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Jingzhou: Ancient Water City

M ay 19, 2007

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T o u r i s m D e s ti nati o n P r o j e ct s : I n v e s to r ’ s B rief


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J ingzhou : A nc ien t Wa ter C it y


Jingzhou: the investment opportunity Tourists from China and other parts of the world are discovering Jingzhou. Jingzhou is located halfway between Wuhan, China’s fifth largest city and Yichang, the home of the Three Gorges Dam--now the leading tourist attraction in all of China. This investor prospectus describes twelve projects that are designed to significantly grow the tourism industry in Jingzhou. The projects will lead to a doubling of the number of tourists to Jingzhou by 2008. These projects represent a direct investment of 485,000,000 yuan, with

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a projected additional investment of 900,000,000 in support facilities such as hotels, restaurants and infrastructure. When completed they will have an annual total economic impact of 230,000,000 yuan, and 460,000,000 yuan annual indirect impact. The first new project is the development of the Xiong Tombs with a projected investment of 100,000,000 yuan. The combined annual return on investment averages 48%.




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J ingzhou : A nc ien t Wa ter C it y


Table of Contents The investment opportunity The Vision The Place in 2007 Themes--The Guiding Values The Development Strategy The Attractions 1. East Gate and Ancient Wall

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2. Juilong Park

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3. Xiong Tombs

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4. Lord Guan Battle Theater

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5. Lord Guan Temple Area

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6. Museum and AV Experience

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7. Three Kingdoms Dynasty Park

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8. High Speed Rail Tourism Center

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9. Famous People Hotel

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10. Development of the City moat

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11. Yangtze Culture Longevity Park

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12. Tourist Transportation

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Jingzhou Infrastructure Projects Sustainable Tourism Policy Implementation Plan Financial Return Jingzhou and Hubei Market Data Development Team

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2 5 11 29 33 37

121 129 131 137 139 147




Jingzhou: The Vision (6.4.4) To best imagine Jingzhou of the future we invite you to close your eyes and IMAGINE!! Open them and we are in 2020 to discover that the city of Jingzhou lying along the Yangtze River, is a place where holidaymakers, tourists and families travel for fun, culture and relaxation. The ancient walled city of Jingzhou has tree-lined boulevards and colorful gardens, sparkling contemporary buildings that sit comfortably side by side with historic temples and villages. It is a bustling city where tourists of many nationalities and locals intermingle in a celebration of entertainment and culture. It has been transformed from a grey city to the City of Pure Water and Dynamic Culture.

If one could imagine a city unlike any other this is it, The combination of a celebration of pure water and dynamic culture that provides a memorable visitor experience. From our 2020 perspective the past thirteen years have seen considerable content development in all sectors that provide support to tourism, as well as the construction of a considerable number of unique entertainment spectaclesshows and destinations that have no rival in China. Jingzhou City now boasts a true sustainable tourism based economy.

The Beginning The program began in 2007. In that year massive city efforts were focused on the cleansing of the moat system, the establishment of new rules and

development guidelines regarding sustainability, the land clearance of unnecessary or decaying buildings inside the walls, and a major tree and landscape planting program that came to full bloom in five years and now provides perennial color and arboreal interest. This landscape plan was undertaken under the themes of the Chinese elements of Fire- Metal- Earth and water. At the end of 2008, demonstrated by a growing interest in China following the successful Olympic Games, Jingzhou City put into place the first of its many famous festivals. Interest in Jingzhou was achieved by the manipulation of foreign media and press as well as the first of the now celebrated Lord Guan Yu Festivals. This attracted adherents from all parts of China and from the Overseas Chinese communities.

7.2.4.3 确定旅游区的性质和主题形象。 To define the destination character and theme image

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The design and construction of the Historical Center that presents the stories of the Three Kingdoms in a coherent Living Scroll manner has been a successful cultural contribution. In the same year Jingzhou City opened its doors to the first influx of tourists- keen to partake in a twoday experience. Commencing at the city’s East gate where new bus and car parking lots led to a pedestrian entry- the tourist pathway consisted of a redesigned market street with its wider display of food, beverage and retail as well as the conversion of the upper spaces above shops for three new hotels. As part of the evolving master plan a commercial street that leads to the Three Kingdoms Plaza was the first improvement project of the new urban concept that now includes a modern city, but constructed with Chinese vernacular architecture. A romantic transportation service was

introduced for tourists. This included themed horse drawn carriages and rickshaws. A more sophisticated use of the surrounding moat occurred once the bridges were designed to accept tourist river boats. In the nearby Three Kingdoms Park (an Asian version of Tivoli in Copenhagen) are the world renowned celebrity chefs of China, each outdoing each other with exotic menus. These culinary bouts are often televised, and with the other festival programs that include the electric light parade, kite flying, the international poetry festival, the commencement of the antique road race from Jingzhou to Beijing, etc, brought Jingzhou to national focus. The Dragon boat festivals reenergized the moat by day. Families were not forgotten. A number of small-scale leisure investments with Chinese themes opened on

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available land in the city. Developers built a cultural mini-golf that proved enormously successful.

How Jingzhou got it’s international focus The International focus and attention took longer. First it was related to the higher end of the cultural spectrum through programs like National Geographic, BBC and the Discovery Channels that brought the amazing finds of the Chu tombs to a wider audience. This market was the older, semi-retired or senior professional with a love of history. The Koreans visited in search of their ancestral traditions. This opening up of the cultural opportunities were also spurred by the construction of the Chu Cultural




AV Theater in the Jingzhou Museum grounds that wandered back in time to a presentation of life at the time of the Chu.

Virtual Reality plays a role The ability to present jade finds, tomb discoveries, etc, with real time transmissions from the archeological field, conducted and presented by national and international archeologists later stirred interest in visiting the locations. Major archeological finds at Xiong Tombs lead to a further understanding of the importance of the Chu Culture. By 2015, the Xiong Tombs built soaring air inflated structures to cover almost all of the 150 tombs, providing visitors with a unique view of one of China’s significant eras. The Xiong site’s former green tents,

always temporary, were now replaced by three large white low profile air domes on ring berms constructed from excavated and compacted earth. The splendors of the shafts are for all to see. In the adjacent museum are some of the recent finds- with exhibits that illustrate the position of the Chu kingdoms within the Dynastic stories. Tourists can also learn about the tombs from afar by visiting the Jingzhou Museum to experience a virtual presentation of the tombs. The 200 seat Chu AV culture Theater with a sophisticated twenty minute show and six hundred an hour capacity opened in 2008. It features banked seating, giant screens, wrap round audio, side panels and actors.

Sweden’s X2000 train has been the model for some of the new Chinese high-speed train technology.

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J ingzhou : C it y

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The Importance of Speed and a Tourist Hub for Hubei

the king’s tomb that contains fabulous works of artistry was finally unearthed. This put the site on a comparison with the terracotta warriors of Xi’an as a major Chinese cultural destination and worthy of consideration as a World Heritage site.

The opening of the high-speed rail station in 2009 provided access to a market beyond the radius of 80 kilometers. For the first time residents of the mega city of Shanghai, with a higher than average disposable income, could discover the splendors of the Chu culture. Ten trains a day from Shanghai bring 5,000 tourists per day. The high-speed rail transit hub is a tourist attraction in itself with interactive theaters, souvenirs, and connections to major attractions. In its current form it has evolved into a state of the art sustainable village with residences, offices, shopping and cultural facilities.

The appeal of Lord Guang Yu

As Jingzhou was once the regional capitol of past dynasties, it is now the Capital of the Lord Guang Yu Society for International Sustainability and Prosperity. As a sign of the Importance of the Chinese Cultural to Chinese, Korean and Japanese (and the Overseas Chinese community), an annual conferences on culture and tourism takes place at the Jingzhou Museum Meeting Center. Jingzhou rejuvenated its tourism program to coincide with 2008 Olympics in Bejing and reinforced it two years later at the 2010 World Expo in Shanghai. The event that inaugurated the Jingzhou City of Culture and Fun took place on August 28, 2008. It was so successful that it has become an annual event to mark the significance of Lord Guang Yu in Jingzhou Chinese Culture.

Just as the walled city built in 800 AD was the result of strategic thinking, so is this urban village of the future. It borrows the best of the past to create a new future. One where open space is interwoven with buildings and streets, organized as small villages. The traditional grid is replaced with meandering paths, the roads with water ways,….. The undoubted draw of the Three Gorges Dam, now producing over half of the electrical needs of China, and of the scenic splendors of the other gorges continued to pull people to the western part of Hubei province. Jingzhou City, with its wide range of motels, rental apartments, and quality hotels provides the Hub(ei) base for regional tourism out to Yichang and Wusan, east to the East Lake area of Wuchang, and north to the splendors of the Chu sites that have now been fully excavated. In 2012

In the 2008 the first program pageantry of the Lord Guang Yu period was fabulously presented in the grounds of the first major city re-urbanisation program. This ‘battle theater’, involving mounted knights, archers, drummers, acrobats, flags and music takes place daily on part of the old prison grounds throughout the tourist season. Designed with spectacle in mind the backdrop is the city wall.

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In 2012, a whole new exposition and learning center is created around the Lord Guang philosophy. Like the ultimate academy for business and culture it is housed in a cluster of custom buildings and environments. It uses video, light, sound, water, stone and metal to create a remarkable temple of the future. The names of the visitors are preserved in a digital information wall where people can connect to people all around the world.

Telling stories with light and sound Across the moat water to the east the spectacular water festival of Jiulong Park presents the Three Kingdoms Son et Lumiere Show. At night from the thousand-seat theater the waters become illuminated with the scene of abstract floating junks, their sails forming the screens for huge projections. A water mist curtain farther out in the water acts as another projected screen. The walls and ramparts of the old city are lit up with exciting synchronized projections from huge projectors. This nighttime show has been hugely successful and is now a ‘must’ on all tourist itineraries. The open-air stadium that was re-clad is also the review stand of the famous Jingzhou City Dragon Boat races that were re-inaugurated in the autumn of 2007. With the completion of the first short term projects that elevated tourism by 200%, the second phase projects began. These included the commencement of more land clearing in the center of the city, the adoption of the new plan as Comprehensive Master Plan, the completion of new development districts, each to reflect character and use. Some of the earlier buildings that were once used by the government have now become five star hotels, their grounds finely landscaped.

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A new city to cater for creativity The redevelopment of the inner city plan was a major achievement. It offered a new home to future creativity- the third age of development and soon became, after the installment of wireless connectivity, a sought after place for artists, technologists, computer graphic designers, architects and craftsmen. New schools of calligraphy were established in a perfect blend of old and new. Other projects in the city featured the lost art of bronze making, of paper manufacture and the principles and evolution of pyrotechnics. This is the living expression of the branding concept of Jingzhou as the crossroads of culture and entertainment. The center for all this is the walled city of Jingzhou, which with the city of Xi’an, shares one of two places in China completely surrounded by an extant archaic wall system. The ancient belt contains a vibrant nucleus. In 2012 the new circulation system changed the movement pattern for both tourist and inhabitants. Certain roads were blocked off as the new landscaping plan created different ways of threading through the primary and secondary pathways. New paths were developed to provide pedestrian wandering, roller blading, biking, running and other exercises. New parks were created that interpreted the stories of The romance of the Three Kingdoms.

The Establishment of City Districts The Entertainment District was fully developed by 2014. This included fitness centers, digital movie houses, dance palaces, discotheques, taverns and international fine dining. Other components of this district included a Family Entertainment Center where state of the

J ingzhou : A nc ien t Wa ter C it y


In 2006 Jingzhou had 250,000 visitors a year. In 2027, Jingzhou became the fourth most visited city (tourists, business travelers, and students) in Mainland China (after Bejing, Shanghai and Xi’an) with an annual tourist turnover of 3,000,000!

art interactive machines allowed penetration of the virtual world.

similar ‘meet and greet’ and orientation facilities.

By 2014, the River Walk developments that provide a mixture of modern offices, lodging, water side restaurants and other private or public buildings had come to change the entire projection and positioning ofJingzhou City. The ‘Walk’ was developed as a belt around the perimeter of the moat, and came to be inhabited by many new start up firms, as well as offering specific employment for a new set of workers capable of providing twenty first century skills. The University of the Future moved back to JZ in 2016 because this was the most exciting place of the region.

The only thing remaining was to reactivate the airport, to provide the fourth of the portals- road-rail- river and air. With this decision Jingzhou was at last able to offer rapid access its own and other destinations, lengthening ‘dwell time’ and increasing the visitor spend.

The affect of this dynamism had a side effect on Shashi, in that the avenues that led to the gates became more, not less important. The ultimate goal was to provide a green corridor that with parks and gardens led all the way to the Yangtze. The walled city becomes the open space, the lung, the garden for the city. A mixture of formal, informal, agricultural, passive, active…

Today Jingzhou represents one on the most dynamic examples of a city establishing a new economic base. Many people in both primary and secondary support and services industries derive their income from this industry. As Chinese domestic disposable income rose, and as the country became by this year of 2020 the most visited from international tourism the future looked bright. The name of Jingzhou has circulated around the world. It features on the tourist routes, and as a part of the greater tourism offer of Hubei Province.

Completion of the Four Portals Here, by the river bank, development of the Yangtze River Portal became a major arrival and departure structure that was tied to an inter-modal transit station and the side tower hotels around the south end of Shashi’s main plaza. This complex now compliments the northern railroad station that has

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Jingzhou: The Place, 2007 Introduction to the Region Jingzhou is a historically significant city in the central part of Hubei Province. Hubei is one of the larger provinces of China containing more than seventy million people. The capital, Wuhan, contains in the district of Wuchang outstanding cultural and leisure attractions, of which the most famous are the Yellow Crane Tower, one of the Chu Kingdom sites around the splendors of East Lake and the Mao Summer Home. At the western end of Hubei Province is the city of Yichang. It is home to the scenery of the Yangtze Gorges, and the new Three Gorges Dam. These, with the splendors of the Yangtze River are currently the main tourist destinations of Hubei Province. Between these major visitor destinations is the walled Ancient City of Jingzhou. In addition to the Walled City the region has many splendid examples of history and culture featuring principally three great historic periods of China: the Chu, the Three Kingdoms, and the River Yangtze cultures.

JINGZHOU

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7.2.4.7 规划旅游区其他基础设施、服务 设施和附属设施的总体布局。 Overall layout of the other infrastructure and supporting facility and affiliate facility.

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J ingzhou : A nc ien t Wa ter C it y


Location Jingzhou City is in the mid part of Hubei Province, and further to the south, with the longitude 112016’ and latitude 30026’, connecting Wuhan, Xianning on the east, Yichang on the west, Jingmen on the north and Hunan Province on the south. It has two districts: Shashi and Jingzhou Districts, three counties: Jiangling, Gong’an and Jianli. It is also in charge of three county-rank cities: Shishou, Honghu and Songzi. The characteristic of Jingzhou City is “national historical and cultural wellknown city, important port of mid reaches of Yangtze River and the core city of mid and south area”.

Climate Jingzhou has a subtropical, humid and monsoon climate, with annual average temperature of 160C and annual rainfall 1158 mm. The city’s river network is dense; lakes and marshes are intertwined: the Yangtze River, Juzhang River, Tiger Cross River, Weishui Lake, Honghu Lake, Taihu Lake Estuary, Long Lake and Haizi Lake. In the urban area, there is the Moat, West Lake, North Lake, West Canal, Horse Pool, Jingsha River, Jiangjin Lake and Bianhe Lake.

History and Culture Jingzhou’s geographic position is unique. The city has a favorable climate and fertile land. Its historical culture is remotely originated. Since five or six

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thousand years ago, humans have been living and inhabiting here in groups. It is one of the birth places of China’s ancient cultures in the Yangtze River area, and it has also been the key place in every dynasty for the feudal lords and their official residences. The Chu Kingdom which was one of the “Spring and Autumn Period Five Lords” and “Warring Period Seven Powers” had set its capital here for more than 400 years. Cultural heritage is abundant here: cultural sites and scenic places are distributed all over the city. There were the Jiangling Eight Sceneries of Qing Dynasty: Mount Ji Mist, Baling Pine Trees and Cloud, Dragon Mount Autumn Scenery, Tiger Cross River Sail Boat in the Sun, Shajin Port Berthing at Dusk, Zhang Hua Terrace Spring Scenery, Jade Pot Lotus Fragrance and Three Lakes Snowy Fishing, etc. Although, most of these sceneries are gone, those surviving are worth developing. In Spring and Autumn Period, Warring Period, Chu capital’s Zhu Palace (royal entertaining palace) and court vessel wharfs were in Jingzhou the Ancient City, which is famous for the story of “Liubei Borrow Jingzhou”. In Three-Kingdom Period, Jingzhou had been the central place that Wei, Shu and Wu the three kingdoms all strived for. In the Romance of Three Kingdoms (historical novel of Three Kingdom), there are 72 chapters that mention Jingzhou within the total 120 chapters, and 17 chapters directly describe Jingzhou. Three-Kingdom sites are distributed widely in the city, such as the site of Guanyu ( Lord

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Guan) scraping the infected arm bone for treating poisonous arrow-shot, Guanyu’s Horse Pool, General Officers Appointment Terrace, Horse-Driving Mount, Reedy Patches, the site of Zhang Fei’s Shouldering a basket of earth, etc. These are all vivid and wellknown Three-Kingdom legends.

Center of Chu Culture Jingzhou is also the center of Chu Culture. The ancient literature and poems are prolific here. In remote times, Jingzhou had been a place of developed music, and “South Style”, “Chu Sound” originated here. The famous patriotic poet Qu Yuan had taken the court position of “Zuo Tu” and “San Lu Da Fu”, and had written the masterpiece Chu Ci. He has become one of the four great patriotic poets of the world. One of Li Bai’s poems mentions Jiangling, “Morning leaves Bai Di Cheng (Cheng Du) in fine weather, while thousand miles away Jiangling is reached in one day.” This poem is still famous. Jingzhou is known for many brilliant people, such as Song Dynasty Zhu Ran (a scholar); Tang Dynasty Prime Minister Liu Bo; Yin Wenchang, and the three generations of Cen family who all had once been Prime Ministers; Song vice Prime Minister Tang Jie; and Ming brilliant Prime Minister Zhang Juzheng. Jingzhou’s tourist attractions are a “diamond in the rough”: gems waiting to be discovered by a larger audience: the historically well-known walled city, Songi Weishui Scenic Area, Honghu

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Scenic Area, Shishou Swan Island, White Dolphin and Wapiti National Conservation Area. There are also many cultural sites, such as New and Old Stone Age sites, ancient city sites, Chu Cultural sites and Three Kingdom sites.

constructed area 50 square km. In 1998, the whole city has a population of 6,363,700, in which the central urban population is 530,400.

In 20 years since the Reform and Opening, the city’s GNP has grown fast, comprehensive capacity and Socio-Economic Conditions comprehensive and capacity has been enhanced. GDP has grown from the Jingzhou is the economic link between 1.766 billion Yuan in 1978 to 33 billion Hunan and Hubei Provinces, as well Yuan in 1998, with the GDP per capita as an important port city of the mid 5,222 Yuan. The annual increase rate reaches of Yangtze River. It is also is the is 9.6%. The object of quadrupling centers for light and textile industries, GDPs has been realized four years in rice, cotton and oil production. advance. Urban residents’ income per Jingzhou is the economic and cultural capita is 4,743 Yuan, while peasants’ center of Jianghan Plain. The length income per capita is 2,002 Yuan, which between east and west is about 274.8 is increased by 12.6 times and 16.5 km, and about 130.2 km from south to times respectively. The total savings per north. capita of urban and rural residents is 1,900 Yuan. Jingzhou has a long history. It was the largest state of the nine great states Land Use: Current Status in ancient times. Since the Spring, Autumn and Warring Period, it has The Jingzhou Tourism Study of 2000 is been the official residences for the one of the studies used as a reference feudal lords in every dynasty. for this plan. The current land use in the Jingzhou City area is traditional. After the foundation of PRC, The categories of land use are: farm Jingzhou’s administrative system and agricultural land, forest, lakes underwent several important changes. and rivers, and some industrial land In October 1994, and approved by reserved for factory, mining and and the State Council, Jing-Sha City was mnufacturing enterprises, traffic entitled, while the titles of the Jingzhou and transportation . There are also Area, Shashi City were abolished. In habitations such as cities, towns and December 1996, the name was changed villages. There is no definition of into Jingzhou City. The whole city has Tourism Development Land which an area of 14,067 square km, in which is not good for Jingzhou tourism urban area 1,576 square km, urban development.

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Tourism Development Land Plan According to Jingzhou Planning Department the following types of land are identifed for tourism development. These includes places where the cultural and historic sites are comparatively concentrated, land where the scenery and environment conditions are outstanding and the land with good ecotype environment. The tourism development land as follows: Historical Culture Area: 606.4km2 Scenic Place of interest: 191.1 km2 Lakes and Marshes: 719.2km2

Tourist and Sightseeing Area: 231.8km2 Resort and Recreation Area: 586.8km2

The five types of tourism development land mentioned above represent a total area of 2,335.3 km2 (including water). The total land area of Jingzhou City is 14,067 km2 , of which tourism development areas currently represent 16.6% of the total. In itself tourism requires no more new land, but a redistribution of land put to different end uses. It can contribute (through Eco Tourism projects) to substantial land enhancement and by its definition require superior land management that reflects well in landscape and water improvements.

13. Long Lake Resort 14. New Fairy Cave Visit Because the use of tourism land is compatible with other land uses, tourism 15. Forest Park 16. Aquatic Park activities are attractive to the city . For 17. Vacation Village example, the forest environment land 18. Zoo will promote tourism. The responsible 19. Golf Villa Garden use of reservoirs will not only be 20. Wapiti Garden good for fishing and recreation, but 21. White Dolphin Visit also can promote tourism and water conservation. Swan Island Marsh Tourist Area 22. Zou Ma Ling Site Museum Entertainment Activities 23. Nanyue Mount Forest Park 6.4.5 24. Reedy Patch Fishing Garden 25. Reedy Patch Fish Catch Garden The land around Jingzhou is covered 26. Fishing Family Experience Garden with reliquary, statues, temples 27. Fishing Family Resort Village and tombs. The following matrix represents some of the existing tourism Honghu Fishing Family Resort Area destinations. Some, if not many have 28. Water Villa limited dwell time and do not really 29. Yangtze River Distinctive Fish count within the basket of attractions. Species Aquatic Park 30. Patriotic Education Base These are the current tourist attractions 31. Old Hua Rong Path Rest Hut in Jingzhou. 32. Fishing Family Meeting Center 33. Forest Park Jingzhou Ancient City Tourist Zone 34. Lotus Garden 1. Chu Culture Exhibition Garden 2. Lord Guan Temple 3. Three-Kingdom Culture Garden 4. Xuanmiao Temple 5. Watery Culture Garden 6. Taoist Temple 7. Ming & Qing Pedestrianized Shopping Street 8. Jingzhou Ancient City Wall Weishui Scenic Area 9. Balingshan Forest Park 10. Taihu Lake Port, Bird Garden 11. Rare Fish Garden 12. Rooster Mount Museum

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Jingzhou Themes: The Guiding Values (6.4.3)

Three very important historic cultures have shaped the Jingzhou region and continue to influence the city: The Three Kingdoms, the Chu Culture, and the Yangtze River.

Three Kingdoms The Three Kingdoms period is a period in the history of China, part of an era of disunity called the Six Dynasties. In a strict academic sense it refers to the period between the foundation of the Wei in 220 and the conquest of the Wu by the Jin Dynasty in 280. However, many Chinese historians and laymen extend the starting point of this period back to the uprising of the Yellow Turbans in 184. The three kingdoms were the Kingdom of Wei , the Kingdom of Shu , and the Kingdom of Wu . To distinguish these states from other historical Chinese states of the same name, historians prepended a character: Wei is also known as Cao Wei , Shu is also known as Shu Han , and Wu is also known as Eastern Wu . The term “Three Kingdoms” itself is somewhat of a 7.2.4.3 确定旅游区的性质和主题形象。 To define the destination character and theme image

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mistranslation, since each state was eventually headed by an Emperor who claimed legitimate succession from the Han Dynasty, not by kings. Nevertheless the term has become standard among sinologists and will be used in this article. The earlier, “unofficial” part of the period, from 190 to 220, was marked by chaotic infighting between warlords in various parts of China. The middle part of the period, from 220 and 263, was marked by a more militarily stable arrangement between three rival states, Kingdom of Wei , Kingdom of Shu , and Kingdom of Wu . The later part of this period was marked by the collapse of the tripartite situation: first the destruction of Shu by Wei (263), then the overthrow of Wei by the Jin Dynasty (265), and the destruction of Wu by Jin (280). Although relatively short, this historical period has been greatly romanticised in the cultures of China, Japan, Korea, and Vietnam. It has been celebrated and popularised in operas, folk stories, novels and in more recent times, films, television serials, and video games. The best known of these is undoubtedly the Romance of the Three Kingdoms, a fictional account of the period which draws heavily on history. The authoritative historical record of the era is Chen Shou’s Sanguo Zhi, along with Pei Songzhi’s later annotations of the text.

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The Three Kingdoms period is one of the bloodiest in Chinese history. A population census in late Eastern Han Dynasty reported a population of approximately 56 million, while a population census in early Western Jin dynasty (after Jin re-unified China) reported a population of approximately 16 million. Even taking into account the inaccuracies of these census reports, it is safe to assume that a large percentage of the population was wiped out during the constant wars waged during this period.

Chu (state)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Chu was a kingdom in what is now southern China during the Spring and Autumn period (722-481 BCE) and Warring States Period (481-212 BCE). It was originally known as Jing and then as Jingchu . At the height of its power, the Chu empire occupied vast areas of land, including the presentday provinces of Hunan, Hubei, Chongqing, Henan, Shanghai, and parts of Jiangsu. The Chu capital was at Ying , which was located in what is today Hubei province. The land of Jing was inhabited by the native Chu people. The early Chu state was ruled by an aristocracy with close affinity to the Zhou kings, with its capital at Danyang. Prior to the dissolution of Zhou’s power, the territory was transferred by authority of the Zhoucheng Wang of Eastern Zhou to Xiong Yi.

In its early years, Chu was a successful expansionist and militaristic state. Chu developed a reputation for coercing and absorbing its allies. Chu grew from a small, dependent state into a large empire worthy of contention, even attaining the traditional title of one of “The Five Overlord States of the Spring and Autumn Period” . Chu first consolidated its power by absorbing the lesser states within its immediate vicinity in Hubei; then, it expanded into the north towards the North China Plain. The threat from Chu resulted in multiple northern alliances against Chu and its allies; these alliances successfully kept Chu in check, with its first major victory at the Battle of Chengpu. The kingdom’s power continued even after the end of the Spring and Autumn period in 481. Chu overran Cai to the north in 447 BCE. During the Warring States Period, Chu was increasingly pressured by Qin to its west. Chu’s size and power made it the key state in alliances against Qin. As Qin expanded into Chu territory, Chu was forced to expand southwards and eastwards, absorbing local cultural influences along the way. In 333 BCE, Chu and Qi partitioned and annexed the coastal state of Yue. By the late Warring States period (ca. late 300s BCE), however, Chu’s prominent status had fallen into decay. As a result of several invasions headed by Zhao and Qin, Chu was eventually subjugated by Qin. In 278 BCE, Qin general Bai Qi

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conquered Yingdu. Following the fall of Yingdu, Shouchun (in today’s Anhui province) became the state’s capital-inexile.

Chu Culture Based on archaeological finds, Chu’s culture was initially quite similar to that of other Zhou states. Later on, Chu culture absorbed indigenous elements as the state expanded to the south and east, developing a distinct culture from the traditional Northern Zhou states. Early Chu burial offerings consisted primarily of bronze vessels in the Zhou style. Later Chu burials, especially during the Warring States Period, featured distinct Chu burial objects, such as colorful lacquerware, iron and silk, accompanied by a reduction in bronze vessel offerings. A common Chu motif was the depiction of snakes, dragons and serpent-like beings. Some archaeologists speculate that Chu may have had cultural connections to the vanished Shang dynasty, since many motifs used by Chu appeared earlier at Shang sites, such as motifs depicting serpent-tailed gods. Later Chu culture was known for its affinity for employing shamanistic rituals. Chu was also known for its distinct music; archaeological evidence shows that Chu music was annotated differently from Zhou music; Chu music also showed an inclination for using different performance ensembles,

30


as well as unique instruments; In Chu, the se was preferred over the qin, while both instruments were equally preferred in the northern Zhou states.

Chu came into frequent contact with other people in the south, most notably the Ba, Yue and the Hundred Yue. Numerous burials and burial objects in the Ba and Yue styles were discovered throughout the territory of Chu, coexisting with Chu-style burials and burial objects. The early rulers of the Han Dynasty romanticized the culture of Chu, sparking a renewed interest in Chu cultural elements such as the Chu Ci. After the Han dynasty, Chu developed an undeserved reputation for being a barbarian state; Confucian scholars considered Chu culture with distaste, criticizing the “lewd” music and shamanistic rituals associated with Chu culture.

Yangtze Culture The Yangtze river is important to the cultural origins of southern China. Human activity was found in the Three Gorges area as far back as 2 million years ago, initiating debate over the origin of the Chinese people.[3] In the Spring and Autumn Period, Ba and Shu were located in the western part of the river, covering modern Sichuan, Chongqing, and western Hubei; Chu was located in the central part of river, corresponding to Hubei, Hunan, Jiangxi, and southern Anhui. Wu and Yue were located in the eastern part of

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J ingzhou : A nc ien t Wa ter C it y


the river, now Jiangsu, Zhejiang, and Shanghai. Although the Yellow River

region was richer and more developed at that time, the milder climate and more peaceful environment made the Yangtze river area more suitable for agriculture. From the Han Dynasty, the region of the Yangtze river became more and more important in China’s economy. The establishment of irrigation systems (the most famous one is Dujiangyan, northwest of Chengdu, built during the Warring States period) made agriculture very stable and productive. Early in the Qing dynasty, the region called “Jiangnan” (that includes the southern part of Jiangsu, the northern part of Zhejiang, and the southeastern part of Anhui) provided 1/3-1/2 of the nation’s revenues. Historically, the Yangtze became the political boundary between north China and south China several times (see History of China) because of the difficulty of crossing the river. Many battles took place along the river, the most famous being the Battle of Red Cliffs in 208 AD during the Three Kingdoms period.

from their capital at Nanjing, though it later moved capital to Beijing. The ROC capital was located in Nanjing in the periods 1911-1912, 1927-1937, 19451949.

Famous people Famed poet Qu Yuan hailed from Chu. A government minister and a patriot, he had advocated uniting with the other states to combat the rising hegemon Qin, yet to no avail; he was banished by the king of Chu. According to tradition, such was his grief upon learning of the Qin invasion, reportedly committed suicide in the Miluo River. The Duanwu Festival honors his death for his country. Warrior King Xiang Yu also known as “Overlord of Western Chu”, he destroyed every single Qin army and also was rival to Han Dynasty founder Liu Bang. He was fearsome in the battlefield but arrogance lead to his downfall.

Politically, Nanjing was the capital of China several times, although most of the time its territory only covered the southeastern part of China, such as the Wu kingdom in the Three Kingdoms period, the Eastern Jin Dynasty, and smaller countries in the Northern and Southern Dynasties and Five Dynasties and Ten Kingdoms periods. Only the Ming occupied most parts of China

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Jingzhou Tourism: the Development Strategy Identity In the world of tourism, location and message are important, and both require a concerted effort across the world of media, television, press and tourist operators. This challenge is translated as branding- putting a strong differential marker on the city so that it stands out from surrounding competition.

Branding In branding (the creation of one image or multi images and graphics that convey the essence of the city) Jingzhou promotes itself as the Enjoyable City of Pure Water and Dynamic Culture. These two elements are not mutually exclusive, but form a ‘ying-yang’ that will appeal to the broadest spectrum of tourist market. The celebration of water and its importance to all aspects of life will appeal primarily to families, and it need not be too sophisticated, certainly in the first phases. At Xi’an, the outdoor show before the tour of the mausoleum is a relatively low budget presentation that is not historically accurate, but conveys a good sense of the costumes and customs of the past. Culture draws a more sophisticated and wealthier crowd, but fewer in numbers.

Marketing and Promotion Hubei’s Jingzhou area offers the greatest short-term opportunity for creating increased tourism. Beyond

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Hubei province other inhabitants of China or foreign visitors may visit Jingzhou, either as a stop along a defined tourist path, or because the ‘critical mass’ of Jingzhou’s content, allied to marketing programs is successful enough to encourage a twoday visit.

Jingzhou City: Master Plan Proposal City Opportunities As the city of Jingzhou metamorphoses it looks back in history to times when it was at the heart of politics and strategy, and ahead to the dynamic future represented by a vibrant China. As the inefficient or tired buildings are swept away there is the opportunity to create a living environment that is entirely unique. The master plan can either revert to a standard city layout, or it can represent something new and in keeping with the interconnectivity of modern life. As the requirements for large offices goes away, work can become pleasurable so the new city core reflects change in the urban manifestation. The probable replacement of large formal squares by more interesting neighborhood landscape pockets that better serve the local population should be couple to an adherence to green principlesthe elements of the Eco City that are emerging in places like Dongtan and Chongming.

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Evolving Master Plan The traditional Chinese grid has dictated the evolution of Jingzhou City, as with thousands of traditional Chinese layouts. While the grid works well for vehicles, it is boring and of less interest to pedestrians, giving away the potential in long views. The long term planning concept is to break with the grid by introducing a new water canal system--comparable to the Grand Canal in Venice, Italy-- over the re-developed areas and districts. This would determine the location of community and destination needs and would follow a hierarchy of piazzas, lanes, passages, courtyards and ultimately larger gathering spaces that include town square/ and public park(s).

District Concept Explanation Each district to be developed would rely on an interpretative density of use. Thus the Entertainment District, the Technology District, the Historic District, of the inner city focuses on the key attributes of the citizen’s lifestyle. Is it possible to incorporate new ideas into a city that is very ancient. Lighthouse believes so, but change is required with considerable sensitivity.

New public/visitor circulation system The perimeter road that circulates inside the walls will become the

35 © Lighthouse Creative Inc. 2007 All Rights Reserved

primary tourist route. A thematic transportation system will be provided to the visitors at the gated entry where tickets are purchased. This could be in the form of human or bicycle rickshaws, or horse drawn vehicles. Ideally the operators of the future attractions will control traffic and usage on portions of the perimeter roads. In certain points, such as the double gates areas, or in the south east (former prison) this perimeter road requires to move around the exterior of the destination leaving the Battle Theater with unhindered views to the wall. The main road from Shaashi, and to the city through the South, West and Large North Gates will continue to carry the traffic of the residents. This is until the impact of the master plan can be examined and calculated.

Content Development versus Architecture Development of content, not architecture, is the initial ‘driver’ to establish a tourism base at Jingzhou. Entertainment is the recommended device by which culture is interpreted through the stories of the Chu, Three Kingdoms and Yangtze River is brought to the public. By content we mean storylines- that illustrate by many methods; theatrical, graphic, light, and sound the notion of dynasties as they refer to this region of Hubei.

Short Term- Mid Term -Long Term Developments This emphasis on content is a strategy so that the developer and Jingzhou can take advantage of the 2008 Olympic year. To achieve notable projects by 2008, our goal is to have a significant number of projects conceived, designed and produced by no later than the end of this year. The larger capital projects that affect the Mid-Term (5 year Plan) and Long Term (10 Year Plan) have a major component of architecture and degree of difficulty. Some of these projects may take up to three years to bring to reality. The short-term projects start this process.

Incentives Jingzhou is considering the creation of Tourism Tax free economic zones, similar to tax free industry zones located at Shenzen, and other places. By this concept all of Jingzhou City within the defined districts would become taxfree. This would encourage investors with leisure project investment in mind to come into a synchronized plan that would place their investment where it was best thought it could thrive. Waiving import duties for specialty entertainment hardware is also under consideration. Project income will be both pay at the gate, and through group ticket sales. Key to this is the transportation system that moves paying visitors from one destination to the next.

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Jingzhou Tourism: New Attractions to Support the Vision

1 East Gate and Ancient Wall (A1) 2. Juilong Park (A2. A26) 3. Xiong Tombs (A12) 4. Lord Guan Battle Theater (A5) 5. Lord Guan Shrine Area (A11) 6. Museum including AV Theater (A6) 7. Three Kingdoms Dynasty Park (A3, A19, A28, A29) 8. High Speed Rail Tourism Center (A33, A34) 9. Famous People Hotel at city hall (A15) 10. Development of the banks of the City moat (A4, A21) 11. Yangtze Culture Longevity Park (A25) 12. Sanyi Historic District (A8) 13. Old North Gate (A41) (numbers in parentheses refer to Master Developer agreement)

7.2.4.4 确定规划旅游区的功能分区和土地利用,提出规划期内的旅游 容量。 Define each functional district and the land usage in the planned destination, and propose a tourism capacity in the plan period

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Attraction Locations: Ancient Walled City

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There are three primary tourism districts in Jingzhou: Project Name

The Ancient Walled City

Content

Target Market duration

Intl.

The Surround Urban Area including Shashi The Region including Jinan City and The Xiong Tombs Within each of these Tourist Districts are a variety of attractions designed to appeal to a variety of markets. These markets are determined by such factors as age, interest, background, and where the visitor is from. The Charts on page 39-42 describe all the various attractions, their content, and what age groups they will appeal to. By refurbishing attractions, and creating a variety of new attractions, Jingzhou is designed to be an appealing destination where tourists can enjoy either two day, a one week, or even longer visit. To support this new tourism focus, the City and its Master Developer have identified thirteen Phase 1 tourist areas. Each area builds on the history and culture of Jingzhou. Each area in turn contains a variety of attractions.

Small East Gate

Orientation Center Pedestrian Entry from Shashi

A2

Son Et Lumiere (2008)

Evening Romance of Three Kingdoms Water show with projection

A3

3 Kingdoms Park

Tivoli Gardens type restaurants- rides - shows and music

A4

Moat Boats

Flat bottom moat boats tour the walls

A5

Lord Guan Battle Theater

Outdoor theater with sets, actors, horses, acrobats, pageantry

A6

Chu Experience AV Theater

Indoor 200 seat audio visual and actor show

A7

Xuanmiao Temple

Historic temple and Artifacts

A8

Sanyi Entertainment Historic District

Historic Area- Entertainment restaurants and artisan shops

A9

Chinese Games

Large scale majong- kite ying - boules, etc

A10

City Landscape

new city parks ower festivals and green corridors

A11

Lord Guan Temple historical center

Temple visit pilgrimage youth center scrolls to comics

A12

Xiong Tombs

Excavation site - nds- jade archeology

A13

Facades

recladding of some buildings to Chinese vernacular

A14

Chinese Cultural School

Establishment of calligraphy, bronze making- cooking skills, etc

A15

New 5 Star Hotel

conversion of party headquarters into quality hotel

A16

Merchandise Concepts

creation of new and original merchandise from sweaters to art

A17

Skills of Contemporary China

language- acrobatics- performance- fashion

A18

Auto Gateway

new portal from the Hanyi Highway

A19

Mini golf

18 hole Historical golf around Chu artifacts.

A20

2 day tour

Redesigned cultural tour of city and regional attractions

A21

City Moat Bank and parks

Reinforcement of city parks with exercise tracks, roller blading

Jinan City

Future cutural theme park on the banks of Haizi Lake

A1

A22

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Family Youth Elderly Passive Active

• • • • • • • •

• • •

• •

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• • • • • •

• • • • • • •

• • •

• N/A

• • •

2 hrs 3-4 hrs 1.5 hrs 2hrs 20' 30'

2 hrs

N/A 1.5 hrs 1 hr

N/A

N/A

• N/A

Dwell Time 40'

• •

• •

• • • • • •

Night

N/A

• • N/A

N/A

1- 2hrs N/A N/A

2-3Hrs N/A

• •

Represents intended 2008 projects

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• • •

Day

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45' 2 days

• •

• •

N/A

1 day


Project Name

Content

A23

Mount Balingshan Tombs

historical burial tombs-

A24

Family Entertainment Center

Video games and virtual reality internet center

Longevity Park Yangtze Museum

River Interpretive Center Hydraulic Play park

A25 A26

Festivals Lord Guan Qu Yuan/Dragon Boat Racing City river ferry link

new Transportation Boat service on canals and river system

Liu Bei Dinner theater

Evening dinner theater with authentic food,music entertainment

A29

Water Park

outdoor family oriented water park with umes and lazy river

A30 A31

Hubei Tourism Partnership Lord Guan Statue

Giant statue and Observation Tower

A32

Phoenix River Port

new river port docking for up to 8 cruise ships. Levee transport

High Speed Rail Station

high speed rail station Chu interpretive

A34

Chu City Visitors Center

interactive historical complex with explanations

A35

Chinese Maritime Collection

collection of inland waterway vessels on Jingzhou lake

A36 A37

Tourism Management TV Program

New tourist management and systems

Façade Design Guidelines Museum District

Design architectural facades

A40

Three Kingdoms Theater

Audio Visual Theater featuring stories from Three Kingdoms

A41

North Gate Entry Parking

Bus parking- restrooms and visotor facilities

A42

Living Walled City

introduction to the history of Jingzhou

A27 A28

A33

A38 A39

Target Market

duration

Intl.

Family Youth Elderly Passive Active

Day

• •

• • • • •

• • • • • • •

• •

Night

1 Hr

New TV promotions and documentaries

Creation of new Exhibits areas

1Hr 1-2 Hr

I day

6hr N/A

• •

2.5 Hrs 1 day

N/A

N/A

• • • • •

Dwell Time Hours

• • •

• • • • •

• • • •

• • •

45' 30'

N/A

N/A

N/A

• • • •

N/A

• • •

2hrs

• •

20'

20' 1- 5hr

Represents intended 2008 projects

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Project Name

Target Market

Content

Intl. Zoning Jingzhou Ancient City Tourist Zone

Shashi and Region

Chu Culture Exhibition Garden

Chu City, Chu Culture Street, Chu Culture Interpretation Garden, Chu Palace of Entertainment Lord Guan Temple Lord Guan Sculpture, Lord Guan Temple, Lord Guan Hall and water pavilion Three-Kingdom Culture Garden Three-Swear-Brother Sculpture Square, 120-Chapter Three Kingdoms Romance Story-Image Wall, Three Kingdom Scenic G Xuanmiao Temple Environment Renovation, Demolish surrounding buildings that are not related with Xuanmiao Temple Ming & Qing Pedestrianized Shopping Street East Gate-South Gate, restore Ming and Qing architecture style, and make it to be a tourist pedestrianized shopping street. Jingzhou Ancient City Wall Preservation management, checking man-made devastation and the city wall bricks crack made by plant roots. Watery Culture Garden Longevity Garden Construction, Jingjiang Flood Distribution Sluice Visiting Site Construction and recreation supporting facilities Balingshan Forest Park Scenic Area Construction, resort facilities construction Taihu Lake Port, Bird Garden

Bird Watching Pavilion, telescopes binoculars birding, ,etc

Rare Fish Garden Aquarium

Chinese sturgeon breeding base to construct Rare Fish Species Aquarium Old Stone Age Museum Interpretation Center

Rooster Mount Museum Long Lake Resort Weishui Scenic Area

New Fairy Cave Visit Forest Park Aquatic Park Vacation Village Zoo Golf Villa Garden

Swan Island Marsh Tourist Area

Wapiti Garden White Dolphin Visit Zou Ma Ling Site Museum

New Stone Age Museum Interpretation Center

Nanyue Mount Forest Park

Scenic area construction, forest layout construction and visiting routes construction Reedy shing ponds construction, shing spots construction, wooden boats building Reedy shing ponds, shing boats, shing forks and shnet

Reedy Patch Fish Catching Garden

© Lighthouse Creative Inc. 2007 All Rights Reserved

Introduce spotted deer and grass-eating animal to form animal visiting zone Golf Course, club and villa Reedy river, lake, pond digging, wood bridge building and deer watching pavilion, wapiti training Sightseeing Terrace

Reedy Patch Fishing Garden

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Resort facilities, sports recreation facilities, cultural recreation facilities, conference facilities. cave entrance renovation, lighting inside cave renovation and some visiting routes renovation. Scenic area construction, resort facilities construction and forest layout renovation Wharf facilities, water transportation and visiting tools renovation, visiting routes choosing and scenic spots along banks construction Improve room standards, resort village environment renovation

• • • • • • • • •

duration

Family Youth Elderly Passive Active

• • • •

Day

• •

Night

Dwell Time 1 Hr 1-2Hr 30'

• • •

30' 30' 1 hr 45'

• • • • • • • • • • •

• •

• • • •

1-3hrs I day 2 hrs 1 hr 1 day 2 hrs

• •

• •

varies

• • •

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1 hr


Project Name

Content

Target Market

Intl. Honghu Fishing Family Resort Area

Fishing Family Experience Garden

Fishing village environment renovation, shing family meal, shing work, lotus owers enjoying

Fishing Family Resort Village

Star hotels, recreation facilities construction

Water Villa

Fishing vessels renovation, making them to be the service facilities on waters.

Yangtze River Distinctive Fish Species Aquatic Park

Build aquarium that has special sh species.

Patriotic Education Base

Cemetery greenland, camping facilities construction, traditional virtues education interpretation center construction and revolutionary sites restoration.

Old Hua Rong Path Rest Hut

Three-Kingdom sites, ancient path scenes rebuilding, horse wagon paths and resting huts construction for tourists entertaining and rest.

Fishing Family Meeting Center

international and domestic conference facilities, dining and accommodation facilities.

Forest Park

Scenic area construction, recreation, entertainment and rest facilities construction

Lotus Garden

Boating in garden and lotus owers enjoyment

• •

duration

Family Youth Elderly Passive Active

• • • • •

• •

• • •

• • •

• • • •

Night

• • • •

• •

• •

• •

Day

Tourism D est ina tion P roje c t s

Dwell Time Hours

4hrs 1 day 2hrs 2hrs

1 day

3 hrs 1 day 1 hr 1 hr

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1. East Gate and Ancient Wall (A1) Arrival to the Ancient Walled City of Jingzhou takes place at the massive fortified stone walled East Gate. This is the place for the ceremonial commencement of a day-long journey through the inner city’s historical, cultural and entertainment attractions. The city is building new structured parking for buses and cars on the modern side of the great moat. From here a traditional Chinese bridge spans the moat water to the archway. Above, towering into the sky, and set on the battlements, is the Orientation Centercontained within one of the gate’s great pavilions with its lifting eaves and mythological creatures. In the shadow of wood beams, through the magic of sound, light, display and costumed actors our visitor is treated to the introductory background to the Three Kingdoms Era, and specifically the tales of Lord Guan Yu whose welcoming effigy stands by the entry. After ticket purchase within the newly landscaped forecourt framed by artisans’ studios, various forms of carriages take visitors west on Zhang Ju Zheng Street into the city of Pure Water and Dynamic Culture

East Gate Site Plan

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East Gate Artisans Quarter

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1. East Gate Capital and Annual Operating Costs East Gate Capital and Annual Operating Costs Capital Costs

Item Site Development Land Purchase Artisan Village Orientation Center & Wall Theming Graphics and Banners Lighting AV/Sound Props Restrooms FF&E Costumes and dressing area Maintenance building AV Production Design Costume Design & production Subtotal Capital Costs Annual Operating costs Item Promotion Merchandise Training and Management Commission fees Taxes Insurance Staff Costs Management Actors/musicians Maintenance staff Operating/office staff Ticket sales staff Security staff Subtotal Annual Operating costs

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Source

Unit 10,000sm @ $100/sm 10,000sm @ $50/sm

100sm @ $100/sm 200sm @ $50/sm 200sm @ $50/sm

RMB Source

Unit

Cost

6% 20% 9% 2 10 8 10 4 8

Cost $100,000 $1,000,000 $500,000 $350,000 $80,000 $25,000 $50,000 $100,000 $45,000 $10,000 $75,000 $10,000 $10,000 $25,000 $200,000 $100,000 $2,680,000 20,636,000

Yearly $48,000 $120,000 $48,000 $120,000 $24,000 $76,800 RMB

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$177,662 $50,000 $100,000 $592,208 $266,494 $100,000 $436,800

$1,723,164 13,268,360


2. Juilong Park Son et Lumiere Water Show (A2)

In one of the most spectacular settings anywhere in China, a twelve hundred seat stadium overlooks the wide moat and beyond it to the bastions, towers and pavilions of the long walled city. In this place when night has fallen illuminated junks appear on the waters, their sails- massive projection screens that tell the story of the water battles and the dominance of the water people in the era of the Three Kingdoms. The two-hour performance is a Jingzhou must destination. Water effects, fireworks, dynamic sound and light effects are produced in this Son et Lumiere performance. The grounds of Juilong Park have been completely re-landscaped, the colors and textures based on the interpretation of Chinese elements. New point of sales pavilions, food and gift pavilions and kiosks provide places for souvenirs.

Location To the southeast of the Jingzhou City East Gate road bridge lies the Jiulong

49 © Lighthouse Creative Inc. 2007 All Rights Reserved

Yuan Park, past and future home to Dragon Boat Racing. It occupies a substantial area along the eastern moat facing one of the most dramatic sections of the city wall. The site is dilapidated, containing run down or damaged structures that include an old damaged review stand holding approximately 1200 spectators. Several other poorly maintained buildings occupy the site area, restrooms and pavilions among them. On the street side a long rusted metal fence separates the land from the busy, noisy street. The city will make this area available to the developer for the following concept:

Concept The Lighthouse concept for this site is to produce an exciting water based spectacular show involving boats, floats, water curtains. giant projection Chinese inspired junk sail/screens, lasers, and Son et Lumiere lightning. Distant lighting will be devised for projection on the ramparts. This will be a two-hour show that interprets of the

sea battles of the Three Kingdoms era, with full support wrap around sound with the spoken word in a minimum of three languages. These are likely to be Chinese Mandarin, English, and Korean.

Show Synopsis The Son et Lumiere show commences with sound, light and image, supported by actors and extras, and tells the various stories of Riverlands water battles of the warring states of the Wu, Wei and Shushan. Using giant screens in the form of junk sails mounted on floating barges, and other screens and mist curtains the full graphic imagery of fact and mythology will be presented to a fascinated audience. From the wings of the land side theater soldiers and sailors board the vessels, engaging in hand to hand combat, or, by a highly choreographed series of movements and actions that will include flying the battle flags, naptha canons, flaming arrows, etc., to portray the pageantry and excitement of the Romance of the Three Kingdoms.

The first level of presentation is the stage of the theater. The floating screens are boarded from flying gangways and passageways above the water. Small sampans rowed by seamen take part in the action. In the middle of the moat, water curtains and dancing water show provides a projection surfaces that use land-based projectors in a compelling manner. Story opportunities: Sun Quan assigned Gan Ming to Xia Kou with five thousand men and 100 war junks. • • • • • •

Boat Building Assembly of Troops Marines Invasion of Jingzhou Archery Dance of the reed maidens

Master Plan Bus and car entry is to the south of the stadium. Buses are parked diagonally facing northeast. Cars, fewer in number are parked in the most southerly position visitors walk to the plaza, save

J ingzhou : A nc ien t Wa ter C it y

for handicap or drop off. Ticket kiosks are pavement mounted turnstiles admit visitors to the south side of the stadium

Conversion of Stadium and Program The existing frame of the stadium remains. Columns will be wrapped with drum shaped cladding. The roof structure will be cleaned and painted with a new covering, A projection and control box will be added to the structure. The existing stadium will be refurbished. New parking, landscaping, back of house areas for actors and staff, ticketing kiosks and merchandize booths will be added to the site. A new high wall will increase security of the area.


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2. Juilong Park Son et Lumiere Water Show (A2)

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2. Juilong Park Son et Lumiere Water Show (A2)

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2. Juilong Park Son et Lumiere Water Show (A2)

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English

Qu Yuan Fireworks & Poetry Festival

Son et Lumiere Spectacle Capital and Annual Operating Costs

In additon to Son et Lumiere performance. , Juilong Park is site of International Qu Yuan Firework Festival held at the time of Dragon Boat Races in May. The Firework Festival uses Fireworks ina > History > Celebrities search together with Music and Poetry to create a unique international competition.

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2. Son et Lumiere Capital And Annual Operating Costs Capital Costs

Item Stadium upgrade VIP suites Pagoda (3 floors @ 400 sm/floor) Projection booth Site Development Car & bus parking (18 buses; 45 cars) Fence Landscape & hardscape Theming, decorative screens & cladding Graphics and Banners Lighting (area & show) Projectors (8 projectors:$40,000; 6 video:$60,000; 4 scrolling:$20,000; 3 video:$30,000;) Water misting screen Control systems Sound systems Floating screens Floating Junks sails San Pans Boat with Motor Water and special effects Firework barges Staging from Towers Props Restrooms Entry Kiosks Food and Beverage CafĂŠ Administration, staff & actors facilities Costumes and dressing room Maintenance Projections towers Design AV Production Costume Design & production Subtotal Capital Costs

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an

an was a great politician and poet in the Warring States Period (476-221BC). He was an aristocratic family of the Chu State, one of seven powerful states at that time. His ce is today's Zigui County in Hubei Province.

Annual Operating costs Item Expenses Land lease Fireworks Preopening expenses Promotion Merchandise Training and Management Soft opening Commission fees Taxes Insurance Staff costs Actors Extra Management Techical crew Operating crew Sutotal Annual Operating costs

usted by the king of the Chu State, Qu Yuan served as the chief assistant to the king. enting progressive forces he had advocated and upheld the idea of political reforms. He out political reforms, set up strict legal system, and gave full opportunity to the able, all h met with strong opposition of the decadent aristocrats.

ed by the threat of the Qin State, Qu Yuan advocated the alliance with other states, against Qin with a combined force. The ruler of the Qin, who viewed the Chu State as mber one adversary, schemed to undermine the good administration of Chu under Qu He sent his men to bribe the brother and favorite woman of the king of Chu, who were of the authority of Qu Yuan. The two spoke ill of Qu Yuan to the king and the king took it h at last. Qu Yuan was exiled eventually.

JZ

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JZ JZ JZ JZ JZ JZ Offshore Offshore Offshore Offshore Offshore/china JZ JZ JZ JZ offishore/china JZ JZ offshore/china JZ JZ JZ JZ JZ JZ US/JZ US/Europe US/Europe

Unit 2,400sm @ $60/sm 10 @ 40sm ea @ $50/sm 1,200 sm @ $170/sm 150sm @ $100/sm 20,000sm @ $10/sm 18,000 sm @ $20/sm 600lm @ $30/lm 38,000 sm @ $5/sm

Cost $144,000 $20,000 $204,000 $15,000 $200,000 $360,000 $18,000 $190,000 $200,000 $100,000 $200,000 $150,000

3 screens

$100,000 $200,000 $150,000 $80,000 $150,000 $50,000 $5,000 $300,000 $100,000 $40,000 $100,000 $40,000 $4,000 $20,000 $50,000 $40,000 $20,000 $40,000 $250,000 $500,000 $100,000 $4,140,000 31,878,000

8 @ 54 sm ea 8 @ 100 sm ea 5 @ 40 sm ea 3 barges 400sm @ $100/sm 40sm @ $100/sm update existing update existing & new 400sm @ $100/sm 400sm @ $50/sm 2 @ 8m x 8m x 14m high

RMB Source

Unit

Cost

$3,000/night @ 240 nights 8%

$398,961 $200,000 $200,000

20% 9%

$997,403 $448,831 $100,000 $924,000

10 20 3 8 12

Annualy

$240,000 $240,000 $108,000 $192,000 $144,000 RMB

course of his banishment, unhappy and dejected, Qu Yuan wandered the countryside and ed a great many poets, expressing his love for the country and its people, his concerns he country and his detestation toward the treacherous persons.

breakthrough of the Qin army into the capital of his country, Qu Yuan threw himself into River in present Hunan Province and died with his country. At the news of his suicide, the ople, who held him in high reverence for his integrity and nobleness, rushed out in their o rescue him by boats, but failed even to find his body. To prevent his body from being by fish they beat the waters furiously with their paddles and dropped rice dumplings

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Tourism D est ina tion P roje c t s Page 1 of 2

$100,000 $720,000

58

$4,089,195 31,486,802


3. Xiong Tombs (A12) In the far off country to the northwest of Jingzhou Ancient City the extraordinary discoveries of the Chu Dynasty make for an ideal half-day destination. At the edge of a massive archeological site where active exploration digging continues daily, bus parking leads to a new entry facility. Knowledgeable guides speaking Asian and Western languages conduct walking tours through the many large air pressure domes that span the burial chambers. Remarkable jade and other artifacts from the 2nd Century BC have been discovered. In this experience visitors gain at first hand knowledge of the archeological methods, the time line of the Chu Dynasty when compared to ther cultures and to see up close some of the extraordinary finds discovered in the graves that lie seven meters below the current land surface. In the adjacent hill

Xiong Tombs Aerial Photo with superimposed tomb plan

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Completed Tomb Excavation

J ingzhou : A nc ien t Wa ter C it y


Tombs with Air Dome Covers

Xiong Tomb Site Plan

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Finds from the Chu Tombs Parking Entrance and Ticketing

The King’s Tomb

Life in the Chu Dynasty

Overlooks

Life of the Servants

New Finds Life of the Nobleman

Model Room Tumulus Before construction

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Theater Splendors of the Tombs

Archeological Group History of tools Parallel Time Lines

J ingzhou : A nc ien t Wa ter C it y


Visitors will see actual archeological dig in progress

Archeologist and Site Manager at Visitor Center

Workers at Site

Temporary Cover to provide shade and rain protection

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3. Xiong Tombs Capital and Annual Operating Costs Xiong Tombs Capital and Annual Operating Costs Capital Costs

Item Site Development Roof superstructure A/V Theater Theming/Exhibits Graphics and Banners Lighting AV/Sound Props Restrooms FF&E Retail shop/entry facility Costumes and dressing area Maintenance area AV Production Design Costume Design & production Subtotal Capital Costs Annual Operating costs Item Promotion Merchandise Training and Management Soft opening Commission fees Taxes Insurance Staff Costs Guides Management Technical crew Maintenance staff Archeological staff Security staff Operating staff Subtotal Annual Operating costs

Tourism D est ina tion P roje c t s

Source

Unit 27,000 sm @ $100/sm 1,000 sm @ $100/sm

100sm @ $100/sm 200 sm @ $50/sm 200sm @ $50/sm 200sm @ $50/sm

RMB Source

6%

Unit

Cost $204,545 $50,000 $100,000

20% 9% 20 2 5 10 5 6 10

Cost $450,000 $2,700,000 $100,000 $300,000 $50,000 $150,000 $100,000 $45,000 $10,000 $75,000 $10,000 $10,000 $10,000 $25,000 $200,000 $100,000 $4,335,000 33,379,500

Yearly $120,000 $48,000 $60,000 $60,000 $60,000 $57,600 $120,000 RMB

64

$681,818 $306,818 $100,000 $525,600

$1,968,782 15,159,620


4. Lord Guan Battle Theater (A5) a King’s tomb may lie.

At the time of the Three Kingdoms Dynasty horsemen and warriors of opposing armies roamed these lands. In an eight-hundred seat canopied show theater set against the inner walls of the city, audiences thrill to the scenes of color, battle and chivalry as mounted horsemen and wheeling men recreate the pageantry and spectacle of the time. Against the walls is an authentic filmic set reminiscent of the Palaces of Jingzhou. Here at different levels costumed actors that form the retinue to Lord Guan and the Emperor survey A new use for the prison buildings comes in the form of horse stables, costume warehouse, armory and actors quarters. In the master plan new landscape, including peach trees, will provide a soft environment for this fast moving presentation.

Location The location for the Lord Guang Yu Battle Theater is in the southeast quadrant of the walled city on land that formerly belonged to the city prison. The size of the project in its first phase is 2.95 Ha, and occupies a portion of the site. The plan is to reuse some of the old prison buildings to provide space for stables, an armory, indoor rehearsals.

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The project contains an elliptical show space that is created with peat over rolled and drained sand. This allows performance horses to gallop without danger to their hooves, and to soften falls. On the west side two angles bleachers for approximately five hundred seating capacity provide seating for the two hour-long show. Entrance to the facility is through an arrival and ticketing complex. Adjacent bus parking is in A & B lots. Approximately six (60 person) tour buses can be parked in close proximity to the entrance, Across the street there is further parking for another eight tour buses. An additional visitor car park is configured for 24 cars. More areas of the prison will be demolished if future expansion is required. On the north side three stable blocks are designed for show horses, stalls, tack and feed rooms. A paddock for open air grazing lies adjacent. A horse staging area is designed to accommodate a minimum of twelve performance Arabians, plus other horses that will be used by the chroniclers of the Three Kingdoms. Actors, acrobats, singers, musicians will also use a converted prison building. This space will be redesigned to accommodate restrooms, make up, costume warehouse, break-room, etc.

Show Concept At the center of the performance oval is

The Lord Guan Show Battle Theater Site Plan

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4. Lord Guan Battle Theater (A5)

The Lord Guan Show Theater Seating

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4. Lord Guan Battle Theater (A5)

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View of Stage and Ancient Wall

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4. Lord Guan Battle Theater (A5)

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4. Lord Guan Battle Theater Capital and Annual Operating Costs Lord Guan Battle Theater Capital Costs

Item Bleachers Conversion of existing buildings Car & bus parking (18 buses, 60 cars) Site Development Landscape Sets & theming Graphics and Banners Lighting Sound systems Props Restrooms Entry Kiosk food and Beverage Café Costumes and dressing Stables Design Horses Costume Design & production Subtotal Capital Costs

Lord Guan Battle Theater Re-enactment of the Stories of the Romance of the Three Kingdoms a tilt or barrier. At each end two large Lord Guan statues anchor the heads of the tilt. The mounted knights of opposing armies will attempt to unseat each other in hand-to-hand combat along and over the tilt by the use of lances. In addition to the knights there are yeomen, soldiers and acrobats. Against the high walls of the castle is an exposed set of ramps, passages, false towers, gangways, etc for the use of archers- kung fu participants, etc. This is the set.

Enhancing Options The action can be magnified for the audience via a live camera whose image is projected onto a large daylight screen. The sounds of this dramatic battle re-creation can be amplified from microphones sited around the performance area. Together these

options can enhance an already powerful experience.

Actors

• The Chronicler Luo Guanzhong introduces the contest by proclamation. • Bowmen • Spearmen • Huntsmen • Mounted Knights • Mounted Musicians • The Three Great Warlords • The concubines and court officials • Lord Guang Yu

Annual Operating costs Item Land lease Preopening expenses Promotion Merchandise Training and Management Soft opening Commission fees Taxes Insurance Staff & horses Actors Extra Management Technical crew Operating staff Horse feed and stable maintenance Grounds equipment & maintenance Sutotal Annual Operating costs

JZ

Source

JZ JZ JZ JZ Offshore or China Offshore or China offshore/china JZ JZ JZ JZ JZ US/JZ JZ JZ/US/Europe

Unit 500 seats 9,000 sm @ $30/sm 9,300 sm @ $20/sm 29,000 sm

200sm @ $100/sm 20sm @ $100/sm 200sm @ $100/sm 20 @ $1,500/horse RMB

Source

Unit

Cost $100,000

8%

$257,143 $200,000 $200,000

20% 9%

$642,857 $289,286 $100,000 $816,000

10 25 3 3 3

Yearly $240,000 $300,000 $108,000 $72,000 $36,000 $35,000 $25,000 RMB

Typical Scenes • Death of Emperor Ling • Forged Decree: Liu Be fights Dhong Zu in support of Zhong Fe • Tao Tao attacks Jingzhou • The Battle of the Red Cliffs • Straw boats bring straw soldiers

Tourism D est ina tion P roje c t s

Cost $75,000 $270,000 $186,000 $200,000 $75,000 $150,000 $50,000 $10,000 $50,000 $130,000 $20,000 $2,000 $20,000 $20,000 $50,000 $250,000 $30,000 $100,000 $1,688,000 12,997,600

72

$2,605,286 20,060,700


5. Lord Guan Temple (A11) • The game of chess upon the ramparts

The existing Lord Guan temple complex is located in the heart of the modern city, inadequate in area to welcome the many visitors, overseas Chinese among them, who are expected to pay future pilgrimage to the city’s God of Wealth and Prosperity Among the new features of the complex are a newly designed public plaza with direct views to the South Gate of the city, a 200 seat Audi-Visual theater that will present Three Kingdoms Lord Guan stories, a pilgrims’ hotel and a modern conference center.

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5. Lord Guan Hotel & Conference Center

Site Plan showing Temple, Hotel, Conference Center and Theater

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DRAFT 4/27/07 5. Lord Guan Hotel and Conference Center Capital and Annual Operating Costs Lord Guan Hotel & Hospitality Training Center Capital and Annual Operating Costs Capital Costs

Item Hotel Site Development Theming Graphics and Banners Lighting AV/Sound Props Kitchen equipment FF&E Design Uniforms Design & production Subtotal Capital Costs Annual Operating costs Item Land lease Promotion Training and Management Commission fees Taxes Insurance Staff Costs Management Front desk staff Housekeeping staff Maintenance staff Technical crew Subtotal Annual Operating costs

Conference Center Roof Plan

Source

Unit 200rms @ $19,000/rm

RMB Source

Unit 6%

20% 9% 4 9 30 10 4

Yearly

$96,000 $108,000 $180,000 $60,000 $24,000 RMB

Lord Guan Historic Center Conference Building Section and Elevation

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Cost $3,800,000 $100,000 $80,000 $25,000 $50,000 $100,000 $45,000 $150,000 $75,000 $300,000 $100,000 $4,825,000 37,152,500 Cost $100,000 $136,519 $100,000 $455,065 $204,779 $100,000 $468,000

$1,564,364 12,045,600


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5. Lord Guan Shrine: Three Kingdoms Theater(A40)

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5. Three Kingdoms AV Experience Capital and Annual Operating Costs Three Kingdoms A/V Experience Capital and Annual Operating Costs Capital Costs

Item Land cost Theater Control booth Site Development Theming Graphics and Banners Lighting AV/Sound Props Costumes and dressing Restrooms Entry Kiosk food and Beverage CafĂŠ Costumes and dressing Maintenance AV Production Design Costume Design & production Subtotal Capital Costs Annual Operating costs Item Preopening expenses Promotion Merchandise Training and Management Soft opening Commission fees Taxes Insurance Staff costs Actors Extra Management Technical crew Operating staff Internal Transportation Sutotal Annual Operating costs

Tourism D est ina tion P roje c t s

Source

Unit 1,000 sm @ $210/sm 900 sm @ $100/sm 100 sm @ $100/sm 5,000 sm @ $10/sm

JZ JZ JZ JZ JZ Offshore Offshore offshore/china JZ JZ JZ JZ JZ JZ US/Europe US/JZ JZ/US/Europe

100 sm @ $100/sm 20 sm @ $100/sm upgrade existing 200 sm @ $50/sm 200 sm @ $50/sm

RMB Source

Unit

Cost

6%

$112,208 $100,000 $56,104

3% 20% 9% 3 4 3 3 5

Cost $210,000 $90,000 $10,000 $50,000 $50,000 $25,000 $200,000 $300,000 $15,000 $20,000 $10,000 $2,000 $10,000 $10,000 $10,000 $500,000 $200,000 $100,000 $1,812,000 13,952,400

$72,000 $48,000 $108,000 $72,000 $60,000 RMB

80

$374,026 $168,312 $50,000 $360,000

$1,220,649 9,399,000


6. Jingzhou Museum & Chu AV Experience (A6, A39) The Jingzhou’s Museum with its amazing finds from the Chu Dynasty, the Three Kingdoms and Yangtze River Cultures will be updated and reorganized to increase attendance. In the next phase of development a two-hundred seat theater constructed close to the entrance will introduce Jingzhou visitors to the Chu Dynastic achievements, in particular. In this banked seat auditorium audience will look down to a stage surrounded by audio-visual panels and screens for a living explanation of the life and customs of a people who lived in the area around the second century BC. Building Foot Print 25m x35m

Location The proposed Chu Culture Theater replaces the existing visitor center of the Jingzhou Museum adjacent to the car parking area. This provides an independent ticket /entry to the museum. Combined tickets might be considered, together with co promotion with the museum.

Concept The Chu AV Theater construction is a 200-seat, immersive Audio Visual experience and features finds from

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tombs, explanation of artifacts, a simulated journey underground, with imaginations of the palace area before burial, plus interviews with leading archeologists. It spans the work at the northern sites without travel and is intended for visitors with limited time.

Architecture A new structure of approx 900 sq m footprint will accommodate a pre-show, an auditorium seating of two hundred people at 37 degree rake, with stage and back stage areas, and a post show retail exit on exiting. The structure is block with the roof described in Chinese style (overhanging lifting eaves and ceramic tiles and boss.) The estimated height is 20 meters above ground level. The auditorium is built to acoustic standards. Contained in a footprint of 25x35 m the theater is a simple construction creating a large volume auditorium that is facing a low stage and surrounding screens.

Staging A stage area of 10x20 m with ample back area for sets, props, dressing room and restroom. The audience enters the raked seating area that is surrounded by banner-shaped layers of gauze- scrim, drops which continue along the front proscenium. The front offstage section of the gauze banners can be flown or roller lifted or removed when desired. At the rear of the stage

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the performance area is defined by a large rear projection screen. Stage access from right and left wings and performers can enter the auditorium through the gauze banners at the sides.

Show Description The show is a multi media experience to illuminate the hi-lights of the Chu Dynasty in a dramatic, compelling and memorable twenty-minute show. The story is told by three main characters who describe distinctive perspectives of their lives. A general describes the military and aristocratic dimensions. A handmaiden to the Empress(Queen) reveals the sophisticated life of the court, its costume and culture. A third character is a servant, one of many who would be buried alive on the death of his master. The latter introduces the others and acts a narrator as if recording his last minutes. The show begins with the theater plunged into darkness. The sound of the earth falling on the lid gives way to the rhythmic beat of his heart, slowly dissolving and eventually dissipating. He has introduced the other main characters who also present their reflections on their lives, misfortunes and fortunes, all to enrich our understanding of the period. A full range of audiovisual techniques will compliment performers and changing sets on stage. The focus of the audience is moved between immersive visual imagery, projected onto the suspended gauze banners, and the more concentrated area on the

83 © Lighthouse Creative Inc. 2007 All Rights Reserved

stage. A high quality multi channel sound system supports the imagery and performance with a specially composed sound track.

Program • Entry Vestibule (Mirrors that convey insight into the past) plus graphics • Main Lobby • Restrooms • Shop • Elevator • Stairs Up/ Down • Back loaded theater with raked auditorium • Stage • Male- Female Dressing Rooms • Props • Spares stores and small workshop

Techincal & Audio Features A surround 3D VR theatre takes the audience on a tour of the tombs and some key artifacts, the voice-over, by an ‘archaeologist’ in 3 selectable languages, with music and effects. A live, or seemingly live webcam link to the site would bring an immediacy to the experience, but would have to be carefully staged. A virtual gallery in which artifacts are displayed on 3D LCD screens, presents highlights from the new archaeological finds and the museum’s existing collection. There could be voice-over interpretations if the audience group is controlled, or, an audio guide system (which needs man management and

J ingzhou : A nc ien t Wa ter C it y


Visit the Xiong Tombs on-line or through the AV Experience

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6. Jingzhou Museum & Chu AV Experience (A6, A39)

Live Actors combined with Visual effects

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6. Jingzhou Museum & Chu AV Experience (A6, A39)

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6. Jingzhou Museum & Chu AV Experience (A6, A39)

CHU THEATRE Technical Concept Side Elevation

services SECUREGANTRY ACCESSTOGANTRY

SECUREGANTRY

top of proscenium arch

cable runs to stage area and lighting bars and wall washers

flats

screen hinges up

baffles conceal lighting & gantry etc.

control room

storage and services under?

20ยบ seating rake

stage rake 2ยบ - 3ยบ

./4%3

!CCESSTOTHEAUDITORIUMISWELLABOVEGROUNDLEVEL THUS RAMPSSTEPSWILLNEEDTOBEPROVIDED

OPTIONALSTAGELIFT

4HEREISPOTENTIALFORALARGESTORAGESERVICESSPACEUNDER THERAKEDSEATING

%XAMPLESOFGAUZESCRIM BANNERS THATAREPROJECTEDONTOANDLIT WITHCOLOUR /RIGINS 4HEHISTORYOF.ORFOLKAND.ORWICH

4HEREISAHIGHLEVELGANTRYSYSTEMABOVESTAGEANDINTHE AUDITORIUM FOR RIGGING MAINTENANCE AND ADJUSTING EQUIPMENT !SERIESOFELEGANTBAFFLESTRUCTURESCONCEALSTHELIGHTING ANDGANTRYFROMTHEAUDIENCE 4HE SEATING RAKE IS ยŽ WHICH PROVIDES GOOD SIGHT LINES ANDAVOIDESTHENEEDFORATALLERBUILDING 4HESTAGEHASAFORWARDSLOPINGRAKEOF ยŽ -%42%3 



CHU THEATRE Technical Concept Drawing drawn by: Malcolm Lewis date: 02/15/07 scale: 1:100 approx issue no. 2

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6. Jingzhou Museum & Chu AV Experience (A6, A39)

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6. Jingzhou Museum & Chu AV Experience (A6, A39)

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1. Chu AV Experience Capital and Annual Operating Costs CHU Culture A/V Experience Capital and Annual Operating Costs Capital Costs

Item

Land cost Theater Control booth Site Development Theming Graphics and Banners Lighting AV/Sound Props Costumes and dressing Restrooms Entry Kiosk food and Beverage CafĂŠ Costumes and dressing Maintenance AV Production Design Costume Design & production Subtotal Capital Costs Annual Operating costs Item Preopening expenses Brochure Promotion Merchandise Training and Management Soft opening Commission fees Taxes Insurance Staff costs Actors Extra Management Technical crew Operating staff Internal Transportation Sutotal Annual Operating costs

Tourism D est ina tion P roje c t s

Source

Unit 1,000 sm @ $210/sm 900 sm @ $100/sm 100 sm @ $100/sm 5,000 sm @ $10/sm

JZ JZ JZ JZ JZ Offshore Offshore offshore/china JZ JZ JZ JZ JZ JZ US/Europe US/JZ JZ/US/Europe

100 sm @ $100/sm 20 sm @ $100/sm upgrade existing 200 sm @ $50/sm 200 sm @ $50/sm

RMB Source

Unit

Cost

8%

$149,610 $100,000 $56,104

3% 20% 9% 3 4 3 3 5

Cost $210,000 $90,000 $10,000 $50,000 $50,000 $25,000 $200,000 $300,000 $15,000 $20,000 $10,000 $2,000 $10,000 $10,000 $10,000 $500,000 $200,000 $100,000 $1,812,000 13,952,400

Yearly

$72,000 $48,000 $108,000 $72,000 $60,000 RMB

94

$374,026 $168,312 $50,000 $360,000

$1,258,052 9,687,002


7. Three Kingdoms Dynasties Park

(A3,A19,A28,A24,A29)

hygienic cleaning). At the western end of the city and well within the walls lies Three Kingdoms Dynasty Park, an entertainment-and dining destination that is comparable in scale and operations to Tivoli Gardens in Copenhagen. This is a family park with activities and attractions for locals, national and international visitors alike. On a series of landscaped islands are individual components- children’s rides- maze and Chinese Adventure Play Dragon, a teenager space for electronic and laser games, mini golf and bump boats, and in the first phase, Pleasure Island, a lake surrounded environment that contains at its’ center the prestigious Liu Bei Dinner Palace Theater. In this seven hundred seat banquet facility paying audiences are welcomed to a nightly feast, and to entertainment from musicians, acrobats, dancers, etc, who amuse the Emperor. Surrounding this facility

Location This project lies at the north west corner of Jingzhou City and comprises a total of 27 Ha of surface area of which water takes 17 Ha. The welllandscaped park contains five to seven lake bank restaurants, small pavilions, walkways, and number of dilapidated

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attractions such as a children’s outdoor fairground- closed and abandoned.

Concept The Three Kingdoms & Dynasties Park will provide a landscaped environment for a cultural and culinary exploration of the dynasty. Managed by one organization, the various restaurants will offer different types of cuisine. The grounds will also contain new themed rides and attractions, boat trips, etc. The pavilions will feature song and music.

Area 24 Ha ( including lakes and water bodies)

Entrance to Three Kingdoms Dynasty Park

Content • Floral Gardens (interpretations by leading landscape designers, architects, etc • Outdoor games areas • Childrens’ Three Romance play park • Mini golf • Artisan village • Rides • Theaters • Family oriented kids across the lake • Five different Chinese restaurants • Electric Light parade • Party Room • Baby sitter • Dinner Theater (Emperor Lu Bai’s Birthday • Weddings

Illustrative Site Plan of Three Kingdoms Dynasty Park, Sanyi Street, and New Market

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7. Three Kingdoms Dynasties Park

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(A3,A19,A28,A24,A29)

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7. Three Kingdoms Dynasties Park

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(A3,A19,A28,A24,A29)

J ingzhou : A nc ien t Wa ter C it y


7. Three Kingdom Dynasty Park Dinner Theater Capital andDinner Annual Costs Three Kingdoms TheaterOperating Capital and Annual Operating Costs Capital Costs

Item Restaurant Site Development Theming Graphics and Banners Lighting AV/Sound Props Restrooms Lobby Kitchen equipment FF&E Costumes and dressing Maintenance AV Production Design Costume Design & production Subtotal Capital Costs Annual Operating costs Item Land lease Preopening expenses Promotion Merchandise Training and Management Soft opening Commission fees Taxes Insurance Staff Costs Actors & performers Musicians Extras Management Technical crew Operating staff Wait staff Subtotal Annual Operating costs

Source JZ JZ JZ JZ China China China JZ JZ JZ JZ JZ JZ US/Europe US/JZ US/Europe

Unit 1,200sm @ $100/sm

100sm @ $100/sm 20sm @ $100/sm 200sm @ $50/sm 200sm @ $50/sm

RMB Source

Unit

Cost $100,000

8%

$205,714 $50,000 $100,000

20% 9%

$514,286 $231,429 $100,000 $576,010

12 5 4 2 1 2 10

Yearly $288,000 $90,000 $48,000 $72,000 $24,000 $24,000 $120,010 RMB

Lu Bei Dinner Theater

Tourism D est ina tion P roje c t s

Cost $120,000 $100,000 $80,000 $25,000 $50,000 $100,000 $45,000 $10,000 $2,000 $150,000 $75,000 $10,000 $10,000 $25,000 $200,000 $100,000 $1,102,000 8,485,400

100

$1,877,439 14,456,277


7. Three Kingdoms Dynasties Park: Teen Island

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7. Three Kingdoms Dynasty Park Teen Island Capital and Annual Operating Costs Three Kingdoms Teen Island Capital and Annual Operating Costs Capital Costs

Item Fast food restaurant Site Development Family Entertainment Center Laser Game area Mini golf (9 holes) Comic Land Theming Graphics and Banners Lighting AV/Sound Restrooms Kitchen equipment Costumes and dressing Maintenance area AV Production Design Costume Design & production Subtotal Capital Costs

Teen Island

Annual Operating costs Item Land lease Promotion Merchandise Training and Management Soft opening Commission fees Taxes Insurance Staff Costs Management Characters & actors Technical crew Operating staff Security staff Subtotal Annual Operating costs

Tourism D est ina tion P roje c t s

Source

Unit 200sm @ $30/sm 1,000 sm @ $50/sm 1,000 sm @ $50/sm

100sm @ $100/sm 200sm @ $50/sm 200sm @ $50/sm

RMB Source

Unit

Cost $100,000 $194,805 $50,000 $100,000

6%

20% 9% 4 4 3 12 6

Cost $6,000 $100,000 $50,000 $50,000 $55,000 $35,000 $80,000 $25,000 $50,000 $100,000 $10,000 $30,000 $10,000 $10,000 $15,000 $70,000 $100,000 $796,000 6,129,200

Yearly $144,000 $72,000 $144,000 $72,006 RMB

102

$649,351 $292,208 $100,000 $432,006

$1,918,370 14,771,446


7. Three Kingdoms Dynasties Park: Children’s Island

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7. Three Kingdoms Dynasty Park Children’s Island Capital and Annual Operating Costs Three Kingdoms Children's Island Capital and Annual Operating Costs Capital Costs

Item Site Development Chinese play dragon Flat ride Racing maze Theming Graphics and Banners Lighting AV/Sound Restrooms Costumes and dressing Maintenance AV Production Design Costume Design & production Subtotal Capital Costs

Children’s Island Site Plan

Annual Operating costs Item Land lease Promotion Merchandise Training and Management Commission fees Taxes Insurance Staff Costs Characters & performers Musicians Management Technical crew Security staff Operating staff Subtotal Annual Operating costs

Tourism D est ina tion P roje c t s

Source

Unit

100sm @ $100/sm 200sm @ $50/sm 200sm @ $50/sm

RMB Source

Unit 6%

20% 9% 4 2 2 2 4 6

Yearly $96,000 $36,000 $72,000 $19,200 $38,400 $36,000 RMB

104

Cost $75,000 $150,000 $100,000 $50,000 $80,000 $25,000 $50,000 $100,000 $10,000 $10,000 $10,000 $10,000 $45,000 $50,000 $765,000 5,890,500 Cost $100,000 $155,844 $50,000 $100,000 $519,481 $233,766 $100,000 $297,600 $297,600

$1,854,291 14,278,040


8. High Speed Rail Tourism Center (A33, A34) • Music and Song The high-speed train from Shanghai is due to reach Jingzhou/Shaashi in 2009. This will place China’s largest and wealthiest metropolis within two hours of the walled city, thus providing a massive new source of potential visitors. Stopping in both Wuhan, and in Yichang with their own attractions of East Lake and the Three Gorges Dam respectively, the train will usher in a new transportation era that will change forever the region’s dynamic. Around the train station a Portal Orientation Center- new hotels and offices, and an inter-modal transportation center will provide opportunities and services to both

7.2.4.5 规划旅游区的对外交通系统的布 局和主要交通设施的规模、位置;规划 旅游区内部的其他道路系统的走向、断 面和交叉形式。 The size and location of the main roads in Planned destination plus all traffic system layout to the external traffic system; also any internal traffic system of direction, vertical elevation and their crossing.

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8. High Speed Rail Commercial Center Capital Annual Operating Costs Rail Stationand Commercial Center Capital Costs

Item Restaurant Site Development Theming Graphics and Banners Lighting AV/Sound Props Restrooms Lobby Kitchen equipment FF&E Costumes and dressing Maintenance AV Production Design Costume Design & production Subtotal Capital Costs

Jingzhou/Saashi with Rail Station

Annual Operating costs Item Land lease Preopening expenses Promotion Merchandise Training and Management Soft opening Commission fees Taxes Insurance Staff Costs Actors & performers Musicians Extras Management Technical crew Operating staff Wait staff Subtotal Annual Operating costs

Rail Station Site

Tourism D est ina tion P roje c t s

Source JZ JZ JZ JZ China China China JZ JZ JZ JZ JZ JZ US/Europe US/JZ US/Europe

Unit 1,200sm @ $100/sm

100sm @ $100/sm 20sm @ $100/sm 200sm @ $50/sm 200sm @ $50/sm

RMB Source

Unit

Cost $120,000 $100,000 $80,000 $25,000 $50,000 $100,000 $45,000 $10,000 $2,000 $150,000 $75,000 $10,000 $10,000 $25,000 $200,000 $100,000 $1,102,000 8,485,400 Cost $100,000

8%

$205,714 $50,000 $100,000

20% 9%

$514,286 $231,429 $100,000 $576,010

12 5 4 2 1 2 10

Yearly $288,000 $90,000 $48,000 $72,000 $24,000 $24,000 $120,010 RMB

106

$1,877,439 14,456,277


Institutions/Troupes China in Classroom

9. Famous People Hotel at city hall (A15)

Travel in China Museum Learning Chinese Laws & Regulations On the Podium Theatre Online Annals E-Shop Focus

visitors and local residents. In the converted City Hall lies Jingzhou’s international five star, with de-luxe rooms decorated in impeccable Chinese style with every service to rival any fine worldwide hotel. In the grounds guests can discover the Chinese personality chalets- each suite named after a famous personage from China’s long history. Conference Hall, fine world class dining and meeting rooms offer the discerning guest a true

Qu Yuan was a great politician and poet in the Warring States Period (476-221BC). He was born in an aristocratic family of the Chu State, one of seven powerful states at that time. His birthplace is today's Zigui County in Hubei Province.

Qu Yuan

Fully trusted by the king of the Chu State, Qu Yuan served as the chief assistant to the king. Representing progressive forces he had advocated and upheld the idea of political reforms. He carried out political reforms, set up strict legal system, and gave full opportunity to the able, all of which met with strong opposition of the decadent aristocrats. 04/28/2007 12:34 PM Menaced by the threat of the Qin State, Qu Yuan advocated the alliance with other states, fighting against Qin with a combined force. The ruler of the Qin, who viewed the Chu State as the number one adversary, schemed to undermine the good administration of Chu under Qu Yuan. He sent his men to bribe the brother and favorite woman of the king of Chu, who were jealous of the authority of Qu Yuan. The two spoke ill of Qu Yuan to the king and the king took it for truth at last. Qu Yuan was exiled eventually. English

Li Bai

April 28, 2007

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In the course of his banishment, unhappy and dejected, Qu Yuan wandered the countryside and produced a great many poets, expressing his love for the country and its people, his concerns about the country and his detestation toward the treacherous persons. On the breakthrough of the Qin army into the capital of his country, Qu Yuan threw himself into Miluo River in present Hunan Province and died with his country. At the news of his suicide, the Chu people, who held him in high reverence for his integrity and nobleness, rushed out in their boats to rescue him by boats, but failed even to find his body. To prevent his body from being eaten by fish they beat the waters furiously with their paddles and dropped rice dumplings

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Li Bai Practically everybody in the Chinese-speaking world knows Li Bai because his works had important and long-lasting influence on the development of Chinese poetry. Lord Guan

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Lobby, Reception, and Conference Center

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Li Bai, titled The Immortal of Poetry, was probably born in 701, and is believed to have died in 762. He was a native of today's Sichuan Province. Li Bai later traveled down the Yangtze River to Yun-meng, a town north of the river and the Dongting Lake, where he married.

J ingzhou : A nc ien t Wa ter C it y

From then on his occupation became that of a wandering poet. Throughout his life he produced an lot of poems on many different subjects -- particularly nature, wine, friendship, solitude, and the passage of time. He has since become recognized by many as the greatest of the highly talented array of Tang poets. He stayed for a few years in various places, and traveled extensively. All this did not provide a satisfactory existence for his first wife, who left him with


9. Famous Persons Hotel and Conference Center Capital and Annual Operating Costs Famous People Hotel & Conference Center Capital and Annual Operating Costs Capital Costs

Item Hotel Villas Conference Center Restaurant Site Development Graphics and Banners Lighting AV/Sound Props Restrooms Lobby Kitchen equipment FF&E Maintenance Design Costume Design & production Subtotal Capital Costs

Main Floor Plan

Annual Operating costs Item Land lease Preopening expenses Promotion Merchandise Training and Management Soft opening Commission fees Taxes Insurance Staff Costs Actors & performers Musicians Extras Management Technical crew Operating staff Wait staff Subtotal Annual Operating costs

Source

Unit 200rms @ $22,000/rm 20 villas @ $25,000/v 6,000 sm @ $20/sm 1,200sm @ $100/sm

100sm @ $100/sm 20sm @ $100/sm 200sm @ $50/sm

RMB Source

Unit

Cost $100,000

6%

$297,947 $50,000 $100,000

20% 9%

$993,156 $446,920 $100,000 $576,010

12 5 4 2 1 2 10

Yearly $288,000 $90,000 $48,000 $72,000 $24,000 $24,000 $120,010 RMB

Front--East Elevation

Tourism D est ina tion P roje c t s

Cost $4,400,000 $500,000 $120,000 $120,000 $100,000 $25,000 $50,000 $100,000 $45,000 $10,000 $2,000 $150,000 $75,000 $10,000 $200,000 $100,000 $6,007,000 46,253,900

108

$2,664,033 20,513,052


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10 Development of the banks of the City moat (A4,A21) welcome. If the principle theme of the Ancient City of Jingzhou is history and tableaus that represent the past , the surrounding land around the 11 kilometer long moat are places for the reconstruction of hotels, offices, apartments, studios and lodging. As the walled city becomes a major tourist destination in its own right, the banks of the moat of pure water will be increasing valuable as real estate. The first phase of the redevelopment of the Moat Lands will be in the southeast corner adjacent to Julong Park. The mixed use development will include residences, shops, and offices.

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Development Sites surround the Ancient Wall of Jingzhou

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San Antonio Riverwalk, San Antonio Texas

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Boat and Clarke Quay, Singapore

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11. Yangtze Culture Longevity Park (A25) At the exact location of the most dangerous bend of the Yangtze River, since time immortal, Jingzhou’s Longevity Park is a strong reminder of the power and force of the river, and of the frequent floods that contributed to many lives lost throughout history. Since the construction of the Three Gorges Dam the Yangtze runs stable and level. Here, in the park in the future, will stand a Flood Museum dedicated to Pure Water, the Rivers and Lakes, a modern day homage to the Yangtze River Culture. Using giant hydrology models- play streams, etc, children and their families will learn about water preservation and control. Here visitors and residents will learn of the plans to divert the river north to feed northern China, how water is used for irrigation and power generation. Like Mud Island on the American Mississippi where a similar hands-on expo is a greatly visited museum, the Longevity Water Temple is the symbol of Jingzhou Committment to pure water and healthy life.

The Yangtze flows under the Jinzhou Bridge

The source of Jingzhou Pure Water

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The Longevity Park celebrates the water of life from the Yangtze

Longevity Tower

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12.Tourist Transportation

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Jingzhou City Infrastructure Projects 1. Green Corridor-Living Lung: The Shashi-Yangtze- Jingzhou City Park Connector The Green Corridor concept proposes the establishment of a green ‘living lung’ corridor that would be located adjacent to and along side the existing stream Jing-Sha moat outlet in Juilong Park. This leisure belt could tie the center of Shaashi and its park and lake to the water bodies of Jingzhou City. A further greenway connector south to the Longevity Park (Yangtze north bank) would provide a future network of recreation and leisure opportunities including bike paths, roller blade parks, fitness and recreational exercise locations, volley ball courts, themed gardens and specific landscape. These green corridor concepts link Shaashi to Jingzhou avoiding the traditional vehicular connections and roads.

Pure Water and a lush Tree Canopy are the new symbols of Jingzhou’s commitment to a sustainable environment

7.2.4.6 规划旅游区的景观系统和绿地系 统的总体布局。 Overall layout for the landscape and Greenland system in the destination.

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2.Wayfinding and Streetscapes Jingzhou’s City Master Plan will reinforce vehicular hierarchy with street tree plantings and other streetscape elements. These might include public seating, trash can design, signage, pedestrian lighting, city and festival banners, hanging flowers and accent plantings. Using appropriate plant materials such as bamboo, poplar trees, shrubs, fencing (natural walls and timber designs) eyesores can be reduced or eliminated. The above elements will have a maintenance program to keep them fresh and clean.

Water (Power) is necessary for the growth of Wood (Protection) Wood (Protection) is fuel for Fire (Energy) Fire (Energy) is burned and returns to Earth (Peace) Earth (Peace) solidifies into Metal (Confidence) Metal (Confidence) solidifies into Water (Protection)

The city is adopting a planting palette to identify districts, establishing a minimum requirement for planting of trees and shrubs and selection of plant materials and maintenance based on sustainable best management practices. In the city and the ancient walled city the proposed landscape development of the major attractions will use principles of Feng Shui and the concept of the five elements and interplay of the yin and yang energies. Wood, Fire, Earth, Metal and Water are the agents of chi and they represent shapes, colors and symbols which will be interrupted in the landscape for each of the main attractions.

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3. Graphics and Signage towers In an approach similar to the Sussman Prezja’s graphics for the Los Angeles Olympics, the city will install a system of giant banners, illustrations and graphics. These would vary design, have a limited life span, and are conceived to provide much needed color to the city walls, gates and surrounds. Since the city is on the Torch Route, it will be appropriate to incorporate the 2008 Olympic design standards.

Graphic design for LA Olympics by Sussman Prezja and Jerde Partnership

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4. Water Connections In conjunction with the future High Speed Rail station, Jingzhou will create a canal connection due south west to connect into the Jingzhou moat and/ or Shaashi central lake. Like Venice’s water born transportation this is an attractive way of arriving at a tourist destination.

7.2.4.5 规划旅游区的对外交通系统的布 局和主要交通设施的规模、位置;规划 旅游区内部的其他道路系统的走向、断 面和交叉形式。 The size and location of the main roads in Planned destination plus all traffic system layout to the external traffic system; also any internal traffic system of direction, vertical elevation and their crossing.

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5. Festival of Fireworks Develop a major World competition in china to complement the events in Cannes Franceand Vancouver Canada. This will either be done together with a current festival--such as the lantern festival, or the spring festival--or it can be a new stand alone event.

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6. Festival of Flowers Develop a festival that focuses on horticultural events; such as the Washington DC Cheery Blossom Festival. • Topiary Steel shell wire and vines • Peach blossom Festive • Apple Blossom • Cherry Blossom

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Jingzhou Sustainable Tourism Policy (6.4.8) The city leaders of Jingzhou understand that long term economic and social vitality depends upon a more efficient use of nature’s resources, coupled with improved human and environmental health. The priority is to capture and purify water in the landscape to support life in the city. Community waste management recycling will generate clean energy from organic waste, educe landfill requirements that damage the environment, Combined heat and power systems will provide technology to source clean and reliable energy. This is true not only to create a suitable environment for tourism but also for the whole community at large, the commercial, agricultural and industrial parts of the study area. Sustainable urban planning should create the new Shashi- Jingzhou a city with lower energy consumption and one that is as close to carbon neutral as possible. Renewable energy, sustainable building design, efficiency in insulation, and the planning of new communities and societies.

7.2.4.10 规划旅游区的环境卫生系统布 局,提出防止和治理污染的措施。 Overall layout of the environmental and sanitation system, to propose the prevention and treatment of pollution.

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The Sustainable Tourism Plan will establish projects integrating the following goals: • Consolidation and strengthening of the Tourism Strategy Vision. • Creating public/private partnerships for implementation of projects that demonstrate a balance between economic efficacy, social equity and ecological sustainability. • Raising awareness by providing education to local people/ entrepreneurs to promote the neatness and sustainable aspects of their community. • Developing new standards for all new structures and major renovations that will incorporate sustainable development practices in the following categories: o Sustainable sites o Water efficiency o Energy efficiency and atmosphere o Materials and resources o Indoor environmental quality

Strategies

• Facilitate partnerships between small business and wider tourism industry. • Enhance and expand linkages between the tourism industry and local suppliers, tourism and other sectors. • Promote improved visitors awareness and ethical commitment. Goals: 1. to develop greater awareness of contributions tourism makes to environment and economy 2. Improve equity in development 3. Improve quality of life in host community 4. provide high quality experience for the visitor 5. maintain the quality of the environment supporting the above Sustainable tourism development rely on participation by government, ngo, tourism industry, Tourists and international promotional organizations.

Waste Water Treatment

• The Development, training and support of a visionary entrepreneur class that provides core competencies in the hospitality industries, • Current technology and business practices, • Conservation of accomplishments

Lighthouse consultant engineers propose a possible phasing of treatments for the wastewater and to accelerate the initial phase by locating grinder pumps at the end of the existing pipes, allowing it to be the primary treatment, prior to it entering the moat and possibly

increasing the flow of water to have an immediate improvement on water quality. This along with the dredging should allow us to improve the water quality sufficient to allow for the use of the water for The show purposes. The second phase would be the construction of the proposed wastewater treatment plant and to treat to at least a secondary level, finally we would hope to provide a tertiery treatment that would allow the water to be re used for irrigation purposes. The location and size of this plant should allow for future capacity of not only the growth inside the walls but also the surrounding area. In addition, once the moat has been “cleaned” to an acceptable level connect the Three Dynasties Park water network to allow for flow and flushing.

Proposed treatment plants and the Yantgze River The South-city Wastewater Treatment Plant located at southwest part at the outskirt of walled city, 500 meters from the new location of Jingzhou Third Prison. The Caoshi Wastewater treatment plant located at the southwest of Tai Lake’s cross-section with Jing-Xiang River. The treated acceptable water will be discharged into the inland water systems, which are Jing-Xiang River, Tai Lake, West Main Waterway, Jing-Sha River

J ingzhou : A nc ien t Wa ter C it y

etc.)will not go into Yangtze River because of cost of pipe work and the higher water level of the River.

Jingzhou City Historic sites Included in the future city development are the preservation of, and access to, additional temples and historic structures . These include the Wen, the Iron Lady, the Kaiyaun Temple and the Kayan Temple. In addition there will be an expansion of the Wall Museum. The Taoist Temples and other tombs, inscriptions, etc, can have broader tourist interest if properly presented. Certain historic streets require preservation and upgrading. These include, but are not limited to Sanyi (adjacent to market street) and Desheng ( village on the north side of the gate and Shengli . Within the master plan there may be different points of view regarding the upgrade of existing facilities. For example the narrow ad poorly maintained Saynyi, or the ineffective, but recently completed Market Street. In the big picture destination steering is paramount if these sectors are to be revitalized commercially.


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Jingzhou: Implementation Plan & Schedule Achieving the Vision The vision of Jingzhou described above starts with a twenty-year plan. The plan sets out the city’s commitment to tourism, describes new projects and how to reposition Jingzhou as an important tourist destination in China.

1. City Initiatives

Proclamation The city of Jingzhou issues a proclamation announcing Jingzhou the honorary capital of Lord Guan Society Cleaning and Landscape The city of Jingzhou begins a street and building cleaning program following a concept plan and guidelines provided by LHC. The scope of the work includes: • All major streets in ancient walled city • All major routes to walled city • All attractions in the walled city • Landscape on both sides of the city walls • The moat Commitment. To illustrate its commitment to tourism to local investors and the tourist agencies the city will do the following: • Establish a Partnership with Lighthouse Leisure International LLC to fund and operate projects. • Establish contracts with China Tourist Agencies with agreed upon commissions for all projects • Establish the Tourism Management Commission to set guidelines, review attractions for quality, determine operating standards.

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2. Schedule: 2007 • Launch Tourism Management Commission • Create Promotion brochure for Jingzhou and projects • Develop training program • Deliver Landscape Guidelines and Master Plan • China Old City Tourist Summit Forum (Mr. Bi) • Contact guidebooks • Interim review meeting : City and Lighthouse China June to December • Provide implementation instructions for upgrade of attractions • Upgrade projects, minimal investment; provide value add at each site • City begins cleaning, landscaping, and signage at projects and in city • Detail design of Group 2 projects (Assuming funding available) • Negotiate tourist agency contracts; attend conferences; sell packages • Participate in the Chinese Domestic Tourist Trade Fair May: • Deliver Tourism Development Plan June • Chinese Musician Association Jingzhou Show October • Open Group 1 Attractions • Six Provinces in Mid China Tourist Cooperation Conference July to December • Tentative plans to have live TV

broadcasting show on Xiong Tombs Excavation oriented to the whole world. Possible tv institutes: CCTV, Hong Kong Phoenix TV, Hubei TV July to August 2008 • Operate approved Group 1 Projects Aug to December: • Monitor performance of Group 1 Attractions October • Chinese International Tourist Trade Fair to announce 2008 projects • Goldenweeks event

January to August 2008 February Chinese New Year: Spring Festival March April • Tourist Season Opens May • Dragon Boat Festival June July August • Lord Guan Event • Open Group 2 Attractions September October • Golden Weeks Event December

3. Projects Rejuvenate current attractions (Group 1) for 2007 • Lord Guan Temple and Visitor Center • Taoist Temple • Xiong Tomb Archeological Site

• Ji’an City • Jingzhou Museum • East Gate Visitor Center Plan and design 2008 attractions (Group 2) • Xiong Tombs Experience Theater • 3 Kingdoms Experience Theater • Lord Guan Equestrian Theater • Dragon Boat Races and Poet Commemoration • 3 Kingdoms Extravaganza (son et lumiere) • 3 Kingdoms Dinner theater (the beginning of the transformation of 3 Kingdoms park • Jingzhou Rural Experience • The Inaugural Lord Guan Tourism Conference for Sustainable Tourism Identify and define potential 2009-2010 Project • High Speed Rail Portal • 3 Kingdoms Park Restoration as Family Entertainment Center • 3 and 5 star hotel (s) • Temple of Heaven at Museum • Longevity Park at River • City Levee

4. Implementation Structure • Jingzhou Tourism Management Commission: manages all aspects of city participation in tourism, training • Lighthouse Leisure International LLC; investment, development, strategic planning, design • Lightbeam: Operations

5. Marketing and Promotion • Tourism agreements • Attendance at tourism conferences

J ingzhou : A nc ien t Wa ter C it y


• Web Site • Advertising

6. Funding • Show City Commitment through investment in current projects, cleaning and signage program, and funding Tourism Management Commission • Establish the Jingzhou Tourism Investment Fund through Lighthouse China to solicit investment from local investors and Lord Guan Society members • Banks • Sponsorship: Special promotions

7. Implementation Lighthouse Leisure International LLC : Development, Investment, Design(Lighthouse Creative) Lightbeam: Operations Jingzhou Tourism Management Commission (Ying Diaming, Chairman): standards, guidelines, training Attractions: Each attraction is a separate business with profits shared between city and Lighthouse Leisure with opertions provided by LHLI

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7.2.4.11 提出旅游区近期建设规划,进行重点项目策划。 Submit the short-term construction plan and undertake key project mastermind.

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Jingzhou: Investment Analysis: Tourist Attractions Projected overall costs in the planning area, for the attractions, infrastructure, support facilities, human resources, and projected revenues in the short, medium and long term (6.4.10) 1. Assumptions a. Annual tourist visitors: 300,000 b. Operating days per year: 240 c. Average tourists per day: 1,250 d. Maximum tourists per day: 3,750 e. Average spend per tourist: 660 RMB f. Maximum cost of land: 1,500 RMB per square meter; 215 USD per square meter 2. Upgrade Group 1 Projects; upgrade infrastructure and renovate selected existing attractions a. Infrastructure upgrade projects: 1. Sewer system for the Ancient Walled City 2. City-wide landscape program 3. City-wide clean-up b. Current Attractions renovation projects: 1. Jingzhou Museum 2. Lord Guan Temple 3. Jinan City 4. Xiong Tombs 5. Watery Culture Longevity Garden 6. Small East Gate 7. Balingshan Forest Park at Baling Mountain 8. Qu Yuan/Dragon Boat Festival c. Group 1 projected financials: 1. Gross annual income for Group 1 attractions: RMB; USD 2. Capital costs for Group 1 attractions: RMB; USD 3. Operating costs for Group 1 attractions: RMB; USD

4. Annual debt service interest on capital costs at 10% interest rate: RMB; USD 5. Annual earnings before taxes, depreciation and amortization: RMB; USD 6. Annual rate of capital pay-back: 7. Total capital pay-off: 3. Create Group 2 Projects; create new attractions a. Infrastructure upgrade projects:

b. New Attractions projects: 1. Chu Culture Show AV Experience 2. Three Kingdoms AV Experience 3. Lord Guan Battle Theater 4. Son and Lumiere 5. Three Kingdoms Park Dinner Theater c. Group 2 projected financials: 1. Gross annual income for Group 2 attractions: 142,000,000 RMB; 18,500,000 USD 2. Capital costs for Group 2 attractions: 81,300,000 RMB; 10,550,000 USD 3. Operating costs for Group 2 attractions: 102,300,000 RMB; 13,300,000 USD 4. Annual debt service interest on capital costs at 10% interest rate: 8,130,000 RMB; 1,055,000 USD 5. Annual earnings before taxes, depreciation and amortization: 29,400,000 RMB; 4,200,000 USD 6. Annual rate of capital pay-back: 40% 7. Total capital pay-off: 2.7 years

City Investments and Returns 1. Investments a. Strategic and planning Studies b. Infrastructure projects c. City beautification projects d. Existing cultural attractions upgrades; Group 1 projects 2. Returns a. Direct income from: i. the operation of the existing attractions ii.the operation of new attractions iii.merchandising iv.tourist fees within room rates v. increased personal and business income tax receipts b. Indirect income for the community i. Increased employment ii.Increased hospitality industry income (hotels, restaurants, retail, tour operators, ancillary services) c. Other benefits i. Wider exposure to the regional/national/ international marketplace ii.Opportunity to attract increased outside investment iii.Additional sources to fund infrastructure and other projects of interest to the city iv.Higher standard of living for its constituents v. Cleaner environment and resources vi.Contribution in the advancement of the Central Government goal of establishing a national tourism policy

7.2.4.13 对旅游区开发建设进行总体投资分析。 The total and overall investment analysis on the development and construction of the tourism destination.

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J ingzhou : A nc ien t Wa ter C it y


GROUP 2 ATTRACTIONS 1. Chu Culture Show AV Experience & Museum 200 seats;6 shows/day; 7days/wk; 240 days 2. Three Kingdoms AV Experience Lord Guan temple 200 seats;6 shows/day; 7days/wk; 240 days 3. Lord Guan Battle Theater at the old prison grounds 600 seats;2 shows/day; 7 days/wk; 240 days 4. Juilong Park; Son and Lumiere 1,300 seats;1 show/day; 7 days/wk; 240 nights VIP suites (4,000 RMB @ 15suites @ 120 nights) 5. Three Kingdoms Park 5a.Teen Island: mini golf, FEC, Laser play, Comic Land 5b. Chldren's Island: rides, chinese dragon, maze 5c. Pleasure Island: Dinner Theater 400 seats;1 show/wkday; 2 shows/wkend; 240 days 6. East Gate Development Artisan Village 10,000 s.m. @ 150RMB/m/sm Orientation Center & Wall 7. Xiong Tombs

INCOME

Projected

RMB

RMB

Attendance

Per Person

Total

240,000

60 14,400,000 50 tkt;10 merch 240,000 60 14,400,000 50 tkt;10 merch 225,000 110 24,750,000 70 tkt; 10 merch; 30 f&b 240,000 160 38,400,000 110 tkt; 20 merch; 30 f&b 7,200,000 500,000 500,000 110,000

240,000 150,000

50 40 180

20 175 125 tkt; 50 merch

TOTALS

$ Per Person

HOTELS & COMMERCIAL 8. Lord Guan Hotel & Hospitality Training Center 200 rooms; family-style hotel 300RMB/rm 9. Famous People Hotel & Conference Center (at the old City Hall) 200 rooms; five-star 20 2-bedroom duplex villas five-star Conference Center (150 FTE events @ $4,000/event) 10. Commercial Center at the High Speed Rail Station Visitor Center Retail Mall (20000 s.m. @ 120 RMB/m/sm) Hotel (200 rooms; business traveler-style)

Capital

Capital

Operating

Operating

Total

Costs (RMB)

Costs ($)

Costs (RMB)

Costs ($)

GROSS MARGIN EBIDA

Year 1

ROI Year 1

EBDA

(EBDA)

$8

$1,870,130

13,952,400

$1,812,000

9,399,002

$1,220,650

$649,480

$468,280

26%

$8

$1,870,130

13,952,400

$1,812,000

9,399,000

$1,220,649

$649,481

$468,281

26%

$14

$3,214,286

12,997,600

$1,688,000

19,565,700

$2,541,000

$673,286

$504,486

30%

$21

$4,987,013

31,955,000

$4,150,000

30,718,802

$3,989,455

$2,026,130

$1,611,130

39%

6,129,200 5,890,500 8,485,400

$796,000 $765,000 $1,102,000

14,771,446 14,278,040 14,060,277

$1,918,370 $1,854,291 $1,826,010

$1,328,384 $743,112 $745,419

$1,248,784 $666,612 $635,219

157% 87% 58%

$1,028,571

25,000,000 20,000,000 19,800,000

$6 $5 $23

$3,246,753 $2,597,403 $2,571,429

18,000,000 4,800,000 26,250,000

$0 $3 $23

$2,337,662 $623,377 $3,409,091

20,636,000

$2,680,000

13,268,360

$1,723,164

$1,237,875

$969,875

36%

33,379,500

$4,335,000

15,159,620

$1,968,782

$1,440,309

$1,006,809

23%

27,755,844

147,378,000

$19,140,000

140,620,246

$18,262,370

$9,493,475

$7,579,475

40%

213,000,000

Total projected tourists per year Average tourists per day Average spend per tourist (RMB)

EXPENSES

$

300,000 1,250 710

INCOME

Projected

RMB

RMB

Attendance

Per Person

Total

$ Per Person

EXPENSES

$

Capital

Capital

Operating

Operating

Total

Costs (RMB)

Costs ($)

Costs (RMB)

Costs ($)

58,400

300

17,520,000

$39

$2,275,325

51,100 12,410

500 650

25,550,000 8,066,500 4,620,000

$65 $84

$3,318,182 $1,047,597 $600,000

0 28,800,000 15,330,000

$0 $0 $39

$0 $3,740,260 $1,990,909

0 0

12,972,273

83,406,400

51,100

TOTALS

300

99,886,500

GROSS MARGIN EBIDA

Year 1

ROI Year 1

EBDA

(EBDA)

37,152,500

$4,825,000

12,045,600

$1,564,364

$710,961

$228,461

5%

46,253,900

$6,007,000

20,513,052

$2,664,033

$2,301,746

$1,701,046

28%

$3,740,260

$3,740,260

$6,752,967

$5,669,767

0 0 10,832,000

32,558,652

4,228,396

NOTES: EBIDA: Earnings Before Interest, Depreciation and Amortization (after taxes) EBDA: Earnings Before Depreciation and Amortization (after taxes and interest)

Tourism D est ina tion P roje c t s

138

#DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! 52%


Jingzhou: the Market

International and Domestic Tourist Visitation and Revenue for the Peoples Republic of China

Exhibit A

Tourism statistics, 1998-2005

Overview In 2005, China’s domestic tourism market made up 91.0% of the country’s tourism traffic, and contributed more than 99.6% of total tourism receipts. Domestic tourists are defined as residents of mainland China who stay for one night at least but no more than six months in tourist areas or facilities other than their permanent residence within the territory of mainland China. Domestic tourism also includes foreigners, overseas Chinese and Chinese visitors from Hong Kong, Macau and Taiwan who have resided in China for over one year. This is presented in Exhibit A. Tourism is still in an early phase of development in China, thus sightseeing is the main form of tourist product, mostly with an emphasis on parks, mountains, lakes, temples as destinations. At present, there are over 120+ national parks and 500+ provincial parks in the country. While there is a significant gap in income between the Coastal Cities and the rural areas, travel preferences of domestic tourists all through the decade of the 90’s appeared to cover a complete spectrum from traditional sightseeing with lower expenditures

to special interest tourism with higher expenditures. Theme parks, sports/leisure services, arts performances and cultural entertainment industries in cities have gradually been identified as a new trend in development, stimulated by domestic tourism and real estate development. The construction of entertainment parks is booming. Large-scale entertainment parks are almost all in the form of theme parks, such as Splendid China, Window of the World, and Chinese Folk Culture Village in Shenzhen, Guangdong province. In contrast, traditional city parks usually in the form of folk villages, family visiting and special festivals, have generally become less popular. Nature scenery tourism emerged slowly but has now become a fullfledged segment of the tourism product in China. During the mid1990’s there were more than 750 scenic forest parks located in 27 provinces and autonomous regions, covering a total area of an estimated 6.3+ million hectares. Setting aside forest preserves is seen as enhancing eco-tourism and thus good for the environment. Chinese forest preserves received more

7.2.4.2 界定旅游区范围,进行现状调查和分析,对旅游资源进行科学评价。 Demarcate and outline the destination boundary, investigate and analyze the actuality, scientifically evaluate the tourism resources.

International tourists arriving in China (millions) Foreigners Compatriots from Hong Kong and Macau Compatriots from Taiwan International Tourism Earnings(USD 100 million) International Tourist Earnings Per Capita Tourists (Overnight Visitors)(10,000 person-times) Domestic tourists (millions) Income from domestic tourism (RMB billion) Income from domestic tourists Per Capita Domestic residents outbound (millions)

1998 63.50 7.10 54.10 2.20 n.a. n.a. 695 239.10 344 8.40

1999 72.80 8.43 61.70 2.58 $140.99 $193.68 27.05

2000 83.44 10.16 70.10 3.11 $162.24 $194.43 31.24

2001 89.01 11.23 74.34 3.44 $177.92 $199.88 33.17

719 283.10 394 9.20

744 317.50 427 10.50

784 352.20 449 12.10

2002 97.91 13.44 80.81 3.66 $203.85 $208.21 36.80

2003 91.66 11.40 77.53 2.73 $174.06 $189.89 32.97

2004 109.04 16.93 88.42 3.69 $257.39 $236.05 41.76

2005 120.29 20.26 95.93 4.11 292.96 $243.54 46.81

870 878 387.80 344.23 442 396 16.60 20.22

1,102 471.07 427 28.85

1,212 528.59 436 31.03

© Lighthouse Creative Inc. 2007 All Rights Reserved

25.7% 73.1% 74.4% 121.1% 26.8% 269.4%

Source: China National Tourism Administration; China Statistical Yearbooks and Latent/Lighthouse Creative

Number of Domestic Tourists in China Provinces

Exhibit B

Multiple Destination Market Share Values 2000 Provinces/SAR Beijing Jiangsu Shandong Shanghai Zhejiang Guangdong Sichuan Hubei (Wuhan) Liaoning Henan Hebei Hunan Yunnan Guangxi Chongqing Shanxi Fujian Anhui Shaanxi (Xi'an) Heilongjian Jiangxi Jilin Guizhou Hainan Mongolia Xinjiang Qinghai Ningxia Tibet Gansu Total Multiple Visit

57,059,971 49,617,366 47,498,705 43,469,278 39,793,128 38,205,372 35,813,319 33,094,783 31,283,749 31,117,531 29,695,497 28,281,899 25,354,970 24,247,511 22,923,223 21,630,691 19,504,587 19,271,385 18,520,674 16,621,818 16,272,015 12,179,575 10,915,821 6,013,625 5,720,882 4,802,465 2,074,006 1,513,330 0 0 692,497,174

2002

2003

2004

2005

115,000,000 87,000,000 119,500,000 125,000,000 100,380,000 114,000,000 146,620,000 172,340,000 95,730,000 89,180,000 117,490,000 149,080,000 87,610,000 70,630,000 85,050,000 90,120,000 80,200,000 84,130,000 106,000,000 127,580,000 77,000,000 140,110,000 169,060,000 221,110,000 72,180,000 84,040,000 114,260,000 131,640,000 66,700,000 56,840,000 68,490,000 76,300,000 63,050,000 63,030,000 80,900,000 98,600,000 62,710,000 50,520,000 80,120,000 100,450,000 59,850,000 44,770,000 72,270,000 80,680,000 57,000,000 59,550,000 64,310,000 71,090,000 51,100,000 51,690,000 60,110,000 68,610,000 48,870,000 45,400,000 55,180,000 64,930,000 46,200,000 42,630,000 52,360,000 59,650,000 43,600,000 34,900,000 55,790,000 65,450,000 39,310,000 37,110,000 46,430,000 56,840,000 38,840,000 33,390,000 43,290,000 46,840,000 37,320,000 33,300,000 41,500,000 49,530,000 33,500,000 35,900,000 40,020,000 41,660,000 32,700,000 33,910,000 40,890,000 50,580,000 24,550,000 23,310,000 25,880,000 28,510,000 22,000,000 18,350,000 24,800,000 30,990,000 12,160,000 12,050,000 13,720,000 14,730,000 11,530,000 12,940,000 15,110,000 20,620,000 9,680,000 10,120,000 12,420,000 14,650,000 4,180,000 3,940,000 1,090,000 6,330,000 3,050,000 2,740,000 4,040,000 5,000,000 730,000 880,000 1,130,000 1,680,000 10,350,000 8,630,000 9,500,000 12,080,000 1,407,080,000 1,384,990,000 1,767,330,000 2,082,670,000

Source: Yearbook of Tourism Statistics, Hubei Province, and Latent/Lighthouse Creative

139

1998-2005 Growth % 89.4% 185.3% 77.3% 86.8%

J ingzhou : A nc ien t Wa ter C it y


Estimated Domestic Tourism by Province

Exhibit C Historical

2000

1 2 3 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31

Beijing Jiangsu Shandong Shanghai Zhejiang Guangdong Sichuan Hubei (Wuhan) Liaoning Henan Hebei Hunan Yunnan Guangxi Chongqing Shanxi Fujian Anhui Shaanxi (Xi'an) Heilongjian Jiangxi Jilin Guizhou Hainan Mongolia Xinjiang Qinghai Ningxia Tibet Gansu

2002

7.7% 6.7% 6.4% 5.8% 5.3% 5.1% 4.8% 4.4% 4.2% 4.2% 4.0% 3.8% 3.4% 3.3% 3.1% 2.9% 2.6% 2.6% 2.5% 2.2% 2.2% 1.6% 1.5% 0.8% 0.8% 0.6% 0.3% 0.2% 0.0% 0.0% 93.1%

8.2% 7.1% 6.8% 6.2% 5.7% 5.5% 5.1% 4.7% 4.5% 4.5% 4.3% 4.1% 3.6% 3.5% 3.3% 3.1% 2.8% 2.8% 2.7% 2.4% 2.3% 1.7% 1.6% 0.9% 0.8% 0.7% 0.3% 0.2% 0.1% 0.7% 100.0%

2003

6.3% 8.2% 6.4% 5.1% 6.1% 10.1% 6.1% 4.1% 4.6% 3.6% 3.2% 4.3% 3.7% 3.3% 3.1% 2.5% 2.7% 2.4% 2.4% 2.6% 2.4% 1.7% 1.3% 0.9% 0.9% 0.7% 0.3% 0.2% 0.1% 0.6% 100.0%

Estimated 2004

2005

6.8% 8.3% 6.6% 4.8% 6.0% 9.6% 6.5% 3.9% 4.6% 4.5% 4.1% 3.6% 3.4% 3.1% 3.0% 3.2% 2.6% 2.4% 2.3% 2.3% 2.3% 1.5% 1.4% 0.8% 0.9% 0.7% 0.1% 0.2% 0.1% 0.5% 100.0%

6.0% 8.3% 7.2% 4.3% 6.1% 10.6% 6.3% 3.7% 4.7% 4.8% 3.9% 3.4% 3.3% 3.1% 2.9% 3.1% 2.7% 2.2% 2.4% 2.0% 2.4% 1.4% 1.5% 0.7% 1.0% 0.7% 0.3% 0.2% 0.1% 0.6% 100.0%

2006

5.6% 8.7% 6.9% 4.1% 6.2% 11.8% 6.7% 3.5% 4.7% 4.5% 3.7% 3.5% 3.3% 3.0% 2.8% 3.0% 2.6% 2.2% 2.3% 2.1% 2.4% 1.4% 1.4% 0.7% 1.0% 0.7% 0.2% 0.2% 0.1% 0.8% 100.0%

2007

5.2% 8.9% 6.9% 3.7% 6.3% 12.8% 7.0% 3.3% 4.7% 4.6% 3.6% 3.4% 3.3% 2.9% 2.7% 3.0% 2.6% 2.1% 2.2% 2.1% 2.4% 1.3% 1.4% 0.7% 1.0% 0.7% 0.2% 0.2% 0.1% 0.9% 100.0%

2008

4.8% 9.1% 6.9% 3.3% 6.3% 13.8% 7.2% 3.0% 4.8% 4.6% 3.5% 3.3% 3.2% 2.9% 2.6% 3.0% 2.6% 2.0% 2.1% 2.0% 2.4% 1.2% 1.3% 0.7% 1.0% 0.7% 0.2% 0.2% 0.1% 1.0% 100.0%

2009

4.4% 9.4% 6.9% 2.9% 6.4% 14.9% 7.5% 2.8% 4.8% 4.7% 3.4% 3.1% 3.1% 2.8% 2.5% 3.0% 2.6% 1.9% 2.1% 1.9% 2.4% 1.1% 1.3% 0.6% 1.0% 0.7% 0.1% 0.2% 0.1% 1.0% 100.0%

2010

3.9% 9.6% 7.0% 2.5% 6.5% 15.9% 7.8% 2.6% 4.8% 4.7% 3.4% 3.0% 3.1% 2.7% 2.5% 3.0% 2.5% 1.8% 2.0% 1.9% 2.4% 1.1% 1.3% 0.6% 1.1% 0.7% 0.1% 0.2% 0.2% 1.1% 100.0%

2015

2020

3.9% 9.6% 7.0% 2.5% 6.5% 15.9% 7.8% 2.6% 4.8% 4.7% 3.4% 3.0% 3.1% 2.7% 2.5% 3.0% 2.5% 1.8% 2.0% 1.9% 2.4% 1.1% 1.3% 0.6% 1.1% 0.7% 0.1% 0.2% 0.2% 1.1% 100.0%

3.9% 9.6% 7.0% 2.5% 6.5% 15.9% 7.8% 2.6% 4.8% 4.7% 3.4% 3.0% 3.1% 2.7% 2.5% 3.0% 2.5% 1.8% 2.0% 1.9% 2.4% 1.1% 1.3% 0.6% 1.1% 0.7% 0.1% 0.2% 0.2% 1.1% 100.0%

Source: CNTA and Latent/Lighthouse Creative

Estimates of Domestic Tourists to Selected Provinces in China

Exhibit D

Person visitor trips 2006 Beijing Shanghai Guangdong Sichuan Hubei Chongqing Shaanxi Guizhou Hainan

130,552,656 93,946,227 272,175,887 155,365,937 80,536,426 64,915,057 52,500,977 31,950,613 16,693,996

2007 134,377,726 94,807,228 330,193,089 179,919,882 83,981,341 70,084,224 56,802,464 34,917,044 17,867,106

2008 136,008,170 93,715,088 393,526,342 205,815,636 86,286,931 74,807,946 60,767,580 37,747,685 18,894,782

2009

2010

135,444,012 90,669,827 462,175,591 233,053,188 87,453,208 79,086,230 64,396,327 40,442,538 19,777,027

132,685,739 85,671,880 536,139,655 261,632,237 87,480,425 82,919,173 67,688,781 43,001,634 20,513,872

2015 183,071,966 117,353,825 746,370,325 366,143,933 122,047,978 115,448,224 94,242,975 59,871,102 28,561,429

2020 234,654,894 150,419,804 956,669,951 469,309,787 156,436,596 147,977,275 120,797,169 76,740,570 36,608,986

Note: Adjusted for multiple location visits by a factor of 1.6 Source: Latent/Lighthouse Creative

Tourism D est ina tion P roje c t s

140


than 30 million visitors, with an overall income of more than RMB 400 million (USD 48.37 million).

Characteristcs of the domestic visitor, day trip, and international markets China’s tourism started to mature following China’s economic reforms and opening-up policy. Since 1990, the market for all tourism has developed rapidly.

Domestic Tourism Market With increasing incomes, the travel preferences of sightseeing destinations had shifted from historic and cultural areas (e.g. Beijing, the capital city of the country, and Hangzhou, Zhejiang province) to natural landscape areas (e.g. mountain resorts far away from cities); from traditional national parks (e.g. Huangshan Mountain, Anhui province, and Guilin, Guangxi Autonomous Region) to newly developed areas (e.g. Jiuzhaigou, Sichuan province, and Zhangjiajie, Hunan province). This has especially been the case for tourists seeking rest and relaxation. A total of 12 national vacation tourism areas were established, mostly located in Southeast China. The region has a warm climate, is close to densely populated cities and high-technology development areas.

While domestic tourism has had an overall increase, the increase rate for tourists and domestic tourism receipts leveled off during 2003 to some extent and has since regained its growth trend as is shown in Exhibit B. While this is a normal for most markets, it demonstrated that the domestic tourism market needs new products and opportunities for growth and future development. The expansion and fluctuation of the domestic tourism market is the result of the interactions among periodic change of national economic growth, government encouraged policies for the tourism industry, increases in consumer income, changes in consumption concept and more leisure time. The potential growth of the domestic tourism market displayed as Exhibit C. Future numerical estimates for selected provinces (with Hubei and Shaanxi highlighted) are shown next in Exhibit D.

Structure of market demand The breakdown of China’s current domestic tourists and their demographic and socio-economic profiles are given in the following paragraphs.

Income Qualification The principal driver of increases in domestic tourism is the growing prosperity of the residents both urban

The domestic visitor market is rapidly increasing in spending power

Exhibit E

National China Average Household Income Distribution of Domestic Travelers

Income Level 2000 (1) < 500 RMB 500-999 1000-1999 2000-2999 3000-3999 4000-4999 > 5000 Income Qualied

Income Qualied Market Share 2002 (2) 2005 (3) 2010 (3)

2000

5% 13% 40% 24% 10% 5% 3% 100%

5% 5% 3% 13%

18% 12% 6% 4% 40%

6% 6% 4% 16%

20% 24% 12% 6% 4% 66%

(1) China National Tourism Administration (2) China Tourism Yearbook 2003 (3) Estimates by Latent/Lighthouse Creative

Exhibit F

DOMESTIC TOURISM METRICS YEAR 2005

Travelers (million)

Propensity Rate

Tourism Expenditure (100Mn.RMB)

Average Expenditure Per Capita

TOTAL Urban Residents Rural Residents

1,212 496 716

.927x 1.351x .762x

5,285.9 3,656.1 1,629.7

436.1 737.1 227.5

Urban Residents JAN. - MAR. APR. - JUNE JULY - SEP. OCT. - DEC.

496 133 118 118 127

135.1 36.2 32.2 32.2 34.5

3,656.1 842.1 858.4 1,015.9 939.8

737.1 633.1 727.4 860.9 740.0

Tourism Expenditure (100Mn.RMB)

Average Expenditure Per Capita

26.8% 23.8% 23.8% 25.6%

YEAR 2000 Travelers (million) TOTAL Urban Residents Rural Residents Urban Residents JAN. - MAR. APR. - JUNE JULY - SEP. OCT. - DEC.

Propensity Rate

744 329 415

.591x 1.044x .44x

3,175.5 2,235.3 940.3

426.6 678.6 226.6

329 85 88 80 77

1.044x .268x .279x .254x .243x

2,235.3 559.2 579.7 635.6 460.8

678.6 661.1 658.8 791.9 601.0

Note: Propensity of urban and rural residents to take trips of over 24 hour stay in an area outside their residence. Source: CNTA, China Statistics Yearbook 2006

141 © Lighthouse Creative Inc. 2007 All Rights Reserved

2015 (3)

J ingzhou : A nc ien t Wa ter C it y

6% 40% 24% 12% 6% 4% 92%


Domestic Tourism Expenditures 2005

Exhibit G

National Total Receipts US$ 100 Million

(%)

Per Capita Receipts

$528.59

100

$439.42

Hubei Province Total Receipts RMB 100 million (%)

Per Capita Receipts



450.76

100



590.77

Transportation Air Rail Bus Ship

    

88.80 19.38 25.24 29.30 14.88

19.7% 4.3% 5.6% 6.5% 3.3%

    

116.38 25.40 33.08 38.40 19.50

Shopping Accommodation Other Food & Beverage Entertainment Sightseeing Local Transportation Communication

       

98.72 49.13 42.37 68.52 65.81 16.68 12.62 8.11

21.9% 10.9% 9.4% 15.2% 14.6% 3.7% 2.8% 1.8%

       

129.38 64.39 55.53 89.80 86.25 21.86 16.54 10.63

TOTAL

Source: China National Tourism Administration and Latent/Lighthouse Creative

Domestic Visitors By Age & Sex - 2005

Exhibit H

`

TOTAL PRC Beijing Shanghai Guangzhou Wuhan Xi'an

TOTAL (Person)

>14

15-24

AGE 25-44

45-64

Over 65

Male

Female

100%

7.3%

9.0%

35.1%

41.0%

7.6%

47.4%

52.6%

100.0% 100.0% 100.0% 100.0% 100.0%

4.9% 6.7% 16.9% 3.4% 8.7%

9.5% 11.0% 8.4% 6.9% 10.1%

25.8% 29.0% 35.1% 31.3% 25.6%

52.8% 43.5% 34.0% 49.3% 42.9%

7.0% 9.8% 5.6% 9.1% 12.7%

47.4% 46.0% 49.1% 54.5% 50.3%

52.6% 54.0% 50.9% 45.5% 49.7%

Sex

SOURCE: EXIT-ENTRY ADMINISTRATION BUREAU, MINISTRY OF PUBLIC SECURITY

Adjusted market capture of Principal Cities in Hubei

Hubei Wuhan Jingzhou Yichang

Shaanxi Xi'an

Exhibit I

2005 76,300,000 29,010,000 38.02% 3,870,000 5.07% 8,620,000 11.30%

2006 80,536,426 31,223,896 38.77% 3,992,531 4.96% 9,534,893 11.84%

2007 83,981,341 32,744,668 38.99% 3,982,738 4.74% 9,955,968 11.85%

2008 86,286,931 34,137,871 39.56% 3,964,277 4.59% 10,545,446 12.22%

2009 87,453,208 34,894,821 39.90% 3,849,324 4.40% 10,803,969 12.35%

2010 87,480,425 35,338,277 40.40% 3,707,947 4.24% 11,059,689 12.64%

49,530,000

52,500,977

56,802,464

60,767,580

64,396,327

67,688,781

2015 122,047,978 51,810,148 42.45% 4,081,788 3.34% 16,683,049 13.67%

2020 156,436,596 69,707,390 44.56% 3,849,051 2.46% 23,073,867 14.75%

94,242,975

120,797,169

MARKET SHARE OF INTERNATIONAL TOURISTS BY PROVINCE Distribution by Percentage Exhibit J PROVINCE/SAR

BEIJING TIANJIN HEBEI SHANXI INNER MONGOLIA LIAONING JILIN HEILONGJIANG SHANGHAI JIANGSU ZHEJIANG ANHUI FUJIAN JIANGXI SHANDONG HENAN HUBEI HUNAN GUANGDONG GUANGXI HAINAN CHONGQING SICHUAN GUIZHOU YUNNAN TIBET SHAANXI GANSU QINGHAI NINGXIA XINJIANG

2000

2005

GAIN/(LOSS /1)

9.1% 1.1% 1.3% 0.5% 1.3% 2.0% 0.7% 1.8% 5.8% 5.2% 3.6% 1.0% 5.2% 0.5% 2.3% 1.0% 1.4% 1.5% 38.5% 3.9% 1.6% 0.9% 1.5% 0.6% 3.2% 0.5% 2.3% 0.7% 0.1% 0.0% 0.8% 100.0%

10.1% 1.9% 1.0% 0.5% 1.5% 2.8% 0.5% 1.3% 10.4% 7.8% 6.1% 0.7% 5.0% 0.5% 2.8% 1.1% 1.1% 1.5% 33.8% 1.5% 0.6% 1.0% 1.3% 0.4% 2.1% 0.2% 1.6% 0.3% 0.1% 0.0% 0.5% 100.0%

0.010 0.008 (0.003) (0.001) 0.002 0.008 (0.002) (0.005) 0.046 0.026 0.025 (0.003) (0.001) (0.000) 0.005 0.001 (0.004) 0.001 (0.047) (0.025) (0.010) 0.002 (0.002) (0.002) (0.011) (0.003) (0.006) (0.004) (0.000) (0.000) (0.004)

Source: Yearbook of China's Tourism Statistics 2006 and Latent/Lighthouse Creative

Source: Jingzhou City Tourism Department and Latent/Lighthouse Creative

Tourism D est ina tion P roje c t s

142


and rural. Household income levels of domestic tourists is shown in Exhibit E for the Year 2000. Estimates of the rapid increase in income are then expressed in “income qualified ranges” through the year 2015. By 2015, 92 percent of the population will have achieved a level of income which will allow tourism to flourish.

Demographics of Domestic Tourists

Travel Propensity

Market Segmentation

Important domestic tourism metrics are presented in Exhibit F. Rural residents have made dramatic increases in the propensity to travel from a rate of 0.44x to .762x which means that on average, 76 percent of all rural residents take a trip lasting at least overnight more than 50 miles from their home.

Key market segments are described in the following paragraphs.

Domestic Expenditures Exhibit G describes domestic tourism expenditures for visitors to Hubei province. Per capita expenditures are RMB591. The overall levels of expenditure of domestic tourists has continued to rise in both total and per capita rates, and reached RMB 528.59 billion and RMB 439/ person respectively in 2005. There is, however, still a very large difference in consumption levels between urban residents and rural residents. Stimulating the rural tourism market is a primary objective for the future development of China’s domestic tourism industry.

143 © Lighthouse Creative Inc. 2007 All Rights Reserved

Age and sex demographics distribution are presented in Exhibit H. Women seem to predominate as travelers with the age segment of 45 – 64 having the highest percentage representation at 41 percent.

(FIT) Free Independent Traveler Despite the promotional activities and service enhancements of travel agencies, the number of tourists on package tours is still around 12%. Over 85% of domestic tourists still prefer to make their own travel arrangements.

International Tourism Expenditures 2005

Exhibit K

National

Hubei Province

(%)

Per Capita Receipts

Total Receipts US$

(%)

Per Capita Receipts

$292.96

100

$243.54

276,363,000

100

$334.70

Transportation Air Rail Motor Sea

$82.94 $59.28 $9.04 $7.18 $7.44

28.3% 20.2% 31.0% 24.0% 25.0%

$68.95 $49.28 $7.52 $5.97 $6.18

119,665,200 54,996,200 13,541,800 4,974,500 46,152,600

Shopping Accommodation Other Food & Beverage Entertainment Sightseeing Local Transportation Communication

$63.78 $37.75 $32.99 $27.48 $17.02 $12.27 $10.30 $8.44

21.8% 12.9% 11.3% 9..4% 5.8% 4.2% 3.5% 2.9%

$53.02 $31.38 $27.42 $22.84 $14.15 $10.20 $8.56 $7.02

46,429,000 33,163,600 12,159,900 22,661,800 10,501,800 17,963,600 5,250,800 8,567,300

43.3% 19.9% 4.9% 1.8% 16.7% 0.0% 16.8% 12.0% 4.4% 8.2% 3.8% 6.5% 1.9% 3.1%

$144.93 $66.61 $16.40 $6.02 $55.90 $0.00 $56.23 $40.16 $14.73 $27.45 $12.72 $21.76 $6.36 $10.38

Total Receipts US$ 100 Million TOTAL

Source: China National Tourism Administration and Latent/Lighthouse Creative

Silver Market The senior market has perhaps the greatest potential for growth. The highest market share was recorded for those aged 45 to 64 at 41.0 percent in 2005 which has grown from 39 percent in 2001. The market for retirees (age 64+) also has shown strong growth and now accounts for nearly 8 percent of the domestic tourism market in 2005. This trend suggests that the silver market has changed its concept of consumption and foretells a large potential in this particular sector for the domestic tourism market.

J ingzhou : A nc ien t Wa ter C it y


Visitor Arrivals By Mode of Transport 2005 People

Growth (%)

Exhibit L Sea

Mode of Transport Air Rail

Motor

Foreign Visitor Arrivals By Purpose 2005

Foot

Exhibit M

MEETINGS CONVENTIO SIGHTSEEING/ N LEISURE 22.7% 46.1%

VISITING RELATIVES & FRIENDS 2.0%

WORKER & CREW 9.9%

OTHERS 19.2%

120,292,255

10.32

5,211,623 14,736,170 1,609,751

31,937,852

66,796,859

TOTAL

TOTAL 100.0%

70,193,786 25,734,145 4,109,187 20,255,137

5.49 17.61 11.5 19.62

2,097,293 1,354,287 54,922 42,930 662,993 1,793,705 2,396,415 11,545,248

828,525 2,143 35,441 743,642

26,750,982 1,189,824 835,528 3,161,518

39,162,699 24,444,326 781,520 2,408,314

12,506,302 3,545,341 3,389,976 899,643 812,922 755,883 654,000 641,985 586,267 377,622 356,460 186,647 125,800 83,813 37,466 29,016 23,461

16.48 24.62 1.67 21.26 57.54 18.7 19.04 15.93 26.3 7.94 15.21 14.88 12.27 6.37 -5.39 -0.22 65.6

1,506,243 562,743 264,523 34,513 107,059 32,070 316,886 579 22,411 52,212 72,052 108 27,865 3,705 18 956 8,543

7,695,653 2,655,843 2,573,324 640,960 330,005 511,541 116,472 35,009 411,484 179,683 114,707 36,462 19,758 38,547 13,471 8,426 9,961

275,612 22,691 57,168 10,510 23,809 11,784 7,124 62,168 3,929 10,980 15,284 27,670 19,559 1,120 549 333 934

1,367,108 128,089 180,389 57,249 43,257 58,427 31,727 530,680 53,015 40,682 30,084 116,517 53,875 9,286 23,379 9,158 1,294

1,661,686 175,975 314,572 156,411 308,792 142,061 181,791 13,549 95,428 94,065 124,333 5,890 4,743 31,155 49 10,143 2,729

ASIA KOREA JAPAN MALAYSIA OTHERS SINGAPORE PHILIPPINES MONGOLIA THAILAND INDONESIA INDIA KAZAKHSTAN KOREA D.P. REP. PAKISTAN KYRGYZSTAN NEPAL SRI LANKA

61.7% 17.5% 16.7% 4.4% 4.0% 3.7% 3.2% 3.2% 2.9% 1.9% 1.8% 0.9% 0.6% 0.4% 0.2% 0.1% 0.1%

13.7% 4.9% 4.4% 0.6% 1.0% 0.6% 0.2% 0.3% 0.2% 0.2% 0.5% 0.3% 0.1% 0.2% 0.1% 0.0% 0.0%

28.0% 8.7% 8.2% 2.6% 1.7% 1.9% 0.9% 0.1% 1.8% 1.0% 0.6% 0.2% 0.0% 0.1% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%

0.9% 0.2% 0.2% 0.1% 0.0% 0.1% 0.0% 0.0% 0.1% 0.1% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%

6.4% 1.2% 0.5% 0.3% 0.6% 0.2% 1.5% 0.5% 0.3% 0.3% 0.3% 0.3% 0.3% 0.0% 0.1% 0.1% 0.0%

12.7% 2.5% 3.4% 0.8% 0.6% 0.9% 0.6% 2.2% 0.5% 0.4% 0.4% 0.2% 0.1% 0.1% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%

AMERICA U.S.A. CANADA OTHERS MEXICO

10.6% 7.7% 2.1% 0.6% 0.2%

2.2% 1.7% 0.4% 0.2% 0.0%

4.8% 3.6% 0.9% 0.2% 0.1%

0.6% 0.4% 0.2% 0.0% 0.0%

0.4% 0.3% 0.1% 0.0% 0.0%

2.5% 1.7% 0.6% 0.2% 0.0%

AMERICA U.S.A. CANADA OTHERS MEXICO

2,145,758 1,555,450 429,784 129,221 31,303

19.91 18.86 23.48 17.5 36.96

170,172 125,482 30,181 11,840 2,669

1,402,656 1,071,710 240,405 69,609 20,932

77,219 47,291 19,128 8,278 2,522

206,538 140,585 49,708 13,880 2,365

289,173 170,382 90,362 25,614 2,815

EUROPE RUSSIA U.K. GERMANY OTHERS FRANCE ITALY NETHERLANDS SPAIN SWEDEN AUSTRIA SWITZERLAND BELGIUM NORWAY PORTUGAL

4,784,936 2,223,875 499,629 454,859 442,128 371,987 176,989 145,823 114,758 110,253 53,832 51,385 50,510 45,127 43,781

26.73 24.09 19.49 24.51 34.19 32.33 44.63 24.25 84.75 26.47 22.9 26.18 24.61 25.92 10.76

665,842 388,124 50,903 39,465 119,818 20,465 16,307 8,789 4,128 5,680 2,172 3,520 2,654 2,247 1,570

2,004,646 204,168 296,267 355,182 277,559 282,370 129,543 102,762 95,265 90,089 44,772 36,972 39,157 37,503 13,037

340,234 247,308 24,350 12,147 10,772 13,457 7,039 9,099 4,034 4,035 1,299 2,587 1,878 1,610 619

1,512,372 1,380,502 43,126 17,971 13,289 19,379 10,268 9,562 4,234 3,622 1,823 3,284 2,408 1,265 1,639

261,842 3,773 84,983 30,094 20,690 36,316 13,832 15,611 7,097 6,827 3,766 5,022 4,413 2,502 26,916

EUROPE RUSSIA U.K. GERMANY OTHERS FRANCE ITALY NETHERLANDS SPAIN SWEDEN AUSTRIA SWITZERLAND BELGIUM NORWAY PORTUGAL

23.6% 11.0% 2.5% 2.2% 2.2% 1.8% 0.9% 0.7% 0.6% 0.5% 0.3% 0.3% 0.2% 0.2% 0.2%

5.8% 2.9% 0.7% 0.6% 0.4% 0.4% 0.3% 0.2% 0.1% 0.1% 0.1% 0.1% 0.1% 0.0% 0.0%

11.7% 6.3% 1.1% 0.9% 0.7% 0.9% 0.4% 0.3% 0.3% 0.3% 0.1% 0.1% 0.1% 0.1% 0.0%

0.3% 0.0% 0.1% 0.0% 0.0% 0.1% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%

2.9% 1.6% 0.1% 0.2% 0.6% 0.1% 0.0% 0.1% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%

3.0% 0.2% 0.6% 0.5% 0.4% 0.4% 0.2% 0.2% 0.1% 0.1% 0.1% 0.1% 0.1% 0.0% 0.1%

OCEANIA AUSTRALIA NEW ZEALAND OTHERS

2.8% 2.4% 0.4% 0.1%

0.6% 0.5% 0.1% 0.0%

1.3% 1.1% 0.2% 0.0%

0.1% 0.1% 0.0% 0.0%

0.2% 0.1% 0.0% 0.0%

0.6% 0.5% 0.1% 0.0%

OCEANIA AUSTRALIA NEW ZEALAND OTHERS

573,579 482,968 78,365 12,246

26.86 28.34 21.37 8.8

43,419 32,006 5,645 5,768

317,077 274,715 40,372 1,990

25,739 21,051 4,285 403

52,617 42,361 9,098 1,158

134,727 112,835 18,965 2,927

AFRICA OTHERS

1.2% 0.0%

0.4% 0.0%

0.4% 0.0%

0.0% 0.0%

0.1% 0.0%

0.3% 0.0%

238,046 6,516

37.3 25.45

9,456 1,283

121,298 3,918

24,717 121

22,483 400

60,092 794

TOTAL Hong Kong Macau Taiwan Province Foreigners BY NATIONALITY ASIA SOUTH KOREA JAPAN MALAYSIA OTHERS SINGAPORE PHILIPPINES MONGOLIA THAILAND INDONESIA INDIA KAZAKHSTAN NORTH KOREA PAKISTAN KYRGYZSTAN NEPAL SRI LANKA

AFRICA OTHERS

Source: Ministry of Public Security; Latent/Lighthouse Creative

SOURCE: EXIT-ENTRY ADMINISTRATION BUREAU, MINISTRY OF PUBLIC SECURITY

Tourism D est ina tion P roje c t s

144


Middle-income family dominant consumer group According to income based on family units, the middle-income family has been the dominant consumption group. In 2001, families with an income range between RMB 1,000 to 3,999 (or USD 120.9 to 483.6) accounted for 70.6% of total domestic tourists.

Domestic Tourism to Hubei Province Exhibit I illustrates market share capture rates estimated for the years 2006 – 2015 for Hubei Province and also the principal cities of the province including Wuhan, Yichang and Jingzhou. These values and market share data will be used in the forthcoming business models to ascertain likely economic outcomes.

International Tourism Market The international tourism market, as shown in Exhibit A, has grown at a growth rate exceeding 89 percent over the period 1998 – 2005. Showing weakness during 2003 with the outbreak of SARS concerns. The largest component of international tourism is those visitors from Hong Kong, Macau and Taiwan at 83.2 percent and totaling over 100 million visitors. Foreigners account for 16.8 percent and 20.3 million visitors.

145 © Lighthouse Creative Inc. 2007 All Rights Reserved

Market Share of Visitors by Province

Visitor Arrivals by Purpose

Visitor purpose is presented in Exhibit Over the period 2000 – 2005, the market M. The sightseeing/leisure category ranked as the number one reason to share of international visitors has visit the PRC at 46.1 percent. Followed fluctuated between provinces. Beijing, Tianjin, Mongolia, Liaoning, Shanghai, by MICE (Meetings, Incentive, Conventions, Exhibitions) at 22.7 Jiangsu, Zhejiang, Shangdong, Henan, percent. Top producing countries are Hunan, Chongquing have increased highlighted.Visitor Arrivals by Age and market share as displayed in Exhibit Sex Distribution Exhibit N, shows age J. Hubei and Shaanxi as well as the and sexdemographics for international majority of provinces have lost market visitors. By a ratio of almost 2:1 males share primarily to the coastal (and travel to the PRC compared to women, warmer) provinces exhibiting a global The age segment between 25 – 64 phenomena. account for 83+ percent.

International Expenditures

Hubei Province has experienced better than average visitor expenditures per capita given its strong business visitor orientation as shown in Exhibit K. Hotels, Shopping, Food & Beverage, Entertainment and sightseeing account for 47 percent (US$158.31) of the total expenditures of US$334.70.

Visitor Flows by Month Seasonality characteristics are demonstrated in Exhibit O. Peak months for international visitors include July and August (typically summer holiday months) as well as October which coincides with Golden Week.

Visitor Arrivals by Transportation Mode

International Tourism to Hubei Province

Over 55 percent of all arrivals to the PRC come by foot, primarily from Hong Kong and Macau, shown in Exhibit L. This phenomenal number suggests that again 55% are primarily going to those areas that are very closely associated with Hong Kong and Macau – Guangdong province.

Exhibit P with market share capture rates estimated for the years 2006 – 2015 for Hubei Province and also the principal cities of the province including Wuhan, Yichang and Jingzhou. Shaanxi Province is also included. These values and market share data are used in our business

models to ascertain likely economic outcomes.

Conclusion China’s domestic tourism industry entered a new period of development in 2000. In the 1980s, China’s tourism industry depended largely on international tourism and centered around products catering to this segment. These included such national treasures as the terracotta warriors and horse figures in the ancient city of Xi’an, the picturesque landscape in Guilin, as well as, the Forbidden City and Great Wall in Beijing. These attractions were internationally known and highly-rated and thus did not require heavy investment in transforming resources into tourism “products”. Increasingly, the Chinese government has focused on the construction of infrastructure and accommodation facilities, in addition to the development of tourism products and attractions. The demand for tourist products has become more diversified. The domestic tourist wanted greater freedom in selecting where they went and what they saw. With this diversity the old “low-input, high-output” strategy no longer was satisfactory. With more

J ingzhou : A nc ien t Wa ter C it y

diversity came more competition which then required more investment at a higher risk. This in turn has required more sophisticated development and management of tourism resources and facilities. This new development structure has been called “3H” (highinput, high-risk and high-output). Developers and consumers have become more concerned with the quality of attractions and services. Tourists have different demand tolerances for various tourism products based on different travel objectives.


Foreign Visitor Arrivals By Age & Sex - 2005 TOTAL (Person) TOTAL

20,255,137

ASIA SOUTH KOREA JAPAN MALAYSIA OTHERS SINGAPORE PHILIPPINES MONGOLIA THAILAND INDONESIA INDIA KAZAKHSTAN NORTH KOREA PAKISTAN KYRGYZSTAN NEPAL SRI LANKA

61.7% 17.5% 16.7% 4.4% 4.0% 3.7% 3.2% 3.2% 2.9% 1.9% 1.8% 0.9% 0.6% 0.4% 0.2% 0.1% 0.1%

AMERICA U.S.A. CANADA OTHERS MEXICO

10.6% 7.7% 2.1% 0.6% 0.2%

EUROPE RUSSIA U.K. GERMANY OTHERS FRANCE ITALY NETHERLANDS SPAIN SWEDEN AUSTRIA SWITZERLAND BELGIUM NORWAY PORTUGAL

23.6% 11.0% 2.5% 2.2% 2.2% 1.8% 0.9% 0.7% 0.6% 0.5% 0.3% 0.3% 0.2% 0.2% 0.2%

OCEANIA AUSTRALIA NEW ZEALAND OTHERS

2.8% 2.4% 0.4% 0.1%

AFRICA OTHERS

1.2% 0.0%

Seasonality of Visitor Flows By Month - 2005

Exhibit N

>14

15-24

AGE 25-44

45-64

Over 65

Male

Female

799,272 3.9%

1,644,564 8.1%

9,797,421 48.4%

7,038,429 34.7%

975,451 4.8%

13,211,563 65.2%

7,043,574 34.8%

56.5% 23.4% 10.1% 5.2% 1.6% 5.7% 2.0% 1.2% 3.3% 2.0% 1.1% 0.3% 0.1% 0.3% 0.0% 0.0% 0.1% 0.0% 19.8% 13.8% 4.7% 1.2% 0.1% 0.0% 18.1% 7.6% 2.3% 1.6% 1.2% 2.2% 0.4% 0.8% 0.3% 0.7% 0.2% 0.2% 0.3% 0.3% 0.2% 0.0% 5.0% 4.2% 0.8% 0.1% 0.0% 0.6% 0.0%

54.8% 17.0% 8.7% 3.6% 4.0% 2.4% 3.1% 5.3% 2.8% 2.6% 2.8% 1.0% 0.3% 0.7% 0.2% 0.2% 0.1% 0.0% 8.6% 5.9% 1.8% 0.7% 0.2% 0.0% 33.4% 23.2% 2.0% 1.5% 2.0% 1.8% 0.5% 0.6% 0.3% 0.5% 0.3% 0.2% 0.2% 0.2% 0.1% 0.0% 2.2% 1.9% 0.3% 0.1% 0.0% 1.0% 0.0%

63.4% 15.8% 15.2% 4.5% 5.7% 3.5% 4.3% 4.4% 2.8% 1.9% 2.2% 1.2% 0.7% 0.5% 0.2% 0.2% 0.1% 0.0% 8.1% 5.5% 1.8% 0.6% 0.2% 0.0% 24.2% 11.3% 2.4% 2.4% 2.5% 1.8% 0.9% 0.7% 0.7% 0.5% 0.3% 0.2% 0.2% 0.2% 0.2% 0.0% 2.6% 2.1% 0.4% 0.1% 0.0% 1.6% 0.0%

61.5% 19.2% 20.5% 4.4% 2.3% 4.0% 2.1% 1.6% 2.8% 1.6% 1.1% 0.7% 0.7% 0.2% 0.1% 0.0% 0.1% 0.0% 12.5% 9.6% 2.2% 0.6% 0.1% 0.0% 22.2% 9.0% 2.7% 2.3% 2.1% 1.9% 1.0% 0.8% 0.5% 0.6% 0.3% 0.3% 0.3% 0.3% 0.3% 0.0% 3.0% 2.6% 0.3% 0.0% 0.0% 0.8% 0.0%

63.0% 19.0% 24.0% 5.4% 1.4% 4.4% 1.2% 0.5% 3.6% 2.1% 0.6% 0.2% 0.2% 0.1% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 17.5% 13.6% 3.1% 0.6% 0.2% 0.0% 16.0% 4.0% 2.6% 2.3% 1.2% 2.0% 0.9% 0.6% 0.4% 0.7% 0.2% 0.3% 0.2% 0.3% 0.2% 0.0% 3.1% 2.7% 0.3% 0.0% 0.0% 0.3% 0.1%

64.9% 17.6% 20.0% 4.0% 5.1% 3.6% 3.5% 2.3% 2.1% 1.5% 2.3% 0.9% 0.9% 0.6% 0.2% 0.2% 0.2% 0.0% 10.5% 7.7% 2.0% 0.6% 0.2% 0.0% 20.5% 6.8% 2.7% 2.5% 2.5% 1.9% 1.0% 0.8% 0.5% 0.5% 0.3% 0.3% 0.3% 0.2% 0.2% 0.0% 2.7% 2.3% 0.4% 0.1% 0.0% 1.4% 0.0%

55.9% 17.2% 10.5% 5.4% 2.1% 4.1% 2.8% 4.7% 4.4% 2.5% 0.7% 1.0% 0.2% 0.1% 0.2% 0.1% 0.0% 0.0% 10.8% 7.6% 2.4% 0.6% 0.2% 0.0% 29.5% 18.9% 2.0% 1.7% 1.6% 1.8% 0.6% 0.7% 0.6% 0.6% 0.2% 0.2% 0.2% 0.3% 0.2% 0.0% 3.0% 2.6% 0.4% 0.0% 0.0% 0.8% 0.0%

Exhibit O

Sex

Foreigners

Total JAN FEB MAR APR MAY JUNE JULY AUG SEP OCT NOV DEC TOTAL

9,383,255 8,561,400 10,281,091 10,252,772 9,956,604 9,899,247 10,765,877 10,665,473 9,887,684 10,547,914 9,907,791 10,183,147 120,292,255

Compatriots From Hong Kong, Macau, Taiwan

7.8% 7.1% 8.5% 8.5% 8.3% 8.2% 8.9% 8.9% 8.2% 8.8% 8.2% 8.5%

1,430,385 1,261,967 1,672,335 1,799,898 1,631,812 1,835,759 1,720,428 1,848,886 1,748,702 2,020,095 1,750,351 1,534,519 20,255,137

7.1% 6.2% 8.3% 8.9% 8.1% 9.1% 8.5% 9.1% 8.6% 10.0% 8.6% 7.6%

7,952,870 7,299,433 8,608,756 8,452,874 8,324,792 8,063,488 9,045,449 8,816,587 8,138,982 8,527,819 8,157,440 8,648,628 100,037,118

7.9% 7.3% 8.6% 8.4% 8.3% 8.1% 9.0% 8.8% 8.1% 8.5% 8.2% 8.6%

Estimates of International Tourists to Hubei and Shaanxi Provinces

Exhibit P

Person visitor trips

2000 China PRC

2001

83,443,900 89,012,900

Hubei % Hubei of PRC Wuhan % Wuhan of Hubei Jingzhou % Jingzhou of Hubei Foreigners % Foreign Yichang % Yichang of Hubei

450,805 0.54%

2002

Historical 2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

2010

2015

2020

97,908,300

91,662,100

109,038,200

120,292,300

122,366,787

142,772,932

149,574,981

667,818 0.75% 285,929 42.82% 25,860 3.87%

1,024,312 1.05% 420,164 41.02% 29,948 2.92%

405,214 0.44% 224,408 55.38% 9,059 2.24%

611,859 0.56% 314,493 51.40% 9,645 1.58%

825,700 0.69% 412,331 49.94% 21,954 2.66%

866,249 0.61% 419,745 48.46% 41,074 4.74% 17,600

897,320 0.60% 434,458 48.42% 46,637 5.20% 17,600

1,052,678 0.57% 508,025 48.26% 74,453 7.07%

1,208,035 0.56% 581,591 48.14% 102,269 8.47%

383,711 37.46%

101,743 25.11%

140,207 22.91%

181,941 22.03%

804,106 0.62% 390,318 48.54% 29,948 3.72% 21,120 70.5% 262,502 32.65%

835,178 0.61% 405,032 48.50% 35,511 4.25% 17,600

234,289 35.08%

773,035 0.63% 375,605 48.59% 23,500 3.04% 17,600 74.9% 221,495 28.65%

302,541 36.22%

343,225 39.62%

383,479 42.74%

585,896 55.66%

788,165 65.24%

850,000 0.87%

465,800 0.51%

800,200 0.73%

928,300 0.77%

903,400

960,330

1,017,260

1,074,190

1,131,120

1,415,770

1,700,420

Shaanxi

129,168,835 135,970,884

Estimates 2009

Note: Adjusted for multiple location visits by a factor of 1.6 Source: Latent/Lighthouse Creative

SOURCE: EXIT-ENTRY ADMINISTRATION BUREAU, MINISTRY OF PUBLIC SECURITY

Tourism D est ina tion P roje c t s

146

183,585,224 217,595,467


Preliminary Operations Plan Overview Jingzhou is a start-up destination with arrivals for 2008 projected to be a few hundred thousand visitors. Virtually all visitors are first timers and the total counts have been decreasing for the last several years as competition in regional areas increases. Jingzhou, if it is to appeal to first time visitors must have new attractions and experiences which provide visitors of all ages the opportunity to participate in exciting, interactive reenergizing activities. While it is the strong desire of the local government to reach international tourists, the major market for Jingzhou is domestic tourism from the day trip and extended domestic markets. International tourism will capitalize on markets with a long history of connection with Jingzhou such as Lord Guan Yu societies, ethnic Koreans and then from other foreign inbound destinations. Learning and experiencing culture and history first hand is a new trend that will be especially beneficial for Jingzhou with its emphasis on Chu Culture and Pure Water.

Description Jingzhou Tourism Operations Plan begins with a description of key new attractions that Light Beam will bring to the market.

Phase 1 Tourist Areas: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7.

East Gate and Ancient Wall (A1) Juilong Park (A2. A26) Xiong Tombs (A12) Lord Guan Battle Theater (A5) Lord Guan Shrine Area (A11) Museum including AV Theater (A6) Three Kingdoms Dynasty Park (A3, A19, A28, A29) 8. High Speed Rail Tourism Center (A33, A34) 9. Famous People Hotel at city hall (A15) 10. Development of the banks of the City moat (A4, A21) 11. Yangtze Culture Longevity Park (A25) 12. Sanyi Historic District (A8) 13. Old North Gate (A41)

© Lighthouse Creative Inc. 2007 All Rights Reserved

Content - Identity In the world of tourism, location and message are important, and both require a concerted effort across the world of media, television, press and tourist operators. This challenge is translated as brandingputting a strong differential marker on the city so that it stands out from surrounding competition. The initial market research project will identify key themes for consideration.

Product

Branding In branding (the creation of one image or multi images and graphics that convey the essence of the city) Jingzhou promotes itself as the Enjoyable City of Pure Water and Dynamic Culture. These two elements are not mutually exclusive, but form a ‘ying-yang’ that will appeal to the broadest spectrum of tourist market. The celebration of water and its importance to all aspects of life will appeal primarily to families, and it need not be too sophisticated, certainly in the first phases. At Xi’an, the outdoor show before the tour of the mausoleum is a relatively low budget presentation that is not historically accurate, but conveys a good sense of the costumes and customs of the past.

In the eyes of the patron, the various attraction elements will give ‘them’ the opportunity to explore a thousand years of Chinese history.

Creative To the domestic wholesalers, tour operators, transportation companies, and their sales staff,

DEVELOPING THE MARKETING PLAN A marketing plan consists of creating a product, pricing it, delivering it to the customer and promoting it. The following bullet points describe the unique situation of Jingzhou.

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Understanding The first step in positioning the product is to understand what the market thinks about it already. Thus, an initial market research project with content, pricing, market channels, distribution methods, AD tags and creative will be completed. This will form the basis for a host of marketing decisions.

Light Beam’s efforts will be to position Jingzhou as the first and only City oriented to Pure Water. The Company will endeavor to establish the day experience as a sales product worthy of ‘highpriority’ status that will generate competitive commissions for their sales efforts and an unparalleled degree of happy customers that have been energized to purchase more activities. Management and sales staff will come to see a visit to Jingzhou, as a “must do” introductory and or segue for the well traveled visitor

Pricing - Value Preliminary price points for the attraction were developed through analysis of comparable regional attractions and then adjusted by Lighthouse Creative management. In the final analysis, which will be completed prior to opening, the pricing strategy, which will reflect favorable price/time/value comparisons with the competing events pricing, is designed to have broad-based appeal across the market and achieve the penetration as projected. The market quantitative survey project will be undertaken to validate price points with real customers. The price will express to the market that the attraction is the best value per unit of vacation (time) invested in any historic/cultural activity. The large wholesalers (Chinese and International) often look for “unique selling points in features/ advantages” when determining how to sell a new activity. LightBeam will be open to developing custom “packages” including (a) added value features (logo wear, promotion gifts etc.), (b) bundling with other activities/attractions for one or more of the big wholesalers to give them the type of competitive positioning they desire.

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Sales – Distribution Sales contracts with net rates will be negotiated with wholesalers, tour operators, independent briefing companies, transportation companies and travel/ticket desks to enable them to send the customers to our various attractions. The main thrust of marketing and sales will be directed at the domestic top 20 tour operators who include; n China International Travel Services n China Travel Services n China Comfort Travel Co. n China CYTS Tours Holding Co. n Overseas Tourist Group Co. n China Merchants International Travel n BTG International Travel & Tours n GZL International Travel Services Co. n Changjiang Cruise Overseas Travel Corp. n Shenzen Tourism Group Corp. n Shantou Travel Co, n Shanghai Airline Tours, International Travel Services n Merchants International Travel Services Co. n New Century Int’l Service Co. n Huating Overseas Tourist Co. n China Peace International Tourism Co. n Henan Tourism Group n China Youth Travel Services n China Women Travel Services n Western Regions International Travel Services Japanese, Korean, US, UK and German (westbound) agencies will also be the focus of sales calls and development. All travel agencies will be targeted through cooperative efforts and industry alliances with the plethora of travel companies selling domestic and international tourism to China. Also important, Light Beam sales representatives will attend travel trade

shows. Finally, selected General Sales Agents or multi-line representatives will be contracted for specific market niches. The primary pre-arrival sales and distribution efforts will be to secure and establish promotional agreements and sales contracts with travel agents so that Jingzhou can be included in packaged tour booklets, travel brochures, optional tour books, and guide books. This effort will require at least 6 months prior development for international travel agents Essential to the after arrival efforts will be to negotiate sales agreements with the regionally based wholesalers, tour operators, independent briefing companies, and transportation companies that will position the attraction as a high priority optional tour on itineraries, at informational briefings, travel/ticket desks and lounges and inclusion in information packets and maps which are distributed at briefings and tour desks/lounges within the first 24 hours after arrival. The direct sales effort (in selected cities including Wuhan, Xi’an, Yichang etc.) will maintain close contact with the key management and sales personnel for various travel companies and related companies such as hotels, taxi, bus, boat and other transportation operations. The Company’s direct sales effort will maintain close contact with sales staff at all facilities desks and lounges; attempting to keep the attractions at ‘top of mind’ perceived as a ‘must do’ activity for all their patrons (repeat and first-time visitors alike). Familiarization Tours (FAM Tours) will be conducted for all those in customer-contact positions as well as desk and lounge sales staff will be encouraged to experience the attraction during the first few months of operation.

The Meetings, Convention and Incentive (MC&I) market will have special potential for Jingzhou’s attractions. The opportunity to experience our offerings in a themed party venue or as an option for small groups will be marketed directly to companies within the region.

PRELIMINARY OPERATIONAL CONSIDERATIONS

Advertising – Promotion - PR

Reservations Customers or their booking agent will be required to call or go online to Light Beam’s website to make their reservations. Sales management will establish certain block starting times to accommodate wholesalers, tour operators, independent briefing companies and transportation companies bookings. Transportation and processing instructions and guidelines will be provided in writing in advance to all booking agents and reconfirmed by the attraction’s reservation staff. Confirmation and cutoff guidelines will be negotiated in the sales contract and coordinated via telephone and email on a daily basis to insure optimum utilization and minimize no-shows. Tour/ticket desks will likely book on a first-come-first-served basis over the phone. Customers without a booking agent calling in direct will be provided a time and given directions/instructions to the attraction.

Select messages will be used to advertise and promote the attractions’ unique message(s) to the trade, press, and travel consumers in China’s main domestic and international markets. Priorto-arrival advertising efforts will be directed to key trade publications, regional consumer and travel magazines, in-flights, and select electronic media. Wherever possible, Light Beam will look to enlist interest from the travel trade and press in the form of facility familiarizations, press trips, and feature stories, because of the projects important impact on China and the unique quality of the experience created. Light Beam plans to actively participate in and host wholesaler/ hotel, Convention & Visitor Bureau, and airline retail travel agent familiarization (FAM) trips to China; piggybacking on their sales/contact networks and promotional programs targeting prearrival penetration and exposure with the key participants while capitalizing on their regional, multi-regional or national strengths in respective markets. After arrival efforts will focus primarily on visitor publications, briefing support promotions, in-room TV, sales brochures, and point of sale pieces at the tour/ticket desks and lounges. In the local market the will likely be a regular display ad in the entertainment section of the Sunday paper. Participation at national and regional Travel Trade Shows will round out the effort.

Tourism D est ina tion P roje c t s

With initial planning, design and construction underway, the operational plan will become a key focus.

Customers will either purchase tickets from a wholesaler, tour operator, independent briefing company, tour/ticket desk, and transportation company or directly from one of LightBeam’s reservation staff on the phone, via the web, or at the ticket counter at the entrance to the attraction. Walk-in customers that buy their ticket at the attraction will be given a receipt at the time of purchase. Staff will make every effort to process walk-in customers immediately to ‘fill in’ short term vacant slots. Customers who purchase tickets from a wholesaler, tour operator, independent briefing company, tour/ticket desk, or transportation company will present a voucher at the attraction ticket office as proof of payment and admission.

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Patrons will be issued an ID card in order to make it more convenient to purchase items, such as drinks, without the need to access their wallets once they are participating in the experience. On Premises Guest Flow Patrons will access the attraction through the East Gate main entrance: by walking over the access ways; by automobile, parking in the designated parking area; by bus or taxi to the disembarkation area. • Arrival to the Ancient Walled City of Jingzhou takes place at the massive fortified stone walled East Gate. This is the place for the ceremonial commencement of a day-long journey through the inner city’s historical, cultural and entertainment attractions. n The city is building new structured parking for buses and cars on the modern side of the great moat. From here a traditional Chinese bridge spans the moat water to the archway. Above, towering into the sky, and set on the battlements, is the Orientation Center-contained within one of the gate’s great pavilions with its lifting eaves and mythological creatures. n In the shadow of wood beams, through the magic of sound, light, display and costumed actors our visitor is treated to the introductory background to the Three Kingdoms Era, and specifically the tales of Lord Guan Yu whose welcoming effigy stands by the entry. n After ticket purchase within the newly landscaped forecourt framed by artisans’ studios, various forms of carriages take visitors west on Zhang Ju Zheng Street into the city of Pure Water and Dynamic Culture

149 © Lighthouse Creative Inc. 2007 All Rights Reserved

Orientation Patrons will proceed to the entrance of the Transition Area, where they will enter an area that features an array of television monitors identified by a sign identifying the language of presentation. Patrons will then observe a continuous-loop two-minute video describing the experience they are about to undertake, narrated in their native language. Queing Following orientation, Patrons will proceed to their several attraction components in preparation for their experience Ride and Show Orientation When Patrons arrive at their various ride or show facilities, operators will be there to provide brief explanations, situate Patrons in seats, and make sure ride/show safety requirements are adhered too. Follow the completion of the experience, ride operators will open required safety barriers allowing Patrons to exit smoothly. Retail Store Retail stores will be set up with groupings of different types of items available for purchase, including personalized videos and still photographs, related works of art, wearing apparel bearing the facility logo, cultural and historical educational materials, and the like. Purchasing will be quick and easy for those who have the credit card information encoded on their wrist bracelets, the sales attendant uses a scanner to scan the bar code on the merchandise, then scan the wristlet, and the guest proceeds to the check-out counter with the merchandise. Cash customers will be handled conventionally. Larger items, which require special handling and shipping, will be handled by attendants designated for that function.

Restaurants A variety of restaurants and food service outlets will be available. Each will be set up with selected food and beverage items available for purchase. Purchasing will be quick and easy for those who have the credit card information encoded on their wrist bracelets, the sales attendant uses a scanner to scan the bar code on the merchandise, then scan the wristlet, and the guest proceeds to the check-out counter. Cash customers will be handled conventionally. Check Out All Patrons will exit through the checkout station, where they will have their wristlet scanned one final time. Those with encoded credit card information will be presented with a voucher for their beverage and retail purchases.

Safety

The primary responsibility for the safety of patrons will rest with the tour guides and ride operators. Tour guides will have microphones connected to a radio transmitter that is part of the audio system. This radio link will join the guides to portable radios carried by roving guards, who can then be dispatched within seconds to any portion of the facility and assist any guest who may be experiencing difficulty. Camouflaged exit steps will be located along the pathways to facilitate the removal of a guest in need of assistance. All attraction and transition area employees will be fully trained in first aid and CPR.

Security All tour guides, attendants and lifeguards will be trained in security issues and responses. Unauthorized personnel will be easily recognizable by the absence of a wristlet, and,

once identified, will be ejected from the facility by one of the two radio-equipped roving security guards. After hours, a security guard will be assigned the sole duty of patrolling the attraction and transition area. Check-in stations will be strategically located to insure full coverage.

Quality Assurance Facility management will employ a zero defects quality assurance strategy, involving all employees in refinement of operations procedures with the objective of optimizing the guest experience. Cash or kind refunds will be made to Patrons who, after review by management, are not satisfied with their experience in the attraction. Regular feedback will be actively sought from tour companies and hotel management, as well as from customers on a random sampling basis.

Unusual Occurrences Storm The attraction will be closed during typhoons and major thunderstorms that are forecast to include lightning. The reservations staff will advise all booking agents and Patrons of their revised start times, or arrange for refunds if necessary. During major storms the seawater system will operate at reduced flow rate, and the water will be prefiltered to remove sediment. Security guards continue to patrol during storm periods. Power Outage All systems and operations will continue to operate normally during power outages. Backup power generation will provide the required electrical power.

J ingzhou : A nc ien t Wa ter C it y


Maintenance All rides and moving equipment including vehicles requiring maintenance will be services according to the manufacturers’ recommendations. In case of breakdown during operating hours, they will be removed by small boom truck or jib hoist, deposited onto special trailers, and removed to a central maintenance facility offsite. Repaired equipment and vehicles will be reinstalled during non-operating hours. Maintenance of other systems will be accomplished by staff maintenance personnel, or in special instances, under contract with outside firms. Grounds Maintenance Habitat maintenance will be provided by the staff, as well as by the guide/attendant staff. All maintenance of waterways will either be accomplished by divers or through the utilization of local isolation dams. Support Facility Maintenance Janitorial maintenance will be accomplished by staff personnel. Changing/shower room cleaning will be accomplished at least once per shift.

START UP STAFFING Jingzhou’s operation is a “people-to-people” production. Its success depends on the personal communication that the employees are able to establish with the Patrons. Developing the correct staffing levels, employee qualifications and profiles, recruiting programs, selection criteria and training programs are critical to Jingzhou’s long term success.

Jingzhou’s staffing plan includes a timetable for building and staffing the project management organization and the operating management team. The skills required by the management staff opening Jingzhou include multi-tasking abilities, creativity, decisiveness and flexibility. These skills are critical in their ability to be successful in their positions during the hectic days when construction and operational readiness, set-up and training overlap. The opening management staff will also play a key role in developing the culture of the company and to the success of the project. It is foreseen that the key operating management will be recruited early in the project development phase and be very heavily involved in planning and executing all project pre-opening requirements and activities. A recruitment timetable, indicating months before opening should be developed now.

Operations Organization Day-to-day operations of the facility will be managed by an experienced General Manager from the attractions industry with competent specifically trained staff. Functionally, the organizational plan reflects the major activities for which the Operating Management will be responsible. These activities fall into four major divisions. They are Operations, Operational Support, Administrative Support, and Sales & Marketing. Operations Division: This division will have the responsibility of planning, organizing, staffing, directing and controlling all ride, show, food, beverage, and merchandise operations throughout the facility and in all off-site locations. It includes all nonentertainment staff that are on-stage at any given moment during the operating day from the

time a Patron may board a hotel trolley or other people mover to the final close down cycle where Patrons are escorted out of the facility at days end. This division is primarily responsible for Patron satisfaction as they have the most face to face time with our Patrons. Operations Support division: This division provides support services that have a direct effect on the day-to-day operations and Patron experience. Included in this division are the following departments; Entertainment includes the almost unnoticed themed background music to spectacular festival celebrations, entertainment plays an essential role in the presentation of the theme show. The overall Patron experience is enhanced by continually changing live entertainment programs and special events. The Entertainment Department supports and supervises all in-house and Patron talent and provides the technical support for the shows and events held throughout the facility and in all areas that are extensions to it. Its functions include Show Development and Productions, which creates and stagemanages all on-going and special entertainment programs. Atmosphere Entertainment organizes, auditions, trains and supervises all walk-around celebrities and contract entertainment groups. Show Services is responsible for all physical requirements, as well as talent booking and choreography support. The Wardrobe/Costuming department is responsible for ensuring the quality of the project’s show by providing clean and wellmaintained costumes for the employees. Wardrobe maintains and issues the costumes and accessories for all costumed employees, including entertainers and maintenance. Costuming employees design and source costumes for the various costumed positions throughout the project.

Tourism D est ina tion P roje c t s

The Security Department provides an umbrella of protection for Patrons, employees and company property. It is a highly visible group, on duty 24 hours a day. It staffs all entrances and exits to the project and is also responsible for issuing employee identification cards. Within Security is also the function of Fire Prevention. Like Security, Fire Prevention employees assume responsibility for the protection of Patrons, employees and property from injury and damage. These specialists patrol and inspect the Center and implement fire prevention training programs for all employees. The Maintenance Department is a complex organization of diverse crafts and skills. Responsible for the maintenance of the Center’s magic, this department assures the continued safety, peak capacity and overall integrity of the theme show. Its varied responsibilities include repairs and general maintenance, application of a preventive maintenance program, grounds maintenance, and scheduling and performance of rehabilitation work. The department is divided into three areas. Planned Work develops, coordinates, and monitors the ongoing maintenance and refurbishment programs around peak attendance periods and operating hours. Crafts supervises the various crafts needed for the on-going maintenance support of the Center such as mechanics, electricians, audio specialists and arcade mechanics. Buildings and Trades, which includes landscaping, creates and maintains the mood and ambiance of the theme show by keeping the facilities as well as the “living scenery” at its colorful best. In addition to establishing and maintaining a reputation for cleanliness, the Custodial Department addresses another important objective: to protect the investment in the

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physical facilities through proper care. During operating hours, the custodial staff maintains all Patron areas and serves as the best source of information for the Patron. Thorough cleaning is performed each night, during non-operating hours. Administrative Support Division This division is dedicated to “keeping the show on the road” by providing the essential administrative services needed to maintain an efficient and profitable operation. The key to long-term success is the quality and motivation of the employees. The Human Resources Department is responsible for providing the leadership for carrying out a comprehensive, successful employee relations program. The following functions assist in carrying out these objectives. Employment/Training handles recruitment, selection and placement of all employees, and coordinating with the various divisions to meet their varied staffing needs. This group also develops and conducts all orientation and general training programs. It produces all forms of internal communications and coordinates employee activities and services that enhance the working atmosphere for all employees. Personnel maintains all documentation for each employee, coordinates all aspects relating to payroll and benefits, manages relationships with trade unions and is responsible for administering and monitoring all employee policies. Personnel advises on and implements wage and salary programs, performance evaluation programs and implements and monitors all Patron and employee safety programs.

151 © Lighthouse Creative Inc. 2007 All Rights Reserved

The Finance Department is organized into four major functions. Accounting, Admissions/Cash Control, Purchasing and Financial Planning. Accounting is responsible for Operational Accounting, including accounts payable and receivable and revenue accounting; and General Accounting, which includes cost accounting, fixed assets/property control, financial statements, taxes and inventory control. Admissions and Cash Control is responsible for all aspects of ticket media as well as the counting and processing of all forms of cash taken in as revenue, the issuance of change funds to the cashiers and the scheduled daily pick-up of excess cash from the registers throughout the project. Purchasing is responsible for the procurement of all materials and services, other than retail merchandise, needed in the day-to-day operation of the project. Financial Planning consists of Computer Services, Business Planning and Budgeting. Computer Services maintains and services all computer hardware and software related to business systems, and evaluates programming and system needs. Business Planning is responsible for accumulating and reporting data concerning Patron demographics and preferences through the use of surveys and establishing annual attendance and occupancy projections for the project. Budgeting establishes the annual financial objectives and monitors the operating budgets. The General Services Department is responsible for Office Services and Distribution Services. Office Services provides the telecommunications, mail services, and controlled lock and key systems, as well as administers office space requirements and furnishings. Distributions Services is responsible for receiving, storing and shipping all material, merchandise and general supplies used by the project.

Marketing: Marketing will clearly be an important key to success. A Director of Marketing will be hired to specifically address this function, with separate managers to address sub-markets including; groups, direct sales and the tourist market. Marketing efforts locally will focus on media advertising, special events, sporting events, discount inducements and so forth. The Sales and Marketing Division provides the essential communication link between the project and its audience. Through advertising and promotional campaigns, newspaper and other media coverage, the staff continually informs the public about the unique experiences the project has to offer.

project through selling association rights, product awareness and hospitality opportunities to major corporations. Tour & Travel Sales maximizes attendance and occupancy by incorporating and selling the JINGZHOU experience in tour and travel packages and programs offered through the travel industry. Group/Event Sales endeavors to make non-peak periods more productive through the sale of group-ticket events to principal organizations, including educational, business, military, youth and service groups, as well as conventions.

There are five departments within the sales and marketing division. PR/Publicity develops story ideas for release to newspapers and magazines through news releases, special interest stories, interviews, etc. They also maintain a photograph archive and a press-clippings library. PR develops and maintains productive and positive relationships within the various communities important to JINGZHOU’S success: local, regional and national government, community interests since image identification has become an important factor in the leisure entertainment business. Promotions is responsible for maximizing the project’s exposure utilizing special events, campaigns and tie-ins with other quality companies and products. Sponsorship Sales provides financial and marketing support for the

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The Development Team

Chris Miles, President , Design Director Jeffrey Blydenburgh, Project Director Pete Karamitsanis, Development Director Aaron Wang, Asia Director Lighthouse Creative, Inc. 501 North Orlando Avenue, Suite 313 Winter Park, Florida 32789 USA Office: 407. 578.581 Cell: 407.421.9409 www.lighthousecreative .net

Malcolm Lewis, Media Specialist Peter Kaanapu, Economist Patrea St. John, Landscape Architect Victor Viso, Architect Vicky Wang, Administrator Kenny Yan, Assistant Convergence, Media Production

153 Š Lighthouse Creative Inc. 2007 All Rights Reserved

J ingzhou : A nc ien t Wa ter C it y


The Client Team, Jingzhou

Wang Xiangxi, Mayor Deng DiMing, Planning Director Yang Yuhua, Deputy Mayor Ying Daiming, Tourism Chairman Wu Biwu, Director of Jingzhou Tourism Bureau

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荆州-清水之域,文化之都

Jingzhou: City of Pure Water & Dynamic Culture

M ay 19, 2007

To u r i s m D e s t i n a t i o n P r o j e c t s : I n v e s t o r ’s B r i e f

Lighthouse Creative, Inc. 501 North Orlando Avenue, Suite 313 Winter Park, Florida 32789 USA Office: 407. 578.581 Cell: 407.421.9409 www.lighthousecreative .net

© Lighthouse Creative Inc. 2007 All Rights Reserved


Jingzhou Tourism Master Plan