Issuu on Google+

A2

❘ the gazette ❘ Wednesday, June 8, 2011

lotteries

Lotto: 4, 10, 13, 19, 30, 37

Today’s estimated jackpot: $1.6 million

Cash 5: 5, 12, 17, 21, 31

bach: Working on hiring chief of staff

Drawings are held daily.

MatchPlay: 21, 22, 28, 31, 33, 37 Tuesday’s estimated jackpot: $370,000

Powerball: 17, 19, 39, 41, 58 Powerball: 21 - Powerplay: 5 Today’s estimated jackpot: $25 million

Mega Millions: 29, 32, 35, 47, 52 Megaball: 13 - Megaplier: 4 Tuesday’s estimated jackpot: $24 million

for All suBscriBer services, cAll

1-866-632-newS (6397) For a missed paper, call between 6-9 a.m. Monday-Friday, 6:30-10 a.m. Saturday, or 7-11 a.m. Sunday and your paper will be delivered in the Colorado Springs metro area only. Daily: $267.28 for 52 weeks Long Weekend: $234.52 for 52 weeks Short Weekend: $212.68 for 52 weeks Sunday Only: $198.12 for 52 weeks All subscriptions active on November 24th, 2011 and December 25th, 2011 will include that day’s edition. Home delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editions. Jerry Buck Vice President, Operations • 476-4892

Key contActs Steven K. Pope

President & Publisher • 636-0201 • steve.pope@gazette.com

from page 1 —

long time. We’re headed back to the top, where we belong.” Bach, 68, who beat downtown businessman Richard Skorman in a runoff election May 17, said the city’s best days are ahead. “There have been days when one might think that the sun is setting on Colorado Springs,” he said. “In fact, it’s rising. It’s just over the hill.” Bach pledged to create during the next four years a “city government that is a national model for a city our size, delivering quality service with a can-do attitude (and) rapid response.” He also pledged to create a vibrant, diversified economy with abundant quality jobs. “It’s a tall task, but I think we’re up to it,” he said. Bach said he would work to unify the business community. “I truly hope we’ll have a more diverse community leadership involving more, younger people, more women and more people of color,” he said. “I’ve already begun working on finding ways to do that, and that will be a priority in my administration.” Although he didn’t elaborate, Bach said he is “going to find the money right away to bring back 275 acres” of

neighborhood parks. “We’re going to reseed and water. We’re going to use outside contractors. Yes, we’re going to get it done,” he said. “Yes, we’re going to have to find the money (but) we will.” Fire Chief Steve Cox, who had been interim city manager, said Bach wants to spend $411,450 to seed neighborhood parks and $276,494 to provide them an additional 6 inches of water. The seed would be a one-time expense, but the additional water could be an ongoing expense if Bach wants to give the parks 24 inches of water. Under the 2010 budget, neighborhood parks were slated to receive 18 inches of water, but 24 to 28 inches is recommended. “We have several (funding) options to look at,” Cox said. “We just have to sit down and look at which options we want to exercise, but the bulk of it would probably come from salary savings,” he said. “Just the ebb and flow of the workforce, we end up with vacant positions, so we’ll look at using some of those dollars.” Councilman Bernie Herpin said city residents will be very appreciative of increased attention to neighborhood parks, which he said have been neglected. “It’s the first time that I heard about

it, but I support it,” Herpin said. Bach also promised to build strong alliances with the state of Colorado and other Front Range communities. He said he has an appointment with Gov. John Hickenlooper next week to discuss ways the state can help Colorado Springs, and vice versa. “We are part of a larger community, and we need to demonstrate that by our behavior,” he said. “I’m also going to ask him to help us in ways I believe the state can, so it will become a twoway dialogue.” Among Bach’s first orders of business will be hiring a chief of staff, which he said he expects to do within the next 10 days. He said he has interviewed 16 candidates, including Cox. “Steve Cox is an outstanding individual. I will just tell you that I think a lot of him. There are a number of other people who could be well-qualified,” Bach said before the swearing-in ceremony. He said he plans to make a decision within 10 days, if not sooner. Bach thanked former Mayor Lionel Rivera for his 14 years on the City Council, the last eight as mayor. “You’ve been dedicated, and you’ve gotten a lot of things done,” he said. “We owe you a great debt of gratitude.”

Jeff Thomas

Editor & Vice President • 636-0384 • jeff@gazette.com

dePArtments

General Information . . . . . . . . . 632-5511 Local News . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 636-0221 Local Fax . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 636-0202 Sports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 636-0250 Business News . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 636-0273 Entertainment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 636-0270 Life . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 636-0278 Letters to the Editor . . . . . . . opinion@gazette.com Obituaries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 636-0101 Retail Advertising . . . . . . . . . . . 636-0306 Classified Advertising . . . . . . . . 444-SELL

Freedom Colorado Information Inc. ISSN 1531-2607 • USPS 123-440

30 S. Prospect St. Colorado Springs, CO 80903 Periodical postage: Paid at Colorado Springs, CO 80901 Postmaster: Send address changes to: The Gazette, 30 S. Prospect St, Colorado Springs, CO 80903

Photo rePrints Buy reprints for noncommercial, private use. gazette.com/photos

memorial: Group to look at PERA costs from page 1 —

future before recommending that it become an independent nonprofit. A City Council task force led by former Mayor Lionel Rivera took up that recommendation and developed a plan on how an independent Memorial would be set up and governed. That plan was approved 5-2 in the previous council’s final meeting in April as a recommendation to the incoming council. But any change to Memorial is now in the hands of the new City Council, and its members made clear Tuesday that they want to reopen the process before deciding whether to put a plan to voters in November. Councilwoman Jan Martin, who now heads the task force, said the task force would have to complete its work by mid-August to give the full council time to put it on the November bal-

lot. “We have a very short window here, and we have some big decisions to make,” she said. Martin, as part of the previous council, supported the nonprofit plan. But, she said, it’s appropriate that the new group gets a chance to ask questions and come to their own conclusions. “We do have new players at the table and some of these options need to be revisited,” she said. Councilman Tim Leigh said he’s heard concern in the community that all the options, such as selling the hospital, were never fully explored by the commission. “In the last couple of weeks, I’ve talked to citizens across the community, and I think there’s a mistrust of the process,” Leigh said. Leigh briefly served on the Memorial commission before resigning to avoid the appearance of a conflict of interest because his wife works at Memorial.

In addition to selling Memorial, the task force also plans to learn more about Poudre Valley Health System in Fort Collins, a former county-owned hospital that was leased to a nonprofit entity similar to what the task force initially envisioned, which has been presented as a model for Memorial. The group also wants another look at the $5 million initial payment and minimum $1 million yearly payments that the task force previously called for Memorial to pay into a health care foundation. And it hopes to answer the $246 million question — the amount the state’s employee pension program, PERA, told Memorial it would have to pay to exit the system (which would be required if it became a nonprofit). Memorial is working on its own study of its pension liability. —

Call the writer at 636-0275

corrections

The Gazette corrects errors of fact in this space. If you find mistakes, please call 636-0266 during business hours.

BAcK PAGes

June 8, 1911 The police yesterday spread a dragnet to rid the city of vagrants, and as a result 22 men are in the city jail to await arraignment in the justice courts on that charge. A large number of these men, it is said, come here after being run out of Denver, Pueblo or other nearby places. June 8, 1936 Marksmen of the Pikes Peak Rifle Club emerged with a score of 1,925 to annex the five-man team championship of the 1936 Southern Colorado small bore rifle shoot yesterday at the Pikes Peak range on the Woodmen road. June 8, 1961 Senate and House conferees Wednesday approved a $12.4 million appropriation for construction of the underground combat operations center for the North American Air Defense Command in Cheyenne Mountain. The group reached an agreement on military building for the year beginning July 1. The measure totals around $900 million for the entire country. COLORADO SPRINGS PIONEERS MUSEUM

todAy in history

In A.D. 632, the prophet Muhammad died in Medina. In 1845, Andrew Jackson, seventh president of the United States, died in Nashville, Tenn. In 1861, voters in Tennessee approved an Ordinance of Secession passed the previous month by the state legislature. In 1864, Abraham Lincoln was nominated for another term as president during the National Union (Republican) Party’s convention in Baltimore. In 1905, President Theodore Roosevelt offered to act as a mediator in the Russo-Japanese War. In 1915, Secretary of State William Jennings Bryan resigned in a disagreement with President Woodrow Wilson over U.S. handling of the sinking of the Lusitania.


memorial 4a