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Mr. J. Shelke

Science 2

March 9, 2013

BOATS & BUOYANCY Through trial and error students will select from the objects provided in order to construct a water worthy vessel of their own. Students will learn about balance and stability as they select objects for their boats.

GENERAL LEARNER EXPECTATIONS/OUTCOMES: Students will: B.6 2-3 Construct with guidance an object that achieves a given purpose, using materials that are provided. B.8 2-7 Construct objects that will float on, and move through water and evaluate various designs for watercraft.

SPECIFIC LEARNER EXPECTATIONS: Students will: Focus Identify the purpose of the object to be constructed: what structure do we need to make? What does it need to do?

SPECIFIC OUTCOMES 1. Describe, classify and order materials on the basis of their buoyancy. Students who have achieved this expectation will distinguish between materials that sink in water and those that float. 2. Students will assemble materials so they will float, carry a load and be stable in water. ***Students have previously learned about elements such as balance, stability, and buoyancy in their last class. Today’s class will involve: inquiry, exploration, and construction.

INTRO: 5 min. 1. Written on the whiteboard is a list of objects for students to test and choose from in the construction of their boat: popsicle sticks, Styrofoam balls, corks, straws, lids, ping pong balls, toothpicks, coins, marbles, washers, erasers, tart tins, string, paperclips, Styrofoam meat trays and elastics.

J. Shelke

03/09/13

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Mr. J. Shelke

Science 2

March 9, 2013

2. Students will be reminded of the key points from last classes lecture on balance, stability, and buoyancy before testing them out.

INPUT: 25 min. Directions Students are to be placed in groups of 5 and given a handout in checklist format where they are required to test the given objects in order to determine if they sink or float. At each table/station there will be a container of water and a container filled with useable objects for this task. There is enough objects in the container for each student to test each object. Each group will have one checklist sheet that they will fill out together. Once the checklist is completed and handed in to the teacher, group members may begin constructing their boats individually at their table. *Construction is to be continued during the next science class* Materials Needed: scissors, glue guns, parent volunteers The Base: students are required to start this project by first constructing the base of their boat. The teacher will provide an example for the class to view. Students are required to demonstrate to the teacher that their boat can indeed float before further construction is permitted. The Mast: students will build a simple mast for their boat. The teacher will also provide an example of this for the class. Decorate: the final step to this project is to decorate, personalize, and name your boat. ***Survey the classroom regularly to ensure that students are staying on task and sharing with one another. The water containers may also need to be watched closely. Parent helpers can also be made aware of this prior to the outset of the activity.

CLEAN UP 8 min: tidy up by putting unused materials back into containers, wipe down tables, and dump out water.

CLOSURE: 5 min: Review objectives and revisit which objects floated and which sank in a class discussion while calling on groups for answers. Demonstrate how your boat floats and make clear to students that they will need to alter their boat if it does not float well.

J. Shelke

03/09/13

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Mr. J. Shelke

Science 2

March 9, 2013

*Note: boat building will likely carry into the next science class for most students.

ASSESSMENT 5 min: assessment involves a class discussion where each of the 4 groups is given a question to answer on the board when called upon as follows: 1. Which materials worked well in building the base? Why? 2. What worked well for building the mast? Why? 3. How did you choose what to use for your boats? 4. Which objects floated? Which ones sank?

J. Shelke

03/09/13

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Lesson Plan