Issuu on Google+

by Jeanette Diaz


TYPE SMART


Š Copyright 2011 Type Smart by Jeanette Diaz City College Electronic Design 2


PT. 1 RAZOR


VI

T Y P E S M A R T P T. 1


DEFINITION

RAZOR ra·zor [rey-zer] –noun 1. a sharp-edged instrument used especially for shaving the face or trimming the hair. 2. an electrically powered instrument used for the same purpose.

SYNONYMS 1. Blade 2. Cutting Edge 3. Safety Razor 4. Shaving Instrument 5. Knife 6. Shaver 7. Remove 8. Sharp

T Y P E S M A R T P T. 1

VII


1.1 RAZOR

VIII EXPRESSION

T Y P E S M A R T P T. 1


1.1 RAZOR

IX

T Y P E S M A R T P T. 1


1.2 RAZOR

X EXPRESSION

T Y P E S M A R T P T. 1


1.2 RAZOR

XI

T Y P E S M A R T P T. 1


1.3 RAZOR

LEGIBILITY XII

T Y P E S M A R T P T. 1


1.3 RAZOR

XIII

T Y P E S M A R T P T. 1


1.4 RAZOR

LEGIBILITY XIV

T Y P E S M A R T P T. 1


1.4 RAZOR

XV

T Y P E S M A R T P T. 1


1.5 RAZOR

DEPTH XVI

T Y P E S M A R T P T. 1


1.5 RAZOR

XVII

T Y P E S M A R T P T. 1


1.6 RAZOR

DEPTH XVIII

T Y P E S M A R T P T. 1


1.6 RAZOR

XIX

T Y P E S M A R T P T. 1


PT. 2 RAZOR WIRE


XXII

T Y P E S M A R T P T. 2


DEFINITION

WIRE [wahyuhr] –noun 1. a slender, stringlike piece or filament of relatively rigid or flexible metal, usually circular in section, manufactured in a great variety of diameters and metals depending on its application. 2. such pieces as a material. SYNONYMS 1. cable 2. coil 3. line 4. strand 5. thread

T Y P E S M A R T P T. 2

XXIII


2.1 RAZOR WIRE

EXPRESSION XXIV

T Y P E S M A R T P T. 2


2.1 RAZOR WIRE

XXV

T Y P E S M A R T P T. 2


2.2 RAZOR WIRE

EXPRESSION XXVI

T Y P E S M A R T P T. 2


2.2 RAZOR WIRE

XXVII

T Y P E S M A R T P T. 2


2.3 RAZOR WIRE

DENSITY XXVIII

T Y P E S M A R T P T. 2


2.3 RAZOR WIRE

XXIX

T Y P E S M A R T P T. 2


2.4 RAZOR WIRE

DENSITY XXX

T Y P E S M A R T P T. 2


2.4 RAZOR WIRE

XXXI

T Y P E S M A R T P T. 2


2.5 RAZOR WIRE

EMOTION XXXII

T Y P E S M A R T P T. 2


2.5 RAZOR WIRE

XXXIII

T Y P E S M A R T P T. 2


2.6 RAZOR WIRE

EMOTION XXXIV

T Y P E S M A R T P T. 2


2.6 RAZOR WIRE

XXXV

T Y P E S M A R T P T. 2


PT. 3 THIS IS WATER


T Y P E S M A R T P T. 3

XXXIX


3.1 THIS IS WATER

12–20

So let’s talk about the single most pervasive cliché in the commencement speech genre, which is that a liberal arts education is not so much about filling you up with knowledge as it is about, quote,

“teaching

you how to

S

think.”

If you’re like me as a college student, you’ve never liked hearing this, and you tend to feel a bit insulted by the claim that you’ve needed anybody to teach you how to think, since the fact that you even got admitted to a college this good seems like proof that you already know how to think.

This is Water by David Foster Wallace

But I’m going to posit to you that the liberal arts cliché turns out not to be insulting at all, because the really significant education in thinking that we’re supposed to get in a place like this isn’t really about the capacity to think, but rather about the choice of what to think about. If your complete freedom of choice regarding what to think about seems too obvious to waste time talking about, I’d ask you to think about fish and water, and to bracket, for just a few minutes, your skepticism about the value of the totally obvious.

Here’s another didactic little story. There are these two guys sitting together in a bar in the remote Alaskan wilderness. One of the guys is religious, the other’s an atheist, and they’re arguing about the existence of God with that special intensity that comes after about the fourth beer. And the atheist says, “Look, it’s not like I don’t have actual reasons for not believing in God. It’s not like

I haven’t ever experimented with the God-and-prayer thing.

T Y P E S M A R T P T. 3

XL


3.1 THIS IS WATER So let’s talk about the single most pervasive cliché in the commencement speech genre, which is that a liberal arts education is not so much about filling you up with knowledge as it is about, quote,

“teaching

you how to

think.”

XLI

If you’re like me as a college student, you’ve never liked hearing this, and you tend to feel a bit insulted by the claim that you’ve needed T Yanybody P E S M Ato R Tteach P T. 3you how to think, since the fact that you even got admitted to a college

Here’s another didactic little story. There are these two guys sitting together in a bar in the remote Alaskan wilderness.


3.2 THIS IS WATER

so let’s talk about

So let’s talk about the single most pervasive cliché in the commencement speech genre, which is that a liberal arts education is not so much about filling you up with knowledge as it is about, quote,

“teaching you how to think.” If you’re like me as a college student, you’ve never liked hearing this, and you tend to feel a bit insulted by the claim that you’ve needed anybody to teach you how to think, since the fact that you even got admitted to a college this good seems like proof that you already know how to think. But I’m going to posit to you that the liberal arts cliché turns out not to be insulting at all, because the really significant education in thinking that we’re supposed to get in a place like this isn’t really about the capacity to think, but rather about the choice of what to think about. If your complete freedom of choice regarding what to think about seems too obvious to waste time talking about, I’d ask you to think about fish and water, and to bracket, for just a few minutes, your skepticism about the value of the totally obvious. Here’s another didactic little story. There are these two guys sitting together in a bar in the remote Alaskan wilderness. One of the guys is religious, the other’s an atheist, and they’re arguing about the existence of God with that special intensity that comes after about the fourth beer.

12–20

And the atheist says,

“Look, it’s not like I don’t have actual reasons for not believing in

God. It’s not like I haven’t ever experimented with the God-and-prayer thing.

This is Water by David Foster Wallace

T Y P E S M A R T P T. 3

XLII


d to feel a ve needed , since the a college ou already

the liberal ting at all, cation in in a place y to think, t to think

ce regardobvious to u to think , for just a the value

ether in a .

r’s an athestence of comes after

XLIII

3.2 THIS IS WATER

And the atheist says,

“Look, it’s not like I don’t have actual reasons for not believing in

God. It’s not like I haven’t ever experimented with the God-and-prayer thing.

T Y P E S M A R T P T. 3


3.3 THIS IS WATER

This is Water by David Foster Wallace

S

o let’s talk about the single most pervasive cliché in the commencement speech genre, which is that a liberal arts education is not so much about filling you up with knowledge as it is about, quote, “teaching you how to think.” If you’re like me as a college student, you’ve never liked hearing this, and you tend to feel a bit insulted by the claim that you’ve needed anybody to teach you how to think, since the fact that you even got admitted to a college this good seems like proof that you already know how to think.

But I’m going to posit to you that the liberal arts cliché turns out not to be insulting at all, because the really significant education in thinking that we’re supposed to get in a place like this isn’t really about the capacity to think, but rather about the choice of what to think about. If your complete freedom of choice regarding what to think about seems too obvious to waste time talking about, I’d ask you to think about fish and water, and to bracket, for just a few minutes, your skepticism about the value of the totally obvious.

Here’s another didactic little story. There are these two guys sitting together in a bar in the remote Alaskan wilderness. One of the guys is religious, the other’s an atheist, and they’re arguing about the existence of God with that special intensity that comes after about the fourth beer. And the atheist says, “Look, it’s not like I don’t have actual reasons for not believing in God. It’s not like I haven’t ever experimented with the whole God-and-prayer thing.

12–20

T Y P E S M A R T P T. 3

XLIV


Water

Foster Wallace

k about the single vasive cliché in mencement speech that a liberal arts t so much about ith knowledge as e, “teaching you

me as a college ever liked hearing end to feel a bit claim that you’ve to teach you how the fact that you tted to a college s like proof that ow how to think.

X LV

3.3 THIS IS WATER

But I’m going to posit to you that the liberal arts cliché turns out not to be insulting at all, because the really significant education in thinking that we’re supposed to get in a place like this isn’t really about the capacity to think, but rather about the choice of what to think about. If your complete freedom of choice regarding what to think about seems too obvious to waste time talking about, I’d ask you to think about fish and water, and to bracket, for just a few minutes, your skepticism about the value of the totally obvious.

T Y P E S M A R T P T. 3

Here’s anothe little story. There are thes sitting together in remote Alaskan wild One of the guys the other’s an atheis arguing about the God with that spec that comes after fourth beer. And the atheist say not like I don’t have a for not believing in It’s not like I experimented with God-and-prayer thi


3.4 THIS IS WATER

THIS IS WATER

since the fact that you even got admitted to a college this good seems like proof that you

David Foster Wallace

time talking about, I’d ask you to think about fish and water, and to bracket, for just a few minutes, your skepticism about the value of the totally obvious.

already know how to think. But I’m going to posit to you that the liberal arts cliché turns out not to be insulting at all, because the really significant education in thinking that we’re supposed to get in a place like this isn’t really about the capacity to think, but rather about the choice of what to think about. If your complete freedom of choice regarding what to think about seems too obvious to waste

Here’s another didactic little story. There are these two guys sitting together in a So let’s talk about the single most pervasive cliché in the commencement speech genre,

bar in the remote Alaskan wilderness. One of the guys is religious, the other’s an

which is that a liberal arts education is not so much about filling you up with knowledge as it is about, quote, “teaching you how to think.” If you’re like me as a college student, you’ve

atheist, and they’re arguing about the existence of God with that special intensity that comes after about the fourth beer. And the atheist says, “Look, it’s not like I don’t

never liked hearing this, and you tend to feel a bit insulted by the claim that you’ve needed

have actual reasons for not believing in God. It’s not like I haven’t ever experimented with

anybody to teach you how to think,

the whole God-and-prayer thing.

12 – 20

T Y P E S M A R T P T. 3

X LV I


IS R

llace

rvasive genre, not so e as it is X LV I I

because the really significant education in thinking that we’re supposed to get in a place like 3.4 THIS but IS WATER this isn’t really about the capacity to think, rather about the choice of what to think about. If your complete freedom of choice regarding what to think about seems too obvious to waste time talking about, I’d ask you to think about fish and water, and to bracket, for just a few minutes, your skepticism about the value of the totally obvious.

Here’s another didactic little story. There are these two guys sitting together in a bar in the remote Alaskan wilderness. One of the guys is religious, the other’s an atheist, and they’re arguing about the existence God with that special intensity that comes T Y of PE SM A R T P T. 3


3.5 THIS IS WATER 12

THIS IS WATER

20

If your complete freedom of choice regarding what to think about seems too obvious to waste time talking about, I’d ask you to think about fish and water, and to bracket, for just a few minutes, your skepticism about the value of the totally obvious. Here’s another didactic little story.

S

There are these two guys sitting together in a bar in the remote Alaskan wilderness.

o let’s talk about the single most pervasive cliché in the commencement speech genre, which is that a liberal arts education is not so much about filling you up with knowledge as it is about, quote, “teaching you how to think.”

One of the guys is religious, the other’s an atheist, and they’re arguing about the existence of God with that special intensity that comes after about the fourth beer.

If you’re like me as a college student, you’ve never liked hearing this, and you tend to feel a bit insulted by the claim that you’ve needed anybody to teach you how to think, since the fact that you even got admitted to a college this good seems like proof that you already know how to think.

It’s not like I haven’t ever experimented with the whole God-and-prayer thing.

“teaching you how to think”

And the atheist says, “Look, it’s not like I don’t have actual reasons for not believing in God.

– David Foster Wallace

But I’m going to posit to you that the liberal arts cliché turns out not to be insulting at all, because the really significant education in thinking that we’re supposed to get in a place like this isn’t really about the capacity to think, but rather about the choice of what to think about.

T Y P E S M A R T P T. 3

X LV I I I


S

your skepticism about the value of th totally obvious.

3.5 THIS IS WATER

Here’s another didactic little story.

There are these two guys sitting togethe in a bar in the remote Alaskan wildernes

o let’s talk about the single most pervasive cliché in the commencement speech genre, which is that a liberal arts eds not so much ng you up with e as it is about, aching you how

One of the guys is religious, the other an atheist, and they’re arguing about th existence of God wit that special intensit that comes after abou the fourth beer.

like me as a college student, ver liked hearing this, and you el a bit insulted by the claim ve needed anybody to teach X L I Xsince T Y P E Sthe M A Rfact T P T. 3that you o think,

It’s not like I haven’t ever experimente with the whole God-and-prayer thing.

“teaching you how to think”

And the atheist say “Look, it’s not like I don have actual reasons fo not believing in God.

– David Foster Wallac


3.6 THIS IS WATER So let’s talk about the single most pervasive cliché in the commencement speech genre, whichis that a liberal arts education is not so much about filling you up with knowledge as it is about, quote, “teaching you how to think.” If you’re like me as a college student, you’ve never liked hearing this, and you tend to feel a bit insulted by the claim that you’ve needed anybody to teach you how to think, since the fact that you even got admitted to a college this good seems like proof that you already know how to think.

THIS IS WATER DAVID FOSTER WALLACE

But I’m going to posit to you that the liberal arts cliché turns out not to be insulting at all, because the really significant education in thinking that we’re supposed to get in a place like this isn’t really about the capacity to think, but rather about the choice of what to think about.

If your complete freedom of choice regarding what to think about seems too obvious to waste time talking about, I’d ask you to think about fish and water, and to bracket, for just a few minutes, your skepticism about the value of the totally obvious. Here’s another didactic little story. There are these two guys sitting together in a bar in the remote Alaskan wilderness. One of the guys is religious, the other’s an atheist, and they’re arguing about the existence of God with that special intensity that comes after about the fourth beer. And the atheist says, “Look, it’s not like I don’t have actual reasons for not believing in God.

12–20

It’s not like I haven’t ever experimented with the whole God-and-prayer thing.

T Y P E S M A R T P T. 3

L


a bit insulted by the claim that you’ve nee anybody to teach you how to think, since fact that you even got admitted to a college 3.6 THIS WATER good seems like proof thatISyou already kn how to think.

THIS IS WATER DAV I D F O S T E R WAL L AC E

But I’m going to pos you that the liberal cliché turns out not to insulting at all, beca the really significant ed tion in thinking that w supposed to get i place like this isn’t re about the capacity think, but rather ab the choice of what think about.

If your complete freedom of choice regard what to think about seems too obvious to wa time talking about, I’d ask you to think ab fish and water, and to bracket, for just a minutes, your skepticism about the value of totally obvious. LI

T Y P E S M A R T P T. 3


THANK YOU



Type Smart