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5TH RIPESS INTERNATIONAL MEETING OF SOCIAL SOLIDARITY ECONOMY Building SSE as an Alternative Model of Development October 15-18, 2013, Manila, Philippines Asian Solidarity Economy Council

Intercontinental Network for the Promotion of the Social Solidarity Economy

Mabuhay! th

RIPESS will celebrate the 20 anniversary of its global forum on the occasion of the 5th International Meeting of SSE in Manila on October 15-18, 2013. This will be the first time the RIPESS international meeting will be hosted in Asia. Confirmed resource speakers to date include. Michael Lewis, Executive Director, Canadian Centre for Community Renewal (British Columbia); Emily Kawano, Executive Director, Institute of Popular Economics (USA); Nancy Neamtan, President, Chantier de l’economie sociale (Quebec); Datuk Dr. Denison Jayasooria, Principal Research Fellow, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia (Malaysia); Chilo Villareal, Rural Coalicion (Mexico); Luis Eduardo Salcedo, President, RIPESS Latin America & the Caribbean (Colombia); and Daniel Tygel, RIPESS Operations Manager (Brazil). RIPESS traces its roots to the early 1990s during which local and regional SSE movements began to forge global connections to support and promote community-based economic projects as key elements of alternative social organization. To provide an enduring platform for exchange and updates of SSE concepts and practices, SSE practitioners and advocates established an international forum on the globalization of SSE.

Four international meetings have already been organized over a period of 16 years. The first international meeting of SSE movements was held in Lima, Peru in September 1997 with almost 400 participants from 35 countries. Solidarity economy was defined in this meeting as an economy that incorporates cooperation, collective sharing and action, while putting the human being at the center of economic and social development. Since then, international meetings are held every 4 years, alternating the host between Northern and Southern countries. The second meeting was held in Quebec, under the slogan “Resist and Build”, with over 400 participants. At the end of the meeting, the International Liaison Commission (ILC) was established. It served as an instrument for fostering sustainable dialogue between continents, inducing the creation of a resisting rally against neo-liberal globalization management and strategies, and creating effective and sustainable alternatives. The ILC then decided on its first internal meeting to adopt the name “RIPESS”. The third meeting was held in Dakar, Senegal in November 2005 under the slogan “Empowering People”, with 1200 participants.

It was jointly organized by RIPESS and the Senegalese Social Solidarity Economy Group (GSESS) and gave Africa the opportunity to share its vision of the social solidarity economy with countries of other continents. th

The 4 International Meeting on the Globalization of Solidarity was held in Luxemburg in April 2009, under the slogan “Another economy exists: the innovations of the social and solidarity economy”, with 700 participants. It was jointly organized by RIPESS and the Institut Européen de l’Economie Solidaire (INEES). The meeting allowed participants from all continents to Illustrate, Debate, and make Proposals on thirteen specific themes such as public policies, responsible production and consumption, environment and food sovereignty. th

The 5 global forum of SSE in Manila, Philippines on October 15-18, 2013 will focus on the theme “Building SSE as an alternative model of development”. It aims to uphold SSE as a durable alternative to the market-oriented culture of neoliberal globalization.


5th RIPESS International Meeting on SSE

October 15-18, 2013, Manila, Philippines

What is Social Solidarity Economy? Ordinary people throughout the world today have become victims of, and increasingly marginalized by, the environmental, social justice, resource and sustainability crises the world is currently facing in alarming proportion. Many have become dissatisfied with the market-oriented economy unleashed by neoliberal globalization. They have come to the realization that the basis for the unrelenting crisis is a deeply distorted and distorting economic system. They are trying new ways of generating livelihoods and providing services. These initiatives contribute to the co-creation of a new model of development called social solidarity economy (SSE). These SSE initiatives all share a common set of operative values: cooperation; autonomy from centralized authorities; sharing of human responsibilities towards people, the biosphere, and the economy; participatory self-management by collaborating stakeholders; and equitable distribution of material benefits.

SSE is an economy in which ordinary people play an active role in shaping their economic lives. Self-management and collective ownership in the workplace and in the community is a central aspect of SSE governance. It has a focus on the advancement of human rights of all the people, the empowerment of women and other marginalized groups, as well as antipoverty and social inclusion work. SSE is an ethical and values-based approach to development (as opposed to growth) that prioritizes the welfare of people and planet over profits and blind growth. SSE is devoted not to the expansion of private profit regardless to ecological and human costs, but to the achievement of social, ecological, and economic justice. It cares for the Earth and enhances the creation of sustainable, humane and culturally rich futures for the inhabitants of our planet. It upholds the values of: solidarity/ mutualism/cooperation/reciprocity, including globalization of solidarity;

social, political and economic democracy; equity/justice for all including the dimensions of gender, race, ethnicity, class, age, sexual orientation, etc; pluralism/ inclusivity/ diversity/ creativity; territoriality/ localism/subsidiarity, and supports decisionmaking and management at the local level. Organizations traditionally associated with SSE are cooperatives (worker, producer, consumer, credit unions, housing, etc), and the mutual guarantee/aid associations (selfhelp groups, savings & credit associations, neighborhood and community associations). These are expressions of self-management and collective ownership. In more recent years, many new institutional forms of mutual cooperation outside the cooperative movement sprang to life as globalization brought about widespread marginalization of workers, small producers, and professionals. They include unemployed or landless worker mutual-aid organizations, joint purchase associations, self-managed enterprises, community-owned enterprises, and commons.

Relevance of SSE to Developed and Less Development Countries One of the main weaknesses of neoliberal, market-oriented economy is its inability to arrest economic marginalization of the vast majority of the people and eradicate poverty. This owes to its fundamental focus on profit and economic growth rather than on social development and ecological conservation, as well as to the State’s policy and incentives bias towards big companies and multinationals whose profit and economic growth do not necessarily trickle down to ordinary people. This is true in both developed and less developed countries where economies are market-oriented and profit-driven. These economies cannot escape further economic atrophy in the 21st century without people’s participation in entrepreneurial activities and the attendant democratization of job and wealth creation. SSE is relevant to both developed and less developed countries because it is an antidote to the economic deterioration that neoliberal globalization has brought about. Even in a highly developed countries today, pockets of poverty are evident in urban and rural areas. SSE is an alternative economy in which organized groups of individuals play an active role in shaping their economic lives. Self-management and collective ownership in the workplace and in the community is a central aspect of SSE governance. This implies that the chain of economic activities in SSE - from input supply, to production, distribution and consumption - are undertaken by organized groups of individuals.

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SSE as an ethical and values-based approach to development (as opposed to growth) is also relevant in reorienting and reorganizing the economic activities of the people. SSE prioritizes the welfare of people and planet over profits and blind growth. SSE is devoted not to the expansion of private profit regardless to ecological and human costs, but to the achievement of social, ecological, and economic justice. It has a focus on the advancement of human rights of all the people, the empowerment of women and other marginalized groups, as well as anti-poverty and social inclusion work. It cares for the Earth and enhances the creation of sustainable, humane and culturally rich futures for the inhabitants of our planet. Finally, SSE is highly relevant to territories as it upholds the key role played by cooperatives and social enterprises in advancing local development. Organizations traditionally associated with SSE are the cooperatives and the mutual guarantee/aid associations. These are expressions of self-management and collective ownership. In more recent years, many new institutional forms of mutual cooperation outside the cooperative movement sprang to life as neoliberal globalization brought about widespread marginalization of workers, small producers, and professionals. They include unemployed or landless worker mutual-aid organizations, joint purchase associations, selfmanaged enterprises, community-owned enterprises, and commons.


5th RIPESS International Meeting on SSE

October 15-18, 2013, Manila, Philippines

RIPESS and the Global Movement of SSE VISION

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The vision of RIPESS is an economy that makes it possible for all the people to have access to the material, intellectual and spiritual resources that guarantee their dignity; that promotes the respect for individual, social and economic rights; that stimulates democratic participation in economic decision making and citizen control of the operation of the markets and the intervention of the State; that push for the adoption of environmental and social responsibility criteria in production, distribution and consumption; and finally, that strives for social and gender equality in wealth distribution.

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MISSION The mission of RIPESS is to build and promote social solidarity economy, taking into account the social and ethical dimension in all economic activities. This consists of producing, exchanging and consuming goods and services that correspond to the economic and social needs of the local and international community, and the establishment of harmonious relations between competitors in economic sphere. OBJECTIVES The objectives of RIPESS are: -

To support the creation and consolidation of national and continental networks for the promotion of the social solidarity economy and its interconnection at continental and intercontinental levels.

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To enable services and exchanges directed to develop management capabilities and political incidence of the social solidarity economy actors at continental and intercontinental levels. To influence multilateral public organizations and international civil society organizations in order to promote social solidarity economy worldwide. To contribute to the social and political recognition of social solidarity economy as a sustainable with social equity development strategy worldwide. To promote with criteria of North-South rotation, periodic spaces for the analysis, projections and evaluation of the actions taken by the international social solidarity economy movement worldwide. To mobilize persons, financial and material resources in order to comply with its institutional objectives.

GLOBAL NETWORK As of yearend 2012, the RIPESS global network consists of 80 SSE networks in 148 countries in 6 continents - Africa, Asia, Latin America, Europe, North America, and Oceania. Of the 80 SSE networks, 18 are continental networks and 62 are national and local/ territorial networks. As a network of networks, RiPESS brings together continental networks, that in turn bring together national and sectoral networks. RIPESS believes in the importance of global solidarity in order to build and strengthen an economy that puts people and planet front and center.

Provisional Program for the 5th International Meeting

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5th RIPESS International Meeting on SSE

October 15-18, 2013, Manila, Philippines

Measuring and Evaluating SSE Performance: The 5 Dimensions One of the challenges faced by advocates and researchers is the lack of a common framework for measuring and evaluating SSE performance. Available literature is confined mainly to descriptions of activities and programs of organizations or networks involved in solidarity-based initiatives. The lack of performance standards has constrained in-depth inquiry into the direction and magnitude of contributions of SSE to the great transition towards an alternative development model with the triple bottom line of social development, ecological conservation, and economic sustainability. In response to this challenge, the Asian Solidarity Economy Council (ASEC) embarked on an action research for conceptualizing, measuring, and evaluating SSE performance, based on a common understanding of SSE indicators. Upon determination of strategic dimensions of a shared vision of SSE, an evaluation tool was developed by constructing indicators for each dimension and providing a performance scorecard. The Asian Solidarity Economy Council (ASEC) pilot tested the evaluation tool on a limited scale of 15 case studies: nine from Indonesia, five from the Philippines and one from Cambodia. The action research illustrated the usefulness of supply chain analysis in SSE performance evaluation and its advantages over the individual enterprise method of analysis. But the evaluation tool could still be improved. ASEC welcomes the collaboration of other organizations and networks in extending the action research to other countries. The ASEC evaluation tool features five major attributes of SSE: socially responsible governance, edifying values, social development services, ecological conservation measures, and economic sustainability. Socially Responsible Governance Governance of any organization is said to be socially responsible when it is socially inclusive, participatory/ democratic, just, and equitable. SSE is defined as an economy in which organized groups of individuals play an active role in shaping their economic lives. It constitutes a durable alternative to capitalism as well as other authoritarian, state-dominated economic systems. SSE also encourages the democratic participation of civil society in the political and socio-economic governance of nations and strengthens the society’s capacity for justice, equity, and sustainable economy. Self-management and collective ownership in the workplace and in the community is another central aspect of SSE governance. Cooperatives, mutual guarantee/aid associations and other institutional forms of mutual cooperation are expressions of self-management and collective ownership. In Africa the term cooperatives is avoided due to negative connotations. Instead they use the term collegial management. In Cambodia, the term cooperative is associated with the repressive communist regime. Cambodians prefer to use the term ‘social enterprise’. SSE has a focus on the empowerment of women and other marginalized groups, as well as anti-poverty and social inclusion work. It advances the human rights of all the people, including migrants and overseas residents whose number is growing in the age of globalization, as well as those who are characterized as ‘weak’, ‘marginalized’, and ‘excluded’.

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Edifying values SSE is an ethical and values-based approach to economic development (as opposed to growth) that prioritizes the welfare of people and planet over profits and blind growth. It upholds the values affirmed in the RIPESS Charter which includes: •

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solidarity/mutualism/cooperation/reciprocity, including globalization of solidarity (as opposed to neoliberal, market-oriented globalization) social, political and economic democracy equity/justice for all including the dimensions of gender, race, ethnicity, class, age, sexual orientation, etc. sustainable development pluralism/inclusivity/diversity/creativity territoriality/localism/subsidiarity, supports decision-making and management on as local a level as makes sense.

Triple bottom line: social development, ecological conservation, and economic sustainability The other three attributes of SSE are social development services, ecological conservation measures, and economic sustainability. These attributes are also generally referred to as the “triple bottom line”. In contrast to the market-oriented neoliberal economy which devotes to the expansion of private profit regardless to ecological and human cost, SSE is committed to the achievement of social, ecological, and economic justice. It cares for the Earth and enhances the creation of sustainable, humane and culturally rich futures for the inhabitants of our planet (Clammer, 2011). SSE pursues sustainable development by restoring the diversity and vibrancy of local territories/ communities, and revives indigenous means of generating employment for the people (Asian Solidarity Economy Forum Declaration, Tokyo, 2009).

Them atic Topics for the 5 th International Meeting 1 - State of the Art of SSE: updates on the breadth and depth of SSE networks in different parts of the world, their programs and activities, and the results of their interventions. 2 - Global vision of SSE: listening to the voices and thoughts on the ground and revisiting the global vision of SSE. 3 - SSE experiences in the territories: taking stock of the more recent SSE experiences while keeping tabs of developments in much earlier initiatives. 4 - Global networking and organizing: establishing links with social movements, networks and economic sectors to broaden and deepen the SSE outreach 5 - Communication and visibility of SSE: overcoming communication barriers across different sectors of the economy and enhancing the visibility of SSE.


5th RIPESS International Meeting on SSE

ASEC CALL FOR PAPERS - ASIA

October 15-18, 2013, Manila, Philippines

Proposal Submission Forum (Extended Abstract)

Last day for submission of proposal: May 31, 2013 Applicable only to residents of countries in Asia info.ssegf2013@gmail.com The Asian Solidarity Economy Council (ASEC) invites researchers and experts from universities, academic and research institutions from Asian countries to submit proposals for papers that critically examine social solidarity economy (SSE) as an alternative model of development. The key themes are as follows. 1 - State of the Art of SSE 2 - Global Vision of SSE 3 - SSE experiences in the territories 4 - Global networking and organizing 5 - Communication & Visibility of SSE To participate in the Call for Papers, please submit the following to info.ssegf2013@gmail.com by May 31, 2013: •

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An extended abstract (500-1,000 words) outlining the territorial focus (community/country), main issues, hypotheses, arguments, case studies to be considered, and structure of the paper. CV (150 words, including nationality) and full contact details

By June 30, 2013, successful candidates will be notified and invited to submit a full paper (approximately 6,000 words), due not later than August 31, 2013. Some candidates will also be invited to prepare shorter think pieces of approximately 1,500 words for publishing in the RIPESS Global Facebook page and global promotion. Proposal alone will not be accepted for the final conference and will not necessarily entitle the proponent to an invitation to submit a full paper.

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5th RIPESS International Meeting on SSE

October 15-18, 2013, Manila, Philippines

Thematic Topics of the 5th International Meeting 1. State of the Art of SSE th

At the 5 RIPESS International Meeting, each continental network will present a report on the State of the Art of SSE in their respective continents. In order to provide inputs for the continental State of the Art report, authors focusing on this topic are enjoined to study and analyze the performance in 2012 of at least 10 SSE organizations per country on the following items, at the minimum: (a) The organization’s outreach and operations - name, address, email address and website of the organization - principal activities/programs of the organization - estimate of member-clients of the organization - amount of assets of the organization - total gross revenues/receipts of the organization - total expenditures of the organization (b) Results of any performance or impact assessment of the organization’s SSE activities 2. Global Vision of SSE th

Participants of the 5 RIPESS International Meeting will draft a global vision of SSE. To provide relevant inputs for this session, researchers focusing on this thematic topic are enjoined to compile and synthesize the prevailing concepts of SSE in the concerned country. The research method may consist of a literature review or an interview via telephone, email, skype or other electronic means. In case of the latter method, at least 20 individuals should be covered by the interview. The report should suggest ways and means of enabling SSE practicioners and advocates to consolidate and synthesize the SSE concepts at the individual level for the purpose of forming a shared vision of SSE at the country or territorial level. 3. SSE Experiences in the Territories In contemporary economics, the scope of analysis is either at the microeconomic (the primary enterprise or household) level or the macroeconomic (aggregate of enterprises or households) level. If the researcher were to focus on a single cooperative, he/she could only observe the solidarity-based activities among the organizations that are involved in the production, financing, distribution and consumption of a given product or service in a given territory. A ‘territory’ may consist of a local village/community, a municipality, or a province. Within a territory, one might find a variety of solidarity-based organizations. Each of these organizations organize solidarity work among their members around a unique product or service. They are either part of a multi-stakeholder supply chain or they have developed their own supply chain by internalizing the basic functions of input supply, production, financing and distribution down to the final user. A supply chain is a fundamental unit of inter-organizational collaboration at the industry level. It requires the cooperation of various stakeholders (input suppliers, producers, distributors, financiers, and final users/consumers) to ensure the creation of value added to existing resources of a territory and that the resulting product is of good quality, it meets the needs of the people, and it is accessible. The supply chain is, therefore, vital

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in elaborating a shared responsibilities approach to development. This stands in contrast to the single enterprise focus which emphasizes individualistic pursuit and competitive drive towards economic growth. All economic supply chains take resources from the biosphere, including base metals and non-renewable energy, as inputs for commodity production. They also throw out wastes into the biosphere from every stage of production to end-user consumption. Because the supply of energy and base metals is not infinite, a development model oriented towards sustained growth will reach its limits as natural resources are depleted. Stakeholders of the supply chain will, therefore, have to take a decision whether to continue with the profit-growth model or to make a transition to the triple bottom line model. The SSE supply chain is unique because it includes selfmanaged enterprises of the poor, socially excluded, and economically disadvantaged as co-equal stakeholders. The institutional forms of SSE supply chains are varied. There can a a purely cooperative-based supply chain – the input supplier is a cooperative, the producer is a cooperative, the marketing channel is a cooperative, and the end-users are cooperative members. Or it can be a purely social enterprise supply chain – the input supplier is a social enterprise, the producer is a social enterprise, the marketing channel is a social enterprise, and the end-users are ethical consumers. But in an imperfect world, the supply chain with which a SSE organization (e.g. cooperative or social enterprise) is associated will be more likely a mixed entity where stakeholders ma include government extension service agencies, for-profit private companies, cooperatives, social enterprises, NGOs, self-managed enterprises of the poor/ socially excluded/economically disadvantaged, and marketinfluenced (in contrast to values-oriented) consumers. th

At the 5 RIPESS International Meeting, participants will examine both the structure and performance of supply chains where SSE organizations are involved. Researchers dealing with this thematic topic may choose from two options in research methodology: First option: take a broad view of the SSE movement in the country and deal with the following research questions: (a) What actions/innovations are being undertaken by SSE to link/connect (ethical) producers and (ethical) consumers? (Note: Fair trade producers are examples of ethical producers and those who buy fair trade products are examples of ethnical consumers. Some cooperatives and mutual guarantee associations may also be deemed to be ethical producers in the sense that they do not exploit labor and/or destroy the biosphere in the process of producing their products/services. Those who buy from such SSE organizations can be considered ethical buyers, too.) (b) What actions/innovations are being undertaken by SSE to link/connect (ethical) production and solidarity/social finance? (c) What concrete actions/innovations are being undertaken by SSE to create an alternative market for SSE products and services at the local, national and international levels? (d) What actions/innovations are being undertaken by SSE that contribute to territorial development?


5th RIPESS International Meeting on SSE

October 15-18, 2013, Manila, Philippines

Continued… Second Option: Conduct a case study of a particular supply chain where an SSE organization is involved. The researcher needs at the outset to situate the SSE organization in a supply chain by identifying the other enterprises with which it interacts in the process of producing and delivering its products/services. Once the other stakeholder-enterprises of the supply chain are determined, the case study can then evaluate the performance of each stakeholder enterprise in terms of the 5 dimensions elaborated below. The researcher may propose a performance scoring system for purposes of evaluating SSE performance. (a) socially responsible governance: What are the governance practices of the organization? Which of these governance practices are associated with SSE organizations? Is the said SSE governance practice implemented by the organization frequently/strongly? (b) ethical values: What ethical principles/values are being adopted by the organization? Which of these ethical principles/ values are associated with SSE organizations? Is the said SSE ethical principle/value carried out by the organization frequently/ strongly? (c) triple bottom line: Which of the three (3) bottom lines – social development, ecological conservation, and economic sustainability – are pursued by the organization as organizational goals? What are the measures undertaken by the organization to achieve these goals? Are these measures being implemented frequently/strongly? The gender factor can be integrated into the above dimensions, e.g. how are women represented in governance and how do they participate in governance; what ethical values do women contribute to the values formation of the stakeholders; what social development services are undertaken by women; what environmental conservation measures are particularly contributed by women; and how do women contribute to the overall sustainability of the supply chain? 4. Global Networking and Organizing ASEC recognizes the importance of linking with social movements because ‘we’ can’t do it alone. Moreover, the supply chain/shared responsibilities approach to development naturally requires networking at the local, national and global levels. There are many fertile bases that hold great potential to develop as allies. Some of these bases are partially aligned with, but are not part of, the social solidarity economy such as the popular economic/informal sector. Others identify with a particular aspect, such as green, organic, or fair trade, that is aligned with social solidarity economy values, but may be in conflict with other values in important, structural ways. Nonetheless there is great potential to build alliances and mutually supportive collaborations. The popular or informal sector of the economy is very important given that many people, particularly in the global South, depend on it for their livelihoods. The popular economy is comprised of economic activities that are not covered by formal arrangements such as taxation, labor protections, minimum wage regulations, unemployment benefits, or documentation. Many self-employed workers, microenterprises, traders, and mutual aid practices are part of the popular economy. The popular economy is not the same as the social solidarity economy, but is aligned in many ways because the actors often

find collective ways to provide for social and economic needs, such as lending circles, community kitchens, mutual aid, mutual insurance systems and so forth. In Venezuela, the Ministry of Popular Economy is very close in their orientation to the social solidarity economy. th

At the 5 RIPESS International Meeting, participants will identify economic sectors with which social solidarity economy can build business links. Researchers dealing with this thematic topic shall deal with the following research issues: (a) What are the network initiatives that are necessary for reinforcing the global vision in the following dimensions: finances, public policies, and research and education? (b) What are the key actors (social movements, institutions, government structures) with which we should establish strategic links? (c) What actions are undertaken by SSE enterprises to link/ connect with local, national, and international networks? How SSE expands membership locally and internationally? (d) What are the challenges in establishing such institutional linkages? 5. Communication and Visibility of SSE Since the framework of the SSE is relatively unknown, we must engage in raising awareness about, and engagement with, the SSE. The target audience includes the general public, potential allies, and practitioners who are part of the SSE, but who do not identify within the framework. Two central strategies to raise visibility are: (a) education – education about the SSE and its many aspects can take many forms, including workshops, forums, trainings, seminars and classes. Education is often the first step in the process of SSE mobilization, organizing or economic development. (b) Communication, media, social media – articles, books, video, media coverage are all important ways of raising awareness about the SSE. We need to develop a library of these resources. th

At the 5 RIPESS International Meeting, participants will reflect on and suggest strategies for overcoming communication barriers across different sectors of the economy and enhancing the visibility of SSE. Researchers dealing with this thematic topic shall deal with the following research questions: How SSE organizations/movements in a given territory (village, municipality, province, or country level) developed the visibility of: (a) the SSE experiences among each other (SSE initiatives knowing and learning from each other) (b) the SSE initiatives to society, common public, other movements and actors (c) the organization of SSE (its networks, where they are, what are the actors doing SSE and how it is organized (d) the global vision of SSE in respect to political issues of interest for society and development (political positions/views).

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The RIPESS Board Members AFRICA MADANI KOUMARE Réseau National de Promotion d’Économie Sociale et Solidair e – Mali CHERKAOUI ABDELJALIL Réseau marocain d’Économie Sociale et Solidaire – Maroc

LATIN AMERICA AND THE CARIBBEAN LUIS EDUARDO SALCEDO Cooperativa financiera coopfinep Colombia ALTAGRACIA VILLAREAL SANTOS Rural Coalicion – Mexico

ASIA

NORTH AMERICA

BENJAMIN QUIÑONES, JR. Asian Solidarity Economy Council (ASEC) - Philippines

NANCY NEAMTAN Chantier de l’Économie Sociale – Canada

DENISON JAYASOORIA Jaringan Masyarakat Ekonomi Malaysia - Malaysia

EMILY KAWANO United States Social Economy Network (SEN) – USA

EUROPE

OCEANIA

ERIC LAVILLUNIÈRE Institut Européen pour l’Économie Solidaire, INEES – Luxembourg

DAVID THOMPSON Jobs Australia – Australia

Intercontinental Network for the Promotion of the Social Solidarity Economy

JUDITH HITCHMAN URGENCI – France

Registration for the 5th International Meeting PERSONAL DETAILS Last Name: __________________________ First Name: __________________________ Middle Name: ________________________ Suffix (Prof./Dr./Mr./Mrs./Ms.): ___________ Email Address: _____________________________________________ Mobile No/s: _______________________________________________

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Registration fee: Early bird (Until August 31, 2013) - $225.00; Regular (After August 31, 2013) - $250.00 Fill up and send this registration form to: info_ssegf2013@gmail.com


5th RIPESS International Meeting on SSE