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Considerations to make when creating computer-based instructional objects CEP 811 When designing a computer-based instructional object (CBIO), one must make sure this object serves an educational purpose. It’s very easy to fall into the trap of designing a very appealing Stand Alone PowerPoint presentation that would keep students busy clicking right and left without an educational goal. One must design a CBIO with the following points in mind: 

What exactly do you want your students to learn after they have used this CBIO? Think about the higher-order skills that your students would be acquiring. In other words, what are they supposed to do afterwards? Evaluate the usefulness of this object, write a summary, analyze and explain the content of this object, produce a similar object, or use this object in meaningful ways?

Plan your design backward. It sounds awkward, but it’s always easier to go from a place you don’t know to a place you know than the other way around. (Whenever I go to a new address, it takes me forever. However, going back home is faster and easier).

Once your design is set, look for complex parts that you can break up into simpler ones. One tends to overlook the undesirable combination of two or more skills that would be required in order to accomplish a particular task.

Use a variety of strategies to stimulate students’ desire to learn and cater for the different learner needs. Decide on a starting point, then work your way up through the design making sure that even the weakest student can still manage to work successfully on the CBIO.

Make sure the task is doable and the process is clear. There’s no point in designing a timeconsuming CBIO that will end up frustrating students because it’s beyond their ability or it’s not clear what they have to do. Set realistic objectives that lead to student success.

Created by: Jean-Claude Aura

Date: April 2009

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Considerations to make when designing CBIOs