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Implementing a Model Lesson Plan CEP 810 Objectives At the end of the lesson, students will be able to: 1. Use the present simple tense in the passive voice to describe the process of papermaking. 2. Use sequencers to describe the process of papermaking in the correct sequence.

Teaching Tool Since this is an Internet-integrated lesson, students will use search engines (Google in this case) to access the information needed for the study of the process of papermaking.

Target Audience This lesson can be used in correlation with a science lesson with high school students or as a separate English lesson with adults.

Benefits & Challenges 

Benefits: Students will be able to interact with the different parts of the papermaking machine to explore what each one does. It’s also faster and more colorful than other resources.

Challenges: Students might face a difficulty with the new vocabulary. To solve this problem, they can access an online dictionary (I recommend Merriam Webster’s). That’s also another boon to using the Internet. Instead of having a pile of books in front of them, students will toggle between the website tab and the dictionary tab to work on the activity.

Created by: Jean-Claude Aura

Date: October 1, 2008

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Implementing a Model Lesson Plan CEP 810 Logistics Warm up Teacher shows the students a picture of the papermaking machine and asks:

1. Do you know what this machine does? (It makes paper.) 2. Do you know where paper comes from? (Trees) For question 2, Teacher may give students a couple of choices to guess from.

Created by: Jean-Claude Aura

Date: October 1, 2008

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Implementing a Model Lesson Plan CEP 810 Internet Activity 

Students go to www.forestprod.org/cdromdemo/pf/pf8.html and explore the machine part by part. Then, they answer the 2 sets of questions below: A. What does each of these parts do? (ACTIVE voice) 1. Debarker: 2. Chipper: 3. Bleach Tower: 4. Jordan Refiner: 5. Screens: 6. Head Box: 7. Presses: 8. Reel: 9. Unwinder & Splitter:

It removes the bark. It reduces logs to uniformly-sized chips. It creates high brightness products such as writing paper. It further refines fibers and cuts them to length. They remove oversized particles from the pulp. It discharges a uniform flow of pulp stock onto the moving wire. They remove additional water. It collects the paper in a convenient form for subsequent off-machine processing. It cuts the large paper reel into smaller rolls.

B. What happens…? (PASSIVE voice) 1. in the Debarker? 2. in the Digester? 3. to the digester? 4. in the Washer? 5. in the Beater? 6. in the Dryer? 7. in the Size Press? 8. in the Calendars?

Created by: Jean-Claude Aura

The bark is burned. Wood chips and “liquor” are cooked. It is emptied into the blow pit. The cooked pulp is washed. The pulp fibers are modified. Residual water is removed. Additives such as starch are added to the sheet. The sheet is pressed.

Date: October 1, 2008

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Implementing a Model Lesson Plan CEP 810 o Students compare their answers. o Teacher gives class feedback. o Teacher writes one ACTIVE sentence and one PASSIVE sentence on the board. o Students explain the difference and come up with the rule for forming the PASSIVE voice. o Students change all the ACTIVE answers to the PASSIVE voice. o Students compare their answers. o Teacher gives class feedback.

Evaluation Students are put in groups of 3 or 4 and are given 10 to 15 minutes to prepare an oral presentation of the process of papermaking. They will be evaluated on how well they can retell the process using the PASSIVE voice (and avoiding the ACTIVE voice as much as possible) since processes are better told using the PASSIVE voice.

Follow-up Activities Students can increase their understanding of the process of papermaking by visiting http://www.wipapercouncil.org/process.htm They can also research the following processes (possible for extra credit): 

wax making

cotton making

making concrete slabs

prefabricated houses

For an immediate follow up activity on the Process of papermaking, please click on the link: Educational_Use_of_Excel

Created by: Jean-Claude Aura

Date: October 1, 2008

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Implementing a Model Lesson Plan