Page 1

Ina Herlihy 1

1. skilled and creative use of media content — photography

published 2.2.09 the broadview

Then President-elect Barack Obama and Michelle Obama wave to the crowd with Vice President-elect Joe Biden and his wife Dr. Jill Biden. Sasha and Malya Obama waited for their parents behind bullet proff glass on side stage.

I waited in 12 degree weather for six hours to secure a front row standing space in the press section. To my left was a photographer from the St. Petersburg Times, and to my right was a photographer from The New York Times. I was the only high school student. When I left there were hundreds of photographers behind me.

Bruce Springsteen performs his hit song “The Rising” with accompaniment of a full gospel choir at the Opening Ceremony for President-elect Barack Obama on Jan. 18. An estimated 400,000 peopel withsthod the cold at the National Mall in Washington, D.C. to watch the event.


Ina Herlihy 3

1. skilled and creative use of media content — photography

Varsity swim team captain Tara Garnett swims the 100m breathstroke at Bernan Christian April 27. The swim team swam their last meet, the BAC Chanmpionship, on May 12 at Miramonte High School.

published 5.25.07 in the broadview

Senior Kaitlin Van Zandt placed third at the East Bay preOireachtas feis. She first danced in a group competition, then individually in a series of three dancers.

published 11.02.07 the broadview

“

Freshman year I was assigned to take photos at a swim meet. I was very nervous because this was my first time photographing sports. I shot with a 200 mm lens, and I laid on the floor so I would be at the same level as the swimmers. I have Irish danced since I was three, so I was excited to finally have the opportunity to photograph it. I wanted my photo to be more than just a dancer, so I used depth of field with a blurred musician in the background.


Ina Herlihy 4

1. skilled and creative use of media content — photography

Markeith McDaniels spent the majority of his childhood living on the street after running away from his aunt when he was 14. After attending rehab for a drug and alcohol addiction, he found a job at Glad Tidings published 12.17.09 in the broadview Church.

With a pink sweater wrapped around her neck, Johanne Oppenheimer joined nearly 5,000 people in walking last Sunday’s 16th annual Race for the Cure at the Embarcadero. This was Oppenheimer’s first time at the event since being diagnosed with breast cancer.

published 9.29.06 in the broadview

I asked Markeith to bring his favorite item for the photo. He chose the Bible, and I photographed him in front of his Church to unify the image. My Oppenheimer photo was my first time using a digital camera.


Ina Herlihy 5

1. skilled and creative use of media content — photography

Pop-star Katy Perry sings for a sold-out audience at The Fillmore on January 28, 2009 (above). Perry reaches down to touch a fan’s hand while donning a leopard print unitard. An inflated cathead represents Kitty Perry, Katy’s pet cat who couldn’t join her “Hello Katy” tour due to her crew members’ allergies (below).

published 2.2.09 the broadview

I was only allowed to shoot with my standard 35mm lens, so I had to squeeze my way to the front. My most difficult obstacles were being pushed by the crowd, elbowed, and not being able to stay still because of the bouncy floor. I knew most of my photos would be blurry, so I took photos throughout the 2-hour concert.


Ina Herlihy 7

1. skilled and creative use of media content — production

“

published 2.2.09 the broadview

I wanted the reader’s eyes to bounce around the page, so I included color throughout the page. The dominant image is a photo illustration portraying Convent students cheering on the first family. The smaller photo clearly shows the perspective of the students watching the inauguration from the crowd. Up until one minute before the paper was sent to the printer, the banner headline was in regular type. Then I realized there was something missing, and I experimented with drop shadow. It completely transformed the page.


Ina Herlihy 8

1. skilled and creative use of media content — production

published 9.19.08 the broadview

“

I made the first line of the hammer yellow, so it would complemet the illustration. I also gave the photo illustration credit a curve to it, so it would look like another root of the CFL tree. Most school mass photographs are just students standing and looking straight at the alter. I chose a photo with a unique angle: seniors stretching their arms over the student body for the blessing.


Ina Herlihy 10

1. skilled and creative use of media content — production

The newspaper racks outside The San Francisco Chronicle building at 901 Mission Street at 9 a.m. last Saturday had few people buy papers. More readers are getting their news online, causing a decrease in circulation for newspaper country-wide.

published 4.3.09 in the broadview

“

I intended to take a photo of an empty newsstand, to accompany the article, but I realized it would be too plain. The plan for the tech graphic was to have a girl listening to her iPod while on the computer. Again, it needed to be more innovative.

published 12.18.08 in the broadview


Ina Herlihy 11

1. skilled and creative use of media content — writing

published 9.24.09 the broadview

Although this was my first time writing a colum, I found it easy to write because I formulated my arguments over the summer, and I am very passionate about this topic.


Ina Herlihy 12

1. skilled and creative use of media content — writing

“

published 10.30.09 the broadview

I attend an all-girls school, and everyday I am reminded by teachers and administrators that I can achieve anything. It does not seem like young women across America are receiving this same message because men still have more leadership roles than women and receive more awards.


Ina Herlihy 14

1. skilled and creative use of media content — writing

Body signs send extra messages

J

unior Shannon McInerney was riding the 38 Geary bus alone when she noticed an older man staring at her and shaking his legs up and down, but she was not sure how to react. “She could just ignore him,” said Linda Talley, President of Linda Talley and Associates who specializes in body language. “When people get into your space that is a real danger signal. Loud shouting voices can be a dangerous signal to look for. [People] looking directly at you, hands on hip — those are confrontational body language signals that can effect you.” Interpreting body language can help people to successfully conduct an interview, evaluate a possibly dangerous situation, and understand the opposite sex. “Body language is not used as a predictor [of what you are going to do next],” said Talley. “It is used as a language. If you want to get close to somebody, you want to make sure what you are saying verbally is congruent to what someone is saying nonverbally.” Gestures can help establish a personal connection to a college interviewer, according to body language expert Patti Wood. “You want to make sure that you make very good eye contact,” said Wood. “Make sure that you get an initial handshake. You want to make sure your palm touches their palm.” Eye contact is so vital that even mistakes on television can change a message and loose viewers’ confidence. “[President] Obama looked forward, but as he was continuing the rest of the sentence, he was looking down and away,” said Wood in a phone interview 30 minutes after she finished a CNN interview about President Obama’s nationally-televised Dec. 1 Afghanistan speech. “You want to make sure that you are looking at the interviewee for the whole sentence.” Body language is not the only way to establish a first impression. “You want to make sure that [your phone] is off,” said Wood. “It acts as a barrier between you and them, and symbolically says that it is more important than they are.” Some people purposely set these barriers when they feel too close to someone by placing

a purse or restaurant menu between them. “If you are talking to somebody and they will put an object between you and them,” said Wood. “It just means that they want to protect themselves.” Body part movements can be an expression of true feelings because sometimes they cannot be controlled. “When you are in the presence of someone who finds you attractive, their pupil will dilate,” said body language expert Vincent Harris. “If someone finds you repulsive, their pupils will be very restricted and smaller than usual.” The entertainment industry in particular uses this knowledge to its advantage. “Models on the magazine cover will have their pupils airbrushed to look dilated and be more attractive,” said Harris. Humans take in 82 percent of information from their eyes, according to a study by the Wharton School of Business at University of Pennsylvania. “People might be maintaining eye contact longer than eight to 10 seconds,” said Talley. “It could be intimacy — they want to get closer to you, or it could be intimidation. If you feel physically threatened, you need to leave.” Body language often gives meanings that individuals cannot infer. “The words we can make up,” said Wood. “The words don’t really reflect how we feel. The best gift you can give to a person is that you understand. My big thing with body language is that you are getting to the heart of someone else.” But at other times understanding body language isn’t enough — it is how you react that counts. “[McInerney] could have turned around and started talking to somebody else,” said Talley. “On the city bus the best thing might be to go behind the bus driver and say that she feels uncomfortable.” There is one fact that all body language specialists agree on. “The more confident that you appear, the less [likely] perpetrators will strike,” said Talley.

published 12.17.09 the broadview

Body language is a topic many students talk about but don’t know too much about. My goal was to provide some concrete examples of body language signals that student can interpret to receive a message.


Ina Herlihy 15

1. skilled and creative use of media content — writing

Q & A with Eric Hutchinson Hutchinson is currently the opening act for Kelly Clarkson’s “All I Ever Wanted” tour. Hutchinson song, “Rock and Roll” featured in The Sisterhood of the Traveling Pants 2 Q: Describe your song writing process. A: It is a trial and error. I spend a lot of time writing songs that don’t go anywhere that were pretty good, and it’s frustrating but then there are moments where I keep writing, because when the inspiration comes, I have to be sure my song writing tools are sharp enough that I can execute any idea that I might come up with. Q: How long does it take you to write a song? A: A good song I can usually write in a few hours. But then a lot of time I will spend several weeks, going back and fine tuning it. I am really specific on the lyrics and a lot of the time I will go and change the lyrics around, a little word here and there. One song I just finished recently I wrote in one sitting, and spent about two months tinkering with it. Q: What is your favorite thing about performing? A: I just like the energy. I love singing songs that I believe in and wrote. I love seeing people either sing the songs back to me or learning the songs for the first time. I just love that feeling of connection. It is just a unique feeling. It symbolizes being in an excited sports arena watching a football game. There is a lot of community and energy and I always think it is amazing to watch people singing along to my songs that I wrote by myself somewhere. Q: Tell me story of you on stage, or a time when you were with your fans that stands out to you. A: I go out most nights and do a meet and greet with fans. One night a woman came up to me and said she just lost her job that day and she didn’t want to come to the show, but she decided to anyway and it really cheered her up. She was really glad that she came to the show. It was just a really great thing to hear that my music has helped someone feel better. Q: What advice do you have for teenagers who hope to have a career in music? A: I think you need life experience. I think any teenager needs to go out and live life and that’s where music comes from. It is from real things happening, and experiences that you can draw from can build emotions into a song. I think you just need to keep getting better, keep performing, keep writing, and toughen your skin up because it is definitely not a forgiving industry but it can be really rewarding at times.

published 12.17.09 the broadview

My goal was to receive a photography press credential for Hutchinosn’s San Jose, Calif. concert. His publicist turned me down, but offered me a 10-minute interview instead. Our administration censored our front page story, and we had to rearrange a few stories. This Q & A saved the day.


Ina Herlihy 18

1. skilled and creative use of media content — writing

Girls in Uganda appreciate education

O

n the other side of the globe, a Sacred Heart School is making its mark on modern Uganda one woman at a time. “Education is the path to suc­cess,” said Theresa Padden, Help­ing Education in Africa Reaching Together (HEART) chapter mod­erator. “Enlightening the mind can be a joyful experience and we can look at [the Ugandan girls] as real models.” The girls have a deep ap­preciation for their education, according to Irene Cullen, RSCJ, Mission Support Coordinator for the Religious of the Sacred Heart in UgandaKenya during a visit to San Francisco. “Early on I had heard that the first graders had insisted with their head mistress, Annet Nankusu, RSCJ, that they have evening study just like the older girls so that they could also do well in their studies,” said Cullen. Life expectancy in Uganda is 51.75 years, and 4.1 percent of the population has HIV/ AIDS, ac­cording to the Central Intelligence Agency’s World Factbook. “Many of the girls who at­tend our schools in Uganda are orphans or have only one living parent,” said Elizabeth Moore (’07), founder of the school’s HEART chapter. “Consequently, their family income is shockingly low. Some women are forced by financial circumstances to take to prostitution, dramatically increas­ing their risk of getting AIDS.” Death is an every day occur­rence for Ugandan girls. “The girls have a song saying we are losing our brothers and sisters, our mothers, father, our aunts and uncles to AIDS,” said Cullen. “Can you imagine dealing with such a life situation?” Despite these circumstances, Cullen says people are optimistic, and recalled her conversation with a Ugandan woman regarding Cullen’s painful arthritis.

“You can thank God you lived to have the experi­ence,” the woman told Cullen. Poverty prevails in the coun­try because there are not enough jobs in Uganda for all its citizens. “Don’t be job seekers, be job creators,” said Cullen, quoting Ugandan President Yoweri Kaguta Museveni. In response, one group of Ugandan girls determined the most profitable time of year for the purchase of plastic chairs, created a plastic chair rental com­pany for parties and organized storage when the chairs are not in use. Generosity is a principle of everyday life for U.S. Schools of the Sacred Heart students towards the Ugandan school, according to Cullen. “They really exemplify the more lifeenhancing philosophy of you and me,” said Cullen, with emphasis on the conjunction. San Francisco Schools of the Sacred Heart are likewise sharing in this spirit of service. “Girls have taken the initia­tive to have lemonade stands over a weekend and then brought me the money for the kids in Uganda,” said CES Head of School Anne Wachter, RSCJ. “I have had girls who asked their grandparents to contribute to Uganda instead of giving them a birthday or Christ­ mas present.” The second annual Walk for Uganda over the Golden Gate Bridge on March 31 raised $22,819. This money went for the construc­tion of a half-finished dormitory or academic building, yet to be decided — as well as financial aid and scholarships. “The Walk for Uganda has had tremendous success in the past two years,” said Moore. “But while the funds raised may seem very large, our schools in Uganda still need our help. The single most important thing we can do for our students there is to contribute what financial support we can.”

published 9.21.07 the broadview

Irene Cullen, RSCJ, asked me to e-mail my story to her before it was published. She was concerned about the message of my article. It was my first time I was asked that. I verified her quotes via e-mail, but I did not send her the story to maintain journalistic ethics.


Ina Herlihy 19

2. Inquiring mind and investigative persistence resulting in in-depth study or studies of issues important to the local high school audience, high school students in general, or society.

CFL lights installed, replacing inefficient incandescent bulbs

S

chools of the Sacred Heart in­stalled new lighting in much of the campus over the summer in an effort to conserve energy and to reduce en­ergy costs. Compact fluorescent light bulbs (CFLs) and motion light sensors re­placed older lighting in the Flood Man­sion, Grant House and Herbst House. “These changes were made be­cause we want to be responsible with our resources,” said Head of School Andrea Shurley. “They are both envi­ ronmental and financial.” The $50,000 price tag was offset by a $35,000 grant from the City of San Francisco, according to Facilities Director Rick Cole. “We should recover that $15,000 in lower electricity costs in seven months,” said Cole. Eventually, these savings will add up to about $25,000 a year. “It is like tuition for an elementary school child,” said Terry Betterly, Direc­tor of Finance and Operations. The City of San Francisco enacted new code in 2001 requiring CFLs in new buildings, although The Siboni Arts & Science Center and Stuart Hall High School were built with them be­ fore the code was put in place. By using less wattage, CFL bulbs can last four to five years, while in­candescent bulbs last only one to two years. CFLs also use 60 to 75 percent less electricity than incandescent bulbs. Although these changes provide eco­nomic and environmental benefits to the school, most students are not aware. “I never noticed anything,” said junior Katherine Mibelli. “My day is so hectic, it is really hard for me to pay attention to the lights. It is hard to notice unless there is a drastic change of color.” According to Shurley, the plan was to keep the lights looking the same way. “They managed to keep the look and feel of the fixtures while improving their efficiency,”

said Shurley. “There was a lot of behind the scenes electrical work.” Motion sensor lights were installed in the restrooms, turning lights off when no one is using them in up to 80-minute block classes. “It is a simple solution that saves a lot of energy,” said Betterly. The installation of the light bulbs met several obstacles. “The original bulbs were too long, so they stuck up above the glass units,” said Cole. “We had to get slightly smaller bulbs with a lower wattage.” The biggest difficulty was identifying the dimmer lights on the main floor. “We didn’t realize the lights were on a dimmer switch, so they were burning out rapidly,” said Cole. “The difference between the bulb you choose with a dim­mer is that it has a built-in ballast in the bulb itself.” Ballasts control the amount of electric­ity going into the lighting unit. CFL light bulbs also require careful handling and disposal. “The CFLs contain mercury, but it is very minimal,” said a representative from the PG&E Smarter Line who declined to give her name. “Years ago, when they had mercury in thermometers, they had more in them. If a CFL breaks, you can’t just throw it in the garbage can. There is a special way to recycling them.” The school recycles up to 30 light bulbs at any one time at no cost, through Golden Gate Disposal. Schools of the Sacred Heart is looking at other environmental initiatives. “We have established an eco-com­mittee consisting of teachers, administers, and parents,” said Cole. “The purpose is to start looking at enhancing recycling, and composting — which is already in effect — looking at water usage and potential savings, and looking at the potential use of solar energy.”

published 9.19.08 the broadview

CFL lights were installed at our school over the summer, but most students did not notice them. I wanted to answer questions of many students about how the administration uses tuition.


Ina Herlihy 20

2. Inquiring mind and investigative persistence resulting in in-depth study or studies of issues important to the local high school audience, high school students in general, or society.

SF aims to reduce waste

R

ecycling and composting has become a bigger focus on campus just as San Francisco has implemented a new zero waste goal by 2020, re­quiring all garbage to be recycled or composted. The Eco Council, made up of Heads of School, faculty and stu­dents, has put trays in every classroom for reusable paper, placed signs above compost bins explain­ing what is compostable and has put more com­post and recycling bins around campus to make it easier to recycle and compost. “I think people try to recycle when it is easy,” said junior Erin Minuth, a member of the Eco Council last year, “but they are lazy and would rather put their trash in whatever bin is closer.” Recyclable materials are often thrown in trash bin, according to Facilities Manag­er Geoff Smith. “[Recy­cling] is filling up the trash bins, which means we have to have more trash bins, which cost more money,” said Smith. “If we eliminated one [dumpster] it could eliminate $500 to $600 a month in our garbage bill.” The Broadway campus recycles and composts 54 yards of material a month, equivalent to about half a football field, according to Smith. However, the campus cannot eliminate all the trash bins because not all refuse can be recycled. “Some things aren’t recyclable yet because there is not the technol­ogy to recycle, or it is not economi­cally feasible,” said Teresa Bui policy associate at the Sacramento nonprofit, Californians Against Waste. “It takes too much en­ergy to recycle them.” HediSays Shoes on Fillmore Street re­cycles 75 percent of its refuse because it makes a conscious effort to recycle, according to manager Susanna Taylor. Some waste is beyond the store’s control. “Unfortunately, some of the designers don’t make it a priority [to re­cycle],” said Taylor. “They stuff the shoeboxes with plastic and then we have to throw it away. Until they change, we can’t do anything about it.” The store’s only trash is soft plas­tic, which also includes plastic bags and candy

wrappers. “[Recycling and composting] requires the consumer to not buy those packets, and hopefully buy products that are made from recyclable content,” said Hilary Near, Commercial Zero Waste Associate at the San Francisco Department of the Environment. Hedisays Shoes is also trying to cut waste that leaves the store. “When we switched from paper to cloth bags, a lot of people assumed that it would be more expensive,” said Taylor. “But really if you are smart about it and search for products and deals, it really doesn’t hurt your wallet that much to help save the environment. We finally found a vendor that [sells as the same price] as paper bags. It was a win-win for everyone.” San Francisco is the first Califor­nia city with a goal of producing zero waste by 2020. As of Oct. 21, San Francisco resi­dents and small businesses who do not participate in the zero waste program can be fined up to $100, with fines up to $500 for large businesses. Although single-family houses are now affected, multiple tenant buildings will not be fined until 2011. Some citizens, including Peter Gomez, El Potrillo Taqueria owner, whose Bayshore Boulevard taqueria recycles and composts 93 percent of its refuse, think it will be difficult for San Francisco to achieve the zero waste goal. “It would be pretty hard to [re­cycle and compost] 100 percent,” said Gomez. “A can could go in the food section. Mistakes are made.” San Francisco has reduced its trash going into landfills by 72 percent from 1996 levels. “We are well on the way [to di­verting 100 percent],” said Near. Near visits San Francisco schools to teach students about recycling and composting. Education is essential for the city to reach the goal, according to Near. “The younger students are, the more likely they are to incorporate the behavior of composting and recycling in their minds as a daily habit,” said Near.

published 10.30.09 the broadview

San Francisco implemented a zero waste law that most students were uninformed about. I wanted to spread the word about this city goal, especially since households and businesses will face a fine if they do not comply.


Ina Herlihy 21

2. Inquiring mind and investigative persistence resulting in in-depth study or studies of issues important to the local high school audience, high school students in general, or society.

Moth spraying sparks debate

D

espite the public’s concern about potential health issues, the State of California is planning to continue with aerial spraying in San Francisco on August 17 to eradicate the light brown apple moth (LBAM). The once a month spraying over three years will leave particles in the environment even after spraying is finished. “Because of [LBAMB’s] small size, they can be suspended in the air for up to 12 months,” said Paul Schramski, Pesticide Watch State Director. Common symptoms of the spraying in Monterey have been respiratory conditions and headaches, according to activist Mike Lynberg, who has collected hundreds of health complaints. “I went to lunch at 12 the next day after the spraying,” said Lynberg. “Within 10 minutes of being outside I got a sore throat.” Approximately 150 to 250 per 1000 adult Californians experience headaches, wheezing and irritated eyes, without being linked to any specific cause, according to a report by The Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment, Department of Pesticide Regulation and the California Department of Public Health. The state plans to also spray other Bay Area counties including Alameda, Contra Costa, Marin and San Mateo this summer. “The moth poses a risk to the environment and food supply of California because it feeds on plants,” said Steve Lyle, Director of Public Affairs at the California Department of Food and Agriculture (CDFA). “There are 2,000 host plants and 250 crops that they rely on for food.” “The light brown apple moth is a serious threat to California’s forests and agriculture,” said Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger in a press release. “If left uncontrolled, the moth would have a devastating impact on our state’s environment and economy.” Although some of California’s leaders don’t want to risk the state’s multibillion dollar agriculture exports, not all officials are supporting spraying. “The public, no matter what, does not want to be sprayed,” said Senator Carole Migden (DSan Francisco) during a phone interview. “If we don’t spray, then Mexico or Canada will not take California agricultural goods, the federal and state government department of agricultural are saying.”

Others are adamant these concerns of the government are not representative of the light brown apple moth population as a whole. “There is limited damage,” said Jeff Rosendale, grower, horticultural consultant & LBAM co-author. “One bad apple in an orchard is not indicative of the orchard. [The moths] are given the status of a pit bull, when they are really like a chihuahua.” One plan to eradicate the moths is to spray the city through low flying planes, according to Nan Wishner, Chair of the City of Albany Integrated Pest Management Task Force. “They want to release a wasp that will eat the light brown apple moths, but will also eat butterfly eggs,” said Wishner. The spray is effective according to Lyle, because it takes a different approach to the usual use of pesticide. “These are the safest products,” said Lyle. “They are not a conventional product that has been used to kill insects. With the spraying, the moth population dies out because the moths don’t mate. It achieves what the pesticide achieves without hurting anything.” “Arial moth pheromone products have been used in populated places around the United States including Chicago, which has been treated for gypsy moths, and Austin, Texas,” said Lyle. The state had originally scheduled aerial spraying in San Francisco for mid-June, then pushed it back to August 1 and now to mid-August for toxicological testing on possible spray products. “I am confident that the additional tests will reassure Californians that we are taking the safest, most progressive approach to ridding our state of this very real threat to our agriculture, environment and economy,” said Schwarzenegger. The test results are planned to be available to the public at the end of May or in June according to Migden, but assistance from scientists is needed to interpret them. “We are going to continue to get the experts to ask good questions,” said Migden. Migden is introducing legislation, SCR 87 to stop the spraying until proven safe and effective. “I want people to get involved and express their opinions and join the effort if they agree to help people,” said Migden. “This is led by ordinary people. I would ask people to log on to the site http:// stopthespray.org and we can go from there.”

published 5.28.09 the broadview

Many San Franscians did not hear about the proposed moth spraying, so I wanted to spread awareness. Soon after my article was published, the plan was canceled, due to public outcry.


Ina Herlihy 22

2. Inquiring mind and investigative persistence resulting in in-depth study or studies of issues important to the local high school audience, high school students in general, or society.

published 5.25.07 the broadview

“

Since I was in charge of of laying out this page, I needed a Nefertiti photo to accompany the story. I tried calling the Egyptian Museum of Berlin to obtain reprint rights, and when that failed I sent them an e-mail, a fax and a letter in mail. I still received no reply. With the deadline in just a few days, I went to my last resort — an online translator. I sent the request in German through e-mail, and sure enough I received a German response with an attachment of the piece of art within 24 hours.

�


Ina Herlihy 24

2. Inquiring mind and investigative persistence resulting in in-depth study or studies of issues important to the local high school audience, high school students in general, or society.

Unheard epidemic: Not eating

I

n a world where being unhealthily skinny is now considered normal, discussing eating disorders has become a social taboo, despite the fact an estimated 100 million American women suffer from one. “Most times in human history, thinness was not something that was considered attractive,” said clinical psychologist Deb Burgard. “When it is harder to get food, people who are heavier are considered higher status and more attractive. What can happen is that in order to feel like a success, people will try to be as thin as they can get.” Some people consider eating disorders simply a type of diet, a way to lose weight and something that can be quit at anytime. Eating disorders are defined by National Eating Disorders Association (NEDA) as a mental illness, and often times develop after years of already flawed eating habits. How Eating Disorders Start Advertising featuring models who suffer from eating disorders is prevalent from billboards on the freeway to magazine inserts. Peers believe it has become difficult to not believe in these messages about body image. A group of women living in a remote area in Fiji were interviewed before satellite television was installed in the 1990s. The women were re-interviewed three years later as part of a study on the effects of media on their society. “[The study found that] more of the girls had eating disorders,” said Charlotte McCall, who holds a certificate in treating eating disorders. “They were watching a lot of 90210. Girls tried to change their mood, exercise and eating habits to be more like the television movie stars.” Hollywood has made some adolescents believe in Peter Pan’s Neverland. Some think that it is possible to never grow up if you are anorexic. “Anorexia is a state of trying to keep a girlish body,” said family therapist Matt Keck.

“It is a state of not wanting to grow up.” Clinical psychologist Joyce Nash profiles girls with eating disorders as perfectionists with high expectations for themselves. “Young girls get involved in anorexia because they need to control something in an environment that is out of control,” said Nash. “They are overachievers. These girls are the best students. They know how to control what they eat, and force themselves to exercise excessively.” Developing an eating disorder is due to people not knowing what is normal eating because of all the mixed messages that surround us, according Burgard. “If I am giving a speaking engagement, I’ll ask the people in the audience what they think is normal eating,” said Burgarb. “They’ll look at me and they don’t know what to say.” Harmful repercussions Eating disorders, in particular anorexia can have life-long health effects. “As people starve themselves, the body tries to survive by eating up the muscles in the body for nutrients,” said Deborah BrennerLiss Ph.D., Director of the Association of Professionals Treating Disorders. “People get more and more muscle wasting, including the muscle of the heart. The amount of effort from sitting to standing and lying to standing becomes dangerous and people need to be hospitalized.” Eating disorders can weaken the heart, and can lead to bone weakness from a lack of nutrients in food. “Many people with anorexia die of heart failure,” said Nash. “The electrolytes, the substances in the blood that send signals to the heart, keep the heart beating on a regular basis. When the electrolytes go unbalanced then the heart has an irregular beat. When the heart does that, it starts to shake. It is almost having a seizure. That is when you die. The heart stops.” The body tries to protect itself when it is malnourished and on the verge of dying.

published 4.3.09 the broadview

Eating disorders affect so many teenage girls, it was imperative we covered them — especially since we are an all-girls school.


Ina Herlihy 26

2. Inquiring mind and investigative persistence resulting in in-depth study or studies of issues important to the local high school audience, high school students in general, or society.

Concentration has links to memory

S

he carefully reads the chapter while taking notes and high­lighting, recognizing that she would otherwise lose the reason of the assignment. “Usually if you are reading something for the purpose of getting through it, you are going to miss the details,” said senior Maxine Gaspar. “Especially in an academic focus, you need to pay attention to those details because they enhance the purpose of the work.” Learning new information can be improved through concen­trating on one thing at a time. “Reduce any distracting things in the environment such as eating, watching TV and checking your e-mail,” said neuro-psychol­ogist Christina Weyer Jamora. “If you are only doing one or two things, then you will be more likely to remember.” People staying calm and not stressed, helps memory. “If you are under lots of stress, you are not likely to have as good a memory,” said Weyer Jamora. “Whenever you are under increased levels of stress, stress hormones can negatively influence your ability to remember information.” Stress often causes problems for retaining memories. “Stress is an impediment to information that is taken in,” said Bob Osborne, the registered nurse manager for the Memory Clinic at California Pacific Medical Center. “It keeps the information from becoming memory.” People who participate in dai­ly exercise lower their risk of stress by over 40 percent, according to research by Mark Hamer, M.D. at the University College London at Department of Epidemiology and Public Health. “Exercise reduces stress and it has been shown to improve memory power,” said Osborne. “Exercise provides a physical outlet for any stress that you are carrying around with you.” Sleep is also necessary to re­tain information, as memories are printed on the brain during the sleep cycle according to Osborne. Adolescents need eight and a half hours of sleep every night, but only 15 percent of teens get it, ac­cording to a study by the National Sleep Foundation. Memories help trigger infor­mation. “If you are able to connect a memory with a certain emo­tion, you are more likely going to be able

to recall it,” said Weyer Jamora. The format of any test also influences memory retention. For instance, it is easier for the brain to complete multiple-choice questions because it stimulates memory, than to think of content for an essay, according to Weyer Jamora. “The brain is much better at being able to recognize information than retrieving information,” said Weyer Jamora. “If you are able to get a little bit of information, you are most likely going to remember the area. Sometimes the area of the brain needs a jump start.” Through repetition of study patterns, memories become im­printed on the brain more effi­ ciently as well. “Study in a similar place that you are going to take the test,” said Weyer Jamora. “If you are going to take the test in a loud room, then practice in a loud room.” Even people who think they have a bad memory can still im­prove it. “Some people might not be born with a great memory,” said school counselor Courtney Doyle. “But if they practice rehearsing the information they are trying to retain, they have a greater percent­age of retention.” One way people can better their memory is to draw a connec­tion between concepts and their relative images, such as names and faces. “If I saw a name written and your face next to it, that is a way for me to remember you name,” said Doyle. “But some people are more verbal.” Another way to approach memorization is through looking at something from all angles. “Hear it, see it, read it, make it something personal,” said Weyer Jamora. “You are more likely to remember it than if you just cram it down you mind.” “The cramming is able to keep the information for a short amount of time,” said Doyle. To keep the brain active, it must stretch its limits. “Challenge it with new things all the time,” said Osborne. “By challenging it, it keeps learning. It is like exercising your brain. If you stop exercising, muscles get weak.” Gaspar strengthens her mind through her academic goals. “I need to challenge my mind by taking different classes in dif­ferent subject areas,” said Gaspar. “Not just emphasizing one area, but all of the varied courses of­fered. It makes your mind more perceptive and more familiar with a lot of things.”

published 9.19.08 the broadview

Being in a competitive high school, many students strive to achieve their academic best. The intention of my article was to help students learn more about memory, so they could improve their own study habits.


Ina Herlihy 27

2. Inquiring mind and investigative persistence resulting in in-depth study or studies of issues important to the local high school audience, high school students in general, or society.

‘Expensive’ pets fill up SPCA shelter

T

he San Francisco Society for Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (SF­SPCA) is reporting a rise in pet aban­donment because the weak economy has left the guardians unable to care for their pets, which is turning out to be a hardship and a blessing for the agency. “We have witnessed that there are more pet owners that can’t afford treat­ ment, and we try to help them,” said David Tateosian, Chair of the SFSPCA Investment Committee. “We have also seen more instances where people will unfortunately abandon their animals, or if they have adopted their animal they will return it. One of the reasons is because of the cost to take care of an animal.” Expenses for buying and caring for a dog for the first year range from $511 to $6,600, and range from $287 to $2,485 a year thereafter, according to Doctors Foster and Smith Pet Education. “In California, the economy has hit hard in terms of people losing their homes,” said SFSPCA President Jan McHughSmith. “In many places, people have had to give up their pets because they have lost their homes.” California has more houses fore­ closed than any other state at 523,624, according to a CNN Money Special Report, more than doubling 2007 levels. SFSPCA has laid-off 16 percent of its work force and reorganized its budget — including eliminating the Santa Paws social activity where families take a group photo with their pet and Santa Claus. “It is sad that those memories aren’t there,” said SPCA foster parent Dixie

Conner who has worked at Santa Paws for the past four years. “The kids would get larger and the pets would look the same. Probably Santa was sorry, too.” The SPCA is also encountering an unexpected positive effect of the weak economy — more people have free time because they have been laid off from their jobs, and they are fostering animals. “When people are out of work, instead of feeling sorry for themselves, they are deciding they want to use the time to help,” said Alison Lane, SPCA foster care coordinator. “Right now I have 216 foster parents. About 150 are pretty consistent. [We had] about 190 foster parents before the economy went bust.” Fostering pets is a cheaper alterna­tive to adopting because the SPCA provides all of the food and medicine. “You just have to provide all of the litter and love,” said Conner, who has fostered over 500 kittens in the past 10 years. Foster parents are vital in the adop­ tion process because they socialize kit­tens in their homes until the potential pets are old enough to be spayed and neutered meet the adoption weight of two pounds, according to Lane. “We generally foster out 1,100 animals every year,” said Lane. “The majority of kittens that you have seen in the adoption center have been through foster care.” SPCA cats and dogs available for adoption are in the Macy’s windows at Stockton and O’Farrell Streets until Jan. 3. Two live Web cameras are linked to http://www.sfspca.org/.

published 12.17.09 the broadview

I originally thought my story was going to focus on how the SPCA has too many pets because of the weak economy. I found the opposite to be true, so I just changed the angle of my story.


Ina Herlihy 29

2. Inquiring mind and investigative persistence resulting in in-depth study or studies of issues important to the local high school audience, high school students in general, or society.

Health care plan frustrates doctors

T

he health care plan described by President Barack Obama during his address to Congress on Sept. 9 is not the universal health care Americans have been expecting. The American Medical Association (AMA), America’s largest organization of doctors, with 250,000 members, opposes Obama’s health care plan. “The introduction of a new plan threatens to restrict patient choice by driving out private insures, which currently provide coverage for nearly 70 percent of Americans,” a representative said in comments to the Senate Finance Committee. Obama’s proposed plan is to provide universal health insurance to all United States citizens. Instead of Obama’s plan being the “public option,” it might soon become the only option if the plan passes. The private option will have difficulty competing with the government’s public option because it is funded by taxes. “We will reduce costs for business and their workers by picking up the tab for some of the most expensive illnesses and conditions,” said Obama in a campaign stump speech at the University of Iowa. The administration says the health care plan should, “save $2,500

for the typical family,” according to an Obama campaign ad in Iowa. Although the new health care plan is supposed to save people money, it would not protect them like it should. Doctors and nurses will be paid less because they will be put on the government’s payroll. This may cause many to retire early or to change their professions. Since there will be fewer medical practitioners available, there could be a waiting list to make appointments just like in Canada. President Obama has said he is modeling the U.S. health care bill on Canada’s universal health care plan. But that’s not the best idea. Canada’s breast cancer mortality rate is 9 percent higher than the United States’ and prostate cancer is 184 higher, according to the National Center for Policy Analysis. A better option for health reform would be former House Majority Leader Newt Gingrich’s suggestion to pass smaller bills. For tort reform, and cutting fraud and monetary waste out of Medicare and Medicaid. These smaller bills would be more efficient than combining everything into one bill that is over 1,000 pages long. Since Canada’s health care isn’t system isn’t successful, we shouldn’t base our health care on it.

published 9.24.09 the broadview

Living in San Francisco, where most students supported Barack Obama, I wanted to present the other side of the heath care debate to give students a better view of what other people outside the Bay Area believe.


Ina Herlihy 30

3. Courageous and responsible handling of sensitive issues — local or societal — despite threat or imposure of censorship.

Alcoholism rooted in teenage drinking

K

athy Lord spiked the punch bowl in eighth grade and attended the football after-parties serving alcohol sophomore year with her

friends. “It was cool to be in with the in crowd,” said Lord. Forty percent of high school sophomores have admitted to drinking within the past month, according to American Academy of Pediatrics. “I graduated [high school] at 17,” said Lord who is a recovering alcoholic. “In November of my senior year I had enough credits to graduate, but my mother said I was too young. I only had three classes my whole senior year, so I had a lot of free time. I started meeting friends that were a lot older than me.” Contrary to the myth teenage alcohol abuse is more common in the cities, Lord, a Pleasanton native, had access to as much as she wanted. “Alcohol and drugs have no barriers,” said Lord. “If you want it, you are going to get it. We had to ride our bikes for miles, but we still got what we wanted.” Lord said she realized she needed to stop drinking when she was taken to the hospital after poisoning herself with alcohol and a priest was called to administer “last rites.” “I had been throwing up blood for 24 hours and could not stop,” said Lord. “The doctor said if I had not been brought in within one hour I would have been dead.” Lord had several transfusions to replace her blood levels. Lord’s first step to recovery was finding a different group of friends. “You can’t go back to the same friends, because those were the friends you used to drink with,” said Lord. “I had to change my friends that I had known for 30 years. I could not see them anymore because it was not healthy for me, even though I still loved them.” Women cannot handle the same amount of alcohol as men because women’s bodies store less water, according to the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism of the National Institutes of Health. Women have a higher concentration of alcohol in their bodies when they drink the same amount as men. “I couldn’t tolerate it, but I could not just recognize the fact,” said Lord. “If your friends can see it, a real friend would have said stop.” In Lord’s case, no one intervened in her alcoholism. “Had I been talked to as a teenager, I wouldn’t have made the same mistakes at 40 as if they caught

me at 20, or 19, or 18, or 17, or 16,” said Lord. “Those are when I had the red flags, and no one said anything. I was coming home past curfew, and I started telling stories that weren’t true to hang out longer with my friends.” The consequences of Lord’s 35 years of drinking included totaling five cars, receiving two DUIs, losing her job, house, health and losing custody of her son. “I was just very blessed that I never hurt anybody, but my chances of hurting someone were one in one every time I went out,” said Lord. “God is on my side that I never hurt anyone but myself.” Lord admits she inherently hurt her family, because they witnessed her deterioration. “[My son] had to go through all the turmoil of me trying to get sober,” said Lord. “It affected his learning, his self esteem and how he felt about himself.” Children of alcoholics have a higher probability of failing school, anxiety, depression, abuse and negligence due to the parent’s drinking, according to the National Association for Children of Alcoholics. “Now that I am sober [my son] can see that when you make a mistake you can rebuild your life. You don’t have to stay broken, you can rebuild your life and make things better.” Lord’s advice comes from reconstructing her life. “I have gained my self-respect back, which is the most important,” said Lord. “When you can have selfrespect, it doesn’t matter what other people think.” In her first job after becoming sober, Lord was awarded Paratransit Driver of the Year 2003 from Muni. “It was quite the honor after getting my license revoked and showing that I could gain my way back,” said Lord. “These are all fixable errors.” Lord says she refrains from all types of temptation to avoid relapsing, including avoiding the alcohol aisles at the grocery store. “I forget eggs and milk because the eggs are right next to the beer isle, and the milk is right next to the cheese and wine,” said Lord. Lord has been working as an administrative assistant at Walden House, a non-profit substance abuse center, for over a year. “I hope that my experience can help others to ask for help, to recognize when someone needs help and where you can get help,” said a Lord. “It helps keep me healthy, and it reminds me of where I used to be. It’s okay if you make mistake. It can be fixed, and then you can start over.”

published 10.30.09 the broadview

My intended angle for the story was about teenage drinking, but when I interviewed Lord, I immediately knew the story needed to focus on her. I talked to her several times, and she cried each time. Her responses were honest, and I hope teens will rethink drinking.


Ina Herlihy 31

3. Courageous and responsible handling of sensitive issues — local or societal — despite threat or imposure of censorship.

Schools should require eating disorder classes

F

rom glossy magazine covers to Hollywood movies, me­dia are inundated with im­ages of women without a pinch of extra skin, and men with six-pack abs. Bombarded with these images everyday, most people have come to accept them as normal. But they’re not. The fact is eating disorders are prevalent in the modeling industry. Models literally starve themselves to have the “perfect” figure. CSH has integrated sessions into freshmen and sophomore community programs to address eating disorders, but this should be a requirement in elementary and high schools across the coun­try. Although schools cannot provide informational programs for every important issue, eating disorders is a vital and necessary topic. Girls 15 to 19 years old ac­count for 40 percent of newly iden­tified cases of anorexia, according to The National Eating Disorders Association (NEDA). This topic is every bit as im­portant as alcohol and drug abuse education, which is already in place in schools. Such a program needs to pro­vide a distinction between a peer suffering from an eating disorder, and someone who is naturally skinny. Many adolescents cannot comprehend eating disorders, and quickly label peers with having this disorder if they look very slim. People have different eating

habits, and even though someone eats small portions of food, it could simply mean she doesn’t have an appetite. However, eating disorders are not a chosen way of life, like many assume. An eating disorder is a psychological con­dition that takes on average six years to recover, according to clinical psy­chologist Joyce Nash, Ph.D. A stronger focus should be placed on prevention because recovery is such a long and involved pro­cess. For those who are not suc­cessful in recovering from an­orexia, the mortality rate is 12 times higher than any other cause of death for females between the ages of 15 and 24, according to NEDA — higher than depres­sion. A crucial part of any program is teaching adolescents to exercise control by becoming involved in their community. Adolescents often develop eating disorders because they feel a lack of control in their lives. Eating disorders gives them the mentality that they are controlling something, when they are just causing themselves harm. Understanding eating disor­ders and feeling powerful may lead to a decrease in the number of people diagnosed. Only by estab­lishing a mandatory educational program about eating disorders will adolescents be less likely to buy into the media’s images of unrealistic body types.

published 4.3.09 the broadview

The school administration practices prior review and restraint, so I was hesitant that they would cut the story. Because so many girls struggle with this issue, I knew I had to write this opinion piece.


Ina Herlihy 32

3. Courageous and responsible handling of sensitive issues — local or societal — despite threat or imposure of censorship.

Marriage proposition protects, continues tradition

I

n the passing of Proposition 8 last month protects the insti­tution of marriage as a union between a man and a woman. History has defined and accepted this definition for thousands of years, and Proposition 8 contin­ues this tradition. One of the central traditions of marriages is procreation, and redefining marriage for a small minority weakens the institu­tion. Children in public schools would have been taught about “same-sex marriages” as well as traditional marriages if Proposi­tion 8 did not pass. There was already an inkling of this when a San Francisco public school used funds to bus a class of first grad­ers for a field trip to attend their teacher’s same-sex wedding at City Hall in October. Although there is no scientific evidence at the moment, proponents of Proposition 8 argue that teaching about gay marriage confuses children because they won’t be able to fully compre­hend it. Proposition 8 won by a margin of 52.3 percent to 47.7 percent. Voters in California passed Proposition 22 in 2000, which defined marriage as being between a man and a woman, by a margin of 61 to 39 percent. The California State Supreme Court in May called this definition unconstitutional, and thus legalized same-sex marriage. The judges’ decision to redefine marriage went against the patterns of history. This led to churches of many

denominations, including the Catholic, Protes­tant, Orthodox and Latter Day Saints (Mormon), to campaign “in favor of Proposition 8 because of their belief that the traditional understanding and definition of marriage is in need of defense and support, and not in need of being redesigned or re-configured,” said Roman Catholic Archbishop George Niederauer in his Dec. 5 column in Catholic San Francisco. Some proponents of Proposi­tion 8 say homosexual couples who choose to adopt children, put the children at a disadvantage for not living with a mother or father figure. Girls growing up without a father figure are more likely to be sexually active in their teenage years according to a 1996 release by the Indiana Office of the Governor. Soon after the announcement that Proposition 8 won, several gays and lesbians filed lawsuits for discrimination. It is a com­mon misconception to believe Proposition 8 takes away rights from same-sex couples, but Cali­fornia’s Family Code 297.5 states, “Domestic partners shall have the same rights, protections and benefits.” San Francisco passed these domestic partnership laws protecting same-sex couples and heterosexual couples alike in 1990, which California passed in 2005. This effectively gives same-sex couples the same rights and ben­efits as a heterosexual couple have in marriage.

published 12.18.08 the broadview

I was beyond scared when I received this story assignment. Living in the first city that sanctioned singlesex marriages, Proposition 8 was opposed by most San Franciscans. I even heard students say they wanted to kill people who were against gay marriage.


Ina Herlihy 33

3. Courageous and responsible handling of sensitive issues — local or societal — despite threat or imposure of censorship.

Plan B offers alternative to victims in trouble

T

he Food and Drug Administration (FDA) initiated a change late last month to allow 17-year-olds to purchase an emergency contraceptive pill, marketed as Plan B, without a doctor’s prescription. This is a wise decision because it benefits young women who find themselves in need of emergency contraception and who may not otherwise receive it. These women may be victims of rape, or they may be women who are not in control of their reproductive lives. Plan B offers them an alternative. The pill is taken in two doses. The first pill needs to be taken within 72 hours of sexual intercourse, although it is most effective if taken within 24 hours. The second pill is taken 12 hours later. The FDA has allowed women at least 18-years-old to purchase Plan B over the counter since 2006. Judge Edward R. Korman of Federal District in New York ruled in March that the FDA limited the age of distribution without a prescription because of politics, not because of any specific scientific evidence, and he ordered the FDA to lower the age restriction to include 17-year-olds. Pregnancy begins when a fertilized egg becomes implanted to the wall of the uterus, according to science and to federal policy. Plan B prevents ovulation, along with the egg being fertilized. If the

egg is already fertilized after taking Plan B, the pills do not affect it. Therefore, Plan B does not act as an abortion. This should satisfy even religious groups who believe life begins with conception because it does not affect fertilized eggs. Although a victim of rape should report the crime and possibly speak to a counselor, the victim may be dealing with too many emotions during the 72 hours after the event and may not feel comfortable to immediately share the situation with others. The availability of Plan B offers a way for 17-year-old victims to receive help by themselves. Although victims of rape may not be the only users of Plan B, they are the most deserving recipients. This change makes Plan B more accessible by the process of selling them to 17-year-olds at pharmacies without prescriptions. The pills need to be taken in a timely fashion. By the time a woman makes an appointment to receive the pills from her doctor, they may no longer be effective. The FDA has made a wise decision in deciding in lowering the age restriction for purchasing Plan B. Young women now have another option when faced with the possibility of an unplanned pregnancy when they have already been traumatized.

published 5.21.09 the broadview

I knew Plan B was a highly debated topic, but I was not afraid to write an opinion piece about it. I thought students needed to hear about another option to prevent an unplanned pregnancy.


Ina Herlihy 34

4. Variety of journalistic experiences, each handled in a quality manner

“

I always try to tweet breaking news at school and tweet photos whenever applicable. Staff members end their tweets with a backslash and their initials. Twitter also allows alumnae to feel apart of the community they have left.

�


Ina Herlihy 35

4. Variety of journalistic experiences, each handled in a quality manner

I co-presented the session “Planning an edition two years in advance.” at the JEA/ NSPA Convention in Washington, D.C. on Nov. 14, 2009. At the JEA/NSPA Convention in Saint Louis on Nov. 15, 2008, I also copresented a session called “Pushing Past the Velvet Rope: Take the Shot.” I have had so many great opportunities with journalism, I wanted to help other high school journalists have these same great experiences.


Ina Herlihy 36

4. Variety of journalistic experiences, each handled in a quality manner

winter 2008 Blend Magazine

“

My adviser sent the staff an e-mail saying the staff was invited to cover a Mike Huckabee fundraiser. Since I was a freshman, I signed up to photograph him and I thought a junior or senior would interview. But she didn’t arrive, so I interviewed Huckabee as well.


Ina Herlihy 38

4. Variety of journalistic experiences, each handled in a quality manner

published Aug. 6, 2009 The Southern Star

“

I was determined to have my photos published in a newspaper in Ireland over the summer, so I attended many community events, resulting in several of my photos being published as a story of a regional concert.


Ina Herlihy 40

4. Variety of journalistic experiences, each handled in a quality manner

After photographing first lady Michelle Obama at the National Conference on Volunteering & Service, I called The New York Times to see if they would like my photographs. They didn’t have the space online, but they hired me as a freelance photographer. This offer was soon reversed, since they didn’t realize that I was still a minor. This June 25 when I turn 18, I’m applying again as a NYT freelance photographer. I sent the deputy photo editor of Rolling Stone an e-mail requesting to be a freelance photographer. She has forwarded my e-mail to the Web editor, and the photo editor who coordinates live shows.

First lady Michelle Obama speaks at the National Conference on Volunteering & Service on June 22 at the Moscone West Center. Other speakers included Speaker Nancy Pelosi and Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger.


Ina Herlihy 41

4. Variety of journalistic experiences, each handled in a quality manner


Ina Herlihy 42

4. Variety of journalistic experiences, each handled in a quality manner

visit inaherlihy.com for my full photography portfolio

When I apply for photography jobs, the first thing many newspapers and magazines ask for is the URL of my Web site. I realized it was imperative that I launch my own site. I have just been attaching PDF’s of photo stories — and it’s just not the same.


San Francisco Chronicle photographer Michael Macor shows fellow broadview photographer Rena Hunt and myself (far left) the ropes while standing in the press section at Speaker Nancy Pelosi’s Women’s Leadership Tea (top, left). Macor brought us with him to the front of the room when Secret Service escorted photographers in small groups. I sign my name to the “press pool” in the basement of the White House press room, as have most press who have covered the White House (top, right). As soon as Robert F. Kennedy, Jr. stepped out of his car at the Saint Francis of Assisi Church to promote his children’s book, I jumped to the front of the crowd to interview him (bottom).

Journalist of the Year portfolio: Ina Herlihy 2010  

Excerpts from Ina Herlihy's winning Journalist of the Year portfolio. Judges cited outstanding visual presentation, breadth and depth in ter...

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you