to play.

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Most people don’t know anything about my condition. The most important thing is how I feel at work every day. I am fortunate to find myself in a working environment where my colleagues are aware of my condition, and support me. They know that a very short nap helps a lot. (Frankly, I think we’d all function a little better if we included power naps in our working days.) I still experience cataplexy every day, too, but it’s manageable. And because I’ve plateaued, it shouldn’t get any worse. It’s taken me a long time to write about this. I wanted to beat it, but I know you can’t really. I’m getting closer to finding how best to live with it. A good sense of humour, ironically, helps get me through. Frustrating and infuriating as it may be at times, I have a million and one other things and people in life to be grateful for. A little understanding and kindness on their part goes an awfully long way. As the saying goes, ‘Be kind, for everyone you meet is fighting a hard battle.’

And, yes, I am the worst travelling companion, but those words confirmed for me that our relationship was over. I suffer from daytime exhaustion. I get up and down from my desk all day, and I clearly remember the days when I’ve managed to focus a little more than usual. Most of the time, it’s an all-day struggle. Anyone who knows me well, who notices when I am laughing and holding something, will immediately grab it out of my hands. I have drizzled whisky onto my toes in the past, trying to keep a grip on my glass and unable to tell anyone to take it from me. Socially it can be quite a challenge, because if something makes me giggle, I can look as though I’ve had six tequilas. And I do love to giggle. If I’m watching a sad movie (and if I’ve managed to stay awake through it), I can only describe the feeling as having just done 12 tumble-turns.

PHOTOGRAPHS: TYSZKA MARCIN / PIXELLE

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FEMINISM THE

P WORD

Menstruation continues to be regarded all over the world as something shameful. Ntombenhle Shezi wonders why periods are still treated as taboo

PHOTOGRAPH: IMOBERDORF HEINIGER NICOLE /PIXELLE

Recently, Canadian artist Rupi Kaur made headlines around the world after Instagram removed an image she shared on her account from her Period photo series. The image, a shot of Kaur lying on a bed, fully dressed, with blood on her clothes and the bed, was removed as being in violation of the social media platform’s community guidelines. After she reposted the image, Instagram took it down again. After pointing out that the image did not violate the stated guidelines, she took to Tumblr: ‘Thank you Instagram for providing me with the exact response my work was created to critique. You deleted a photo of a woman who is fully covered and menstruating stating that it goes against community guidelines when your guidelines outline that it is nothing but acceptable… I will not apologise for not feeding the ego and pride of misogynist society that will have my body in underwear but not be okay with a small leak.’ She later encouraged her followers and friends to keep the conversation going by engaging with the

When I was in school, I was an avid swimmer. I  prided myself on being particularly strong at backstroke and looked forward to our weekly lessons on Wednesday mornings. But when I had my periods, I would not swim and was too embarrassed to tell my sports teacher why. Instead I’d lie – fake a cough or blame it on the flu. It was only much later in high school that someone shared the revelation with me that you could swim during your period if you wore a tampon. This is an experience that many of us women will relate to. And the way other people react have made us even more uncomfortable. Like the time when, to my horror, a tampon fell out of my bag onto the floor. Like the time I was not in a good mood and someone just assumed I was experiencing PMS when I was not. (What conditions are attributed to men when they are upset?) Sure, periods are not fun and most women would skip the whole thing if they had a choice. But why does something so biologically normal still come with such a powerful taboo?

66 @ ELLEmagazineSA

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PHOTOGRAPH: IMOBERDORF HEINIGER NICOLE /PIXELLE

FEMINISM work, adding, ‘Their patriarchy is leaking. Their misogyny is leaking. We will not be censored.’ Kaur’s full series shows normal situations that women find themselves in when they have their periods. Her work is making an important contribution to a much-needed conversation in a world where the media often encourages hypersexualised images of women but excludes even a mention of something that naturally affects women everywhere. This started me thinking about the hit movie Fifty Shades of Grey, based on the super-selling novel. A passage in the book, in which Christian Grey removes a tampon from Anastasia before they make love, never made it to the screen. In an interview with showbiz magazine Variety, director Sam Taylor-Johnson said, ‘[Its inclusion] was never even discussed.’ Producer Michael De Luca added, ‘The book needed to put you in Ana’s shoes to be a successful experience… A lot of it was very literal. The movie didn’t need to do that. It’s a completely different medium.’ But couldn’t that scene have been included in the movie in a way that at least alluded to menstrual sex (which some couples do engage in), without making it uncomfortable for audiences? For Durban resident Thandi*, 26, menstruation was discussed openly among the women in her family, who reassured her that there was nothing to be ashamed of. She also remembers conversations with her female friends where they shared advice. ‘One of the tips we shared, which I will never forget, is that one should always wash one’s underwear with cold water rather than hot water to make the stain “disappear” more easily. The topic isn’t taboo among us and we don’t feel ashamed about it when we’re together. But it’s a whole different story once we’re out in society,’ she notes. A number of religions and cultures brand women as ‘unclean’ when they have their period – prohibiting them from being intimate with their partners, and in some cultures not allowing them to handle food. Have these bans contributed to the perception in some societies that menstruation is linked to uncleanliness? ‘When I was growing up in KwaZulu-Natal, the term “menstruation” was euphemised as es’khathini (meaning that time of the month),’ says Belinda, 31, a Grahamstown resident. What she understood from the whispers behind closed doors was that even an oblique reference to menstruation was taboo. ‘When I was a young girl, adults used to reprimand my friends and me for casually singing the jingle

from the New Freedom pads advert. We knew from their reaction that what we were singing about was inappropriate. Out of rebellion, we would sing the jingle behind our parents’ backs and laugh ourselves silly,’ she says. Accessibility (or the lack of it) to sanitary products also plays a huge role in maintaining the ‘silence’ and the shame. One in 10 African girls, reports a study by UNICEF, misses school for a few days each month partly as a result of inadequate sanitation facilities and lack of access to sanitary products. ‘Pads, tampons and moon cups should be available in vending machines in toilets, schools and churches,’ says Belinda. Yet not all cultures see menstruation as shameful. A few Native American communities, such as the Navajo and the Apache, celebrate a young woman’s first period as a symbol of physical and spiritual closeness to Mother Nature. Closer to home, Belinda acknowledges that in some, more traditional areas of Ulundi in KZN, topics such as menstruation were discussed during the coming-of-age ceremonies. Young women dressed up in their izidiya (traditional Zulu attire) and sought counsel from older women. ‘I didn’t go through the process myself though,’ she says, ‘because by the time I came of age, I was already attending an Afrikaans boarding school, where any such conversation was discouraged.’ Could it be different one day? Encouragingly, other women, like Kaur, are also challenging the taboo – such as British tennis star Heather Watson, who attributed her poor performance at the Australian Open to the discomfort, low energy and light-headedness she felt while having her period. ‘It’s just one of these things that I have – girl things,’ she told the press. ‘It just, yeah, happens.’ She was applauded by her fellow female players (and other women) for mentioning something they had experienced for years but had never publicly referred to themselves. Once we show we’re ready to talk about periods, openly and in a non-sensational way, we can start setting aside the secretiveness and eliminating the shame. The media, including social media, can help by taking a positive approach to t he topic. Adver t i ser s can contribute by creating .CO.ZA adverts that aren’t awkward or euphemistic. We’re women. What we experience is not the GO ONLINE P-word. It’s a period. Period. * Name has been changed

to read about brands that are changing the conversation around periods

67 @ ELLEmagazineSA

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Where sustainability meets luxury, and nature meets art (with an eye on science). These keep-me-forever hand-blown glass flacons are not only beautiful to the eye; inside, rich scents tell tales of African adventures

Beauty_Opener2.indd 1

From top to bottom: Frazer Parfum African Collection in Namibia, African Soliflore Rose, African Soliflore Ylang Ylang, and After The Rains, each R2 500

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B E AT T H E

C H I L L

B E A U T I F U L LY JUST BECAUSE THE TEMPERATURE DROPS DOESN’T MEAN THAT OUR BEAUTY ROUTINE SHOULD TOO – IN WINTER, SKIN AND HAIR NEED JUST AS MUCH WARMTH AS OUR BODIES DO. IT’S A TIME TO NURTURE, SOOTHE AND PROTECT

by M A Y B E C O R P A C I photographs U L R I C H K N O B L A U C H

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1. ESSE COCOA EXFOLIATOR, R220 2. KIEHL’S CRÈME DE CORPS NURTURING BODY WASHING CREAM, R285 3. RAIN WASHBALL JUTE, R95 4. RAIN OLIVE OIL KALAHARI SOAP, R45 5. LUSH BUFFY SOAP, R105

Try these as well:

ELEMIS SKIN NOURISHING BODY SCRUB, R600 DOVE PURELY PAMPERING CREAM BAR, R11 LIPIDOL CLEANSING BODY OIL, R79.95

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opposite

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KNIT, R1 199, ZARA; COWHIDE, R6 200, LIM

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SMOOTH AND CLEANSE Operation Exfoliation

Temperature Counts

Despite common belief, exfoliating during the winter months is as important as in summer (if not more so). It helps get the most out of your moisturiser and leaves skin soft and supple. Some body polishes can be particularly irritating especially if your skin is sensitive, so test them on a small patch of skin first or opt for gentler formulations. Textured gloves, sponges and mittens will also do the job. Repeat twice a week for best results but don’t overdo it, as your skin will – paradoxically – become drier and irritated if scrubbed often.

Long, hot showers might warm you up on cold winter mornings, but they strip the skin and increase the dehydration process. Keep the temperature down and check the time: your shower should take less than 10 minutes.

Be Gentle Start nourishing your skin in the shower or bath – instead of shower gel, use cream cleansers or shower oils that are rich in skin-soothing ingredients derived from nature. If you love a soap bar, make sure it contains nurturing oils such as avocado, almond and olive, which keep the skin’s moisture balanced.

107 @ELLEmagazineSA

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1. WILD OLIVE PLANTIFOLIA LIGNOSA BODY BUTTER, R570 2. THERAVINE MOISTURISING PINOTAGE BODY OIL, R331 3. AESOP GERANIUM LEAF BODY BALM, R450

Try these as well:

NIVEA RICH NOURISHING BODY CREAM, R33 FOR 250ML DR HAUSCHKA ROSE NURTURING BODY CREAM, R431 BEAUTÉ PACIFIQUE CORPUS PARADOXE BODY OIL, R1 250

opposite

MOHAIR THROW, R1 810, LIM NBONGOLO SINGLE THROW, R4 770, MADWA AT PEZULA INTERIORS

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DEEPLY NOURISHED Condition To stay hydrated, the skin pulls moisture out of the air – a problem in cold weather when humidity is low. Your skin tends to become dry, flaky and at times red and itchy.

Solution To fight winter’s drought and prevent your skin from pulling, stay away from light formulas and slather on a rich moisturiser, body butter or oil within three minutes out of the shower to ensure a better absorption. Look for ingredients such as jojoba oil, shea butter and beeswax, which deeply condition and repair the skin’s surface. Also, consider moisturising morning and evening – there’s a slight elevation in temperature during the night, so product seeps better into skin.

108 @ELLEmagazineSA

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KEEP IT HEALTHY Washing Daily shampooing depletes the hair’s natural oils and means using heat and styling tools that damage the hair fibre – keep the washes down to every two or three days and opt for a sulphate-free formula, it doesn’t dry your scalp out.

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Brushing Choose a boar-bristle brush over a metal, plastic or nylon bristle, as these increase the chance of static hair.

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Treating Give love to your locks by applying a nourishing mask at least once a week- we love Aesop Rose Hair & Scalp Moisturising Masque, R450. Apply the product on scalp and lengths, leave in for 30 minutes (or overnight) before rinsing thoroughly.

1. AFRICA ORGANICS MARULA HAIR TREATMENT OIL, R85 2. AFRICOLOGY SHAMPOO, R240, AND CONDITIONER, R250

Try these as well:

L’ORÉAL ELVIVE EXTRAORDINARY OIL SHAMPOO AND CONDITIONER DRY HAIR, EACH R67.95 TRESEMMÉ OIL ELIXIR HAIR OIL, R120 EVO THE GREAT HYDRATOR MOISTURE MASK, R335

opposite

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FAUX-FUR WAISTCOAT, R250, MRP

111 @ ELLEmagazineSA


SOOTHING EXTREMITIES Hands and feet need extra care when the temperature drops. Keep a heavy-duty hand moisturiser in your bag that’s rich in Vitamin E for multiple application during the day. Twice a week, pamper your feet with a foot soak to soften the dry skin. For added moisture and softness, slather a foot balm and wear cotton socks to bed — they’ll block evaporation and help the cream penetrate more effectively.

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1. RAIN FOOT PUMICE STONE, R55 2. RAIN FOOT SOAK, R85 3. ESSE HAND CREAM, R120 4. OH-LIEF NATURAL OLIVE HAND WAX, R110

Try these as well:

AVON FOOTWORKS BEAUTIFUL BERRY AND VANILLA SMOOTHING SCRUB, R65 CRABTREE & EVELYN JOJOBA OIL MOISTURISING HAND & CUTICLE CREAM, R250 SKNLOGIC RENEW FOOT BALM WITH FIG EXTRACT, R85

opposite

KNIT, R559, ZARA; COWHIDE, R6 200, LIM 112 @ ELLEmagazineSA

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PHOTOGRAPHS: ULRICH KNOBLAUCH AT SNCM / PHOTOGRAPHER’S ASSISTANTS: KATINKA BESTER AND RUDI GEYSER / MAKE-UP


1. COMFORT ZONE RENIGHT VITAMIN INTEGRATOR, R535 2. LAMELLE SERRA CLEANSING GEL, R170 3. AESOP CAMELIA NUT FACIAL HYDRATING CREAM, R630

Try these as well:

AVÈNE EAU THERMALE SPF50 EMULSION, R230 WOOLWORTHS EVEN RECOVERY FACIAL OIL, R200 MAYBELLINE BABY LIPS DR RESCUE, R35

PHOTOGRAPHS: ULRICH KNOBLAUCH AT SNCM / PHOTOGRAPHER’S ASSISTANTS: KATINKA BESTER AND RUDI GEYSER / MAKE-UP AND HAIR: ALET VILJOEN AT SNCM /MODELS: EMMA AND SUMMER AT BOSS MODELS / BEAUTY INTERNS: EEDEN LA GRANGE AND SARAH HILTON-BARBER

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FACE-ING THE COLD Oil Up Indoor heating might keep you cosy, but it really dries out skin. Whether oily or sensitive, add a face oil to your night-time routine to intensify the nurturing action. Most creams contain a  little oil, but not enough to make a big difference in water loss. Look for great sources of antioxidant ingredients such as goji berry, Africa Marula and Argan oil, which guard against free radicals and decrease inflammation.

.CO.ZA

Protect Switch your exfoliating cleanser for a gentle gel or a creamy version to avoid too much scrubbing. Also, ensure your day cream has a built-in SPF – just because it’s cooler outside doesn’t mean the sun rays won’t damage your skin.

GO TO ELLE.CO.ZA

Go online to watch the behind-the-scenes video 115 @ ELLEmagazineSA

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BEAUTY

Best buys Seek comfort in the nurturing, hydrating and moisturising properties of these winter must-haves

Rain Bee Essential Remedies Heel Balm, R115 Just because you’re wearing boots and loafers doesn’t mean you should neglect your feet. For the most supple heels you’ve ever had, dash on this glorious botanical balm before slipping into bed.

Nuxe Rêve de Miel Lip Balm, R130 To combat the frigid temperatures, this honey-based product will take care of your pout. Adieu chapped lips!

Avène Thermal Spring Water, R150 We cannot live without water – inside and out. This mist is an instant pickme-up – its unique mineral composition helps replenish skin’s moisture for rejuvenating purposes, leaving the complexion radiant and plumped-up.

Kiehl’s Superbly Restorative Argan Dry Oil, R455 This multipurpose, restorative dry oil for the face, body, and hair incorporates Moroccan Argan Oil and naturally derived ointments to deeply replenish dry skin and damaged hair. We love the all-in-one Kiehl’s goodness.

.CO.ZA

GO TO ELLE.CO.ZA for winter skincare tips to follow

Essie Apricot Cuticle Oil, R135 A weatherproofing plan right at your fingertips? The natural oils contained in this tiny bottle will save your cuticles, increase nail growth and improve the overall appearance and suppleness of your tips. Clarins HydraQuench Intensive Serum Bi-Phase, R580 for 30ml With an Omega-3 boost, Inca peanut oil boosts the restoration of moisture in the skin. The serum is the perfect product to calm skin’s redness and nurtures even the most sensitive skin through the colder months.

BEAUTY INTERN: EEDEN LA GRANGE/ PHOTOGRAPHS: SÉBASTIEN ROHNER / COMPILED BY: MAYBE CORPACI

Moroccanoil Intense Hydrating Mask, R370 This hair mask that keeps on giving will help your mane survive even the driest of winters. It conditions and replenishes your locks to give you static-free, strong, healthy hair.

116 @ ELLEmagazineSA

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BEAUTY I F

WHO AM I? I am a creature of the ocean as much as I belong to her shores – as sensual as sun-kissed skin emerging from the water. I am orchards in a sea breeze. I am fresh, floral and feminine.

T H I S

bottle CO U L D TA L K …

COMPILED BY: SARAH HILTON-BARBER / JUNIOR BEAUTY EDITOR: MAYBE CORPACI / PHOTOGRAPHS: SHUTTERSTOCK, NIQUITA BENTO, SUPPLIED

THE BOTTLE Emblem of the most enticing of pearls, my jewel-bottle pays tribute to the beauty of Botticelli’s Venus. My iridescence and curved shape are inspired by the seashell from which I emerge. I am the polished gem in the Bvlgari fragrance crown.

FAMILY CONNECTIONS I am the first feminine fragrance in the Aqva Collection, Alberto Morillas’s homage to the vital force of the sea. My brothers and I represent different facets of the Mediterranean explored by Bvlgari. Aqva Amara has unmistakable aquatic notes enriched with natural ingredients and essences of the finest quality. Aqva Pour Homme follows in the footsteps of Bvlgari’s deepseated perfumery tradition. The Aqva Collection is a celebration of beauty in the world.

Bvlgari Aqva Divina EDT, R970 for 40ml

ON THIS NOTE I’m a floral-aquatic fragrance, fresh and delicately feminine. I am reminiscent of the salty sea breeze, with accords of bergamot and pink ginger. I have a soft heart of magnolia and sunlit quince. Sensual base tones of beeswax and amber add an unexpected touch, enhancing the character of my scent.

THE FACE As the fragrance’s face, model Magdalena Frackowiak shines with the glow and natural sensuality of Aqva Divina. In the campaign, she features as a mermaid transformed into a modern-day Venus. Frackowiak is the golden goddess emerging from the Mediterranean sea in perfect grace and harmony.

THE AQVA DIVINA WOMAN She is sensual and youthful, the epitome of the coast. She is born of the wonders of the ocean, with salt in her hair and sand between her toes. She is fresh and radiant, a true Renaissance beauty.

.CO.ZA

GO TO ELLE.CO.ZA Go online to watch the behind-thescenes campaign video and pictures starring Magdalena Frackowiak

WHAT THE EXPERTS SAY… ‘It’s like a flower that emerges from the sea foam, a salty flower.’ – Alberto Morillas, Master Perfumer

‘This scent makes me feel like a goddess. Its floral-aquatic notes are deeply refreshing: the fragrance energises the soul while remaining delicately feminine.’ – Maybe Corpaci, Junior Beauty Editor

117 @ ELLEmagazineSA

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3. COMFORT ZONE FRUITY PEEL BODY SCRUB, R495 Deborah Rudman, Copy Editor

polish up With the cold season comes dry and flaky skin. Scrub away winter woes and reveal a smooth, glowing complexion with these four exfoliators we’ve put to the test 1. SORBET BALANCING BODY SCRUB, R40

2. KIEHL’S GENTLY EXFOLIATING BODY SCRUB IN LAVENDER, R385

Jaime Waddington, Online Intern

How it works: This new body scrub is a gentle exfoliator containing microbeads as well as rosemary and starflower oil scents, which are designed to give you a spa-style experience in your own home. Results: After only one application, my skin felt super-soft. People looking for an intense scrub may not find this product completely satisfying, but for someone like me with a sensitive skin, it was an ideal match. It is a refreshing and cleansing product, leaving skin smelling lusciously spascented. For its price, it’s a great buy. Rating: 4/5

Tarryn Oppel, Senior Fashion Editor

How it works: After cleansing in the shower, apply a generous amount of this calming, aromatic, lavenderscented scrub to your entire body. Rub through gently until the textured grains are evenly distributed and rinse off. Results: The scrub is very gentle and the fragrance of the lavender is extremely soothing. Although the scent doesn’t linger long afterwards, my skin feels incredibly soft once dried. A bonus: it’s perfect in aiding a good night’s sleep when used in the evening. Rating: 5/5

.CO.ZA

GO ONLINE

for DIY body polishes

4. GUINOT EASY BODY SCRUB, R586 Emilie Gambade, Editor

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How it works: Apply a touch of the gel – which looks like a berry smoothie! – on the skin, especially on the ‘rough’ areas, the elbows and knees. Because it has a soft grainy texture, it can easily be applied everywhere else on the body too, but avoid places where the skin is thin. Results: I loved how the grainy texture soothes the skin; it feels like old cells are being banished. After the shower, my skin definitely felt smoother. It also doesn’t dry the skin, which can sometimes happen after a scrub, but even without body cream, my skin felt fresh and soft. Rating: 4/5

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COMPILED BY: MAYBE CORPACI / IMAGES: BETINA DU TOIT, SUPPLIED / MODEL: GILLIAN AT FULL CIRCLE

TRIED AND TESTED

How it works: Apply a little of this lightly scented, grainy-textured scrub to your legs (or whole body) and massage in until it’s been absorbed. Use a towel to gently remove any residue or shower it off. The directions on the tube warn those with super-sensitive skin to stay out of the sun for a few days after use: it contains alpha hydroxy acid (AHA), which can be an irritant. Results: It’s clearly a double-action scrub – my skin felt really smooth and soft afterwards, moisturised and tingly as well as exfoliated! Rating: 4/5

118 @ ELLEmagazineSA

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L I P 5 1 _ AS O. p d f

Pa ge

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AM

SAST

After Shower Oil, R79.95, lipidol.com


BEAUTY PRE-WORKOUT: I use my daily cleanser, RégimA Hydroactive Cleansing + Toning Gel, R599,

drink a big glass of water and eat a banana

GETTING READY FOR THE DAY: After applying my daily moisturiser, Embryolisse Lait-Crème Concentré, which I buy in Paris, I apply sunblock, Eucerin Then I use my only make-up and cover-up, Garnier BB cream, R89.95

Sun Fluid SPF50, R180.

I add some Elizabeth Arden Eight Hour Cream Skin

to moisturise and soothe my skin and finish off with a touch of Chanel Hydra Beauty Lip Balm, R560

Protectant, R210,

EN ROUTE TO SUNDOWNERS: Here I apply a little more make-up: Dior Diorshow Blackout mascara, R435,

and reapply the Elizabeth Arden to add

shine to my cheekbones. AFTER A LONG DAY: I remove all make-up with Bioderma Make-up Remover, R190,

I CAN’T GET ENOUGH: Burberry Body Perfume, R785 for 35ml,

and apply a little Bio-Oil, R49.99,

as night cream.

and L’Oréal Mythic Oil, R303

Johnson’s Baby Powder, R23.95,

– this is a great hair treatment that I add to the ends of my hair for daily TLC MID-WEEKEND TREAT: Dior One Essential Ultra-Detox Mask, R1 260

to regenerate and plump my complexion

BEFORE A NIGHT ON THE TOWN: Some blush, Chanel Joues Contraste in 190 Angélique, R590, Lipstick, R505

and my favourite Chanel Rouge Coco no 428 Légende

to add a pop of colour to my natural look

FOR THE WEEK AHEAD: A good hair mask, I love Moroccanoil Restorative Hair Mask, R470 all over, like Nivea Coco Body Lotion, R32.99

and I use a quality body moisturiser

– it leaves skin silky-smooth for hours

A LAZY AFTERNOON: Any lazy afternoon means no make-up, so I can give my skin a rest BEFORE BED: A good face wash and night cream like Oh-lief Aqueous Cream, R99, Collection – I use the Skin Conditioning Hand Recovery, R380,

works wonders. I use my Crabtree & Evelyn Hand Care Lavender

to exfoliate and the Ultra-Moisturising Hand Therapy, R330

to nurture skin.

COMPILED BY: LAUREN DE BEER / PHOTOGRAPHS: SUPPLIED

AS SOON AS I GET HOME: I drink two glasses of water and have a good 7-8 hours’ sleep.

my weekend in products Cape Town-based model Katryn Kruger unveils her

weekend beauty secrets

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katrynkruger

GO ONLINE

for 5 minutes with Katryn 120 @ ELLEmagazineSA

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BEAUTY

FOREST

B AT H I N G

Tree-hugging is only for hippies, right? Wrong. Forest bathing is a wellness practice being adopted the world over – all you have to do is take a simple step (okay, a few steps) towards nature, says Nicole Newman 122 @ ELLEmagazineSA

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PHOTOGRAPH AND ILLUSTRATIONS: FARROKH CHOTHIA/PIXELLE, SHUTTERSTOCK

BEAUTY When you first hear the term ‘forest bathing’, you probably can’t help but picture someone lying in a bath filled with foliage. You might imagine a woman gently washing herself among leaves and branches, lying back and relaxing in all the natural goodness. Although this is not physically what the practice entails, it is not far from the forest-bathing truth. Most weekends, instead of repeating my weekday gym routine, I pull on my trainers and looked at images of nature experienced a sense of head into Cecilia Forest to walk one of the trails affection and calm, while the students who viewed that spans this beautiful piece of mountain. The urban scenes reported feelings of sadness. trails lead across two valleys, where you encounter Yoshifumi Miyazaki, a professor at Chiba running waterfalls, tall walls of moss and views University in Japan, found lower cortisol levels that take your breath away – and not because in people who took walks in the forest. (Lower you’ve climbed 300 man-made steps to get there cortisol levels are associated with lower blood – or you end up in Cape Town’s famous botanical pressure and a slower heart rate – as well as gardens, Kirstenbosch. These walks give me time improved functioning of our immune system.) to relax, unwind and clear my head from the week The boost that our immune system gets from that has passed … but a fresh mind is not all that being surrounded by trees comes from a substance I am left with. Any tension that’s built up inside is called phytoncides, which we absorb through our immediately cleared, I am suddenly a calmer and skin and through breathing. Li and Miyazaki also happier version of myself. Now, after discovering found that exposure to forests causes an increase the art of forest bathing, I know why. It doesn’t in the level of our white blood cells – these release take an expert’s opinion or a doctor’s advice to anti-cancer proteins, which attack tumours and know that being surrounded by nature has a infected cells. positive effect on our health and wellbeing The benef its of spending time in but, until now, there has been very little nature are rapidly becoming recognised hard evidence to support the idea. internationally; rooftop gardens and Forest-bathing, known as Shinrinman-made parks are a feature of cities .CO.ZA yoku, is a term that was first coined such as New York and Hong Kong. in Japan in 1982 when The Forest The proliferation of walking trails on Agency introduced the movement to our own doorstep indicates that it’s promote natural wellness and health the new, ‘in’ form of exercise – and it’s GO TO ELLE.CO.ZA among the people living in the fastone trend that I hope is here to stay. In to see some of SA’s best green spaces growing cities. Japanese scientist Dr our busy, urban lives it is far easier, or Qing Li of Nippon Medical School in so we tell ourselves, to drive to a gym, do Tokyo, one of the world’s foremost experts an hour’s workout and go back to our day. on Shinrin-yoku, has discovered that this But with a simple change of routine, we can practice has a world of benefits to offer people enjoy the beauty, literally and figuratively, of forest who take part in it. bathing. We can reap the rewards of Shinrin-yoku Although this may be the first time that we’re by simply sitting in a park, going for a leisurely looking at the health benefits of immersing stroll in the mountains or making time to sit in our ourselves in nature, doctors in the mid-19th century own garden. used to prescribe a sojourn in sanitariums and For the fashion editorial ‘The Road Less health resorts, such as the Swiss Alps, to counteract Travelled’ in this issue, we drove to Knysna, so we the effects of the Industrial Revolution. The could shoot in the greenery of the area. Although benefits of natural settings can now be quantified we hadn’t earmarked exact locations and we were by research not only in Japan but across the world. a small crew with a heavy shoot schedule, there was Roger Ulrich, a psychologist at Western not one moment where we felt stressed or anxious. Michigan University in the US, found that students The environment we were in simply banished any who completed a demanding task and then negative emotions; without even thinking about it, we experienced the true meaning of Shinrin-yoku. So, next time you reach for your running shoes to head to the gym, think about the all-round rewards your body will experience from spending that time outdoors instead.

123 @ ELLEmagazineSA

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ROOM FOR TWO p130 PASSAGE TO INDIA p134 MENU

LIFESTYLE THE VOLUNTOURIST

PHOTOGRAPH: GALLO IMAGES/GETTY IMAGES

Want to see the world and give back? Voluntourism is one way to merge both, as Xanthe Hunt found out while in India

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LIVING ROOM

for two Practical and stylish, this interior designer’s compact Parisian flat is a little raw, a little bit industrial and totally cool text C L É M E N C E

Parisians seem to be born with the knack of creating laid-back, effortless style in a way that’s almost impossible to achieve beyond the 20th arrondissement. Interior designer Margaux Beja is one of those ridiculously chic locals; her apartment, located in the heart of the French capital, takes its cue from the uncomplicated elegance of the surrounding streets. Faced with a blank canvas when she first moved in, Beja called on the skills she acquired at L’École Bleue, a prestigious school of interior design and architecture in Paris. ‘At school, we were constantly hammering this rule in any project that there must be a strong element to the design,’ says Beja, referring to a solid Moroccan walnut wall in her flat. Its purpose? ‘It keeps everything hidden,’ she explains. ‘It separates and conceals the bathroom, toilet, laundry and bedroom.’ Beja, who lives with her partner and fellow designer Thomas Pujol, chose a strong monochrome palette punctuated with chrome and walnut touches, which give the space a rustic edge. Like most Parisian apartments, this home is best

LEBOULANGER photographs R O M A I N

RICARD

described as ‘cosy with a side of intimate’, so she focused on space-saving features. ‘In our previous apartment, there was no storage so that was important for me to take into account,’ she says. Making the most of the small space, the apartment is completely open-plan, save for a glass wall between the bedroom and living area. ‘Whether I’m in the kitchen, dining room or bedroom, I wanted to be able to see straight through,’ says Beja. ‘I didn’t want anything to obstruct the flow.’ The Beja apartment, like the projects she undertakes, reflects her signature interest in the raw, natural and textured – resolutely contemporary and minimalistically chic. Designer duo Margaux Beja with her partner, Thomas Pujol ABOVE AND RIGHT To create an illusion of space, Beja opted for a monochrome palette enhanced by wood

126 @ ELLEmagazineSA

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LIVING

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LIVING

BAGS OF STYLE Paper sacks offer a modern alternative to drawers

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LIVING

Ma k i ng the most of the sma ll space, the apa r tment is completely open-pla n, save for a glass wa ll bet ween the bed room a nd liv i ng a rea

129 @ ELLEmagazineSA

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TRAVEL

in d i a PA S SAGE TO

Combining foreign travel with a good cause needs planning and research – but it amply repays the effort, as Xanthe Hunt discovers

130 @ ELLEmagazineSA

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TRAVEL

Xhanthe Hunt I can’t remember when I fell in love with the idea of India: somewhere between reading The Jungle Book at age five and visiting a Bengali bazaar in Durban when I was nine. The gilded statuettes, the heady spices, the myriad saris, bracelets and jewelled bindis (forehead dots) captured my imagination in a flurry of peacock feathers, incense and visions of palaces, princes and belly-dancing beauties. As I grew up, the fascination only intensified, spurred by the political parallels I noticed between the Eastern nation and our own, and by the Indian authors who painted a hypnotic picture of their complicated home in novels like Salman Rushdie’s Midnight’s Children and The God of Small Things by Arundhati Roy. But when my chance came to travel there, the steamy cities of the South India of my dreams eluded me and, early in 2014, I found myself living and working at a monastic school in Gombadara, a tiny hill station in the lower reaches of the Himalayas. My path to this curious and cold destination? Googling ‘Volunteer in India’. Like many recent graduates, mildly overwhelmed by the prospect of entering the working world, itchingly keen to finally meet my hero India, and determined to do something worthwhile, I decided to take part in the growing field of ‘voluntourism’ – the genre of travel that allows the traveller to work in the non-profit sector while living abroad. The packages often include bed and board, vastly reducing the overall cost of what would otherwise be a pricey endeavour. (I managed to live in India for nearly five months for less than R40 000, R11 000-a-pop flights included – a fraction of the price of ‘holidaying’ for the same period.) Also, I would have the unparalleled opportunity to acculturate, work, and truly live the authentic Indian experience while, hopefully, making my own small contribution. There’s a downside. With many agencies, you relinquish control over where precisely you are placed, and if you aren’t careful and considered, you can’t be entirely sure you’re going to end up where you’d imagined. So, before all ye good-willed nomads rush off to Google, there are a few things you need to know before you turn your Googling into going.

LOCAL LINGO The main language in West Bengal is Nepali. Try to get a few of these phrases under your tongue: Namaste Hello Dhanyabad Thank you Hajur Sanchai cha? How are you? Hajur Yes Tapaai Angreji bolnuhunchha? Do you speak English? 131 @ ELLEmagazineSA

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RESEARCH IS KEY

If you don’t research your host company well, you can’t complain if they let you down. Many (such as Lattitude, with whom I travelled, Lattitude.org.za ) provide some support, from hosts and coordinators both on this side of the world and in the destination country. Nonetheless, agency or no, when you do make contact with your coordinator or host, find out details – from exactly what sort of meals will be provided to the type of accommodation, transport, and support services they make available. Discovering that you need to travel the equivalent of Cape Town to Johannesburg on the roof of a Jeep (yes, this happened), is something which is best established at the outset. In many respects, I skimped on the research: I had a vague notion that the town in which I was to work was on a mountainside (wrong – it was on top of a mountain) and was delighted to discover, via Wikipedia, that the seasonal temperatures were ‘moderate’ (it was freezing; below 5°C for three months). But in the end I was placed at a beautiful monastery on a picturesque Himalayan mountain, with a school full of eager, talented and curious children. However, had I known prior to arriving that I would spend five months eating very different food to what I was used to, wearing at least four layers on most days, and teaching everything from basketball and grammar to how to draw a pig to 20 very, very small children, I’d have had a smoother time adjusting than I did.

TRAVEL YOU HAVE OPTIONS: DON’T BE HASTY

A key decision to make before you settle on the when, where and how of your trip to India (or anywhere else), is whether you’d be better off travelling with an agency, or off your own bat. The perks of the agency option range from their booking your ticket to providing recourse to relocate if you are unhappy at your placement. The downside? Volunteering through agencies can be expensive, with some charging as much as R11 000 per week. Unfortunately, because voluntourism grew to faddy prominence in the US, England and Australia over the last decade, many agencies sprouted up to capitalise on the wealthy foreign travellers keen to Instagram their way to gap-year fame featuring themselves holding a baby tiger in Bengal. Because of this, many aspiring volunteers on a shoestring budget make contact with independent Indian charities when seeking a placement, cutting out the middle man. And there are many authentically good options out there. The popular, cool WWOOF (Willing Workers on Organic Farms, Wwoof.net) is a  worldwide network of organic farmers who offer bed and board for anyone who wants to come and work on their plantation/ dairy/orchard. In India alone the number of hosts has grown to over 100. For organic-eaters, these tea estates, coffee estates and vegan agricultural communities offer the perfect opportunity to contribute at a grassroots level (literally) to their bread, butter and tofu. To join, there’s a membership fee of R289 for singles or R464 for couples, for 12 months, and once part of the network, it’s up to you where and for how long you WWOOF. There is one resounding benefit of agency travel, and that is your fellow volunteers. From the unlikely Essex lass who held my hand in a dodgy hospital as I recovered from food poisoning to the down-to-earth New Zealand farmgirl who taught me to paint a lion so that I could teach my class about the Big Five, my co-volunteers became my greatest resource.

FINALLY, RELAX

Everything in this bustling, colourful and completely overwhelming country has its own internal logic. From the airlines that don’t necessarily fly on time to the excessive bureaucratic rigmarole foreigners are subjected to, the seeming disorganisation comes with a  country whose population dwarfs ours by over 200 percent. The beauty is that, if you let go of your sense of indignation (‘But I booked the flight and I need to be in Delhi by 6pm to check in!’), it can lead to a strangely liberating brand of acceptance as you appreciate your very tiny place among the millions. Once you do this – stop rushing, stop insisting, and curb your indignation at the petty – you open yourself to a sort of humble humour and ultimately enjoyment: the ubiquitous head-wiggle (Yes? No? Maybe?) that greets most queries becomes endearing as you relinquish control to the ebb and flow of this huge tide of humanity. And even if you do end up in a cold, misty, mountainous village, with no sight of a sari nor scent of a spice, India will weave her magic on you: humble you and honour you. But as you eat, sleep and volunteer alongside the people of this mystifying land, you soon realise that India is enriching you more than you’re enriching her.

132 @ ELLEmagazineSA

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PHOTOGRAPHS: XANTHE HUNT, GALLO IMAGES/GETTY IMAGES

u, 13, Ph u r ba Lam in h e r h a nd s o l s e t a r o c e d th e s c h o h e nna for dr e s s fanc y


TRAVEL

PHOTOGRAPHS: XANTHE HUNT, GALLO IMAGES/GETTY IMAGES

Children in civvies to celebrate Buddha Jayanti, the birth of Buddha F I N D Y O U R PA S S I O N B E F O R E Y O U R PA S S P O R T If you wouldn’t do it at home, you’re not going to magically enjoy it abroad. If you can, try and do a bit of volunteering in different sectors at home before settling on one that you’re going to be doing for a prolonged period in a foreign country. Adjusting to India was an enormous challenge, particularly because, as a volunteer, I was living in the most un-touristy reaches of the country. And, while this is precisely the beauty of volunteering – the opportunity to eat, sleep and breathe the country in the same taste, feel and smell as the majority of the locals – it is also its greatest challenge. I was fortunate in that I guessed correctly, hypothesising that my enjoyment of children and relative ability to spell correctly would make teaching the right path for me. But it is better – for you and the people/animals/ organisation you are setting out to work with – if you make sure you’re going to be able to sustain your passion for the duration of your trip.

.CO.ZA

GO ONLINE

for our top 5 voluntourism picks

T RAV E L A DV I C E When to go? India is a pretty big country, so there’s no perfect time to go if you’re going to be moving from province to province. What you need to research is when the monsoons and the summer heat most affect your chosen area. In general, the best time to go is from October to March

133 @ ELLEmagazineSA

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WARMING

ramen

Food photographer, stylist and blogger Alida Ryder of Simply-delicious-food.com shares this noodly Japanese broth recipe, perfect for an Eastern-infused night in PORK BELLY RAMEN

Ponzu, a citrusy Japanese sauce, adds excellent tang to pork broth. Pick up a bottle from your local oriental supermarket.

METHOD

INGREDIENTS

1x1.6kg bone-in pork belly Salt & pepper to taste For the broth Pork bones from roasted belly 2 carrots, roughly chopped A handful of spring onions, roughly chopped 4 garlic cloves 1x4cm piece fresh ginger, sliced 8 cups chicken stock ½ cup soy sauce 2T fish sauce 2-3T ponzu (or to taste) 2T miso paste Soy sauce, to taste For the ramen Roasted and cooled pork belly, sliced Noodles, cooked 1 boiled egg, per person, cooked to preference Fresh spring onions, sliced 134 @ ELLEmagazineSA

1 Pre-heat the oven to 160°C. Rub the pork belly with salt and pepper then place in the oven and allow to roast for 90 to 120 minutes or until the belly is cooked through. 2 Remove the belly from the oven and allow to cool, then carefully slice off the bones and place the belly in the fridge to chill completely. 3 Place the roasted pork bones in a large pot and add all the remaining broth ingredients. Bring the broth to the boil. Turn down the heat and allow to simmer for two to three hours or until the broth is golden brown in colour and deeply aromatic. 4 Strain the broth then set aside. When you are ready to serve, slice the cold pork belly then warm in the broth for five minutes. 5 Serve the pork belly with the noodles, boiled egg and spring onions, and top with the broth.

COMPILED BY: HOLLY MEADOWS / PHOTOGRAPHS: ALIDA RYDER

t ip

Serves 6-8


MENU @SimplyDelishSA @alidaryder

Who is Alida? Mom to twins, Aidan and Abigail. Wife to Chris. Former make-up artist. Obsessed with creating delicious food and beautiful images. A little too fond of G&Ts, margaritas and shoes.

‘This is such a glorious meal and yes, it takes a bit of time but man, it’s so worth it!’

ALIDA’S TOP 3 FOOD INSTAGRAMMERS

@evakosmasflores @bakersroyale_naomi @linda_lomelino

.CO.ZA

GO ONLINE

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INSIDE WORD

SWITCH ON YOUR HAZARD LIGHTS

This is your first post-accident step – to warn other vehicles. If you can, get out of your car. If anyone is injured, call an ambulance and the police.

TAKE NOTE

T O

COPE WITH A MOTORING MISHAP (HINT: MAKE NOTES!)

Executive Head of 1st for Women Insurance Robyn Farrell shares her advice on what to do

Write down all the info from the other people and vehicles involved as well as witnesses, street names, time of accident, visibility and road conditions. Information must include full names, ID numbers, home, cell and business phone numbers, physical addresses, email addresses and vehicle registrations. Note whether the other driver appeared intoxicated, was talking on a cellphone, or was driving negligently or too fast.

DON’T ADMIT LIABILITY

BE WARY OF TOW-TRUCK DRIVERS If your insurance includes roadside assistance and towing services, don’t allow your vehicle to be towed by any service other than your insurance provider’s. If you don’t have tow cover, ask for a quote from the operator first and negotiate the price upfront. Remember to note the name, contact details and vehicle registration of the tow-truck driver.

Take pictures of the accident and the damage to your car, as well as the other car involved, from different angles. You will need these for insurance.

Only give the essentials when making your statement to the police, even if you think you may have caused the accident, and do not sign a written statement without first consulting your insurance company or an attorney.

REPORT IT TO THE POLICE The police don’t have to be called to the scene if no one is hurt, but the accident must be reported within 24 hours at a police station by all parties involved. It is an offence not to report an accident, even if neither party intends to take legal action.

TELL YOUR INSURANCE COMPANY Even if you don’t claim, the other party may wish to make a claim against your policy if you caused the accident.

.CO.ZA

GO ONLINE

for tips on how to change a tyre

DON’T INTERFERE If anyone has been injured, do not tamper with the evidence or move the vehicles. An exception is if the vehicle obstructs the traffic completely, in which case you can move it slightly to allow traffic to move past, but first mark the original position with chalk or spray paint. No one should administer first aid unless they are qualified to do so.

PHOTOGRAPH: SUPPLIED / ILLUSTRATION: SHUTTERSTOCK

H O W

SNAP AWAY

136 @ ELLEmagazineSA

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2015/04/29 12:51 PM


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C A R V E L A A N D N I N A R O C H E E X C L U S I V E T O S P I T Z | 0 8 6 0 10 9 3 21 | W W W . S P I T Z . C O . Z A

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2015/02/20 2:40 PM


GEAR

MOTOR MOUTH

The Opel Adam offers plenty of reasons why it’s the ELLE team’s choice this month

I’M A STATEMENT CAR:

Make me your own, with choice of wheels and interior design.

PAINT THE TOWN RED (OR ANY COLOUR YOU WISH) WITH PERSONALISED PAINT OPTIONS LIKE THE GREYFATHER OR JAMES BLONDE.

.CO.ZA

PLAY IT SAFE

GO TO ELLE.CO.ZA for more info on the OPEL ADAM

with the Safe Blind Zone Alert that has integrated warning lights and Advanced Park Assist 2 to help with parallel parking.

FATHER FIGURE PAYING HOMAGE TO ADAM OPEL, I’M INNOVATIVE AND FORWARD-THINKING.

Technically speaking: I monitor energy consumption, provide steering assistance and let you chat to friends via smartphone connectivity.

FUEL-EFFICIENT?

I’m light on petrol, thanks to a lightweight design, superior braking energy, improved torque and reduced friction.

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SMART AND SMALL I MAKE AN IMPACT, BUT I’M RELIABLE AND RESPONSIBLE TOO.

138 @ ELLEmagazineSA

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2015/04/29 12:38 PM


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ELLE DECORATION No 102

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THE WINTER ISSUE – SOFAS, RUGS & FIREPLACES

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SPECIAL FOCUS: LIGHTING, FIREPLACES & SOFAS TRAVEL FEATURE: CHASE THE NORTHERN LIGHTS

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2015/04/23 12:11 PM

The Winter Issue

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@ELLEDecorationSA

@ELLE_Deco

2015/04/23 1:16 PM


ADDRESS BOOK Prices and availability were checked at the time of going to press. ELLE cannot guarantee that prices will not change or items will be in stock at the time of publication

B

Aesop 021 425 6320 Africa Organics 033 212 3508 Africology 011 791 6890 Aldo 011 884 4141 Anna Scott 021 914 1390 Ash 021 683 1666 Avène 011 803 5140 Avon 010 205 5000 Beauté Pacifique 011 268 0486 Bio-Oil 021 201 1310 Bioderma 011 801 9153 Botane 072 479 1688 Bronx Woman 021 590 7000 Burberry 011 325 5923 Bvlgari 0800 020 3925

C

Call it Spring 021 418 2491 Calvin Klein 021 418 1185 Caviar 011 783 5215; 021 914 1390 Chanel 0860 692 274 Clarins 0860 692 274 Clinique 011 516 3000 Comfort Zone 011 791 3567 Cotton On 021 552 0726 Country Road 011 290 5200 Crabtree & Evelyn 011 792 7572

D

Dior 0860 692 274 Dove 021 460 1009

Jo Borkett 011 883 7240 Johnson 0860 410 032 Jorge 011 783 5215; 021 914 1390

Dr Hauschka 021 702 3617 E

Edgars 0860 692 274 Elemis 021 442 7700 Elizabeth Arden 0860 692 274 Esse 033 212 3508 Essie 011 286 0700 Eucerin 0860 254 257 Evo 011 448 2210 Express 0860 692 274

F

Falke 0860 692 274 FitFlop 021 510 4428 Forever 21 021 555 3324 Frazer Parfum 021 421 9159

G

Garnier 0860 254 257 Gerard Darel 021 418 6447 GHD 031 766 0320 Gucci 021 421 8800 Guess 011 883 8391; 021 421 0110 Guinot 011 305 1600

H

Habits 021 671 7330 Hugo Boss 0860 692 274

I

Inglot 021 447 7718 Isabel Marant 021 683 1666

J

Jenga 011 783 5215; 021 914 1390 Jigsaw 021 418 1364

K

L

Kaika Jewellery 082 377 1017 Kat Van Duinen 021 447 6582 Kelso 0860 692 274 Kérastase 011 286 0700 Kevin Murphy 021 876 2285 Kiehl’s 0860 692 274 L’Oréal 011 286 0700 LaMelle 011 465 2264 LIM 021 423 1200 Lipidol 0860 254 257 Louis Vuitton 021 405 9700 Lukhanyo Mdingi 076 052 7538 Lush 021 418 4150 Luxco 011 448 2210

Nuxe 021 701 2900 O Oh-Lief 0860 100 987 Old Khaki 021 418 2240 Ordinary Skincare 021 671 2956 P

Pezula Interiors 021 424 2661 Picot & Moss 011 669 0500

R

Rain 082 514 2926 Reebok 021 555 0395 RégimA 011 615 2869 Replay 011 884 6727 Retrosuperfuture 011 262 4478 River Island 021 555 3691

S

Safilo 011 608 2265 Scotch and Soda 021 418 1725 SDM Eyewear 011 334 7020 Second Time Around 021 432 1674 Simon and Mary deanp@ W Wild Olive simonandmary.co.za 021 422 2777 Sknlogic Witchery 021 552 6999 021 418 9893 Smashbox Wolford 011 516 3000 011 325 6457 Sorbet Woolworths 011 202 7940 0860 022 002 Studio 8 021 683 1666 Z Zara Stuttafords 011 302 1500 011 783 5215; Zoom 021 914 1390 021 555 2021 Superdry 021 418 2748 Superga 011 608 0023

M MAC 011 516 3000 Mango 011 783 7907 Mari and Me 021 424 5446 Max Mara 021 418 9447 Maybelline 011 286 0700 Mimco 021 418 9893 MRP 0800 212 535 N

Nicholas Coutts 079 567 1129 Nivea 0860 102 091

T

Tamara Chérie 082 788 4978 Ted Baker 011 783 5215; 021 914 1390 Tessa Design 011 268 0997 Theravine 021 886 6623 Tiger of Sweden 021 421 9177 Topshop 011 685 7070; 021 419 5900 Trenery 021 405 4300 TRESemmé 0860 254 257 TW Steel 011 448 2210

PHOTOGRAPH: ULRICH KNOBLAUCH AT SNCM / ILLUSTRATIONS: SHUTTERSTOCK

A

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140 @ ELLEmagazineSA

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S U B S C R I B E

T O

SPECIAL SUBSCRIPTION OFFER Subscribe to ELLE for 12 months or renew your subscription, and GET A 35% DISCOUNT. You could win one of 11 PANDORA bracelets worth R2 500. Pay R257 for your subscription. Escape with PANDORA to faraway shores filled with exotic treasures, vibrant florals and playful creatures this season. Be one of 11 lucky readers to win a sterling silver bracelet and three charms from Pandora’s new collection. Put a tropical spin on your jewellery. From ethnic patterns and ornamental openwork to intricate latticework, there’s nothing we don’t expect from this world-renowned brand. The high quality and beautiful hand finishes will leave you in awe.

PHOTOGRAPHS: SUPPLIED / PRIZES MAY DIFFER FROM BRACELETS PICTURED

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can subscribe to ELLE for only R198 for 12 issues. Visit VitalityShop on discovery.co.za to get this great saving. You can use your Discovery Miles and/or Discovery Card to pay. DISCOVERY VITALITY (PTY) LTD IS AN AUTHORISED FINANCIAL SERVICES PROVIDER. REGISTRATION NUMBER:

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1999/007736/07. Terms and conditions apply. A 12-month printed subscription for local readers costs R198. The monthly debit order rate is R27 per month. This offer is limited to SA residents only and is valid until 30 June 2015. Terms and conditions: Each SMS costs R1.50, free minutes do not apply and errors are billed. Overseas subscriptions are an all-inclusive rate of R1 000 (first-class mail) and may not include all promotional items packaged with the magazine. For the full terms and conditions, turn to Address Book.

141 @ ELLEmagazineSA


HOROSCOPES

LEO

July 22-August 21

Your inner rock star yearns for top billing and will want to dress the part. As you move towards centre stage, avoid stepping on the toes of those who helped get you there. A simple gesture of gratitude will do more to bolster that regal image than you may realise. And then … rock on! VIRGO

SAGITTARIUS

August 22-September 21

May 20-June 19

There’s not a butterfly in the sky with wings as radiant as yours during your solar month, when flirtation is your middle name and clever repartee is your game. Make sure your message lands near a certain gentle someone who understands exactly how much space those pretty wings need. CANCER

June 20-July 21

Merge those money-making ideas that are keeping you up at night with your love of all things beautiful and you’ll be sitting on a rocket aimed for success. But first things first, Ms Moonchild! Use your talents to create a compelling business plan. If you can dream it, you know you can manifest it.

You’re a caped crusader by day, as you implement the new and deflect protests from higher-ups who threaten to bring back the Dark Ages. By night, you dream of creating something extraordinary. No need to burn the candle at both ends. There’s not an ordinary bone in your body.

PISCES

February 18-March 18

You look like an absolute star in that new leadership role. Life in the deep end, with all that extra responsibility, financial reward and thrill of swimming with the big fish, becomes you. The home front may look like an Eastern bazaar right now, Little Mermaid, but you won’t notice until you come up for air.

November 21-December 20

June may tempt you to jump on your high horse and gallop away, leaving loved ones in a cloud of hurtful words, hastily delivered. Before you head off, though, count to 10, take a deep breath, then drop the illusion of superiority. Those fences need mending. CAPRICORN

ARIES

March 19-April 18

Have your suitcase packed and ready. This month will have you mixing business with pleasure, which you already have down to a fine art. Indulge selectively and keep a clear head. Things are moving too fast with too much at stake for foolish risk-taking.

December 21-January 19

LIBRA

September 22-October 21

Exercising your delightfully curious mind with a new intellectual pursuit has the capacity to expand more than your educational horizons this month. As doors open socially, Ms Popularity, you may waltz your way right into a flirtation with a slightly erotic slant.

Your efforts to be ‘best and brightest’ will go nowhere if your wheels start spinning, you ambitious young goat. Curling up with an inspiring memoir will keep you out of trouble and help you reconnect with your true motivations quicker than any workplace seduction.

TAURUS

April 19-May 19

Creature comforts are essential for little Bulls, including a home to be proud of. If a purchase or renovation is on your agenda, put a lid on impulse buying. Conjure up some money-making strategies to offset costs, and you’ll be sitting pretty.

AQUARIUS SCORPIO

January 20-February 17

Laying out hard cash to make your business more appealing to potential investors and new clients may get your vote this month. That exquisite taste has a way of ensuring everyone (and everything) looks and feels like a million bucks. Keep the receipts.

An intelligent, passionate meeting of the minds does more to pique your curiosity and spark interest than a dozen overused romantic gestures. If you have the great fortune to meet a confident someone who also treats you like a queen, you just may have a keeper on your hands.

October 22-November 20

Curious about a private session? Email the.galactic.gogo@gmail.com

.CO.ZA

GO TO ELLE.CO.ZA for your weekly horoscopes

ILLUSTRATION AND PHOTOGRAPHS: SHUTTERSTOCK

By THE GALACTIC GOGO

If, like Angelina Jolie, Johnny Depp and Morgan Freeman, you were born under the Twin Constellation, you’re probably wonderfully versatile, with a mind and wit that just won’t quit! Those very qualities require you to balance out busy days with restful sleep to avoid exhaustion. Calming activities like meditation can help you both relax and stay on top of your game.

142 @ ELLEmagazineSA

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LAST WORD @DeborahRudman

A LIGHT FROM WITHIN Delving into photographs and memories, Deborah Rudman uncovered an unexpected beauty secret As I took a closer look at these faces from the past, it all came back to me. Deena was the musical girl, who’d played the piano in ever y concert throughout high school. Terri, witty and entertaining, wanted nothing more than to perform – and always did, putting on a show to amuse the rest of us. Lesley was an enthusiastic novice cook. Marja was cheerfully hopeless at maths but could do our make-up before an evening out like a pro. Jen was the dreamy and imaginative one. And Freya was a ‘natural’ with people, gifted beyond her years with insight, empathy and patience. What a collection of beauty, in so many different forms. Then I realised what it was that made every girl in the photo beautiful. Opinions may differ, but for me beauty is a deep and enduring interest in something. Enthusiasm is beautiful. Joie de vivre is, too. It’s a wider-than-the-sky love for life, it’s putting-yourself-out-there courage, and it’s spotting and embracing your own best bits! It’s laughing with others, or at yourself. (Which is why some of the world’s funny ladies – Allison Janney, Tumi Morake, Miranda Hart – rank higher on my attractiveness scale than the humourless ‘classic’ beauties like Nicole Kidman.) You’re beautiful when you allow yourself to dream, to try, to take a chance … when you understand that you have something special that is uniquely yours and is something to be proud of – whether it’s mastering the smallest task or accomplishing a great goal. So, are you beautiful? Without a doubt. Don’t forget it or waste it. You’ve never been more beautiful than you are now.

.CO.ZA

GO TO ELLE.CO.ZA for more views on what constitutes beauty

PHOTOGRAPH: NIQUITA BENTO

I

t was prompted by a browse through old photographs – the printed-atthe-pharmacy, hard-copy kind, stuck into a ring-bound album, with transparent sheets of protective film separating the pages and a cheesy sunset scene on the cover. (It did date back a bit.) Here was a forgotten face, there a much-loved pet, there a granny who was eccentric and fun: good memories and a few faded ones. In one photo, a group of us were celebrating: we had just finished Matric. We were laughing, glasses in hand, and teasing one another, no doubt, chaotic and conspiratorial. What struck me, above all, was how lovely we all were. Snapped in a moment when the ‘now’ was even more exciting than we’d ever thought, growing up. And the ‘tomorrow’ – if we thought about it much at all – was a promise of more of the same. The heartaches and disappointments that we all must have experienced before that moment had left no sign. The pangs that must have bruised our hearts had just glanced off our cheeks, leaving no outward trace of inner turmoil. Did we appreciate that we were lovely? Probably not, because what I  also remember is that we were anxious. Experts in self-criticism. Everyone else was enviably taller and longer-limbed – or shorter and cuter. Our hair was too frizzy to be alluring or too boringly straight to be seductive (no bed-head there). A lopsided smile, too many freckles, no dimples… So many beauty deficiencies, so many reasons to fret. What else was in that photo, apart from the hidden insecurities and doubts?

144 @ ELLEmagazineSA

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2015/04/30 9:21 AM


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