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EATIN EATOUT www.EATINEATOUT.ca

SPRING 2014, ISSUE 11

INTRODUCING:

THE WANDERLUST KITCHEN OLIVE AND RUBY CITY SPICE

CONNECT OVER FOOD.

2014 TRENDS:

BLOOD ORANGE

EASY INDIAN FOR 2 2014 TRENDS:

CHIA SEEDS

Bム》 Dressed SPRING SALAD FAVOURITES

PLUS Win a $300 grocery gift card!

Reviews - Toronto, Niagara and Halifax!


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Visit us at www.TastyTurkey.ca Like us on facebook.com/TastyTurkey 2Follow WWW.EATINEATOUT.CA us on twitter.com/TastyTurkey


2014

SPRING

HEATHLY EATING

Recipes, reviews and all things delicious!

FEATURES

DEPARTMENTS

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Ruby Goodness

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Best Dressed

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Weeknight Meals: Indian for 2

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Find your Chia

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Blogger Interview

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EATIN & EATOUT Bloggers

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Publisher’s Note Marketplace Books for Cooks Nutrition Your Sommelier

EATIN EATOUT www.EATINEATOUT.ca


PUBLISHER’S NOTE

Is it spring yet? I don’t know about where you live, but here in Toronto this has been the coldest winter in 20 years! Through ice storms, snow storms and the ‘polar vortex’ it feels like we’ve been frozen forever... spring can’t come soon enough! Even though I love rich comfort food casseroles and gooey mac & cheese, it’s time for a change. Time to put away the crock pot. Time to get out the salad bowl. It’s helped to work on this issue filled with fresh greens, tart citrus and new spicy main dishes. The coming of Remember to check out our blog at eatineatout.ca. New original recipes & reviews each week!

Follow me on twitter @eatineatoutmag

Follow me on pinterest pinterest.com/ eatineatoutmag

spring for me means taking stock of my meal planning and trying to lighten up by making more healthy and nutricious choices. Put away the take-out menu and brush up on your cooking skills with some home-cooked meals. The result: our Spring Healthy Eating issue. It’s loaded with new food trends like blood oranges and chia seeds, exotic Indian cooking made fast and easy, plus inspired new salad combinations. As usual, we also introduce you to fascinating bloggers who cook at home or love to eat out. Have fun, enjoy!

Lori

Lori Kennedy, publisher

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FREE GROCERIES! Stocking up on fresh local fruits & veggies is easy with a $300.00 grocery gift card!

Just become an EIEO Insiders Club member and you could win!

Enter now!

a n i W $300 ift c g y r e c o gr

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*By entering you are automatically joining the EIEO INSIDERS CLUB. If already a member, you’re automatically pre-entered. Contest opens April 1, 2014 closing June 6, 2014. For contest rules and more information just click here.


MARKETPLACE

The Marketplace BY THE TEAM AT FOODIEPAGES.CA

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Top All-Natural Protein Bars Our picks of the best all-natural bars from coast-to-coast. From high fibre, to nut-free, we'll help you make informed decisions & keep your body fueled for the day!

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BOOKS FOR COOKS

Time for a change

Add some healthy new recipes to your everyday meal plan... in India, as well as her natural talents, and began catering dinners. Word quickly spread and Vancouver’s food community took notice. Cooking stores and local television stations began asking Bal to share her healthy, quick and delicious Indian dishes. Today, Bal is remarried and a mother of two. She has hosted a popular TV show, Spice Goodess, and a new show, Spice of Life airing on Food Network Canada and on the Cooking Channel in the US.

BAL’S SPICE KITCHEN By Bal Arneson

Bal Arneson is quite the success story. Born and raised in a poor rural village in India, Bal came to Canada through an arranged marriage when she was 20. When the relationship desolved, she found herself alone with a baby. Bal decided to draw on the culinary knowledge she had gained from family

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In her first two best-selling cookbooks, Bal taught North Americans how to make quick and healthy Indian meals at home. In this new book, Bal’s Spice Kitchen, she has turned her attention to spicing up the foods we already know and love. Whether you are feeling adventurous and want to explore new tastes and spices, or just want to create a delicious and satisfying meal, Bal’s Spice Kitchen is a wonderfully overview of the rich tastes of Indian cuisine. ($29.95) Check out this teaser - Scallops with Green Apples and Basil.


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THE OH SHE GLOWS COOKBOOK Vegan recipes to Glow from the Inside Out By Angela Liddon

After struggling for a decade with an eating disorder, Angela vowed to change her diet, and her life, once and for all. She traded the low-calorie, processed food she’d been living on for whole, nutrient-packed vegetables, fruits, nuts, whole grains and more. Eager to share her realization that the food we put into our bodies has a huge impact on how we look and feel, Angela started a blog, Oh She Glows. It was an internet sensation and is one of the most popular vegan recipe blogs on the web. Plus, she’s from right here in Oakville Ontario!

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This is Angela’s long-awaited debut cookbook, with a treasure trove of more than a hundred mouth-watering, wholesome recipes. From revamped classics that even meat-eaters will love, to fresh and inventive dishes all inspired by the world of plant-based cooking. The Oh She Glows Cookbook also includes recipes free of common food allergens – with more than ninety gluten-free recipes, and many recipes free of soy, nuts, sugar, and grains Some of my favourite recipes include: • crowd-pleasing tex-mex casserole • ultimate nutty granola clusters • glowing mojo-ito green monster • oil-free baked falafel bites • fudgy mocha pudding cake Whether you are a vegan, “vegancurious,” or you simply want to eat delicious food that just happens to be healthy, this cookbook is a must-have. ($29.00) Angela has shared one of the recipes from her new book - Grilled Portobello Burger with sun-dried tomato kale-hemp pesto - so try it!


grilled portobello burger with sun-dried tomato kale-hemp pesto

SEE THE RECIPE!

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NUTRITION

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South Asian cuisine is synonymous with curries and the use of spices. Cinnamon and pepper were among the first spices traded in South Asia and the Middle East around 200BC. In fact, spices were among the most expensive items in Europe during the Middle Ages. What’s the difference between an herb and a spice? Herbs are the green leafy parts, and spices are generally dried parts such as: • Dried fruits or seeds e.g. fennel, mustard, and black pepper • Bark e.g. cinnamon • Dried flower buds, e.g. cloves • Stigmas, e.g. saffron • Roots e.g. turmeric, ginger

SPICE UP YOUR

HEALTH! BY ZANNAT REZA, MHSC RD, NUTRITION EDITOR

Masala is a general term for spice in South Asia. If you’re looking for curry powder in India, you’re out of luck. This North American creation is usually a mix of coriander, turmeric, cumin, fenugreek and chili peppers. Most South Asian cooks have their own spice mix they use in cooking and it varies by region. Spices are sources of antioxidants and many have anti-inflammatory properties. Antioxidants protect your cells by cruising around your body zapping free radicals. WWW.EATINEATOUT.CA

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Bring out your exotic side and take advantage of potential benefits with these South Asian spices.

CARDAMOM Description: A member of the ginger family. The seeds are housed in pods. Flavour profile: Floral aroma and spicy-sweet flavour. It’s best to crush the seeds for full flavour. The flavour of ground cardamom quickly dissipates so it’s best to buy the pods and crush the seeds with a mortar and pestle. Goes well with: Chicken, desserts, rice dishes, tea Potential health benefit: Lowering blood pressure

CHILI PEPPER Description: The fruit of the genus Capsicum, there are over 200 varieties of chilies. Flavour profile: Hot and pungent! The seeds and membranes contain 80% of the heat inducing compound, capsaicin. To beat the heat, the protein in milk and yogurt latches on to capsaicin to lessen the fieriness. Goes well with: Beans, curries, rice, tomatoes Potential health benefit: Helps curb appetite and may burn more calories

CINNAMON Description: The inner bark of a tropical tree. The cassia variety is most common in North America. Flavour profile: Sweet, pungent Goes well with: Apples, desserts, chocolate Potential health benefit: Lower blood sugar levels and blood pressure

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TURMERIC Description: This root is related to ginger. Flavour profile: Bitter, pungent. Used as an ingredient to make American-style mustard. Goes well with: Chicken, fish, rice Potential health benefit: Anti-inflammatory; slows growth of cancer cells

FENUGREEK Description: The seeds of the fenugreek plant are found in curry powder and spice blends. Flavour profile: Bitter, sweet. Store in a cool, dark place for up to six months. Goes well with: Curries, lamb, potatoes Potential health benefit: Lower blood sugar, triglycerides and cholesterol

GARLIC Description: A member of the lily family. Related to chives, leeks and onions. Flavour profile: Crushing and chopping garlic releases oils that give it a stronger pungent flavour than slicing or leaving it whole. Goes well with: Lemon, olive oil, tomatoes Potential health benefit: Lower cholesterol and blood pressure

A final word about the potential health benefits of spices. Some of the studies used pills and extracts made from spices, making it hard to get the same dose from cooking with spices. But popping spices pills just doesn’t sound like fun. The best thing is to eat whole foods, and include spices as part of your cooking. You just might get some hidden health benefits. Sources: Food Lover’s Companion, Sharon Tyler Herbst and Ron Herbst, PubMed for health research articles, The Flavour Bible, Karen Page and Andrew Dornenburg, Wikipedia WWW.EATINEATOUT.CA

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rub GOOD

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by DNESS by lori kennedy, creative director

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SEE RE

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E E TH E! E C IP

Ruby Bundt Cake Have you tried blood oranges yet? Due to its pigments, the blood orange contain greater amounts of antioxidants than other oranges. They have a unique flavor profile, with a distinctly different raspberry-like addition to the usual citrus notes. We picked them as one of the Trends of 2014. Here’s three delicious reasons to give them a try!

DOWNLOAD THE RECIPE WWW.EATINEATOUT.CA

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DOWNLOAD THE RECIPE

Ruby Roasted


d Turkey Breast

TH E E E S IPE! REC


DOWNLOAD THE RECIPE

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Ruby Quinoa & P


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EIEO often uses canola oil in our recipes because it’s one of the healthiest oil choices. It’s a good source of monounsaturated fats, the kind that, when used to replace saturated fats like butter and cheese, can help reduce “bad” LDL cholesterol levels and lower your risk of heart disease.

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by Stephanie Arsenault, West Coast Editor

Best Dressed It’s pretty safe to say that the majority of us are tired of winter comfort food. Casseroles, stews, and other stick-to-your-ribs type meals, while delicious, are finally being replaced with lighter, healthier fare. Don’t confuse light and healthy with boring and unsatisfying; combining fresh ingredients to create delicious, nutritious meals is simple. These salads, while filling enough for a lunch on the go or a quick dinner, are easy to make, jam-packed with nutrients, and are as pretty as they are tasty. While they are all different from one another, they do have one thing in common: canola oil in the dressings.

THE E E S IPE! REC Spring Orzo Salad

Using canola oil (grown right here in Canada!) is a springtime salad no-brainer. Not only is it really good for you – high in cholesterol-lowering monounsaturated fatty acids, omega 3 and 6 fatty acids, and a rich source of vitamin E – it’s perfect to use in everyday cooking and baking. Its light colour, texture, and taste are why it’s such a great addition to salads of any kind.

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THE E E S IP E ! C E R

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Canola oil is made from canola seed. It is pressed from tiny canola seeds produced by beautiful yellow flowering plants of the Brassica family. Cabbages and cauliflower are also part of the same botanical family! Canola was bred naturally from its parent rapeseed in the early 1970s.

Kale Salad


THE E E S IPE! REC Turkey, Broccoli & Almond Salad

Canola is the richest cooking-oil source of alpha-linolenic acid, an omega-3 fat that has been linked to heart health.

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Canola is versatile: it has a neutral taste, light texture and a mediumhigh smoke point, so it works well for sautÊing and baking. (An oil’s smoke point is the temperature at which it begins to smoke. When it does, disease-causing carcinogens and free radicals are released, so you never want to heat your oil beyond that point.)

THE E E S IPE! REC Mixed Grain Salad

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DOWNLOAD THE RECIPE

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1/2 HOMEMADE

WEEKNIGHT EXOTICfor 2 Authentic Indian food can be fast, easy and flavour-filled, with a little help from Patak’s and Tilda.

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an food is filled with the rich, oury and healthy spices that we d to add to our everyday meals. wever, during the week when re tired and rushed, it can be d to find the inspiration. Even gh our pantries are crammed our minds still come up a nk. Not to worry, these fast and ourful ideas will help you whip w pantry items into delicious an weeknight meals for two.

Patak’s is very excited to be launching a new line of products Indian Cooking Sauce for 2. These convenient pouches take boring last-minute meals, for one or two, to new heights of yumminess. When paired with authentic Tilda Steamed Basmati Rice, it’s easy to travel around the world... on a weeknight!

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Non Traditional Easy Tandoori (shrimp, red onion, carrot, chives, pumpkin seeds)

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EASY TANDOORI TRADITIONAL FAST & EASY 1. Heat 1 Tbsp oil in pan over medium-high heat. 2. Dice 2/3lb. Pork, Beef, Chicken or Shrimp. Add to pan and brown meat 3-4 minutes. 3. Pour I (200ml) package Patak’s Tandoori Cooking Sauce for 2 over meat, stir well and simmer for 5 minutes, stirring occasionally. 4. Serve with Tilda Steamed Pure or Wholegrain Basmati Rice. So easy, just microwave for 2 minutes and you’re ready to serve!

NON TRADITIONAL ADD-INS After step #2, remove meat and keep warm. Add two ADD-INS and sauté until just soft, about 2 minutes. Add meat back in, plus 1 HERB. Continue on step #3. Sprinkle with NUTS (optional) and serve. CHOPPED ADD-INS

CHOPPED HERBS

NUTS

1/2 cup red bell pepper

1/4 cup fresh citantro

pine nuts

1/2 cup sweet onion

1/4 cup fresh parsley

pumpkin seeds

1/2 cup shredded carrots

3 Tbsp fresh chives

cashews

1/4 cup raisins or figs

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Non Traditional Butter Chicken (red bell pepper, onion, date, parsley and pistachios)

A SPICY INDIAN PRIZE PACK

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BUTTER CHICKEN TRADITIONAL FAST & EASY 1. Heat 1 Tbsp oil in pan over medium-high heat. 2. Dice 2 medium boneless, skinless Chicken breasts. Add to pan and brown meat 3-4 minutes. 3. Pour I (200ml) package Patak’s Butter Chicken Cooking Sauce for 2 over meat, stir well and simmer for 5 minutes, stirring occasionally. 4. Serve with Tilda Steamed Pure or Wholegrain Basmati Rice.So easy, just microwave for 2 minutes and you’re ready to serve!

NON TRADITIONAL ADD-INS After step #2, remove meat and keep warm. Add 1Tbsp butter and two ADD-INS, sauté until just soft, about 2 minutes. Add meat back in, plus 1 HERB. Continue on step #3. Mix in or sprinkle with 1 NUT (optional) and serve. CHOPPED ADD-INS

CHOPPED HERBS

CHOPPED NUTS

1/2 cup red bell pepper

1/4 cup fresh coriander

10-12 pistachios

1/2 cup sweet onion

1/4 cup fresh parsley

10-12 peanuts

1/3 cup frozen peas (add in step#3)

1/4 cup fresh mint

10-12 cashews

1/4 cup dates

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Non Traditional Quick Vegetarian Biryani (spinach, white beans, apricots, parsley, no nuts) X

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QUICK VEGETARIAN

BIRYANI (INDIAN RICE)

TRADITIONAL FAST & EASY 1. Heat 1 Tbsp oil in pan over medium-high heat. 2. Dice 1 chopped onion and 2 cups blanched cauliflower florets. Add to pan and sauté 2-3 minutes. 3. Add I (200ml) pkg Patak’s Spicy Cumin & Ginger Cooking Sauce for 2. 4. Stir in 1 (250g) package Tilda Steamed Mushroom Basmati Rice, cover, reduce heat and simmer for 2-5 minutes until heated through. Fluff and serve.

NON TRADITIONAL ADD-INS Add two ADD-INS to step #2. Stir in 1 HERB and 1 NUT and continue to step #3.

CHOPPED ADD-INS

CHOPPED HERBS

NUTS

1/2 cup beans or chickpeas

1/4 cup fresh parsley

10-12 toasted peanuts

1/2 bunch fresh spinach

1/4 cup fresh coriander

10-12 toasted cashews

1/2 cup snap peas

1/4 cup fresh lemon zest

10-12 toasted almonds

1/4 cup apricots

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Coconut Rice Side Dish X

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BASMATI RICE - 3 WAYS

FAST & EASY Try Tilda Steamed Basmati Pure, Wholegrain, Mushroom or Pilau Rice. Already cooked, just microwave for 2 minutes and it’s ready to serve! NON TRADITIONAL ADD-INS In a pan over medium-high heat, add two ADD-INS and sauté until just soft, about 2-4 minutes. Stir in 2 (250g) packages Tilda Steamed Pure, Wholegrain, Mushroom or Pilau Basmati Rice along with 1 HERB and 1 NUT. Heat through for 1-2 minutes and serve. CHOPPED ADD-INS

CHOPPED HERBS

NUTS

1/2 cup raisins

1/4 cup fresh coriander

10-12 toasted pine nuts

1/2 cup sliced green onions

1/4 cup fresh parsley

10-12 pumpkin seeds

1/2 cup chopped celery

1/4 cup fresh mint

10-12 toasted cashews

A BIT MORE TIME? TRY THIS COCONUT RICE SIDE DISH 1. Heat 2 Tbsp butter in a pan over medium-high heat. Add 1 cup sliced red onion and 2 Tbsps chopped garlic, sauté 2-3 minutes. Add 1 cup Tilda Basmati Rice, stir to coat. 2. Add 1 (400ml) can of coconut milk and 1/2 cup water to the pan. Bring to boil, cover, reduce heat and simmer for 10-15 minutes until rice is tender. 3. Stir in 1/2 cup shredded toasted coconut, 1/4 cup golden raisins. Mix in (or sprinkle on top as shown) 1/2 cup chopped fresh mint. Fluff and serve. WWW.EATINEATOUT.CA 39


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find your chia BY KELLY BRISSON, EAST COAST EDITOR

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No longer just a thing of cheesy jingles and As-Seen-On-TV ads, chia seeds have been stepping out into the spotlight with everyone taking notice of their inarguable benefits. These tiny unassuming black seeds pack a nutritional punch that might surprise you. With a one-ounce serving covering a third of your daily fibre intake, nearly 5 grams of omega fatty acids, 18% of your daily calcium intake and plenty more, it may be time you start incorporating some of these magic seeds into your daily diet. A species of flowering plant belonging to the mint family and native to Central and Southern Mexico and Guatemala, the chia seed was cultivated by the Aztecs in pre-Columbian times and was said to be as important a crop as maize. The seeds are hydrophilic, meaning they have a strong affinity for water. They can absorb up to ten times their weight, which is then slowly released into your body after consumption making them especially great prior to working out. Chia also has a stabilizing effect on blood sugar which can help with insulin resistance and aid in decreasing belly fat. To sum it up, you need more chia in your life. If not because of their powerful health benefits, then

because they are extremely fun and easy to cook and experiment with. Because chia seeds absorb so much water, many recipes use them as thickeners. Smoothies, soups, jams and puddings all make wonderful use of this hydrophilic affect. I decided to test out a few different uses of the seeds and was thrilled with their versatility in the kitchen. As promised, the jam was thickened without the use of pectin, something I'll be sure to experiment with again once the summer bushes start swelling with ripe berries. Hopefully these recipes will help you become acquainted with these little magic seeds and all the benefits they have to offer.

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SEE THE RECIPE!

Spicy Chia-Tomato Jam

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DOWNLOAD THE RECIPE


Crunchy Seed Crackers SEE THE RECIPE! DOWNLOAD THE RECIPE

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SEE THE RECIPE!

DOWNLOAD THE RECIPE

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Banana-Cinnamon Chia Waffles


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Interview

Following a food gypsy. Meet Anetta, the chef and photographer behind the blog The Wanderlust Kitchen

BY LORI KENNEDY, PUBLISHER & CREATIVE DIRECTOR

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THE E E S IP E ! RE C Crockpot Chicken Tikka Masala

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hen you land at The Wanderlust Kitchen, you are struck by two things: the look and the diversity. The look is clean, fresh and full of energy, just like its author, with stunning photography. But it’s the diversity of recipe styles from around the world that is truely unique. Meals from Africa, India or South America are made fun and easy for everyone to experiment with. Let’s meet the author... WELCOME ANETTA, TELL US A BIT ABOUT YOURSELF…

My mom always tells me that I have terrible wanderlust. When I was twelve I went to Europe for three weeks as part of an ambassador program. I then spent the rest of the summer crying and whining because I was so bored at home without something new to see every day. Once I got the travel bug, it just never went away. I always have travel plans brewing in my mind. Other than travel (and my husband), my other great love is food. I’m happiest when I’m eating, but I don’t really like to go out to restaurants that often. When my husband and I go on trips I get tired of eating out; I can’t wait to get back in the kitchen. I can’t remember the last time I made regular old meat and potatoes or any type of gravy. Oh, and I hate leftovers. I need new food for every meal! I also love to read (I’m currently working through the Outlander series), camp, and fish.

WHY DID YOU START A BLOG?

I started my blog because my Facebook friends were sick of seeing pictures of my dinner without sharing any recipes. I was just finishing graduate school and after spending the previous year working full time, getting married, buying a house, and going to graduate school full time, I found myself with way too much free time and lots of new kitchen gadgets. DESCRIBE YOUR BLOG IN 3 WORDS:

This is a hard one! Let’s go with vibrant, fresh, and diverse. WE LOVE THAT YOU MAKE DISHES FROM AROUND THE WORLD SO APPROACHABLE. HOW DID YOU GET SO BRAVE?

Truth be told, I was a really picky eater prior to a couple years ago when my husband (then boyfriend) and I went to Thailand for vacation. We chose Thailand as a vacation destination mostly because I was going through a Chicken with Cashews obsession and wanted to get my hands on more Thai food. It was a pretty rude awakening for me once we got there. I ordered Chicken with Cashews from the room service menu as soon as we checked in and was shocked to find that it was nothing like the kind I have here in Portland. I spent the entire trip ordering Chicken with Cashews at nearly every restaurant we went to, and found that it was different at each one of them. It really helped me gain an appreciation for international cuisine and not just the “North Americanzed” version. I started trying new cuisines and I found that I loved just about all of them! I wanted to share that love of food and culture with others, so a blog felt like the perfect thing.

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I wanted to share my love of food and culture with others, so a blog felt like the perfect thing!

WHICH 3 BLOGS DO YOU FOLLOW/ARE OBSESSED WITH/CAN’T LIVE A DAY WITHOUT?

THE KITCHEN NOBODY KNOWS ABOUT YOU? I’m a total ninja at finding a good

Pinch of Yum, Half Baked Harvest and SkinnyTaste. All three are run by super creative women (and Lindsay’s husband, Bjork, over at POY!) and feature lots of internationally-inspired recipes.

deal! I rarely pay full price for anything. YOU’RE HAPPIEST WHEN COOKING/EATING:

WHAT IS THE ONE KITCHEN TOOL YOU COULD NEVER GIVE UP?

YOUR PHOTOGRAPHY IS BEAUTIFUL. WHERE DO YOU SHOOT AND WHAT CAMERA DO YOU USE? Thank you! It’s been a long

My pineapple peeler/corer tool. I realize this seems really random, but I could never go back to peeling and cutting up a pineapple the old fashioned way. WHAT DISH ARE YOU OBSESSED WITH MASTERING THAT YOU JUST CAN’T GET QUITE RIGHT?

This is really embarrassing. I can’t consistently cook a medium rare steak. I have the tendency to let it go “just another few seconds” or so until I overdo it and the meat is overcooked. It’s my kryptonite! WHAT’S ONE SECRET TALENT OUTSIDE OF

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Hands down, it has to be Thai food. The smell is incredible.

process of trial and error, that’s for sure. I shoot in our dining room right off of our kitchen. We have a table in there that functions as a full-time photography “studio” and only gets cleaned off when we have guests. We usually eat while watching Shark Tank reruns. I’m currently using a Canon EOS Rebel T3i with a 50mm f/1.8 lens. ANY FINAL TIPS FOR BUDDING BLOGGERS?

It’s a labour of love. I had no idea how much work it would be; it’s like having an extra full time job! You have to really love it or it’s just not worth the trouble.


TH O T G O IP E ! RE C

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Israeli Roast Chicken

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EATIN FOOD BLOGGER SPOTLIGHT

FROM THE KITCHENS OF:

OLIVE AND RUBY SPICE CITY

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EATOUT FOOD BLOGGER SPOTLIGHT

DINING REVIEWS FROM:

THE NIAGARA LOCAL FOOD GIRL IN TOWN ROSALYN GAMBHIR

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Nutella Peanut Butter Brownies These fudgy, delicious, dense and moist brownies will change your life. They are seriously the BEST brownies I’ve ever tried. I challenge you to try them and tell me otherwise.

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honda has a love for cooking, baking and her grandmothers. Her blog, Olive & Ruby, is named for her grandmothers, whom she credits for teaching her the art of cooking with love. When Olive passed and left a handwritten notebook of recipes to Rhonda, the inspiration for Olive and Ruby was born. Raised on the island of Trinidad, and now rooted in Toronto, Rhonda shares her thoughts on life, what’s cooking in her kitchen, and the odd recipe from that handwritten notebook. With Rhonda’s husband being a vegetarian, her passion for the kitchen plays well with her enthusiasm for finding and perfecting vegetarian dishes. Whether it’s a spicy chicken dish or how to make the best bread, Rhonda takes us through her adventures in and out of the kitchen with her own personal touches added. Visiting Rhonda’s blog will leave you feeling as if you've stepped into the sunny warmth of Olive and Ruby’s kitchen!

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1 cup butter, melted 2 cups sugar 4 eggs 2 teaspoons vanilla extract 1 cup flour 1⁄2 cup cocoa powder 1⁄2 teaspoon baking powder 1⁄4 teaspoon salt 1⁄2 cup peanut butter 1⁄2 cup Nutella


1. Preheat oven to 350ยบF. Prepare either a square tin or a brownie pan by lining with parchment paper, then set aside until the batter is ready. 2. Sift flour, cocoa powder, baking powder into a medium sized bowl. 3. Add sugar and melted butter to your mixing bowl, combine until smooth. Fold in eggs one at a time, beating in between each addition. Then add vanilla extract, and flour mixture until the flour is just combined.

4. Melt peanut butter and Nutella together in a microwave-safe bowl until the mixture is runny (20 - 30 seconds), then pour into the flour mixture. (I challenge you not to lick the bits that cling lovingly to the bowl). Stir just until the mixture is combined, then spread into the lined baking pan. 5. Bake for 45 - 55 minutes, or until an inserted toothpick comes out clean. Once done, let cool in the brownie tin for a few minutes, then slice into pieces and serve.

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Green Bean Poriyal

K

atie Junus, of Halifax, NS started her blog City Spice in April 2013 as a way to offer Haligonians the opportunity to create affordable, delicious ethnic cuisine at home. Katie, an aspiring clinical social worker, notes that her blog focuses on ethnic cuisine with a “step by step” educational approach. She believes that with true understanding of an ethnic dish and its unique set of ingredients, people can create the item successfully at home and also adjust the recipe to their liking. Katie’s blog recipes are a little taste of healthy homemade, as they are either personal creations or inspired by friends, family and countries she has visited (i.e. various parts of India, Saudi Arabia and the Caribbean).

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350g fresh green beans, chopped, tips removed 2 dried red chilies 1/2 white onion, chopped 5-8 fresh curry leaves 1/4 cup freshly scraped coconut 1 tsp mustard seeds 1/2 tsp salt 1 tsp tumeric powder 1 tsp coriander powder 1/2 tsp garam masala powder 2-3 Tbsp warm water 1. In a skillet, add 3-4 tbsp cooking oil over medium heat. Next, add in the mustard seeds, dried red chilies and chopped onion. Sauté the mixture for 2-3 minutes, or until the mustard seeds change color and the onions appear translucent. 2. Add powdered spices: tumeric, coriander and garam masala. Stir the spiced onion mixture for a minute or two. Add in a few Tbsp of warm water. 3. Add salt, cut green beans and freshly scraped coconut. Mix the ingredients well and cover the dish for 15-20 minutes, or until the beans are cooked through.


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Piatto Pizzeria + Enoteca

5144 Morris Street, Halifax, Nova Scotia 902.406.0909 BY GABBY PEYTON thefoodgirlintown.com

Piatto Pizzeria + Enoteca, in Downtown Halifax, is a slice of Napolitano deliciousness. As the only VPN certified pizzeria east of Toronto, Piatto proves that it takes pizza seriously and is devoted to presenting an authentic Neapolitan experience to hungry Haligonians. Piatto is located on the bottom floor of a contemporary building in the south end of the peninsula. The modern restaurant space is sleek, but full of nostalgic touches, including a full-sized Vespa in the entryway! This is the second location for this pizza magnate; Piatto opened its doors in St. John’s, Newfoundland in 2010 to a very hungry public and in Halifax in 2012. Owners Kate, Jay and Brian Vallis, a father and daughter(s) team, keep it in the family with their ever-growing business, and are dedicated to the creation of delicious food and maintaining authenticity in their pizzas.

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With cool bottles of Peroni in the fridge and steaming Illy coffee filling the cups at this enoteca, Piatto presents a great sampling of Italy’s best. Bites from the menu include Pacchi di Prosciutto ($9), a delicious antipasti of prosicuttowrapped balls of fresh mozzarella baked in tomato sauce, and the Barbabietola Arrostita ($9), a fresh beet salad with goat cheese and walnuts. Pizzas are the main event at Piatto; from the second you walk in the door, you are greeted by titillating aromas coming out of the giant tiled pizza oven at the back of the restaurant. You can even sidle up to the bar along the prep area and watch your pizza being made! The Siciliana ($19) pizza consists of spicy Italian sausage, prosciutto, and roasted red pepper – top that off with fresh basil and Grana Padano and you’ve got a partito in your mouth. A delicious combination of fresh mushrooms and garlic with a creamy white sauce, the Funghi Selvatici ($16) is one of the Pizze Bianche available on the menu daily. Piatto also features a unique method of showcasing new pizza recipes: every week they feature a ‘Pizza of the Week’ made from recipes that are submitted by local patrons and sold daily at the restaurant. With prices ranging from $5-20, there is room at the table for every budget and with the wine flowing, and the good times going, Piatto is a must stop the next time you are in downtown Halifax.

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The Smokin’ Buddha Restaurant and Markets 265 King Street, Port Colborne, ON 905.834.6000

BY Kyla Pennie theniagaralocal.com

Eclectic and intoxicating, The Smokin’ Buddha is a Niagara hotspot that casually serves up Indian and Thai curries, burritos and gluten-free noodles. Bikers-in-spandex, new families and theatre-folk equally enjoy the laid-backvibe in this Port-side summer town, while downing a craft-beer pint with their Pad Thai. In the summer, bands play on the patio, the place is packed, and owner Kevin Echlin charms the crowd. When it rains, the inside fills up fast, and patrons vie for space with Xian warriors to witness the head-banded chefs dodging flames in the open kitchen.

Rise Above Restaurant and Bakery 120 St. Paul St. , St. Catharines, ON 289.362.2636 A celiac’s sanctuary; Rise Above Bakery and Restaurant serves comfort vegan cuisine. With exposed historic brick-lined walls, and soaring pendant lights, Rise Above, owned by Brian Gasbarini and Kelsey Cheslock, brings an edgy urban-art-vibe downtown. Although the Seitan, a meat-alternative made in-house stretches notions of what vegan can be (even your meat and 60

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potatoes pop will enjoy it), the earthy dishes like the harvest salad, mushroom mac and cheese and the cauliflower steak show off the kitchen. Finish with a soy or almond latte, or the holiest of unholy-their signature artisan doughnut.

The Yellow Pear Bistro at Southbrook Vineyards 581 Niagara Stone Road, Niagara-on-the Lake, ON 289.213.4240 Celebrating Niagara farmers and explicitly supporting Niagara homegrown fare, The Yellow Pear, Canada’s first solar food truck, and now full time bistro located at Southbrook Vineyards, is Niagara personified. Wife and husband chef-owners, Nicole and Jason Sawatzky, serve up beautifully presented, gourmet seared trout, crustless quiche, and corn and peach salad (menu changes daily and with the season). The farm salad, featuring produce from over 20 farms is crunchy, savoury, sweet and loaded with veggies; each bite a farmer’s story supported. Exceptional, casual patio setting. The Niagara Local is an online dining guide and app that captures the zeitgeist of the Niagara local food, drink and culture scene. Unique search features such as dining interests (Winery Restaurants) and dietary needs (Vegan, Gluten-free, Halal) help locals and visitors alike navigate the question “where should we go?” and “what can we expect?” Descriptive commentary and photos that celebrate a sense of place, the Niagara Local allows readers to explore the good life in Niagara. WWW.EATINEATOUT.CA

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Le Chien Noir Bistro 69 Brock St., Kingston, ON 613.549.5635 BY ROSALYN GAMBHIR rosalyngambhir.com

With a Parisian bistro feel, located just a few blocks away from historic Market Square, Le Chien Noir Bistro in downtown Kingston is known for serving up fresh, seasonal, high quality, and local ingredients along with a spectacular wine list. This neighborhood hangout spot offers feel good classics with an innovative twist and friendly service in a beautiful art deco inspired setting. You are greeted with high detailed tin ceiling, elegant crystal chandeliers, exposed brick walls and a spacious zinc bar. Offering traditional French dishes such as Duck Confit, Boeuf Bourguignonne and Tartare, this bistro would not be complete without highlighting charcuterie and Canadian artisan cheeses. ‘Tilister’ of Finch, ON, ‘Thunder Oak’ of Thunder Bay, ON and ‘Guanciale’ of Seed to Sausage are my favorite combination. Though not a dish primarily found in France, a rather fancy poutine can also be found on the menu; frites, Quebec

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triple cream brie, shredded duck confit, and green peppercorn-cognac jus. The flavors overwhelm your senses and you are simply in food heaven from indulging oh so much. Customers are also met with a vast selection of seafood; fresh oysters, PEI mussels in a thai red curry, seared sea scallops and seasonal catches. This establishment features a modern spin on French classics and does it quite amazingly. As a Montrealer, Chien Noir is a reminder of home and brings back so many good foodie memories that can be attributed to the man in the kitchen, Chef Derek MacGregor. His food philosophy is all about simplicity and fresh quality ingredients. The concept of Farm to Table is true to his heart, having grown up in a small community near Cornwall, surrounded by fresh foods and grandmas whom were exceptional cooks in the kitchen. He is a firm believer of embracing the local food community and has created great rapport with many farmers such as Patchwork Gardens, Honey Wagon and Kitchen Gardens. All of which resonate beautifully in the dishes made. Le Chien Noir Bistro is a charming and welcoming destination, dishing up pleasurable experiences time and time again.

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T

Your Sommelier

Wine K

he primary role of the sommelier is to enhance the diner’s experience by offering wine suggestions that suit their tastes, budgets and food selections from the menu the last point often being the most under-valued skill. Inevitably we have all encountered that person who is quite content to drink their Napa Cab with their halibut, but the real thrill of a sommelier’s night is to have creative freedom to assist their guests in choosing a glass or bottle of wine for the ultimate experience.

The desired result of pairing one’s meal with a particular wine can often be explained in a simple math equation: 1 + 1 = 3. That is to say that we want the wine and the food to be better together than if they were consumed separately. Despite our best efforts, not all wine and food marriages can be a match made in heaven. There are some foods and ingredients that are out to ruin just about any wine. This is often because of a molecular component in the food (or a chemical reaction that occurs when the food is prepared) that causes a negative reaction with the molecules in the wine. There

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Killers BY ALLISON SLUTE, WINE COLUMNIST

are, however, some rules to help avoid a wine and food pairing disaster. (For you science geeks out there, check out the book “Taste Buds and Molecules” by François Chartier for some fascinating science on food and wine pairings.) For the at-home sommelier, to add to your current arsenal of entertaining tips, I’ve highlighted a selection of common wine “killers” and an alcoholic antidote that will have you hitting a home run with your guests every time: • Artichokes and Asparagus: Both of these tasty spring veggies are not necessarily wine’s best friend. They both contain a particular compound that often makes wine taste off. To lessen this effect, be sure to choose a wine that has some “green” attributes like Sauvignon Blanc from New Zealand or a Grüner Veltliner from Austria. • Horseradish: Although delicious with a prime rib of beef or fresh oysters, horseradish can clash with most wines. Recall that horseradish is a condiment, not a main event, so when choosing a wine, consider what protein is being complimented by the horseradish. If you are having it with red meat, try making a horseradish cream (crème fraiche or sour cream with a few spoonfulls of horseradish to taste) to calm the condiment’s heat and serve with a Rioja from Spain. If you like to top your fresh shucked oysters with horseradish, reach for a rosé brut (dry) champagne or sparkling wine. WWW.EATINEATOUT.CA

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“We want the wine and the food to be better together than if consumed separately.” • Vinaigrettes/Salads: Because the pH of a wine is naturally acidic, acidic foods can often make a wine taste flat. When serving wine alongside a salad with a tart vinaigrette, you will need to choose a high-acid wine to avoid disappointment. Some good choices include a dry Riesling, sparkling wine, or Chablis or Sancerre from France. • Spicy foods: The component in spicy food, whether it be Mexican, Thai, Chinese or Indian, that makes the food ‘hot’ is capsicum (the fiery chili pepper). When paired with the wrong wines, this molecule’s reaction can leave you running for something to douse the flames. Beer, of course, is a natural pairing for most spicy foods, but if you want a wine for your next Mexican dinner party, be sure to avoid wines with high alcohol and high tannin. An Alsatian Gewurztraminer is always a solid choice for whites or try a red wine made from the Barbera or Dolcetto grapes from Italy’s Piedmont region. A final word on how to avoid heart-ache when pairing wine and food: beware of the oak monster! Oaky wines can be the enemy of many of your favourite foods. I would always recommend choosing wines with little to no oak (or wines with less obvious oak usage) for most foods. Oaked wines (especially whites) are best paired with grilled or roasted foods.

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Here are some of my to

2011 Sottimano Bric d Dolcetto d’Alba DOC Dolcetto d’Alba, $18.95

The dolcetto grape is one th quite fruity and usually lower your average red wine. Alth easy to find, Dolcetto can be accompaniment with many m If you cannot find a Dolcetto light-bodied Valpolicella wou

2012 Henry of Pelham VQA Niagara Peninsu $13.95

I love Riesling. I especially lo Rieslings. Our cool climate is this varietal. Riesling grapes natural acidity than most oth there is often residual sugar l acidity in the wine. Even wit sweetness, this wine is electr can stand up to any salad o has relatively low alcohol, so spicy pad thai.


op picks that pair well with ‘wine killers’:

del Salto

, Italy

2012 Domaine Wachau Terraces Grüner Veltliner DAC Wachau, Austria $17.95

hat is soft, supple, r in alcohol than hough not always e a delicious mildly spicy dishes. o d’Alba, a uld also work.

One of my all-time favourite white wines is Grüner Veltliner. Racy, with lots of citrus, white pepper and some grassy notes, it is a perfect foil to any asparagus or artichoke dish. Try it with crispy, deep-fried artichoke hearts with lemon aioli.

m Riesling ula, Canada

2010 Bodegas LAN Rioja Crianza DOC Rioja, Spain $15.95

ove Niagara s perfectly suited for have a lot more hers, which is why left to balance the th a touch of ric with acidity and or vinaigrette. It also o it’s a winner with

Rioja wines are made from the tempranillo grape and can produce a wine in an array of styles. In Spain, the term “Crianza” identifies a wine has been aged for 2 years, with at least 6 months in oak. This style of wine is fruity, with a nice minty/dill undertone, and good structure to stand up to your favourite cut of beef. The light oak treatment and soft tannins means this wine would also work with spicy dishes.

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