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e-Contego Journal of Peacekeeping and Humanitarian Support

March 6, 2012

Dedicated to the global community of peacekeepers and humanitarian aid providers

Failures in Syria Must be Addressed

UNDP’s First-Ever Use of Mobile Money Transfers in Haiti Survivors of the 2010 devastating earthquake in Haiti have this week started receiving cash subsidies through the first-ever mobile money transfer system in support of post-disaster housing reconstruction, the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) reported on March 1. More than 2,000 mobile money transfers are planned in the next three months to 1,000 low-income families receiving subsidies totalling $500 to purchase construction materials such as cement, iron and wood at selected project-certified stores. The initiative is part of the ‘Com-

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munity Support Centres for House Repairs,’ a partnership between UNDP and the government of Haiti. Commissioned by UNDP and developed by Digicel, one of the country’s largest cell phone service providers, the mobile telephone cash transfers are helping boost financial inclusion in Haiti, where nearly two-thirds of the population has access to mobile phones, but only 10 per cent have bank accounts. Beneficiaries can also access a mobile phone checking account, which

Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon recently underlined the need for concerted action to end the crisis in Syria, lamenting that the international community has thus far failed in its responsibility to stop the bloodshed in the country, where he said the Government was waging an “atrocious assault” against its own people. “In fact, the actions—indeed, the inaction—of the international community seems to have encouraged the Syrian authorities in their brutal suppression of its citizens,” Ban said as he reported to the General Assembly on the implementation of its 16 February resolution on Syria. That resolution strongly condemned the continued “widespread Continued on Page 4

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The percentage of the world’s population that has access to improved sanitation. A figure that is projected to hit only 67% by 2015—well below the 75% goal. e-Contego is published 48 times per year by Conego Worldwide. Copyright © 2012. All rights reserved. No portion of this publication may be copied, reproduced, retransmitted or duplicated without the expressed written permission of the publisher. A subscription to e-Contego is free of charge to qualified individuals that provide resources (direct and indirect) in support of global peacekeeping and humanitarian aid. Send an email with name, title, name of organization and email address to the publisher or editor-in-chief. e-Contego welcomes news and information from governments, NGOs, peacekeepers, humanitarian air providers, suppliers and equipment manufacturers, and the donor community. Please contact the publisher before sending materials. Contego Worldwide is not responsible for unsolicited materials Contego Worldwide P.O. Box 236 Forest Hill, Maryland 21050 USA 410-838-0224 fax Publisher Jeff McKaughan jeffm@contegoworldwide.com 443-243-1710 Editor-in-Chief mm@contegoworldwide.com Contego Worldwide accepts appropriate and focused advertising for both e-Contego and Contego. Contego Worldwide reserves the right, at its sole discretion to accept or refuse any advertisement. Contact the publisher or editor for advertising rates and closing dates.

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UNDP’s Mobile Money Transfers Continued from Page 1 is a safer method of keeping cash, reduces financial transaction costs, improves users’ ability to save and helps bring more people into the formal financial sector. “Mobile phone vouchers create additional security and convenience here in Haiti, especially for women, who might feel more vulnerable when carrying large sums of money,” said Jessica Faieta, senior UNDP country director for Haiti. She stressed that more than 40 per cent of Haitian households are led by women.

“With safer housing conditions, this initiative will also encourage the permanent return of camp residents to their neighborhoods and repaired homes,” she added. The support centers, known locally by their French acronym as CARMEN, have been empowering quake-affected communities in Port-au-Prince and the western town of Léogâne to directly take charge of house repairs, with engineering assessments and construction training. Four thousand families have already registered to participate in the project, benefiting 12,000 people. Five thousand participants have been trained in construction techniques and 2,000 damaged houses have already been evaluated, according to UNDP.

Mobilizing Volunteers via an App The next generation of disaster volunteers will be mobilized with the touch of a button, thanks to a new smartphone app recently launched. Premier Anna Bligh said the free App, Ready Qld—developed by Volunteering Qld with the research assistance of the University of Queensland—would empower Queenslanders to be better equipped to work together in situations of disaster. “This app will not only inform Queenslanders about preparedness for disasters—resources, checklists and advice—but will also provide real-time updates and information about volunteering opportunities in your local area,” said Bligh. “While our communities were devastated, the outpouring of compassion was overwhelming. Immediately following the disasters, Volunteering Qld was inundated with calls from people around Queensland and Australia. Within three days of the floods striking Brisbane, 55,000 people had registered their desire to help. We always hope that nothing like this ever happens again, but if it does, this new app will be a great source of real-time information,” Bligh said. Key things the app can do: • Register with CREW (community response to extreme weather) to be an emergency volunteer

• See current emergency volunteering opportunities • Access all the key contacts for emergencies in one place and save your own emergency contacts • Watch the short disaster preparedness and response videos • Find out what you need to have in your emergency stay/go kit (and check them off when you’ve got them) The project has been made possible through the joint state and federal government funded Natural Disaster Resilience Program (NDRP). Volunteering Qld CEO, Jelenko Dragisic, said the natural disasters of 2011 highlighted just how important technology and social media were when it came to rebuilding homes, neighborhoods and communities. “Volunteering Qld has learnt much from thos experiences, now providing better support and services for emergency volunteering,” Dragisic said. “We’ve enhanced our database of emergency volunteers, agencies and opportunities. Improved services means we can quickly register, search and match opportunities with volunteers easily and conveniently—and Ready Qld will take that to a whole new level. Over the past year we have referred over 14,500 volunteers to agencies for disaster recovery work,” he said.

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Failures in Syria Must be Addressed Continued from Page 1 and systematic” human rights violations by the Syrian authorities and demanded that the government immediately cease all violence and protect its people. “Further militarization of the Syrian opposition is not the answer,” Ban told the assembly. “The international community must urgently find unity in pressing the Syrian authorities and all other parties to stop the violence. It must insist, with one voice, that the Syrian authorities give access to international humanitarian workers as an essential first step towards a peaceful solution,” he said. The Secretary-General said that the newly-appointed Joint Special Envoy of the UN and the League of Arab States for Syria, Kofi Annan, will seek to end the violence and human rights violations, and promote a peaceful solution to the crisis. Ban stressed the need to ensure that “there is only one track in the mediation process being undertaken by the international community. The way towards a peaceful solution of the Syrian crisis is difficult but clear,” he said. “First, there should be an immediate end to the killings and violence. International relief workers must be allowed in. Second, there is a clear need for an inclusive political dialogue among all Syrian actors. “The international community must align itself with the process led by the Joint Envoy. To succeed, he will need our full and undivided support. It is time for the international community to speak with one voice, loud and clear,” said Ban, adding that division could embolden the Syrian authorities “in their violent, dead-end path.” Continued violence, Ban emphasized, risks plunging Syria into full civil war and sectarian strife that could haunt the country for generations. “The stakes are high, above all for the people of Syria—but also for the international community. We must act,

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urgently and in concert,” he said. He pointed out that disproportionate use of force by Syrian authorities had driven what had been largely peaceful opposition forces to resort to take up arms in some cases. The opposition’s firepower, however, appeared to be minimal compared to the heavy weapons being used by the Syrian army, the Secretary-General said. Ambassador Bashar Ja’afari of Syria repeated his country’s rejection of the General Assembly resolution, saying it did not meet “the minimum requirements of diplomatic activities in the United Nations.” He said the Syrian government was not consulted and the drafters of the resolution “openly turned a blind eye to Syria’s reforms and the criminal activities undertaken by armed terrorist groups.” Ja’afari said the Syrian opposition has been invited to “participate in authentic national dialogue,” and urged the UN to provide help that is “based on the charter.” In a related development, the Office of the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR) voiced alarm today over reports from the Baba Amro district of the Syrian city of Homs after it was taken over by government forces yesterday, including unconfirmed allegations of 17 summary executions. “Although we are not, at this point, in a position to confirm any of those reports, we would like to remind the authorities of their responsibilities under international law,” OHCHR spokesperson Rupert Colville told reporters in Geneva. He warned against reprisals, summary executions, torture and arbitrary detention. “The rights of those who are detained must be respected. Enough crimes have already been committed in Syria over the past year. We urge the authorities to take immediate steps to ensure no more are committed now that they have taken control of Baba Amro,” Colville added.

Software Specifically for Aid Providers The Aidmatrix Foundation Inc. has announced its spring 2012 release of the Aidmatrix Network for Humanitarian Relief. This latest release is delivered as a software-as-a-service (SaaS) to partnering NGOs, businesses and government agencies. The major additions include the three new integrated platforms. These integrated platforms provide end-to-end workflows for the delivery of humanitarian relief within an NGO’s global network of offices, between the public and private sectors, and between food banks and their local food pantries and kitchens, respectively. SCM4Good-Full Aidmatrix Integration is an integrated supply chain management and logistics platform for NGOs to accelerate their efforts to procure, manage and deliver humanitarian relief and provide global transparency and collaboration within their organization and with their donors. Software modules include: procurement, transportation management, warehouse management, online ordering, fleet management and digital hub. SCM4Giving-Full Aidmatrix Integration is an integrated platform for government emergency agencies and businesses that engage in humanitarian relief, especially during times of disaster, to connect donors with NGOs in high-value public/private sector partnerships. Software modules include: asset registry, needs management, donations management: in-kind, donations management: transportation, warehouse management and digital hub. SCM4Hunger- Full Aidmatrix Integration is an integrated platform for high-volume food banks to streamline their management of food inventories and empower their interactions with corporate donors for collecting overflows and converting that inventory into goods available to local agencies who can shop the warehouse through online ordering. software modules include: donations management: in-kind, warehouse management, online ordering, online auction and digital hub.

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Donation Allows IMC to Meet Needs International Medical Corps (IMC) will scale up health care and nutrition programs for vulnerable communities across the Middle East and Northern and Eastern Africa with a $2.3 million gift from GE. “GE’s tremendously generous support will enable us to reach more communities in Libya, Lebanon, Yemen, as well as East Africa with lifesaving health services, nutrition, and training programs,” said Nancy A. Aossey, president and CEO of International Medical Corps. “With vulnerable communities in Libya and throughout the Middle East needing critical assistance, and with the ongoing drought and hunger emergency ravaging East Africa, GE’s timely award will help us expand vital health care and training services in both regions.” “GE is proud to support the mission and work of International Medical Corps with this donation,” said Bob Corcoran, vice president corporate citizenship, GE. “Our hope is that the funds will enable positive change for health care and nutrition for some of the most vulnerable populations in the world today.” With GE’s support, IMC will focus on these interventions: • Having provided a comprehensive emergency response in Libya since the outbreak of conflict one year ago, IMC will scale up access to primary health care services for hardest-hit communities. • In response to an influx of Syrian refugees into Lebanon, IMC will provide health services and emergency psychological first aid trainings to frontline responders. • In Yemen, IMC will establish two stabilization centers to treat children with acute malnutrition and conduct community outreach and nutrition education. • In response to the ongoing drought and hunger emergency in East Africa, IMC, will increase services to treat and manage malnutrition in Ethiopia, Kenya, and Somalia.

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Mineseeker’s Unexploded Ordnance Solution in South Africa Mineseeker Operations, through its joint venture company, Mineseeker Operations Southern Africa, has held important meetings regarding opportunities to deploy its landmine survey systems in southern Africa. The Mineseeker team presented the technology to Major General Matlakeng, chief director in the South African National Defence Force, together with Brigadier General Pule and Brigadier General Modise who were the first people, outside the company, to be shown sample results of the industry demonstration that Mineseeker conducted in Croatia. “The generals could clearly see suspect sub-surface targets and quickly realized how the system could be used to rapidly identify landmines and unexploded ordnance such as that found on military ranges in South Africa,” commented Mineseeker CEO, Mike Kendrick. Mineseeker Southern Africa director Tabane Romakola added, “Clearing up areas affected by unexploded ordnance is an important step in returning land to the people of South Africa. The generals were clearly impressed by the advances in the technology and immediately saw the potential for several other African countries such as Angola and Mozambique with whom they have close ties.” Some of the countries within the Southern African Development Community are amongst the worst affected countries in the world: In Angola alone there are 50 thousand amputees and huge areas of land that cannot be used for housing, agriculture or the mining of the valuable minerals found there. It is having a devastating effect on the economy and communities across the whole region. Eric Du Plessis, a native of South Africa said, “This meeting represents a game changing opportunity for Mineseeker and for the people of Southern Africa. The need, particularly in Angola, is now and we must respond to the generals’ advice. With their support, Mineseeker is poised to enter into further discussions to deploy the technology and develop the aid free zone programs in order to create sustainable growth and local wealth to the area, which is an integral part of the Mineseeker ethos. It is hugely exciting to play our part in helping these countries to resettle their land that has been unusable and for which there are established government funding programs available.”

Left to right, Brig. General Pule, Major General Matlakeng, Mike Kendrick, Brig. General Modise at their headquarters in Pretoria, RSA.

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Contego Journal of Peacekeeping and Humanitarian Support

September 2012 Volume 1, Number 1

Dedicated to the global community of peacekeepers and humanitarian aid providers

Contego Journal of Peacekeeping and Humanitarian Support

Dedicated to the global community of peacekeepers and humanitarian aid providers

Haiti Afghanistan Indonesia Norway Malawi Ecuador Cyprus United States Tunisia Sri Lanka Pakistan Greece Taiwan New Zealand Sudan Guatamala Uzbekistan France Russia South Korea Seychelles Somalia Denmark Myanmar Czech Republic

Contego Journal of Peacekeeping and Humanitarian Support

September 2012 Volume 1, Number 1

Haiti Afghanistan Indonesia Norway Malawi Ecuador Cyprus United States Tunisia Sri Lanka Pakistan Greece Taiwan New Zealand Sudan Guatamala Uzbekistan France Russia South Korea Seychelles Somalia Denmark Myanmar Czech Republic

Dedicated to the global community of peacekeepers and humanitarian aid providers

Contego Journal of Peacekeeping and Humanitarian Support

Launching September 2012

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Distributed to more than 10,000 qualified government agencies, diplomats, military and training commands, non-governmental agencies, aid providers, medical services, consultants, equipment and service providers, and donors. This printed, full color magazine will be the connection method to bring those with needs together with solution providers.

September 2012 Volume 1, Number 1

September 2012 Volume 1, Number 1

Dedicated to the global community of peacekeepers and humanitarian aid providers Haiti Afghanistan Indonesia Norway Malawi Ecuador Cyprus United States Tunisia Sri Lanka Pakistan Greece Taiwan New Zealand Sudan Guatamala Uzbekistan France Russia South Korea Seychelles Somalia Denmark Myanmar Czech Republic

Contego Journal of Peacekeeping and Humanitarian Support

September 2012 Volume 1, Number 1

Dedicated to the global community of peacekeepers and humanitarian aid providers

Haiti Afghanistan Indonesia Norway Malawi Ecuador Cyprus United States Tunisia Sri Lanka Pakistan Greece Taiwan New Zealand Sudan Guatamala Uzbekistan France Russia South Korea Seychelles Somalia Denmark Myanmar Czech Republic

Contego Journal of Peacekeeping and Humanitarian Support

September 2012 Volume 1, Number 1

Haiti Afghanistan Indonesia Norway Malawi Ecuador Cyprus United States Tunisia Sri Lanka Pakistan Greece Taiwan New Zealand Sudan Guatamala Uzbekistan France Russia South Korea Seychelles Somalia Denmark Myanmar Czech Republic

Dedicated to the global community of peacekeepers and humanitarian aid providers

Contego Journal of Peacekeeping and Humanitarian Support

September 2012 Volume 1, Number 1

Dedicated to the global community of peacekeepers and humanitarian aid providers

Contact Contego Worldwide to reserve your free copy of Contego. Haiti Afghanistan Indonesia Norway Malawi Ecuador Cyprus United States Tunisia Sri Lanka Pakistan Greece Taiwan New Zealand Sudan Guatamala Uzbekistan France Russia South Korea Seychelles Somalia Denmark Myanmar Czech Republic

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Haiti Afghanistan Indonesia Norway Malawi Ecuador Cyprus United States Tunisia Sri Lanka Pakistan Greece Taiwan New Zealand Sudan Guatamala Uzbekistan France Russia South Korea Seychelles Somalia Denmark Myanmar Czech Republic

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Azerbaijan has Improved Living Conditions for Internally Displaced People As negotiations between Azerbaijan and Armenia to resolve the conflict over Nagorno-Karabakh stall, the Azerbaijan government has improved living conditions for the internally displaced (IDPs), though return to the occupied territories remains by far the preferred solution. Tackling Azerbaijan’s IDP Burden, the latest International Crisis Group briefing, examines the impact of the failure to reach a peace settlement on the nearly 600,000 Azerbaijani IDPs forcibly evicted from homes in Nagorno-

Karabakh and seven surrounding districts. With no quick solution in sight, the government, aided by increasing oil wealth since 2004, has intensified efforts to deal with IDP needs. Poverty rates have decreased dramatically, and the state is building better housing and improving health care. “The government of Azerbaijan has progressed from its old attitude of indifference and institutional dysfunction to a new approach of dealing with the painful reality of trying to cope with

Funding Can Open Water Sources for a Sustainable Future A permanent, sustainable source of drinking water that is expected to serve as many as 25,000 people in Niger is being funded in part by a $40,000 donation from The Prem Rawat Foundation (TPRF). With the grant, TPRF is providing further aid to the nonprofit Amman Imman: Water Is Life for an effort already started with the financial assistance of the Vibrant Village Foundation. “This project,” said TPRF President Linda Pascotto, “is particularly valuable because it will not only transform life for people living in this arid region, but will involve them in future management of the water source so that it will be self-sustaining.” The grant will fund construction of a borehole in the village of Ebagueye in the Azawak region that will serve as a year-round source of clean water for people and livestock. Plans call for training local villagers to manage the borehole and engage in activities that will assure water and food security in the future. Ariane Kirtley, founder and executive director of Amman Imman, said Amman Imman is the only organization that she knows of entirely dedicated to building sustainable and permanent sources of water in the

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Azawak, a dry plain about the size of Florida. Amman Imman is also one of the few organizations working in the Azawak region to address the food crisis and emergency humanitarian situation afflicting most countries of the Sahel. The borehole-building team has been in Niger since mid-November. “We chose the site of Ebagueye and its surrounding communities at the beginning of December,” Kirtley says. “By the end of December, the Ebagueye borehole had been drilled. The infrastructure was finished at the beginning of February, and the community has begun drinking the potable water.” Kirtley says it is part of her organization’s overall goal to eventually create an “Oases of Life” across the vast Azawak, starting with drilling permanent and sustainable water sources, not only for its 500,000 inhabitants, but also for the refugees that seek shelter on its vast plains, including those that fled Libya last year, and those fleeing Mali today. “We at Amman Imman are most grateful for the collaboration that has developed between our organization, TPRF and the Vibrant Village Foundation,” said Kirtley.

the economic and social needs of its extremely large displaced population,” says Lawrence Sheets, Crisis Group’s Caucasus Project Director. Yet, 400,000 still live in sub-standard dwellings, there are problems with bureaucracy and corruption, and approximately 128,000 IDPs and permanent residents live in close proximity to the 180 kilometer-long line of contact (LoC) that has divided the opposing forces since the 1994 ceasefire. They are exposed to the immediate threat of ongoing front-line skirmishes that kill some 30 persons yearly. To protect the civilians along the LoC, the Azerbaijan authorities should agree to an expanded interim monitoring role by the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe (OSCE), to proposals to remove snipers from the LoC and to set up an incident investigation mechanism between the sides to discuss ceasefire breaches. The government should also create an inter-ministerial task force, including the National Agency for Mine Action (ANAMA), to design a strategy to increase the safety of communities near the LoC. IDPs should be given opportunities to engage on policies relevant to their daily lives. The Azerbaijan government should include them more in housing decisions, streamline processes for reporting incidents of corruption or violations of state law regarding IDP issues and allow them to vote for municipal councils in their places of temporary residence. The political voice of IDPs in decision-making processes that affect their lives remains weak and should be strengthened. “While the Azerbaijan government has taken important steps to improve living conditions for IDPs, it is shocking that a generation on, displacement and occupation continue to mar regional development and security”, said Sabine Freizer, Crisis Group’s Europe program director. “Lack of sustainable solutions is an important reason why a negotiated settlement is essential if eventual resumption of all-out war is to be avoided.”

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UNAMID Delivers Self-Powered Radios to Dafur Disabled Disabled people of Darfur need full access to information, particularly from radio. That was the objective behind the provision of 30 wind-up and solar-operated radios to the El Fasher Association for the Disabled organized by Radio-TV El Fasher, the state broadcaster. The wind-up radios were a gift by the Communications and Public Information Division of the African UnionUnited Nations Mission in Darfur. In addition, as the state broadcaster was also holding a workshop on covering peace and reconciliation for journalists

from around North Darfur, UNAMID gave five radios for correspondents from distant parts of the state where electricity is inconsistent or not available. The mission had also provided the Disabled Association with a new building which will be used to house an audiovisual library. This centre is intended to assist disabled university students, particularly the sight-impaired, with accessible material so that they can proceed through a standard university program. For now, the building is empty as the association is seeking funds and

Malian Refugees Flood Into Mauritania and Burkina Faso Mauritania and Burkina Faso continue to receive large numbers of Malian refugees fleeing conflict between the army and ethnic Tuareg rebels in the northern region of their country, the United Nations refugee agency noted on March 2. “Refugees tell our staff that their main fear is of being caught up in the fighting,” Andrej Mahecic, spokesperson for the UN High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR), told reporters in Geneva. “They are also concerned about bandits who are taking advantage of the prevailing instability to loot homes and property.” Tens of thousands of people have been uprooted from their homes in Mali, with many seeking refuge in neighboring countries, since fresh clashes erupted in mid-January between the Malian army and the Tuareg insurgency known as Mouvement National

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de Liberation de l’Azawad (MNLA). According to Mauritanian government estimates, there are now over 31,000 Malian refugees in that country, the majority of them having arrived over the past six weeks, Mahecic said. Some 1,500 people are arriving daily. In Burkina Faso, where 19,198 refugees have already been recorded by the authorities, 500 Malians on average are crossing the border every day. The number of refugees entering Niger has subsided over the past week. The overall number of people who have crossed from Mali into neighboring countries now stands at close to 80,000, according to official tallies. Inside Mali, the number of internally displaced persons (IDPs) has been revised upward to 81,000, according to

gifts for Braille materials. UNAMID had another objective to the gift of radios: the mission’s Yala Nebni Darfur program will begin to be broadcast next week over Radio El Fasher’s FM frequency. Currently the UNAMID programming is broadcast to Darfur over short-wave by the Sudan National Radio Corporation’s Al Salaam (peace) Radio. UNAMID’s acting director of communications, Susan Manuel, discussed with El Fasher broadcasting director Saad Abuzeid Ali, collaboration on a listener survey with the University of El Fasher’s Peace Centre, to determine what kinds of programming are most popular and effective for the ongoing peace process. government officials and humanitarian organizations operating in the north. UNHCR has started to register refugees in all three countries of asylum to enable the agency to refine the number of affected people and establish what their needs are. Refugees are settling along the border in the arid regions of Burkina Faso, Mauritania and Niger, where a prolonged drought has caused acute food and water shortages in recent years. A coordinated relief effort includes trucking water into areas where those in need have gathered and distributing rice and other forms of food. “We are also planning to relocate refugees to several camps that we are establishing in the region,” said Mahecic. “In Mauritania, we have already transferred 8,300 particularly vulnerable men, women and children from the border crossing in the region of Fassala further inland to a camp called Mbera,” he added.

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Working Together, UN Agencies Combine Efforts in Mozambique WFP, FAO, IFAD and UN Women are working closely together in Mozambique, one of the countries in the UN “Delivering as One” pilot. P4P in Mozambique has been implemented under a joint UN program called “Building Commodity Value Chains and Market Linkages for Farmers’ Associations.” This joint program was coordinated by WFP’s and planned and executed at country level together with FAO (Food and Agriculture Organisation) and IFAD (International Fund for Agricultural Development). Over 11,000 farming families have been reached until the joint program ended in December 2011. The UN agencies in Mozambique are currently looking into developing a new joint program along the same lines. For farmers like Etalvinha, the programme had many benefits. She lives in the north of Mozambique’s Zambezia Province with her three children. Etalvinha has been growing maize, beans and cassava since she was 14. Her husband works in a mechanical plant in Nampula, but he does not earn enough to ensure the family has food throughout the year. Raising Productivity Her farmers’ organization in Alto Molocue was one of 14 engaged in the joint program that combined the UN agencies’ efforts: “I attended a training held by FAO in March 2010. We were mostly women and even though we felt we knew a lot about farming, we felt it’s always fun to learn. The training showed us how to sow our seeds differently, how to irrigate the crops and how to ensure the quality of the seeds. The trainers also came to the village to show us how to lay out our crops and how to inter-change the crops to make sure the soil is kept rich,” says Etalvinha. The farmers were also trained to increase the quality of their commodity with special cleaning techniques available at their homes. “Before I used to get a low price for my maize because they told me not all was good quality,

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so it all had to be sold at a bad price. Now I am able to separate the grains and get better prices for better grades of maize.” Credit for Production and Commercialization IFAD’s role was to establish a guarantee fund managed by a local microfinance institution that became operational in 2011 and is used as a hedge against loan defaults. With the support of IFAD, FO representatives and partners entered into negotiations with financial institutions to achieve the best possible credit conditions. The contract between farmers’ organizations and WFP served as a form of collateral. IFAD provided close assistance to the joint program in managing the credit component. A Step Ahead Gender is critical for the joint efforts of the UN agencies in Mozambique because the majority of smallholder farmers are women. Under the lead of UN Women, the joint programme took into account the inequality between women and men in accessing seeds, fertilizers, technology, credit, transport, markets and business development services. Women farmers have

been engaged in the joint programme, enabling them to gain extra skills, both in business and in quality crop production. Establishing community storage With funding from the European Commission and from the Flemish International Cooperation Agency (FICA), WFP financed new community warehouses and on-farm silos to help farmers store their crops better. This in turn has ensured that farmers can sell their produce at a higher price. Etalvinha’s fellow farmer Celeste remembers: “Last year, our seeds became infested with pests already in May, and we lost about half of the stock”. The warehouse not only enables safe storage, it also provides a forum for combined sales and more appropriated pricing. “The warehouse is the future of our association. If we had one in each locality, the farmers would have a target to produce for; they would trust enough to diversify their fields and if possible, they would combine their yields to get the best prices,” Celeste said. As a result of joint UN efforts, female farmers like Celeste and Etalvinha were able to progress: “The income gained from increased sales of maize and beans allows me to expand production, educate my children and take care of other family needs,” Etalvinha recalls happily. “I did not expect such a big difference in two years. Once you know what it takes to produce good crops and you know someone will buy it, then I am inspired to do more each year.”

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After Two Years, the Doha Document for Peace in Dafur The Doha Document for Peace in Darfur (DDPD), the culmination of two years of peace negotiations between the government of the Sudan and the Liberation and Justice Movement (LJM), was officially launched on March 4 at a dissemination event in Nyala, South Darfur. The exercise “aims at delivering the DDPD text and communicating its content to increase greater awareness of the peace agreement and what it holds for the people of Darfur. The parties need to ensure that the DDPD message is taken to every corner of Darfur,” said UNAMID Joint Special Representative (JSR) and Joint Chief Mediator a.i Ibrahim Gambari. More than 200 people, mostly consisting of internally displaced persons (IDPs), participated, along with Chairperson of the Darfur Regional Authority

(DRA) Tijani Seissi, newly appointed South Darfur Wali (Governor) Hamad Ismail Hamad Abdelkareem, and JSR Gambari. In his remarks, Seissi stressed that the implementation of the document is not only between the government and LJM, but for all the people of Darfur. The chairperson also reiterated his commitment to work with everyone to ensure the full implementation of the DDPD and to address the issue of voluntary return of those internally displaced. “Despite the challenges, we are optimistic that the people of Darfur will make achievements in changing the situation in Darfur. The international community has assured their support to help us develop our states,” he added. Wali Hamad Ismail Hamad Abdelkareem reaffirmed the government’s

Human Rights Training for Sudan People’s Liberation Army Officers Aiming to boost knowledge of human rights in the military, UNMISS completed a three-day training session for Sudan People’s Liberation Army (SPLA) officers at the end of February in the Western Equatoria State capital of Yambio. The training, conducted in close collaboration with UNMISS Yambio military observers, the state Human Rights Commission and Human Rights Forum of Civil Society Groups, was attended by 30 senior SPLA officers based in the town. In closing remarks, Major Joseph Ohia, Chief of Moral Orientation of 8th Infantry Bridged said the workshop would help officers learn human rights skills in dealing with soldiers and civilians. “Since South Sudan has become independent, it is very important for us to learn what human rights are and … (the) use of force as an army,” Ohia said.

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UNMISS Human Rights Officer Mary Bindi said the training aimed to emphasize human rights and rule of law with respect to the Security Code of Conduct. “Some of the officers lack basic knowledge on human rights in a way that has been witnessed in their actions and omissions,” Bindi said. Topics included democracy, human rights and the SPLA, SPLA human rights and civil disorder, SPLA and rule of law, humanitarian law and human rights implementation in armed conflicts, sexual and gender-based violence, children’s rights and the role of civil society

commitment to implement the Agreement. “We are moving forward and here in South Darfur we are ready to host the land and Voluntary Return and Resettlement Commissions under the DRA,” said the Wali. “The DDPD offers an opportunity for a new beginning, but this is a shared responsibility. We are all committed to sustainable peace in Darfur and must support the signatories in their efforts,” said JSR Gambari who called on the hold-out movements to join the process. The dissemination exercise which began in February in South Darfur has conducted six workshops in Nyala, while similar exercises have also been organized in North, West and Central Darfur. Gambari concluded the day at UNAMID’s hospital in Nyala where he visited three peacekeepers who were injured in the line of duty on 25 February. He thanked them for their service and wished them a speedy recovery. in protecting and promoting human rights. Bashir Ahmed, state chairperson of Human Rights Forum of Civil Society groups, said the training should enable SPLA officers to identify their roles in protecting and promoting human rights. “When members of the military have enough awareness on the meaning and applications of human rights, they will promote and protect (them), as they are the main actors in human rights protection,” he said. Training participant Major Akuot Aiom Akuot said the training increased his knowledge on the fundamental rights of citizens and prisoners of war. “We learned many things, like how to protect the rights and safety of prisoners of war without killing them, during and after war,” the major said. “We also learned how to protect civilians from any type of threat and the rights of children, and how to avoid recruiting them into the army.” The training, which falls under UNMISS Human Rights section mandate, will be carried out among the military all 10 states of South Sudan.

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Anticipated UN Future Solicitations Bid No.

Subject

Opening Date

AIR CHARTER ITBS-2631

Provision of Two Medium Cargo Aircraft for 2+1 Years in Support of MONUSCO Mar 30, 2012

ITBS-2632

Three Medium Utility Helicopters (one of three with enhanced SAR equipment for a Period of 1+1 Years (UNMIT)

Mar 14, 2012

ITBS-2633

One High Speed Liaison Aircraft for 2+1 Years (UNAMID)

Mar 15, 2012

ITBS-2634

One Medium Utility SAR/AME Helicopter, gor a Period of 1+1 Years (UNMIT)

Mar 14, 2012

ITBS-2641

Short Term Air Charter for Passenger Movement

Mar 8, 2012

ITBS-2642

Short Term Air Service

Mar 14, 2012

ITBS-2643

One Light Utility Fixed Wing Aircraft for 2+1 Years (UNMIL)

Mar 27, 2012

ITBS-2637

One (plus one optional) Medium Combi Jet for 2+1 Years (MONUSCO)

Mar 20, 2012

ITBS-1678

Air Charter for One Long Range Wide Body Passenger Aircraft for 2+1 Years

Mar 19, 2012

COMMUNICATIONS EQUIPMENT RFPS-1679

UN MPLS Network

May 1, 2012

RFPS-1641

Maintenance and Repair Services for UPS System

Mar 7, 2012

FREIGHT FORWARDING RFPS-1685

Sea Shipment of Pakistani COE from Port Port-au-Prince, Haiti to Door Karachi, Pakistan

Mar 8, 2012

RFPS-1637

Sea/Surface Freight Forwarding and Related Services

Mar 16, 2012

RFPS-1689

Freight Forwarding Services for Shipment of Mongolian Contingent-Owned Equipment to South Sudan

Mar 13, 2012

RFPS-1686

Risk Assessment Study of the UN Joint Staff Pension Fund (UNJSPF)

Mar 23, 2012

RFPS-1682

Provision of Standard Instructor-Led IT Training for UN Staff

Mar 23, 2012

RFPS-1683

Third Party Consultancy for SAP Basis Administration & Support Services

Mar 16, 2012

RFPS-1684

Third Party Consultancy for Security Design Services

Mar 19, 2012

ITBG-2042

Provision for UN Medals and Numerals

Mar 22, 2012

ITBG-2640

Provision of Recruitment Advertising Services (Re-Bid)

Mar 16, 2012

RFPS-1650

Provision of Food Rations and Related Services to the UN Support Office for AMISOM

Mar 15, 2012

MISCELLANEOUS

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13

Anticipated UN Future Solicitations Bid No.

Subject

Opening Date

MISCELLANEOUS (continued) RFPG-558

Provision of Digital Certificates for the UN

Mar 21, 2012

RFPS-1634

Strategic Captial Review for FMS

Mar 19, 2012

RFPS-1635

Pest Control Services

Mar 22, 2012

RFPS-2636

Renewal of Websense Web Filtering and Security

Mar 13, 2012

UNIFIL Maritime Task Force Change of Command The United Nations Interim Force in Lebanon (UNIFIL) Maritime Task Force (MTF) recently underwent a transfer of command from Rear Admiral Luiz Henrique Caroli (Brazil) to Rear Admiral Wagner Lopes de Moraes Zamith (Brazil). The hand-over ceremony aboard the Brazilian Flagship Frigate União was attended by UNIFIL force commander Major-General Paolo Serra, Lebanese Navy commander Rear Admiral Nazih Baroudi, senior officers from Lebanese Armed Forces (LAF) and UNIFIL as well as representatives from countries contributing troops to UNIFIL. UNIFIL-MTF has been deployed at the request of the Lebanese government to assist the Lebanese Navy to help prevent the unauthorized entry of arms or related material by sea into Lebanon. UNIFIL-MTF also has been working closely with the Lebanese Navy on training and capacity

Force Commander Maj-Gen Serra hands over UN flag to new UNIFIL Maritime Task Force commander Rear Admiral Zamith aboard Brazilian flagship Frigate União.

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building programs. “The Lebanese Navy has demonstrated, time and again, its professionalism and outstanding commitment towards securing Lebanese waters,” Major-General Serra said. “Through its monitoring activities, the MTF is playing a vital preventive role by warding off attempts at illegal arms trafficking, while also having a positive effect on the security of the merchant traffic in the area,” he added. Rear Admiral Zamith said he was looking forward to his task. “I reiterate my commitment to maintaining the high level of relationship between the maritime task force and the Lebanese Navy. We shall continuously strive to strengthen our ties of friendship and cooperation,” he said. Since the start of its operations on October 15, 2006, MTF has hailed around 42,900 ships and referred nearly 1,750 vessels to the Lebanese authorities for further inspections. A total of 15 countries have contributed to the MTF in these years: Bangladesh, Belgium, Brazil, Bulgaria, Denmark, France, Germany, Greece, Indonesia, Italy, the Netherlands, Norway, Spain, Sweden and Turkey. UNIFIL-MTF currently comprises naval units from Bangladesh (2 ships), Brazil (1 ship - flagship), Germany (3 ships), Greece (1 ship), Indonesia (1 ship) and Turkey (1 ship). Out of UNIFIL’s nearly 12,000 military personnel from 37 contributing countries, about 1,050 officers and sailors are currently deployed in the MTF.

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Morocco Takes Steps in the Creation of National Platforms for Disaster Risk Reduction Morocco is taking steps to join 78 other nations whose governments have created National Platforms for Disaster Risk Reduction to support policies for building resilience to disasters. “The future National Platform will help the work of all sectors to converge into one common objective, which is to construct a country that is safer for current and future generations,” said Mehdi Chalabi, director of surveillance and prevention of risk at the Department of Environment. Morocco is one of the Arab region’s most hazard-prone countries and the economy is frequently affected by dry spells, floods, landslides and invasion by locusts. Parts of the country are also exposed to seismic risk; 12,000 people lost their lives in a massive earthquake in the coastal town of Agadir in 1960. Cities and rural communities alike face the danger of sea-level rise and desertification as a result of climate change. As with many countries, the responsibility for leading on disaster risk reduction lies within a government ministry which is also the focal point for the International Strategy for Disaster Reduction—in Morocco’s case, within the Department of Environment at the Ministry of Energy, Water, Mines and Environment. But for resiliencebuilding to be effective, there must be strong collaboration and coordination across many ministries. To realize a “whole-of-society” approach to managing the risk of disaster, the Hyogo Framework for Action 2005-2015: Building the Resilience of Nations and Communities to Disasters—the world’s blueprint for creating resilient communities—encourages the establishment of National Platforms for Disaster Risk Reduction. These are multi-stakeholder organizations aimed at improving national coordination in disaster risk management and reduction. A road map for creating Morocco’s National Platform was developed by 40

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participants after three days of meetings earlier this month between government officials from nine ministries— Energy, Water, Mines and Environment; General Affairs and Governance; the Interior; Health; Agriculture; Education; Finance; Tourism; and Transport. They were joined by experts in urban development, meteorology, engineering, reinsurance and other fields, along with representatives of the Moroccan Red Crescent National Society, UN Children’s Fund (UNICEF), the UN Development Programme (UNDP) and the UN’s disaster risk reduction office in the Arab States (UNISDR) as main facilitator. Welcoming the news, UNISDR regional program officer, Lars Bernd, said disaster risk reduction activities were common in Morocco as a direct result of the country’s exposure to a wide range of hazards but the activities “were too loosely connected” and insufficient to meet the population’s needs whose vulnerability is growing. “Given the vulnerability of Morocco’s population and growing exposure of the country’s economic assets to risk, the forthcoming National Platform,

supported by a strategic national action plan, can help trigger more coherent and systematic interventions,” said Bernd. A robust system for managing disaster risk could also help the country encourage more investment in disaster risk reduction, he added. He referred to the Department of Environment and UNISDR initiative to establish a national disaster loss database that—once finalized—would assess the costs borne by Moroccan households of disasters both large and small. In addition, the World Bank is undertaking a probabilistic risk assessment—a technique used by experts to determine how a complex system of risk assessment can contribute to ensure more safety in Morocco. Under an existing plan to prevent flood risk, Morocco has already developed a forecasting and flood warning system, according to the 2011 National Hyogo Framework Progress Report for Disaster Risk Reduction. The same report says the country intends to develop a geographic information system containing data on natural and technological hazards across the country, called “GIS-Risk”. Additional support to the event was given by the UN Resident Coordinator’s Office and UNICEF Morocco. Funding came from the World Bank Global Facility for Disaster Reduction and Recovery’s contribution to UNISDR.

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Normal to Below Normal Rainfall for Greater Horn of Africa The March to May rainfall season in the Greater Horn of Africa is likely to result in “near normal to below normal rainfall” over much of the region, according to the 30th Greater Horn of Africa Climate Outlook Forum (GHACOF30). This rainfall outlook applies in particular to areas plagued by drought in recent years including much of Somalia; Djibouti; eastern and northern Kenya; southern, eastern and northeastern Ethiopia. UNISDR’s Deputy Regional Coordinator, Youcef Ait-Chellouche, said: “This is not good news for farmers in areas which have been affected by agricultural drought in recent years.

We must plan for the probability that rainfall will be erratic and there will be long dry spells which will impact on crop production and food security. “People’s resilience and coping capacity has been eroded by the last two difficult years especially in Somalia so it’s clear that we must act now. The general consensus from this meeting is that the Horn of Africa is still very much at risk.” Ait-Chellouche said that disaster managers and sector specialists were in agreement that disaster risk reduction must be embedded now in long-term development plans for the region while preparedness measures are put in place for the humanitarian consequences of a

Eliasson is New Deputy Secretary General Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon has announced the appointment of Jan Eliasson of Sweden, a veteran in the fields of diplomacy and foreign relations, as the new Deputy SecretaryGeneral of the United Nations. Eliasson, who will take over from Asha-Rose Migiro of Tanzania on July 1, is no stranger to the UN, having served as the Special Envoy of the SecretaryGeneral for Darfur, President of the 60th session of the General Assembly and first Under-Secretary-General for Humanitarian Affairs. He is currently a member of the Secretary-General’s Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) Advocate Group. At the national level, he has served in key ambassadorial positions representing his country in New York and Washington, as well as State Secretary for Foreign Affairs and Foreign Minister of Sweden. Speaking to reporters at UN Headquarters, Ban also announced that Susana Malcorra of Argentina, who has served as Under-Secretary-General for

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Jan Eliasson Field Support since 2008, will be his new Chief of Staff as of April 1. In her current position, Malcorra directs logistical and administrative support for UN peace missions worldwide in support of about 30 field operations comprising 120,000 military, police and civilian personnel. She will succeed Vijay Nambiar of India, who will carry on at the UN as the Secretary-General’s Special Adviser for Myanmar. Ban said that “transparent and competitive” selection processes for 10 Under-Secretaries-General have started. It was also announced that Robert Orr and Kim Won-soo of the Executive Office of the Secretary-General will move on to new functions. Mr. Orr will lead the effort to create a new partnership facility as a way to harness public and private partnerships to meet global challenges.

poor rainy season in many parts of the Horn. The Greater Horn of Africa region comprises Burundi, Djibouti, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Kenya, Rwanda, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan, Tanzania and Uganda. GHACOF30 also found there is “increased likelihood of near normal to above normal rainfall” over south-western Tanzania, south-western Ethiopia, South Sudan and south-western Sudan. The near normal to below normal forecast also applies to much of Tanzania, western and southern Kenya, Burundi, Rwanda and Uganda. The GHACOF30 statement reads: “The outlook is relevant only for seasonal time scales and relatively large areas. Local and month-to-month variations might occur. For example, episodic heavy rainfall events leading to flash floods might occur in areas with increased likelihood of near normal to below normal rainfall. “Additionally long dry spells may occur in areas with increased likelihood of near normal to above normal rainfall. Some of these dry and wet spells are linked to indirect impacts of the unseasonal tropical cyclones in western Indian Ocean areas during February to April months.” Disaster managers and other end users of the information are advised that the IGAD Climate Prediction and Applications Centre (IPAC) and national meteorological and hydrological services will provide regular forecast updates. GHACOF30 reviewed the impact of global climate systems including the influence of sea surface temperature anomalies over the adjacent tropical Indian and Atlantic Oceans, the La Niña conditions over the Pacific Ocean and evolving atmospheric circulation. Guidance and valuable prediction information was drawn from various sources including the World Meteorological Organisation’s Global Producing Centres, operational research and expert opinion. These inputs were combined using deterministic and probabilistic modelling alongside expert analysis to obtain the regional rainfall forecast for the period March to May 2012.

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e-Contego March 6 2012