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JEAN

NE C ANTO


RESUMÉ

JEANNE MICHELLE CANTO MIAMI, Florida (305) 409-2623 JCANT009@fiu.edu PERSONAL SKILLS

EDUCATION

COMPUTER SKILLS

WORK EXPERIENCE

Motivated and active speaker Hardworking and self motivated Good problem solving skills Proficient in both Windows and Mac AutoCAD Sketchup Pro + Vray Adobe Photoshop CS6 Adobe Illustrator CS6 Adobe InDesign CS6 Rhino + Vray Hand Sketching Microsoft Office Revit (Learning)

LINGUISTIC SKILLS English Spanish French Italian

Florida International University Master of Architecture April 2014 Moss Architects and Design Group Intern, Apr-Aug 2012 RC Group, Structural Engineering Firm Intern, Mar-Aug 2013 Florida International University Graduate Assistant, Aug-Dec 2013

PERSONAL INTERESTS Photography Sketching Digital Art Soccer and Running


TABLE OF CONTENTS

WORKS Genoa Study Abroad

Sketching, Photography

2

Infographics

Graphic Design

8

Materials, Etc.

Plaster Model Making

10

Butterfly Garden

New Materials, Rendering

14

Design | Build

Material Testing, Formwork

18

Sustainable

Vray Rendering, Acoustic

20

Ascension | Canyon

Diagramming, Model, Travel

22

Theater + Lifeguard Center

Drafting

24

Artist Collective

Rendering, Hand drafting

26

Comprehensive Design

Construction Documents

28 1


GENOA

STUDY ABROAD | GENOA THE MARKET PLACE, Brignole

Partners: Giovanni Guadarrama and Tiffany Reyes Reinterpreting the idead of the marketplace was the goal this project aims to realize, a consolidation of two urban scales merged into one. The process of design involved the dissection of the marketplace as we see today and its ultimate reorganization into a striated experience. The typically linear experience has now become an immersive, layered system mediated by walls, screens and pervious barriers. Our conceptual basis began when we analyzed this swath of Genoa that connects the Brignole train station to a monument to Genoa’s seafaring heritage. The expansive site was layered with history and activity, serving as a precedent for our design. Our site converges the medieval fabric with the modern fabric, bridging a gap in the urban condition that disrupts Genoa’s continuity.

2

Model


GENOA Axonometric process plan of the masses that will house and guide people

extend

OR

anomaly

zones

The site spanned from Stazzione Brignole to La Scalinata. We became interested in the strata of activity that occcured between both points, leading to our striated market design. We enhanced the experience of traveling through layers and layers of experience.

walls

instersection

Design Strategy

URBAN FABRIC Axonometric plan of striated intervention

3


GENOA | PHOTOGRAPHY

4 | Elevator


GENOA | PHOTOGRAPHY

While in Genoa we were given an assignment to capture our experience of designing in this new city. I thought the best way to express this was by literally merging to the image of the classroom with the image of the city. Using a pinhole technique, I was able to project the view that we had out from our studio window directly into the classroom. This method took many stages of trial and error to create the best quality image. What I captured was the view of the port, the backbone of Genoa’s prosperity and a mirror to one of Miami’s greatest revenue producers.

5


VENICE |SKETCH

6

Palladio Santa Maria Della Salute


GENOA | PHOTOGRAPHY

No Entry | 7


MASTERS SEMINAR

INFOGRAPHICS DATA + DESIGN

We are in a day and age where data is in surplus and our biggest issue as designers is how to display and use it to our advantage. The process of converting data into a useful and aesthetically pleasing lesson provides many lessons to the creator. In the infographic above, I attempted to track the value of art-related businesses in an area. I gauged this by tracking property value in the area and when galleries opened (and closed). My research determined that the property value increased as more art galleries found their way into the neighborhood. The top row details cultural changes in the areas and influential occurences like the Miami Riots and Miami’s first Art Basel fair.

INFOGRAPHICS On the right is an infographic that breaks down the population of Rio, Brazil in order to bring to light the amount of people living in favelas. The circular format works to express the breaking down piece by piece of the population.

Diagram of Page

8


MASTERS SEMINAR

Over 1.39 million people live in Brazil’s favelas.

9


DESIGN 7

Program adjacencies

MATERIALS ETC. MMC, Miami, Fl

The project that resulted this semester is the culmination of a series of light experiments from the need to provide ideal lighting conditions for the activities that will take place in the fabrication lab. I achieved this through systems that would diffuse, filter and invite light into spaces. This prevents areas from being flooded with direct sunlight, or places becoming dark because they are in the core of the building. Very simply put, when the correct program and pragmatic functions and zone in this matrix are combined, I have achieved the correct lighting. A series of plaster and lighting experiments inspired the way these zones were lit. One example is the woodshop, where I have diffused the light through reflection and through a mass of water. The result is soft light entering a zone where metallic, aka shiny materials, are being used and lighting should not be harsh as to not blind people. In addition, this method creates a lighting effect that adds life and texture to an other-

10

wise bland space. This is a multi faceted detail because similarly to the way that light bleeds into the space during the day, the exterior becomes alive with light when the space in lit from within at night. Activity and life then enhance the building.


DESIGN 7

udio next to the st Site Analysis

Material Light Studies.

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ISSUE

DESIGN 7

SOUTH ELEVATION 1/16”=1

NORTH ELEVATION 1/16”=1

EXAMPLE

THE THICK WALL

LONGITUDINAL SECTION 1/8”=1

SOLUTION TO PARKING

NORTH

TO STUDIO

SECTION A 1/8”=1

LIGHT STUDY

PRINT LAB

PRINT LAB

PAINT SHOP

PAINT SHOP

PLASTIC SHOP

PLASTIC SHOP

OFFICE

OFFICE

SOUTH

TION B 1/8”=1

WOOD SHOP

METAL Metal Shop SHOP

WOOD SHOP

METAL SHOP

VENTILATION DIAGRAM (REFER TO DETAIL 3)

Method of Presentation: Live Diagramming to describe the matrix of opacities in the building.

LIBRARY

PLASTER SHOP

PLASTER SHOP

WOOD SHOP

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SECTION C 1/8”=1

LIBRARY

SOUTH

WOOD SHOP

TEXTURE DIAGRAM


DESIGN 7

ull abenim nonsularet isquit.Uremus rescrem remorevis, us ne in dium ina, manduc te quamque acci sa vivis remurnMintio bera si autem soluptas desequasit es inctat ut quo idipsae cabores cus mo

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DESIGN 10

BUT TERFLY GARDEN OLETA STATE PARK, Miami, FL

Oleta River State Park is the largest urban park in Florida, situated along Biscayne Bay in the Miami metropolitan area. The park offers visitors a large variety of activities from kayaking to mountain biking. On the southern end there is a beach that attracts families with small children. The walk towards the beach does not offer much of a view, which is why we were proposed to design a butterfly garden with a new environmentally friendly material. A mix of cement and mineralized wood from the invasive maleuluca tree would create the material that we were to manipulate in the project. This material is particularly interesting because it has a strength similar to concrete but can be very porous. As a material for floor surfaces, this can be a safe surface to walk on with or without rain as the water would drain right through it and maintain traction. For my design I created an interchangeable system that changes the edge condition of the base segment: the sliver. The sliver’s edge can go from being a retaining wall to a seat, allowing people to appreciate the butterfly ecosystem as they walk along the path. The flexibility of the module allows for many configurations like the one above, as an outdoor class.

14


DESIGN 10

Outdoor classroom as illustrated on opposite page

15


DESIGN 10

16


DESIGN 10

DESIGN | BUILD OLETA RIVER STATE PARK, Miami, FL

The Oleta butterfly project was particularly fulfilling due to the design and build aspect. Along with the design we were asked to turn build full scale models using a mineralized wood and cement mix, which the class would call “woodcrete”. We began by testing different proportions of wood, cement, aggregate and water to see which mixes would be the most favorable for our final product. The best texture would have enough water and cement to fully coat the wood but still maintain a porous surface to drain water.

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The entire process gave us hands-on experience unlike any other class I had taken. One of the most difficult steps in producing a final product was designing the formwork. The goal is to be efficient with the material when building them and thinking of how to the formwork will be removed once the material is ready. The “woodcrete” also has to be compacted once in the formwork, so creating a well designed and strong form is also a key.


DESIGN 10

We tested a variety of woodcrete mixes that would vary the final molds porosity and texture. The best mix included more water in order to fill corners and create a sharp, refined mold.

The piece that I designed for the Oleta installation was a trellis designed to encourage passionflower to grow along it. The passionflower is the host plant for Florida’s butterfly, the Zebra Longwing.

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SUSTAINABLE

MIC | SUSTAINABLE FIU Biscayne Bay Campus

Partners: Eneida Pi単on and Jamie Musgrave The Media Interactive Center is a school for the Media school at the BBC campus. The school required additional space to hold classrooms, offices, an auditorium for lectures and rooms for video and sound recording. We looked to the site for inspiration and based our concept on the three ecosystems available to animals in the mangrove plant: the water, the roots and the canopy.

20

Plan of Third Floor


Auditorium acoustical design.

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

SUSTAINABLE

SUPPLY AIR COLD

DE-SUPER HEATER RETURN AIR

HOT

P

P

STORAGE TANK

MANIFOLD WITH CIRCULATOR PUMP(S)

GROUND LOOP CONNECTION

N

E

W

FLAT GLASS CONCAVE CONVEX FROSTED OPAQUE

S Diagram of glass opacities dictated by interior program.

Diagram on top of page: The stages of design can be simplified into four stages. The first move we made to connect to the school was to raise the mass of the school above the ground floor level. Step two involves implementing vertical circulation. Step three connects the three circulation “tubes” with amorphous floor plates that would allow sunlight you shine to the central courtyard (as demonstrated in the image to the left). Finally, a diagrid skin is applied with varying glass opacities depending on the program. Concave and convex glass will also invite viewers to view out from the building.

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DESIGN 5

ASCENSION | CANYON OCCUPYING A SPATIAL FISSURE

After exploring the Grand Canyon I was fascinated with the rock layers and the many experiences related with the rock faces, edges, and plateaus. The layers of deposited and hardened rock are simple to connect with the idea of ‘ascension.’ The face of the canyon has this texture that also exhances it through light. The projecting layer cast shadows on the ones below and create a fascinatin interplay between shadow and light. These apparent voids blur the condition of actual crevices in the canyon and simply the lack of light. I began my project as a very literal interpretation of a canyon and broke by literally disengaging the undulating ‘canyon’ walls and create a wall-like object that mediates the user from one elevation to another. The higher portion is reminiscent of the plateaus while the lower end is relaying the idea of the descent into the canyon and the many experiences that accompany it.

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layers

DESIGN 5 A

layers

layers

B

layers

Exploded axonometric.

layers

layers

Plan A

Plan B ASCENSION | Moss | Jeanne Canto | Axonometric at 3/16”:1’

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plane. The joining sector that wou tion core. The core itself becomes the large space. This atrium then s Zone 3 is meant what I call “the th shopping, eating, or heading to th sit and relax, or set up a picnic. W ing park, it has everything they ne nates the structure and park to len shares. 

DESIGN 5

PROGRAMadjacencies

I took the program and divided it into  mostly square sections. I spent most of the  time dividing the program into sections that  have relating uses, whether it be similar  program or have similar people using it. 

NODEdev

After choosing whichpieces should be together, I also dealt with vertical adjacency  and which pieces could be stacked. 

The form that came about was a tower with  seperate theater segment. 

PARKexte

FORMof building AXONOMETRIC 1/8"=1' + =

Zone1

Zone2 + 3

Theater + Lifeguard Tower

&

Interior

Atrium Space for Circulation

THEATER + LIFEGUARD LUMUS PARK, Miami Beach, FL

The Miami Beach Theater and Lifeguard Center holds two very different programs to have to integrate into one building. Where one building is meant to house and audience of 150+ people that are there to watch a performance, the other needs to have private showers for the lifeguards, the “second audience,” that work on Miami Beach. I felt that the simplest way to decipher this set of program would be to work with a conceptual model that would help me see the physical adjacencies of the segments. The form that coincidentally ended up occurring was two separate entities: a tower for the lifeguards and an emphasized theater portion that holds both theater spaces in the same vertical plane. The joining sector that would connect these two “zones” would become an articulated circulation core. The core itself becomes a performance space with steel stairs that are like an object within the large space. This atrium then spills out to join the first level park and zone 3 with the building. Zone 3 is meant what I call “the third audience,” the pedestrians that walk on Ocean Drive, who are shopping, eating, or heading to the beach. This zone serves them with showers, restrooms, places to sit and relax, or set up a picnic. Whether their destination is the beach, Ocean Drive, or the neighboring park, it has everything they need. At night zone 3 transforms into a lighting element, that illuminates the structure and park to lend the building the playful night characteristic that the rest of Ocean shares.

24


DESIGN 5

1/8” = 1’ 1/16” = 1’

CUT FACING SOUTH

CUT FACING NORTH

1

3

2

4

B

D

5

B

6

D

C

Dining Hall

Kitchen A

Backstage

Outdoor Theater

Third Floor

Plans1/8" = 1'

Second Floor

25


DESIGN 6

Rendered Section

ARTIST COLLECTIVE SAVANNAH, Georgia

The shadow profile of Savannah invokes information concerning circulation through the city including the pedestrian pathways, and vehicle traffic. It becomes a transition from the public vehicle traffic to the interior housing ward. The profile actively engages both these general spaces as the moment of threshold. The site is along Bull Street, a main pedestrian path that commercially connects to the river. By overlaying this threshold to my site it establishes a new threshold from the public exterior to the private interior. This same threshold turned vertically will house different activities in an attempt to create an individual experience within the communal living conditions. As you move up these levels the profile of the previous floors activity engages the next and dictates its usage. As a result, the section begins to shift in every direction giving ambiguity to what seems like a defined threshold. The plans emphasized shifting section again, horizontally to break the defined edge of the exterior public garden path and the interior studio spaces. The room threshold allows for individuality within the units. The jogging of gallery – dorm –

ing their personal vertical connection makes the ideological feeling of oneness for the individual. The way the entrance meets the city, allows for expansion from the private galleries. The intermediate gallery area that can be fully opened into an exterior/interior place blurs the threshold. As you move up the dorms share that quality. The bull façade is going to be open. The interior hallways will be connected to the studio space by the staircase that will reflect the second floor staircase.

studio – dorm emphasizes the lifestyle and interconnectedness of the inhabiting artists and their craft. Despite this, hav-

26

M

P


DESIGN 6

Detail Elevation

2 1

1

1 1

3

5

33

3

2

2 2

SECOND FLOOR FOURTH FLOOR

THIRD FLOOR

1. DORMITORY 1. DORMITORY 2. 2. INTERIOR PORCH INTERIOR PORCH 3. 3. ATRIUM ATRIUM

1. STUDIO PORCH 2. KITCHEN 3. STUDIO 5. ATRIUM

Two different room layouts which SECOND FLOOR 1. DORMITORY demonstrate how the floors push in and out. 2. INTERIOR PORCH 3. ATRIUM

27


COMPREHENSIVE DESIGN

COMPREHENSIVE DOWNTOWN Miami, FL

One of the biggest issues of Downtown is how after dark the urban climate dramatically changes from a busy shopping and business district to a seedy, and seemingly unsafe area. By designing my building as a cultural living room and applying a glowing facade, I feel that I am able to encourage people to inhabit my Downtown building not only during the day, but at night. The side walk is extended into my building and allows people to walk under the shelter of it. While they walk past they can look through into the “lounge� area that includes the lobby for the auditorium. The final space they see is a garden, separate from the busy street and serving as a quiet get away for students, faculty and community members alike.

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UP

SD

K SD EXIT

A

SD

A

UP

EXIT

SD

C

A

EXIT

B SD

SD

JULY 08, 2013

B

Jeanne Canto

EXIT

LIFE SAFETY PLAN 1/16" = 1'-0"

2nd Ave

Comprehensive Design ARC 5361

Jeanne Canto

Comprehensive Design ARC 5361

JULY 08, 2013

FLOOR PLANS 1/16 " = 1'-0"

COMPREHENSIVE DESIGN

REVISIONS

GRADE

2nd Ave

A 2.1

GRADE

REVISIONS

EXIT

SD

B

LF1.1

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COMPREHENSIVE DESIGN

3

Jeanne Canto

JUNE 12, 2013

GRADE

BUILDING ENCLOSURE: SECTION & AXONOMETRIC 3/8 " = 1-0''

REVISIONS

S3

30

Comprehensive Design ARC 5361


COMPREHENSIVE DESIGN

3

Jeanne Canto

JUNE 12, 2013

GRADE

BUILDING ENCLOSURE: SECTION & AXONOMETRIC 3/8 " = 1-0''

REVISIONS

S4

Comprehensive Design ARC 5361

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Architecture Portfolio - Jeanne Canto  

Master of Architecture 2014 Florida International University JeanneCanto.com

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