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Estimated State-Level Energy Flows in 2008 United States A.J. Simon and R.D. Belles January 2011

Abstract ……………………………………………………………………………….…………. 1 Introduction ……………………………………………………………………………….…………. 1 Individual State Water Flow Charts …………..…………...……………….…………. 2 Analysis ………………………………………………………………………………………... 53 Conclusion ………………………………………………………………………………………... 55 References ………………………………………………………………………………………... 55


Estimated State‐Level Energy Flows in 2008  A.J. Simon and Rich Belles  Lawrence Livermore National Lab    Abstract    An energy flow chart “atlas” of the U.S. states has been constructed from publicly available data and  estimates of energy use patterns.  Approximately 100 quadrillion BTU of primary energy are used in the  U.S. each year, however, energy use is distributed unevenly across from state to state.  Energy can be  visualized as it flows from resources (Coal, Oil, Natural Gas, etc.), through transformations (electricity  generation) to end uses (Residential, Commercial, Industrial, Transportation).  While the basic structure  of the energy system is consistent from state to state, the patterns of resource consumption and energy  use vary considerably.  These flow patterns are visualized in this “atlas” of 51 state‐level energy flow  charts (all 50 states plus the District of Columbia are represented).     Introduction    Lawrence Livermore National Lab (LLNL) has published flow charts (also referred to as “Sankey  Diagrams”) of important national commodities since the early 1970s.  The most widely recognized of  these charts is the U.S. energy flow chart (http://flowchars.llnl.gov) , however, Livermore has also  published charts depicting carbon (or carbon dioxide potential) flow and water flow at the national level  as well as energy, carbon and water flows at the international, state, municipal and organizational (eg.  Air Force) level. Flow charts are valuable as single‐page references that contain quantitative data about  resource, commodity and byproduct flows in a graphical form that also conveys structural information  about the system that manages those flows.    LLNL has depicted energy use in its home state of California for the various years including the mid‐ 1970s through the mid 1990s and the year 2000.  Despite occasional interest from various state  agencies, a comprehensive package of state‐level energy flowcharts has not been assembled until now.    Recent advances in the automation of Sankey Diagram generation have made it possible to produce a  consistent set of state‐level energy flowcharts.   A computer program reads SEDS data, performs a set of  calculations and re‐sizes and re‐labels the flows in the figure.  Human interaction is required only to  reconcile instances where graphical elements overlap.    Energy use at the state level is compiled by the Department of Energy’s Energy Information  Administration (EIA) in the State Energy Data System (SEDS).  SEDS is updated annually and generally  reports data for the time period two years prior to its year of update (ie. the 2010 update records  energy use in 2008).  SEDS contains data on primary resource consumption, electricity generation, and  energy consumption within each of the economic sectors.   


Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

Estimated Alabama Energy Use In 2008 ~2503.7 Trillion BTU Solar 0.1 407.6

Net Electricity Exports

139.1

Nuclear 407.6 445.2 Hydro 60.5

60.5

Wind 0.0

Electricity Generation 1403.9

3.6

Geothermal 0.1 168.9

958.7

109.8

0.1

1.3

8.7

0.1

Residential 164.5

57.6

7.2

106.9

76.9

33.9

38.6

Natural Gas 420.4

1.4

25.8

8.9

Commercial 113.0

79.1 Energy Services 824.5

762.1 119.4

170.2 Coal 842.8

129.6 Industrial 648.0

80.7

160.8

518.4

116.9

16.9 Biomass 178.2

3.8 Petroleum 594.0

Rejected Energy 1540.1

459.7

Transportation 480.4

360.3 120.1

Source: LLNL 2010. Data is based on DOE/EIA-0214(2008), June 2010. If this information or a reproduction of it is used, credit must be given to the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and the Department of Energy, under whose auspices the work was performed. Distributed electricity represents only retail electricity sales and does not include self-generation. EIA reports flows for non-thermal resources (i.e., hydro, wind and solar) in BTU-equivalent values by assuming a typical fossil fuel plant "heat rate." The efficiency of electricity production is calculated as the total retail electricity delivered divided by the primary energy input into electricity generation. Interstate and international electricity trade are lumped into net imports or exports and are calculated using a system-wide generation efficiency. End use efficiency is estimated as 65% for the residential, 70% for the commercial, 80% for the industrial sector, and as 25% for the transportation sector. Totals may not equal sum of components due to independent rounding. LLNL-MI-410527


Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

Estimated Alaska Energy Use In 2008 ~650.8 Trillion BTU Solar 0.0 Nuclear 0.0

Hydro 11.5

11.5

44.6

5.0

Wind 0.0 Geothermal 0.1

21.6

Electricity Generation 66.2

43.4

7.3 0.9

0.1 21.6

17.1

6.2

7.7

0.3

25.8

8.5

9.7

0.1

Natural Gas 343.9

1.4

Residential 39.7

8.3

13.9

Commercial 43.2

12.9 30.2

4.6

61.7

259.7

Coal 14.7

Industrial 308.4 0.1 2.1

246.8

44.1

Biomass 3.5 1.7 211.0 Petroleum 276.9

Rejected Energy 294.3

Transportation 214.8

161.1

53.7

Source: LLNL 2010. Data is based on DOE/EIA-0214(2008), June 2010. If this information or a reproduction of it is used, credit must be given to the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and the Department of Energy, under whose auspices the work was performed. Distributed electricity represents only retail electricity sales and does not include self-generation. EIA reports flows for non-thermal resources (i.e., hydro, wind and solar) in BTU-equivalent values by assuming a typical fossil fuel plant "heat rate." The efficiency of electricity production is calculated as the total retail electricity delivered divided by the primary energy input into electricity generation. Interstate and international electricity trade are lumped into net imports or exports and are calculated using a system-wide generation efficiency. End use efficiency is estimated as 65% for the residential, 70% for the commercial, 80% for the industrial sector, and as 25% for the transportation sector. Totals may not equal sum of components due to independent rounding. LLNL-MI-410527

Energy Services 356.5


Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

Estimated Arizona Energy Use In 2008 ~1846.4 Trillion BTU Solar 4.6 305.8

Net Electricity Exports

94.1

Nuclear 305.8

0.1 354.3

Hydro 71.8

71.8

Wind 0.0

Electricity Generation 1117.3

1.7

Geothermal 0.4 291.6

763.0

113.4

4.5

0.5

13.6

61.6 Residential 175.9

4.9

114.3

102.9

44.2

39.5

Natural Gas 410.3

2.2

33.4

8.9

Commercial 147.5

103.2 Energy Services 464.8

445.8 0.3

20.7 Coal 458.7

43.9 1.6

12.9

67.3

Industrial 146.8

29.4 117.4

25.2 Biomass 38.9 19.7 Petroleum 555.9

Rejected Energy 1287.5

474.3

Transportation 519.2

389.4 129.8

Source: LLNL 2010. Data is based on DOE/EIA-0214(2008), June 2010. If this information or a reproduction of it is used, credit must be given to the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and the Department of Energy, under whose auspices the work was performed. Distributed electricity represents only retail electricity sales and does not include self-generation. EIA reports flows for non-thermal resources (i.e., hydro, wind and solar) in BTU-equivalent values by assuming a typical fossil fuel plant "heat rate." The efficiency of electricity production is calculated as the total retail electricity delivered divided by the primary energy input into electricity generation. Interstate and international electricity trade are lumped into net imports or exports and are calculated using a system-wide generation efficiency. End use efficiency is estimated as 65% for the residential, 70% for the commercial, 80% for the industrial sector, and as 25% for the transportation sector. Totals may not equal sum of components due to independent rounding. LLNL-MI-410527


Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

Estimated Arkansas Energy Use In 2008 ~1160.3 Trillion BTU Solar 0.1 148.1

Net Electricity Exports

11.3

Nuclear 148.1 168.7 Hydro 45.9

45.9

Wind 0.0

Electricity Generation 532.0

1.9

Geothermal 0.6

363.3

59.3

0.1

0.6

2.8

0.5 36.0

66.2 Natural Gas 238.4

0.5

37.2

36.9 Residential 105.3

6.5

68.5

39.9

24.2

2.9

Commercial 80.6

56.4

269.3 58.1

88.9 Coal 278.8

61.5 Industrial 307.4

9.6

245.9

67.3 83.5 10.0

Biomass 74.8 2.3

Petroleum 373.6

280.1

Rejected Energy 705.2

Transportation 292.4

219.3 73.1

Source: LLNL 2010. Data is based on DOE/EIA-0214(2008), June 2010. If this information or a reproduction of it is used, credit must be given to the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and the Department of Energy, under whose auspices the work was performed. Distributed electricity represents only retail electricity sales and does not include self-generation. EIA reports flows for non-thermal resources (i.e., hydro, wind and solar) in BTU-equivalent values by assuming a typical fossil fuel plant "heat rate." The efficiency of electricity production is calculated as the total retail electricity delivered divided by the primary energy input into electricity generation. Interstate and international electricity trade are lumped into net imports or exports and are calculated using a system-wide generation efficiency. End use efficiency is estimated as 65% for the residential, 70% for the commercial, 80% for the industrial sector, and as 25% for the transportation sector. Totals may not equal sum of components due to independent rounding. LLNL-MI-410527

Energy Services 443.9


Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

Estimated California Energy Use In 2008 ~7708.6 Trillion BTU Solar 31.5 339.5

Net Electricity Imports

Nuclear 339.5

309.9

6.6 Hydro 237.8 Wind 53.1

237.8

1302.9

605.0

Electricity Generation 1907.9

53.1 74.6 270.8

19.5

311.3

24.9

Geothermal 273.0

27.2

0.2 882.4

503.6

Natural Gas 2520.6

0.5 9.6

258.4

23.6

1.4

31.5

584.2

426.6

216.3

26.1

Coal 63.1

Commercial 721.2 504.8 Energy Services 3151.4 314.9 Industrial 1574.4

33.4 21.0

Residential 898.7

174.1

855.3

39.4

314.5

1259.5

470.7 3.0

Biomass 229.2 84.4

3103.2 Petroleum 3651.0

Rejected Energy 4557.3

Transportation 3211.5

2408.6

802.9

Source: LLNL 2010. Data is based on DOE/EIA-0214(2008), June 2010. If this information or a reproduction of it is used, credit must be given to the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and the Department of Energy, under whose auspices the work was performed. Distributed electricity represents only retail electricity sales and does not include self-generation. EIA reports flows for non-thermal resources (i.e., hydro, wind and solar) in BTU-equivalent values by assuming a typical fossil fuel plant "heat rate." The efficiency of electricity production is calculated as the total retail electricity delivered divided by the primary energy input into electricity generation. Interstate and international electricity trade are lumped into net imports or exports and are calculated using a system-wide generation efficiency. End use efficiency is estimated as 65% for the residential, 70% for the commercial, 80% for the industrial sector, and as 25% for the transportation sector. Totals may not equal sum of components due to independent rounding. LLNL-MI-410527


Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

Estimated Colorado Energy Use In 2008 ~1479.0 Trillion BTU Solar 0.6 Net Electricity Imports

Nuclear 0.0

Hydro 20.1

0.2 20.1

Wind 31.7

0.7 110.4

170.1

Electricity Generation 536.4

31.7

Geothermal 0.7

8.3

366.3

77.7

60.5

0.4

Residential 221.9

0.2 0.7

0.2

136.0

11.1

66.8

6.3

1.8

144.2

13.0 70.1

0.2

Natural Gas 514.9

5.1

45.1 Commercial 150.2 105.2 Energy Services 602.6

373.0 0.3

47.2

185.4 Coal 385.4

61.1 Industrial 305.6

5.4

0.5

244.5

66.9

16.3 0.2

Biomass 21.5 7.5

411.0 Petroleum 496.2

Rejected Energy 876.4

Transportation 434.9

326.2

108.7

Source: LLNL 2010. Data is based on DOE/EIA-0214(2008), June 2010. If this information or a reproduction of it is used, credit must be given to the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and the Department of Energy, under whose auspices the work was performed. Distributed electricity represents only retail electricity sales and does not include self-generation. EIA reports flows for non-thermal resources (i.e., hydro, wind and solar) in BTU-equivalent values by assuming a typical fossil fuel plant "heat rate." The efficiency of electricity production is calculated as the total retail electricity delivered divided by the primary energy input into electricity generation. Interstate and international electricity trade are lumped into net imports or exports and are calculated using a system-wide generation efficiency. End use efficiency is estimated as 65% for the residential, 70% for the commercial, 80% for the industrial sector, and as 25% for the transportation sector. Totals may not equal sum of components due to independent rounding. LLNL-MI-410527


Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

Estimated Connecticut Energy Use In 2008 ~781.4 Trillion BTU Solar 1.3 161.3

Net Electricity Imports

Nuclear 161.3

Hydro 5.5

5.5

13.2

Electricity Generation 291.3

Wind 0.0

13.3

Geothermal 0.0 60.2

92.4

199.0

1.3 5.9

Residential 172.7

4.9

112.3

79.4

43.8

31.4

46.6

Natural Gas 169.8

38.4

45.2

60.5

43.4

0.8

18.7

Commercial 104.5 73.2 Energy Services 293.4

23.0

14.9

Coal 45.2

3.9

Industrial 57.5

11.5 46.0

15.7

4.4 Biomass 33.1

0.6 10.2 232.4

Petroleum 352.0

Rejected Energy 488.0

Transportation 247.7

185.7

61.9

Source: LLNL 2010. Data is based on DOE/EIA-0214(2008), June 2010. If this information or a reproduction of it is used, credit must be given to the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and the Department of Energy, under whose auspices the work was performed. Distributed electricity represents only retail electricity sales and does not include self-generation. EIA reports flows for non-thermal resources (i.e., hydro, wind and solar) in BTU-equivalent values by assuming a typical fossil fuel plant "heat rate." The efficiency of electricity production is calculated as the total retail electricity delivered divided by the primary energy input into electricity generation. Interstate and international electricity trade are lumped into net imports or exports and are calculated using a system-wide generation efficiency. End use efficiency is estimated as 65% for the residential, 70% for the commercial, 80% for the industrial sector, and as 25% for the transportation sector. Totals may not equal sum of components due to independent rounding. LLNL-MI-410527


Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

Estimated Delaware Energy Use In 2008 ~258.9 Trillion BTU Solar 0.0 Net Electricity Imports

Nuclear 0.0

16.9

23.2

Electricity Generation 73.2

Hydro 0.0 Wind 0.0

1.8

50.0

11.6

15.1 1.1

Geothermal 0.3

1.3

0.3 10.2

11.6 Natural Gas 49.8

9.2

0.2

Residential 33.1 6.2

21.5

14.8

7.9

2.3

Commercial 26.5 18.5

58.7 10.2

18.8 Coal 60.9

15.3 Industrial 76.4

0.1

2.2

61.1

45.1 Biomass 6.3 2.9 70.0 Petroleum 124.7

Rejected Energy 139.5

Transportation 72.9

54.7

18.2

Source: LLNL 2010. Data is based on DOE/EIA-0214(2008), June 2010. If this information or a reproduction of it is used, credit must be given to the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and the Department of Energy, under whose auspices the work was performed. Distributed electricity represents only retail electricity sales and does not include self-generation. EIA reports flows for non-thermal resources (i.e., hydro, wind and solar) in BTU-equivalent values by assuming a typical fossil fuel plant "heat rate." The efficiency of electricity production is calculated as the total retail electricity delivered divided by the primary energy input into electricity generation. Interstate and international electricity trade are lumped into net imports or exports and are calculated using a system-wide generation efficiency. End use efficiency is estimated as 65% for the residential, 70% for the commercial, 80% for the industrial sector, and as 25% for the transportation sector. Totals may not equal sum of components due to independent rounding. LLNL-MI-410527

Energy Services 119.4


Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

Estimated District of Columbia Energy Use In 2008 ~94.0 Trillion BTU Solar 0.0

Net Electricity Imports

Nuclear 0.0

40.1

Electricity Generation 1.0

Hydro 0.0 Wind 0.0 Geothermal 0.0

0.3

0.7

1.0 6.5

1.0

13.6

7.7

Rejected Energy 37.2

Residential 22.0 14.3

0.9

15.8

31.7 Commercial 52.7

Natural Gas 32.8

18.9

0.4

0.2

36.9

1.5

Energy Services 56.8 1.0

Coal 0.4

0.7

Biomass 1.6

1.4

0.3 1.2 0.5

Petroleum 19.0

Industrial 1.8

0.4

14.9

Transportation 16.9

12.7 4.2

Source: LLNL 2010. Data is based on DOE/EIA-0214(2008), June 2010. If this information or a reproduction of it is used, credit must be given to the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and the Department of Energy, under whose auspices the work was performed. Distributed electricity represents only retail electricity sales and does not include self-generation. EIA reports flows for non-thermal resources (i.e., hydro, wind and solar) in BTU-equivalent values by assuming a typical fossil fuel plant "heat rate." The efficiency of electricity production is calculated as the total retail electricity delivered divided by the primary energy input into electricity generation. Interstate and international electricity trade are lumped into net imports or exports and are calculated using a system-wide generation efficiency. End use efficiency is estimated as 65% for the residential, 70% for the commercial, 80% for the industrial sector, and as 25% for the transportation sector. Totals may not equal sum of components due to independent rounding. LLNL-MI-410527


Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

Estimated Florida Energy Use In 2008 ~4152.7 Trillion BTU Solar 38.1 335.9

Net Electricity Imports

Nuclear 335.9

136.9

634.8 Hydro 2.0

2.0

Electricity Generation 2001.9

Wind 0.0

388.8

50.3 127.8

Geothermal 6.9 820.0

1367.1

38.1 2.3

5.5

160.3 Residential 457.9

7.1

297.6

318.0

120.0

16.1

Natural Gas 970.2

1.4 1.1

52.5

26.9

Commercial 400.0 280.0 Energy Services 1279.9

665.9 71.4 Coal 693.2

64.6

27.3

109.3

Industrial 400.6

80.1 320.5

127.9

10.1 0.3

Biomass 210.4 47.4

1469.4 Petroleum 1759.2

Rejected Energy 2872.8

Transportation 1527.2

1145.4

381.8

Source: LLNL 2010. Data is based on DOE/EIA-0214(2008), June 2010. If this information or a reproduction of it is used, credit must be given to the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and the Department of Energy, under whose auspices the work was performed. Distributed electricity represents only retail electricity sales and does not include self-generation. EIA reports flows for non-thermal resources (i.e., hydro, wind and solar) in BTU-equivalent values by assuming a typical fossil fuel plant "heat rate." The efficiency of electricity production is calculated as the total retail electricity delivered divided by the primary energy input into electricity generation. Interstate and international electricity trade are lumped into net imports or exports and are calculated using a system-wide generation efficiency. End use efficiency is estimated as 65% for the residential, 70% for the commercial, 80% for the industrial sector, and as 25% for the transportation sector. Totals may not equal sum of components due to independent rounding. LLNL-MI-410527


Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

Estimated Georgia Energy Use In 2008 ~2910.2 Trillion BTU Solar 0.4 331.3

Net Electricity Imports

Nuclear 331.3

Hydro 21.1

413.0

20.9

Wind 0.0

Electricity Generation 1302.4

0.4

Geothermal 0.2

48.2

889.4

189.7

0.4

1.0

13.2

0.2 99.7

122.3

Natural Gas 436.6

52.8

0.3

2.1

117.8 Residential 336.5

10.7

218.8

159.9

66.8

7.7

Commercial 222.8

156.0 Energy Services 1054.5

849.1 154.5 Coal 885.8

111.0

0.2

36.4

141.9

114.3 Industrial 571.6

457.2

127.6

7.3 Biomass 185.0

0.6 27.4 854.5

Petroleum 1001.5

Rejected Energy 1855.8

Transportation 889.9

667.4

222.5

Source: LLNL 2010. Data is based on DOE/EIA-0214(2008), June 2010. If this information or a reproduction of it is used, credit must be given to the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and the Department of Energy, under whose auspices the work was performed. Distributed electricity represents only retail electricity sales and does not include self-generation. EIA reports flows for non-thermal resources (i.e., hydro, wind and solar) in BTU-equivalent values by assuming a typical fossil fuel plant "heat rate." The efficiency of electricity production is calculated as the total retail electricity delivered divided by the primary energy input into electricity generation. Interstate and international electricity trade are lumped into net imports or exports and are calculated using a system-wide generation efficiency. End use efficiency is estimated as 65% for the residential, 70% for the commercial, 80% for the industrial sector, and as 25% for the transportation sector. Totals may not equal sum of components due to independent rounding. LLNL-MI-410527


Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

Estimated Hawaii Energy Use In 2008 ~286.5 Trillion BTU Solar 2.6 Nuclear 0.0

Hydro 0.8

0.4 2.4

Wind 2.4

35.5

Electricity Generation 111.6

4.0

76.1

Rejected Energy 198.5

82.0 10.5

2.6

4.9

Geothermal 4.9

Residential 14.6

5.1

1.0

9.5

11.9

5.9

0.5 Natural Gas 2.8

3.0

1.8

2.9

Commercial 19.7

13.8 Energy Services 87.9

17.8 0.4 Coal 20.2

13.0

0.4 1.3

2.3

Industrial 37.6

7.5 30.0

20.1

Biomass 11.5 3.2 135.3 Petroleum 241.2

Transportation 138.5

103.9

34.6

Source: LLNL 2010. Data is based on DOE/EIA-0214(2008), June 2010. If this information or a reproduction of it is used, credit must be given to the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and the Department of Energy, under whose auspices the work was performed. Distributed electricity represents only retail electricity sales and does not include self-generation. EIA reports flows for non-thermal resources (i.e., hydro, wind and solar) in BTU-equivalent values by assuming a typical fossil fuel plant "heat rate." The efficiency of electricity production is calculated as the total retail electricity delivered divided by the primary energy input into electricity generation. Interstate and international electricity trade are lumped into net imports or exports and are calculated using a system-wide generation efficiency. End use efficiency is estimated as 65% for the residential, 70% for the commercial, 80% for the industrial sector, and as 25% for the transportation sector. Totals may not equal sum of components due to independent rounding. LLNL-MI-410527


Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

Estimated Idaho Energy Use In 2008 ~426.7 Trillion BTU Solar 0.0 Net Electricity Imports

Nuclear 0.0

46.6

92.3 Hydro 92.3 Wind 2.0

2.0

75.2

1.3

3.2

28.2

4.8 20.6

0.5 16.7

0.5

0.2

42.6

3.0

12.5 Commercial 41.6 29.1

25.8 31.8

0.9 Coal 8.6

8.4 7.1

23.3 Industrial 116.5

19.7

93.2

30.0

Biomass 27.0 2.3 118.5 Petroleum 156.3

Rejected Energy 229.8

Residential 65.5 0.1

12.7

22.9

29.1

1.8

Geothermal 3.3

Natural Gas 90.7

34.9

Electricity Generation 110.1

Transportation 127.9

95.9

32.0

Source: LLNL 2010. Data is based on DOE/EIA-0214(2008), June 2010. If this information or a reproduction of it is used, credit must be given to the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and the Department of Energy, under whose auspices the work was performed. Distributed electricity represents only retail electricity sales and does not include self-generation. EIA reports flows for non-thermal resources (i.e., hydro, wind and solar) in BTU-equivalent values by assuming a typical fossil fuel plant "heat rate." The efficiency of electricity production is calculated as the total retail electricity delivered divided by the primary energy input into electricity generation. Interstate and international electricity trade are lumped into net imports or exports and are calculated using a system-wide generation efficiency. End use efficiency is estimated as 65% for the residential, 70% for the commercial, 80% for the industrial sector, and as 25% for the transportation sector. Totals may not equal sum of components due to independent rounding. LLNL-MI-410527

Energy Services 196.9


Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

Estimated Illinois Energy Use In 2008 ~4554.0 Trillion BTU Solar 1.6

994.6

Net Electricity Exports

162.4

Nuclear 994.6 656.0 Hydro 1.4 Wind 23.0

1.4

Electricity Generation 2068.5

1412.6

23.0 9.5

Geothermal 1.4 35.2

159.6

1.6 1.6 0.5

1.4

472.4

24.6

225.5

4.2

4.0

Residential 687.2 446.7

27.1 176.6

Natural Gas 1014.6

240.5

11.6

126.6 Commercial 421.9 295.3 Energy Services 1675.6

1003.2 155.3

267.7 Coal 1103.2

95.3

169.5 Industrial 847.6

10.0

678.1

319.3 13.7 Biomass 90.3

1.9 42.2

Petroleum 1324.1

Rejected Energy 2715.9

964.5

Transportation 1022.4

766.8 255.6

Source: LLNL 2010. Data is based on DOE/EIA-0214(2008), June 2010. If this information or a reproduction of it is used, credit must be given to the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and the Department of Energy, under whose auspices the work was performed. Distributed electricity represents only retail electricity sales and does not include self-generation. EIA reports flows for non-thermal resources (i.e., hydro, wind and solar) in BTU-equivalent values by assuming a typical fossil fuel plant "heat rate." The efficiency of electricity production is calculated as the total retail electricity delivered divided by the primary energy input into electricity generation. Interstate and international electricity trade are lumped into net imports or exports and are calculated using a system-wide generation efficiency. End use efficiency is estimated as 65% for the residential, 70% for the commercial, 80% for the industrial sector, and as 25% for the transportation sector. Totals may not equal sum of components due to independent rounding. LLNL-MI-410527


Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

Estimated Indiana Energy Use In 2008 ~2998.6 Trillion BTU Solar 0.2 Nuclear 0.0

Hydro 4.3

Net Electricity Exports

54.4

4.3

Electricity Generation 1322.9

2.3 Wind 2.3

3.1

Geothermal 3.2

419.5 903.4

115.9

0.2

1.8

0.8

2.6 34.8

13.0

154.7

86.0

7.1

6.9

Residential 309.6 201.3

22.4 83.8

0.6

Natural Gas 558.6

108.4

12.4

Commercial 196.7

59.0 137.7

1276.6 165.2

275.9 Coal 1558.1

182.9 Industrial 914.5

273.6

13.4

731.6

186.4

7.3 Biomass 58.3

0.1 21.9

Petroleum 813.7

590.8

Rejected Energy 1718.7

Transportation 620.0

465.0 155.0

Source: LLNL 2010. Data is based on DOE/EIA-0214(2008), June 2010. If this information or a reproduction of it is used, credit must be given to the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and the Department of Energy, under whose auspices the work was performed. Distributed electricity represents only retail electricity sales and does not include self-generation. EIA reports flows for non-thermal resources (i.e., hydro, wind and solar) in BTU-equivalent values by assuming a typical fossil fuel plant "heat rate." The efficiency of electricity production is calculated as the total retail electricity delivered divided by the primary energy input into electricity generation. Interstate and international electricity trade are lumped into net imports or exports and are calculated using a system-wide generation efficiency. End use efficiency is estimated as 65% for the residential, 70% for the commercial, 80% for the industrial sector, and as 25% for the transportation sector. Totals may not equal sum of components due to independent rounding. LLNL-MI-410527

Energy Services 1225.5


Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

Estimated Iowa Energy Use In 2008 ~1365.2 Trillion BTU Solar 0.0 Nuclear 55.2

55.2

Net Electricity Exports

17.6

173.4 Hydro 8.1

8.1

Electricity Generation 546.8

40.2 Wind 40.2 Geothermal 0.9

1.7

17.8

373.4

48.0 2.0

0.6

0.3

76.2

56.7

5.3

1.8

Residential 153.5 99.8

22.0 41.6

0.6

Natural Gas 323.7

6.4

53.7

12.1

35.4 Commercial 118.1 82.7

421.8 65.6

158.7 Coal 485.2 57.5 14.2

78.6 Industrial 393.2

314.5

15.5 95.8

Biomass 33.3 7.8 287.3 Petroleum 419.2

Rejected Energy 773.2

Transportation 309.4

232.0 77.3

Source: LLNL 2010. Data is based on DOE/EIA-0214(2008), June 2010. If this information or a reproduction of it is used, credit must be given to the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and the Department of Energy, under whose auspices the work was performed. Distributed electricity represents only retail electricity sales and does not include self-generation. EIA reports flows for non-thermal resources (i.e., hydro, wind and solar) in BTU-equivalent values by assuming a typical fossil fuel plant "heat rate." The efficiency of electricity production is calculated as the total retail electricity delivered divided by the primary energy input into electricity generation. Interstate and international electricity trade are lumped into net imports or exports and are calculated using a system-wide generation efficiency. End use efficiency is estimated as 65% for the residential, 70% for the commercial, 80% for the industrial sector, and as 25% for the transportation sector. Totals may not equal sum of components due to independent rounding. LLNL-MI-410527

Energy Services 574.4


Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

Estimated Kansas Energy Use In 2008 ~1188.1 Trillion BTU Solar 0.0 88.8

Net Electricity Exports

24.8

Nuclear 88.8 159.6 Hydro 0.1

0.1

Electricity Generation 503.2

17.3

343.6

Wind 17.3 Geothermal 0.7

45.7 2.1 72.9

27.1

5.9

0.1

0.6

Natural Gas 292.5

1.0

34.7

47.1 Residential 134.5

9.9

87.4

52.4

27.7

3.6

Commercial 92.3 64.6

367.8 36.7

133.4 Coal 371.8

63.1 Industrial 315.3

2.3

4.0

252.3

138.9 24.5 Biomass 18.3 9.1

Petroleum 398.5

244.0

Rejected Energy 689.6

Transportation 277.6

208.2 69.4

Source: LLNL 2010. Data is based on DOE/EIA-0214(2008), June 2010. If this information or a reproduction of it is used, credit must be given to the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and the Department of Energy, under whose auspices the work was performed. Distributed electricity represents only retail electricity sales and does not include self-generation. EIA reports flows for non-thermal resources (i.e., hydro, wind and solar) in BTU-equivalent values by assuming a typical fossil fuel plant "heat rate." The efficiency of electricity production is calculated as the total retail electricity delivered divided by the primary energy input into electricity generation. Interstate and international electricity trade are lumped into net imports or exports and are calculated using a system-wide generation efficiency. End use efficiency is estimated as 65% for the residential, 70% for the commercial, 80% for the industrial sector, and as 25% for the transportation sector. Totals may not equal sum of components due to independent rounding. LLNL-MI-410527

Energy Services 473.7


Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

Estimated Kentucky Energy Use In 2008 ~2005.8 Trillion BTU Solar 0.1 Net Electricity Exports

7.9

Nuclear 0.0 326.7 Hydro 18.9

18.9

Wind 0.0

Electricity Generation 1030.2

1.3

9.8

94.0

0.1

34.5

Geothermal 1.9

703.5

0.1

1.3

7.8

59.8 Residential 170.8 111.0

10.4

57.0 67.1

0.6

Natural Gas 233.2

1.3

38.4

1.3

4.9

Commercial 113.7

34.1 79.6 Energy Services 745.1

965.7 157.6

114.5 Coal 1024.8

57.6

109.8 Industrial 549.1

19.0

439.3

200.4 13.4 Biomass 44.8 15.5

Petroleum 682.2

Rejected Energy 1252.8

431.9

Transportation 460.8

345.6 115.2

Source: LLNL 2010. Data is based on DOE/EIA-0214(2008), June 2010. If this information or a reproduction of it is used, credit must be given to the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and the Department of Energy, under whose auspices the work was performed. Distributed electricity represents only retail electricity sales and does not include self-generation. EIA reports flows for non-thermal resources (i.e., hydro, wind and solar) in BTU-equivalent values by assuming a typical fossil fuel plant "heat rate." The efficiency of electricity production is calculated as the total retail electricity delivered divided by the primary energy input into electricity generation. Interstate and international electricity trade are lumped into net imports or exports and are calculated using a system-wide generation efficiency. End use efficiency is estimated as 65% for the residential, 70% for the commercial, 80% for the industrial sector, and as 25% for the transportation sector. Totals may not equal sum of components due to independent rounding. LLNL-MI-410527


Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

Estimated Louisiana Energy Use In 2008 ~3387.7 Trillion BTU Solar 0.1 160.7

Net Electricity Imports

Nuclear 160.7

Hydro 10.5

10.5

Electricity Generation 701.0

222.3

478.7

1.2

Wind 0.0 Geothermal 1.3

46.3

98.4

0.1

23.9 38.6

244.0

4.4

0.6

0.6

Natural Gas 1359.8

0.7

23.7

Residential 144.7

Rejected Energy 1450.8 50.6

2.5

94.0

78.3

32.3

4.5

Commercial 107.7

75.4

91.9 998.2

260.7 Coal 262.5

401.2

1.7

90.3

55.3 Biomass 100.7

4.2 Petroleum 1445.9

Industrial 2006.0

1604.8

823.9

591.1

Transportation 650.6

488.0 162.7

Source: LLNL 2010. Data is based on DOE/EIA-0214(2008), June 2010. If this information or a reproduction of it is used, credit must be given to the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and the Department of Energy, under whose auspices the work was performed. Distributed electricity represents only retail electricity sales and does not include self-generation. EIA reports flows for non-thermal resources (i.e., hydro, wind and solar) in BTU-equivalent values by assuming a typical fossil fuel plant "heat rate." The efficiency of electricity production is calculated as the total retail electricity delivered divided by the primary energy input into electricity generation. Interstate and international electricity trade are lumped into net imports or exports and are calculated using a system-wide generation efficiency. End use efficiency is estimated as 65% for the residential, 70% for the commercial, 80% for the industrial sector, and as 25% for the transportation sector. Totals may not equal sum of components due to independent rounding. LLNL-MI-410527

Energy Services 1936.9


Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

Estimated Maine Energy Use In 2008 ~462.8 Trillion BTU Solar 0.2 Net Electricity Imports

Nuclear 0.0

Hydro 43.9 Wind 1.3

36.4

3.0

Electricity Generation 116.1

1.3

34.1

2.3

36.8

79.3

14.8

0.2

2.3

Geothermal 0.0

21.6 Residential 61.7 40.1

43.1

1.2 38.7

14.2

Natural Gas 65.0

2.3

6.3

25.5

Commercial 48.3

14.5

33.8

3.3 17.8 Coal 5.9

10.8

7.5

2.6

30.8 Industrial 154.1

94.3

123.3

21.0 1.0 Biomass 137.2 4.2

Petroleum 206.2

114.3

Rejected Energy 235.8

Transportation 119.5

89.6 29.9

Source: LLNL 2010. Data is based on DOE/EIA-0214(2008), June 2010. If this information or a reproduction of it is used, credit must be given to the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and the Department of Energy, under whose auspices the work was performed. Distributed electricity represents only retail electricity sales and does not include self-generation. EIA reports flows for non-thermal resources (i.e., hydro, wind and solar) in BTU-equivalent values by assuming a typical fossil fuel plant "heat rate." The efficiency of electricity production is calculated as the total retail electricity delivered divided by the primary energy input into electricity generation. Interstate and international electricity trade are lumped into net imports or exports and are calculated using a system-wide generation efficiency. End use efficiency is estimated as 65% for the residential, 70% for the commercial, 80% for the industrial sector, and as 25% for the transportation sector. Totals may not equal sum of components due to independent rounding. LLNL-MI-410527

Energy Services 227.0


Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

Estimated Maryland Energy Use In 2008 ~1313.5 Trillion BTU Solar 0.1 153.4

Net Electricity Imports

Nuclear 153.4

Hydro 19.5

19.5

Wind 0.0

154.1

Electricity Generation 485.8

7.7

Geothermal 0.4

62.0

331.8

0.1

4.9

0.1

0.4 20.5

73.6

92.6

84.2

Residential 210.4 8.0

136.7

25.0

57.0

102.4 Natural Gas 203.4

Commercial 189.9

73.1

0.8

3.3

10.4

133.0 Energy Services 488.4

279.8 21.9

19.3

Coal 309.3

28.5

11.4

26.7 Industrial 133.4

106.7

52.2

3.6 1.8

Biomass 46.0 15.6

427.1 Petroleum 519.5

Rejected Energy 825.1

Transportation 448.1

336.1

112.0

Source: LLNL 2010. Data is based on DOE/EIA-0214(2008), June 2010. If this information or a reproduction of it is used, credit must be given to the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and the Department of Energy, under whose auspices the work was performed. Distributed electricity represents only retail electricity sales and does not include self-generation. EIA reports flows for non-thermal resources (i.e., hydro, wind and solar) in BTU-equivalent values by assuming a typical fossil fuel plant "heat rate." The efficiency of electricity production is calculated as the total retail electricity delivered divided by the primary energy input into electricity generation. Interstate and international electricity trade are lumped into net imports or exports and are calculated using a system-wide generation efficiency. End use efficiency is estimated as 65% for the residential, 70% for the commercial, 80% for the industrial sector, and as 25% for the transportation sector. Totals may not equal sum of components due to independent rounding. LLNL-MI-410527


Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

Estimated Massachusetts Energy Use In 2008 ~1324.9 Trillion BTU Solar 0.4 61.3

Net Electricity Imports

Nuclear 61.3

Hydro 11.4

11.3

69.7

121.0

Electricity Generation 381.6

Wind 0.0

21.7 22.3

260.6

0.4

Geothermal 0.6

Residential 287.2

9.2 160.3

186.7

96.1

114.4

90.7

0.5

0.1

Natural Gas 382.3

100.5

67.0

57.4

1.5

52.3 Commercial 174.4

24.1

122.1 Energy Services 523.5

104.7 Coal 106.9

48.2

31.8

0.1 3.7

2.2

Industrial 116.4

23.3 93.1

30.4

2.0 1.1

Biomass 53.9 17.9

465.4 Petroleum 638.4

Rejected Energy 801.5

Transportation 486.4

364.8

121.6

Source: LLNL 2010. Data is based on DOE/EIA-0214(2008), June 2010. If this information or a reproduction of it is used, credit must be given to the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and the Department of Energy, under whose auspices the work was performed. Distributed electricity represents only retail electricity sales and does not include self-generation. EIA reports flows for non-thermal resources (i.e., hydro, wind and solar) in BTU-equivalent values by assuming a typical fossil fuel plant "heat rate." The efficiency of electricity production is calculated as the total retail electricity delivered divided by the primary energy input into electricity generation. Interstate and international electricity trade are lumped into net imports or exports and are calculated using a system-wide generation efficiency. End use efficiency is estimated as 65% for the residential, 70% for the commercial, 80% for the industrial sector, and as 25% for the transportation sector. Totals may not equal sum of components due to independent rounding. LLNL-MI-410527


Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

Estimated Michigan Energy Use In 2008 ~2945.1 Trillion BTU Solar 0.7 329.1

Net Electricity Exports

12.7

Nuclear 329.1 373.6 Hydro 13.4

13.2

Electricity Generation 1178.0

804.5

1.4 Wind 1.4

22.7

Geothermal 3.5 94.8

187.7

117.0

0.7

Residential 536.3

4.4 0.5

3.0

350.0

21.4

348.6

43.8

99.8

133.0

0.6

Natural Gas 797.3

176.3

4.4

8.3

Commercial 332.8 10.4

233.0 Energy Services 1173.5

712.4 152.0

110.9

0.3

Coal 800.0

82.7

35.1

100.8 Industrial 504.1

403.3

123.1

24.2 Biomass 119.0 31.5 699.0 Petroleum 880.6

Rejected Energy 1758.9

Transportation 754.7

566.1

188.7

Source: LLNL 2010. Data is based on DOE/EIA-0214(2008), June 2010. If this information or a reproduction of it is used, credit must be given to the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and the Department of Energy, under whose auspices the work was performed. Distributed electricity represents only retail electricity sales and does not include self-generation. EIA reports flows for non-thermal resources (i.e., hydro, wind and solar) in BTU-equivalent values by assuming a typical fossil fuel plant "heat rate." The efficiency of electricity production is calculated as the total retail electricity delivered divided by the primary energy input into electricity generation. Interstate and international electricity trade are lumped into net imports or exports and are calculated using a system-wide generation efficiency. End use efficiency is estimated as 65% for the residential, 70% for the commercial, 80% for the industrial sector, and as 25% for the transportation sector. Totals may not equal sum of components due to independent rounding. LLNL-MI-410527


Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

Estimated Minnesota Energy Use In 2008 ~1816.5 Trillion BTU Solar 0.3 135.9

Net Electricity Imports

Nuclear 135.9

Hydro 7.2

6.0

56.3

178.4

Electricity Generation 562.6

384.2

42.9 Wind 42.9

17.7

Geothermal 0.7 25.2

0.3

2.7

90.6

76.3 0.1

0.7

142.8

Residential 259.0 11.2

168.3

27.6

58.9

77.1 Natural Gas 410.5

101.9

1.0

2.7

Commercial 196.2 13.6

137.4

332.2 122.6

81.2

1.2

Coal 359.4

26.1 18.0

Industrial 398.7

33.6

319.0

134.0

21.6 538.7 Petroleum 716.6

79.7

0.1

Biomass 86.8

Rejected Energy 1047.2

Transportation 578.4

433.8

144.6

Source: LLNL 2010. Data is based on DOE/EIA-0214(2008), June 2010. If this information or a reproduction of it is used, credit must be given to the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and the Department of Energy, under whose auspices the work was performed. Distributed electricity represents only retail electricity sales and does not include self-generation. EIA reports flows for non-thermal resources (i.e., hydro, wind and solar) in BTU-equivalent values by assuming a typical fossil fuel plant "heat rate." The efficiency of electricity production is calculated as the total retail electricity delivered divided by the primary energy input into electricity generation. Interstate and international electricity trade are lumped into net imports or exports and are calculated using a system-wide generation efficiency. End use efficiency is estimated as 65% for the residential, 70% for the commercial, 80% for the industrial sector, and as 25% for the transportation sector. Totals may not equal sum of components due to independent rounding. LLNL-MI-410527

Energy Services 769.2


Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

Estimated Mississippi Energy Use In 2008 ~1138.3 Trillion BTU Solar 0.0 98.2

Net Electricity Imports

Nuclear 98.2

21.8

Electricity Generation 444.6

Hydro 0.0

141.0 303.6

Wind 0.0

62.4 0.9

Geothermal 0.7 171.4

5.2

34.7 Residential 99.3

7.2

64.5

45.1

21.8

24.5 0.6

Natural Gas 364.2

0.8

20.7

5.2

Commercial 72.5

50.8

174.0 55.3

118.1 Coal 177.2

3.1

60.3 Industrial 301.7

40.6 29.5

241.3

84.6

Biomass 49.4 2.9 328.9 Petroleum 426.8

Rejected Energy 691.4

Transportation 361.3

270.9

90.3

Source: LLNL 2010. Data is based on DOE/EIA-0214(2008), June 2010. If this information or a reproduction of it is used, credit must be given to the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and the Department of Energy, under whose auspices the work was performed. Distributed electricity represents only retail electricity sales and does not include self-generation. EIA reports flows for non-thermal resources (i.e., hydro, wind and solar) in BTU-equivalent values by assuming a typical fossil fuel plant "heat rate." The efficiency of electricity production is calculated as the total retail electricity delivered divided by the primary energy input into electricity generation. Interstate and international electricity trade are lumped into net imports or exports and are calculated using a system-wide generation efficiency. End use efficiency is estimated as 65% for the residential, 70% for the commercial, 80% for the industrial sector, and as 25% for the transportation sector. Totals may not equal sum of components due to independent rounding. LLNL-MI-410527

Energy Services 447.0


Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

Estimated Missouri Energy Use In 2008 ~1947.4 Trillion BTU Solar 0.1 98.0

Net Electricity Exports

7.4

Nuclear 98.0 295.3 Hydro 20.2

20.2

Electricity Generation 931.2

2.0 Wind 2.0

0.3

Geothermal 0.2

635.9

120.8

0.1

0.8

0.4

0.2 43.8

114.6

Natural Gas 298.1

4.0

65.3

2.1

12.8

94.8 Residential 270.9

22.0

176.1

106.2

56.2

9.7

Commercial 187.3 131.1 Energy Services 662.6

766.1 67.1

60.9

Coal 792.9

22.4

5.3

52.4 Industrial 261.8

209.4

106.2

7.3 Biomass 40.5

0.1 20.1 556.7

Petroleum 695.4

Rejected Energy 1277.4

Transportation 584.2

438.2

146.1

Source: LLNL 2010. Data is based on DOE/EIA-0214(2008), June 2010. If this information or a reproduction of it is used, credit must be given to the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and the Department of Energy, under whose auspices the work was performed. Distributed electricity represents only retail electricity sales and does not include self-generation. EIA reports flows for non-thermal resources (i.e., hydro, wind and solar) in BTU-equivalent values by assuming a typical fossil fuel plant "heat rate." The efficiency of electricity production is calculated as the total retail electricity delivered divided by the primary energy input into electricity generation. Interstate and international electricity trade are lumped into net imports or exports and are calculated using a system-wide generation efficiency. End use efficiency is estimated as 65% for the residential, 70% for the commercial, 80% for the industrial sector, and as 25% for the transportation sector. Totals may not equal sum of components due to independent rounding. LLNL-MI-410527


Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

Estimated Montana Energy Use In 2008 ~585.4 Trillion BTU Solar 0.0 Net Electricity Exports

47.9

Nuclear 0.0 100.2

98.5

Electricity Generation 315.9

Hydro 98.5

215.7

5.8 Wind 5.8

15.9

2.3

7.1

Geothermal 2.6

2.3

0.1 21.9

17.2 Residential 49.3

9.0

32.0

16.5

10.4

0.5 0.1

Natural Gas 77.6

0.3

14.6

0.4

2.8

Commercial 34.6

24.2 Energy Services 186.3

201.6 0.1

33.2

19.9

Coal 203.3

1.4

25.7 Industrial 128.4

11.2

102.7

62.7 7.4 Biomass 16.1

2.3 Petroleum 181.3

Rejected Energy 351.2

99.8

Transportation 109.5

82.2 27.4

Source: LLNL 2010. Data is based on DOE/EIA-0214(2008), June 2010. If this information or a reproduction of it is used, credit must be given to the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and the Department of Energy, under whose auspices the work was performed. Distributed electricity represents only retail electricity sales and does not include self-generation. EIA reports flows for non-thermal resources (i.e., hydro, wind and solar) in BTU-equivalent values by assuming a typical fossil fuel plant "heat rate." The efficiency of electricity production is calculated as the total retail electricity delivered divided by the primary energy input into electricity generation. Interstate and international electricity trade are lumped into net imports or exports and are calculated using a system-wide generation efficiency. End use efficiency is estimated as 65% for the residential, 70% for the commercial, 80% for the industrial sector, and as 25% for the transportation sector. Totals may not equal sum of components due to independent rounding. LLNL-MI-410527


Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

Estimated Nebraska Energy Use In 2008 ~743.8 Trillion BTU Solar 0.0 99.1

Net Electricity Exports

9.4

Nuclear 99.1 107.7 Hydro 3.4

3.4

Electricity Generation 339.8

232.0

2.1 Wind 2.1

0.6

Geothermal 0.9

33.3 0.4 42.8

7.3

3.8

0.2

0.7

Natural Gas 169.5

35.2

0.8

31.2 Residential 89.2

9.1

58.0

32.2

21.5

2.9

Commercial 71.8 50.2 Energy Services 282.4

226.8 32.8

74.1 Coal 234.7 2.9

7.8

32.3 Industrial 161.5

129.2

43.9

10.1 Biomass 12.8 4.8

Petroleum 221.4

165.0

Rejected Energy 451.9

Transportation 179.8

134.8 44.9

Source: LLNL 2010. Data is based on DOE/EIA-0214(2008), June 2010. If this information or a reproduction of it is used, credit must be given to the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and the Department of Energy, under whose auspices the work was performed. Distributed electricity represents only retail electricity sales and does not include self-generation. EIA reports flows for non-thermal resources (i.e., hydro, wind and solar) in BTU-equivalent values by assuming a typical fossil fuel plant "heat rate." The efficiency of electricity production is calculated as the total retail electricity delivered divided by the primary energy input into electricity generation. Interstate and international electricity trade are lumped into net imports or exports and are calculated using a system-wide generation efficiency. End use efficiency is estimated as 65% for the residential, 70% for the commercial, 80% for the industrial sector, and as 25% for the transportation sector. Totals may not equal sum of components due to independent rounding. LLNL-MI-410527


Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

Estimated Nevada Energy Use In 2008 ~710.3 Trillion BTU Solar 3.0 Net Electricity Imports

Nuclear 0.0

Hydro 17.3 Wind 0.0

18.5

1.5 101.6

17.3

Electricity Generation 320.4

29.1

41.2

1.4

0.2

Geothermal 30.4

5.5

0.3 188.2

40.0 0.6

Natural Gas 274.9

29.9

84.2 Coal 88.6

218.8

0.9

Residential 91.4

3.0

59.4

31.7

19.8

3.0

Commercial 66.1 46.3 Energy Services 242.5

0.5

19.4

47.2

13.3 0.6

4.4

32.0

Industrial 97.0

77.6

31.0

3.6 Biomass 13.5 6.5 226.9 Petroleum 264.1

Rejected Energy 467.8

Transportation 237.0

177.8

59.3

Source: LLNL 2010. Data is based on DOE/EIA-0214(2008), June 2010. If this information or a reproduction of it is used, credit must be given to the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and the Department of Energy, under whose auspices the work was performed. Distributed electricity represents only retail electricity sales and does not include self-generation. EIA reports flows for non-thermal resources (i.e., hydro, wind and solar) in BTU-equivalent values by assuming a typical fossil fuel plant "heat rate." The efficiency of electricity production is calculated as the total retail electricity delivered divided by the primary energy input into electricity generation. Interstate and international electricity trade are lumped into net imports or exports and are calculated using a system-wide generation efficiency. End use efficiency is estimated as 65% for the residential, 70% for the commercial, 80% for the industrial sector, and as 25% for the transportation sector. Totals may not equal sum of components due to independent rounding. LLNL-MI-410527


Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

Estimated New Hampshire Energy Use In 2008 ~417.5 Trillion BTU Solar 0.1 97.7 33.7

Nuclear 97.7

Hydro 16.1 Wind 0.1

Net Electricity Exports

71.2

16.0

Electricity Generation 224.4

153.2

0.1 15.0

0.1

17.7 1.5

Geothermal 0.0

2.0

20.2

Rejected Energy 270.1

Residential 57.8 37.6

33.5 7.2 51.1

15.4

Natural Gas 73.4

0.3

9.3

12.6

Commercial 37.7

11.3

26.4 Energy Services 113.8

40.2 5.7

7.0

0.1

Coal 40.2

1.6

14.7

Industrial 29.1

5.8 23.3

Biomass 25.3 3.8

Petroleum 164.5

102.2

Transportation 106.0

79.5 26.5

Source: LLNL 2010. Data is based on DOE/EIA-0214(2008), June 2010. If this information or a reproduction of it is used, credit must be given to the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and the Department of Energy, under whose auspices the work was performed. Distributed electricity represents only retail electricity sales and does not include self-generation. EIA reports flows for non-thermal resources (i.e., hydro, wind and solar) in BTU-equivalent values by assuming a typical fossil fuel plant "heat rate." The efficiency of electricity production is calculated as the total retail electricity delivered divided by the primary energy input into electricity generation. Interstate and international electricity trade are lumped into net imports or exports and are calculated using a system-wide generation efficiency. End use efficiency is estimated as 65% for the residential, 70% for the commercial, 80% for the industrial sector, and as 25% for the transportation sector. Totals may not equal sum of components due to independent rounding. LLNL-MI-410527


Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

Estimated New Jersey Energy Use In 2008 ~2473.3 Trillion BTU Solar 2.5 336.5

Net Electricity Imports

Nuclear 336.5

Hydro 0.3 Wind 0.2

0.3

76.3

427.4

198.5

Electricity Generation 625.9 0.2 14.1

2.5

1.9

Residential 382.3

Geothermal 0.3

6.9

0.3 175.3

133.8

99.3

227.8

248.5

45.5

99.7

138.4 Natural Gas 635.2

Commercial 332.2

174.2

1.1

18.5

232.6 Energy Services 986.6

97.7 55.8

36.0

Coal 97.7

62.8 Industrial 314.0

2.7

251.2

219.5 2.2 1.0

Biomass 52.6 27.8

986.3 Petroleum 1271.7

Rejected Energy 1486.7

Transportation 1017.3

763.0

254.3

Source: LLNL 2010. Data is based on DOE/EIA-0214(2008), June 2010. If this information or a reproduction of it is used, credit must be given to the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and the Department of Energy, under whose auspices the work was performed. Distributed electricity represents only retail electricity sales and does not include self-generation. EIA reports flows for non-thermal resources (i.e., hydro, wind and solar) in BTU-equivalent values by assuming a typical fossil fuel plant "heat rate." The efficiency of electricity production is calculated as the total retail electricity delivered divided by the primary energy input into electricity generation. Interstate and international electricity trade are lumped into net imports or exports and are calculated using a system-wide generation efficiency. End use efficiency is estimated as 65% for the residential, 70% for the commercial, 80% for the industrial sector, and as 25% for the transportation sector. Totals may not equal sum of components due to independent rounding. LLNL-MI-410527


Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

Estimated New Mexico Energy Use In 2008 ~828.0 Trillion BTU Solar 0.3 Net Electricity Exports

43.1

Nuclear 0.0 118.3 Hydro 3.1

3.1

Electricity Generation 373.1

16.2 Wind 16.2 Geothermal 0.3

0.5

254.8

21.8

0.3 0.6

4.5 34.6

69.9

0.1

Natural Gas 250.9

0.7

25.6

282.8

0.3

Residential 67.7

6.5

44.0

30.1

18.5

5.2

Commercial 61.7

43.2 Energy Services 293.6

23.3

106.8 Coal 284.3

38.6 Industrial 193.2

0.5

1.6

23.7

154.6

60.8 14.0

Biomass 9.0 2.8

Petroleum 263.8

190.7

Rejected Energy 491.2

Transportation 207.5

155.6 51.9

Source: LLNL 2010. Data is based on DOE/EIA-0214(2008), June 2010. If this information or a reproduction of it is used, credit must be given to the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and the Department of Energy, under whose auspices the work was performed. Distributed electricity represents only retail electricity sales and does not include self-generation. EIA reports flows for non-thermal resources (i.e., hydro, wind and solar) in BTU-equivalent values by assuming a typical fossil fuel plant "heat rate." The efficiency of electricity production is calculated as the total retail electricity delivered divided by the primary energy input into electricity generation. Interstate and international electricity trade are lumped into net imports or exports and are calculated using a system-wide generation efficiency. End use efficiency is estimated as 65% for the residential, 70% for the commercial, 80% for the industrial sector, and as 25% for the transportation sector. Totals may not equal sum of components due to independent rounding. LLNL-MI-410527


Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

Estimated New York Energy Use In 2008 ~3878.8 Trillion BTU Solar 1.8 451.7

Net Electricity Imports

Nuclear 451.7

Hydro 263.3 Wind 12.3

262.7

48.5

443.0

Electricity Generation 1397.0

954.0

12.3 1.8

29.6

Residential 805.6

37.9

Geothermal 0.8

0.2

0.2 407.3

52.9

523.6

180.5

402.7

Natural Gas 1204.9

211.9

264.1

0.6 296.4

195.6

282.0

167.3

1.5

11.0

Commercial 706.2 132.5

494.3 Energy Services 1547.9

82.4

50.1

0.7

Coal 229.0

31.6

13.7

Industrial 321.3

64.3 257.0

142.7

16.1 Biomass 142.2

10.0 35.0 1030.6

Petroleum 1524.3

Rejected Energy 2330.8

Transportation 1091.7

818.8

272.9

Source: LLNL 2010. Data is based on DOE/EIA-0214(2008), June 2010. If this information or a reproduction of it is used, credit must be given to the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and the Department of Energy, under whose auspices the work was performed. Distributed electricity represents only retail electricity sales and does not include self-generation. EIA reports flows for non-thermal resources (i.e., hydro, wind and solar) in BTU-equivalent values by assuming a typical fossil fuel plant "heat rate." The efficiency of electricity production is calculated as the total retail electricity delivered divided by the primary energy input into electricity generation. Interstate and international electricity trade are lumped into net imports or exports and are calculated using a system-wide generation efficiency. End use efficiency is estimated as 65% for the residential, 70% for the commercial, 80% for the industrial sector, and as 25% for the transportation sector. Totals may not equal sum of components due to independent rounding. LLNL-MI-410527


Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

Estimated North Carolina Energy Use In 2008 ~2602.2 Trillion BTU Solar 0.3 415.8

Net Electricity Imports

Nuclear 415.8

Hydro 29.9

397.3

29.8

Wind 0.0

Electricity Generation 1252.8

7.9

Geothermal 0.7

46.4

855.5

190.2 0.3

2.8

0.7

0.7 36.4

Natural Gas 249.7

65.8 0.1 6.0

50.0

2.5

13.8

107.0 Residential 305.8

34.3

198.8

158.8

72.1

22.9

Commercial 240.3 168.2 Energy Services 900.3

760.1 92.0

94.8

Coal 794.7

27.9

84.8 Industrial 424.0

87.6

339.2

121.8 5.5 Biomass 136.3 24.4 746.6 Petroleum 928.4

Rejected Energy 1701.8

Transportation 776.5

582.4

194.1

Source: LLNL 2010. Data is based on DOE/EIA-0214(2008), June 2010. If this information or a reproduction of it is used, credit must be given to the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and the Department of Energy, under whose auspices the work was performed. Distributed electricity represents only retail electricity sales and does not include self-generation. EIA reports flows for non-thermal resources (i.e., hydro, wind and solar) in BTU-equivalent values by assuming a typical fossil fuel plant "heat rate." The efficiency of electricity production is calculated as the total retail electricity delivered divided by the primary energy input into electricity generation. Interstate and international electricity trade are lumped into net imports or exports and are calculated using a system-wide generation efficiency. End use efficiency is estimated as 65% for the residential, 70% for the commercial, 80% for the industrial sector, and as 25% for the transportation sector. Totals may not equal sum of components due to independent rounding. LLNL-MI-410527


Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

Estimated North Dakota Energy Use In 2008 ~664.4 Trillion BTU Solar 0.0 Nuclear 0.0

Hydro 12.3

Net Electricity Exports

72.0

12.3

Electricity Generation 360.6

16.7 Wind 16.7

114.4

14.5

0.5

Geothermal 0.7

Rejected Energy 377.0

246.3

0.2

0.4

1.5

Residential 38.0

13.3

9.4

24.7

15.2

9.6

12.0 0.3

Natural Gas 65.7

11.6

1.6

0.2

3.2

Commercial 32.2

22.5 Energy Services 215.3

331.1 30.2

12.6

Coal 424.6 1.6

91.7

36.1 Industrial 180.3

144.2

44.2

12.0 Biomass 5.8

2.5 Petroleum 138.4

81.2

Transportation 95.7

71.8 23.9

Source: LLNL 2010. Data is based on DOE/EIA-0214(2008), June 2010. If this information or a reproduction of it is used, credit must be given to the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and the Department of Energy, under whose auspices the work was performed. Distributed electricity represents only retail electricity sales and does not include self-generation. EIA reports flows for non-thermal resources (i.e., hydro, wind and solar) in BTU-equivalent values by assuming a typical fossil fuel plant "heat rate." The efficiency of electricity production is calculated as the total retail electricity delivered divided by the primary energy input into electricity generation. Interstate and international electricity trade are lumped into net imports or exports and are calculated using a system-wide generation efficiency. End use efficiency is estimated as 65% for the residential, 70% for the commercial, 80% for the industrial sector, and as 25% for the transportation sector. Totals may not equal sum of components due to independent rounding. LLNL-MI-410527


Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

Estimated Ohio Energy Use In 2008 ~3856.6 Trillion BTU Solar 0.3 183.1

Net Electricity Imports

Nuclear 183.1

51.8

492.0 Hydro 3.8

3.8

Electricity Generation 1551.5

0.1 Wind 0.1

3.5

Geothermal 2.3 24.3

1059.5

182.2

0.3 14.5 0.6

1.8

318.9

173.8

5.8

3.9

Residential 559.6 363.7

31.8 161.4

0.6

Natural Gas 824.0

24.0

195.9

17.3

108.8 Commercial 362.8 254.0

1322.2 200.0

295.1 Coal 1438.4 109.8

178.3 Industrial 891.3

22.2

713.0

264.2 12.0 Biomass 89.4

0.2 35.8 935.4

Petroleum 1263.3

Rejected Energy 2280.0

Transportation 983.4

737.6

245.9

Source: LLNL 2010. Data is based on DOE/EIA-0214(2008), June 2010. If this information or a reproduction of it is used, credit must be given to the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and the Department of Energy, under whose auspices the work was performed. Distributed electricity represents only retail electricity sales and does not include self-generation. EIA reports flows for non-thermal resources (i.e., hydro, wind and solar) in BTU-equivalent values by assuming a typical fossil fuel plant "heat rate." The efficiency of electricity production is calculated as the total retail electricity delivered divided by the primary energy input into electricity generation. Interstate and international electricity trade are lumped into net imports or exports and are calculated using a system-wide generation efficiency. End use efficiency is estimated as 65% for the residential, 70% for the commercial, 80% for the industrial sector, and as 25% for the transportation sector. Totals may not equal sum of components due to independent rounding. LLNL-MI-410527

Energy Services 1576.6


Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

Estimated Oklahoma Energy Use In 2008 ~1728.2 Trillion BTU Solar 0.0 Net Electricity Exports

39.6

Nuclear 0.0 231.6 Hydro 37.6

37.6

Electricity Generation 730.3

23.2

498.7

Wind 23.2 Geothermal 0.0

74.6 0.1 292.2

3.6

54.0 Residential 154.2

7.7

100.3

64.9

34.1

68.3

Natural Gas 691.2

0.6

42.1

5.9

Commercial 113.5

79.5

377.1 52.5

259.9 Coal 391.7

89.2 Industrial 445.8

356.6

8.9

14.6

109.9 28.7 Biomass 26.3 13.2 434.6 Petroleum 558.1

Rejected Energy 1033.2

Transportation 476.4

357.3

119.1

Source: LLNL 2010. Data is based on DOE/EIA-0214(2008), June 2010. If this information or a reproduction of it is used, credit must be given to the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and the Department of Energy, under whose auspices the work was performed. Distributed electricity represents only retail electricity sales and does not include self-generation. EIA reports flows for non-thermal resources (i.e., hydro, wind and solar) in BTU-equivalent values by assuming a typical fossil fuel plant "heat rate." The efficiency of electricity production is calculated as the total retail electricity delivered divided by the primary energy input into electricity generation. Interstate and international electricity trade are lumped into net imports or exports and are calculated using a system-wide generation efficiency. End use efficiency is estimated as 65% for the residential, 70% for the commercial, 80% for the industrial sector, and as 25% for the transportation sector. Totals may not equal sum of components due to independent rounding. LLNL-MI-410527

Energy Services 655.4


Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

Estimated Oregon Energy Use In 2008 ~1095.0 Trillion BTU Solar 1.8 Net Electricity Imports

Nuclear 0.0

Hydro 333.1 Wind 25.4

333.1

2.5

165.5

Electricity Generation 521.8

356.4

25.4 4.5

67.9

1.8

0.1

Geothermal 1.0

8.1

0.3

45.5 Residential 130.1

5.7

84.5

55.7

28.3

46.2

119.0

0.5

Natural Gas 274.7

1.6

31.2

5.2

Commercial 94.2

65.9 Energy Services 379.9

39.7 0.2 70.5 Coal 41.4

44.2 27.0

1.7

36.7 Industrial 183.3

146.6

39.7

7.7 Biomass 51.1

0.2 9.9

Petroleum 364.0

Rejected Energy 715.1

313.3

Transportation 331.1

248.3 82.8

Source: LLNL 2010. Data is based on DOE/EIA-0214(2008), June 2010. If this information or a reproduction of it is used, credit must be given to the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and the Department of Energy, under whose auspices the work was performed. Distributed electricity represents only retail electricity sales and does not include self-generation. EIA reports flows for non-thermal resources (i.e., hydro, wind and solar) in BTU-equivalent values by assuming a typical fossil fuel plant "heat rate." The efficiency of electricity production is calculated as the total retail electricity delivered divided by the primary energy input into electricity generation. Interstate and international electricity trade are lumped into net imports or exports and are calculated using a system-wide generation efficiency. End use efficiency is estimated as 65% for the residential, 70% for the commercial, 80% for the industrial sector, and as 25% for the transportation sector. Totals may not equal sum of components due to independent rounding. LLNL-MI-410527


Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

Estimated Pennsylvania Energy Use In 2008 ~4508.9 Trillion BTU Solar 1.0 822.2

Net Electricity Exports

193.1

Nuclear 822.2 706.3 Hydro 25.1

25.1

Electricity Generation 2227.3

1521.0

7.2 Wind 7.2

28.6

Geothermal 1.5 145.8

184.5

1.0 9.9

0.5

0.9 238.2

4.7

150.2

3.8

Residential 544.0 353.6

108.1 161.5

0.6

Natural Gas 778.4

10.8

190.4

37.3

Commercial 358.2

107.4 250.7 Energy Services 1573.7

1188.6 205.2

164.2

Coal 1421.1

227.3

31.8

180.4 Industrial 902.2

721.8

273.7

39.0 Biomass 105.6

2.9

30.6 Petroleum 1346.8

Rejected Energy 2742.1

917.9

Transportation 990.5

742.8 247.6

Source: LLNL 2010. Data is based on DOE/EIA-0214(2008), June 2010. If this information or a reproduction of it is used, credit must be given to the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and the Department of Energy, under whose auspices the work was performed. Distributed electricity represents only retail electricity sales and does not include self-generation. EIA reports flows for non-thermal resources (i.e., hydro, wind and solar) in BTU-equivalent values by assuming a typical fossil fuel plant "heat rate." The efficiency of electricity production is calculated as the total retail electricity delivered divided by the primary energy input into electricity generation. Interstate and international electricity trade are lumped into net imports or exports and are calculated using a system-wide generation efficiency. End use efficiency is estimated as 65% for the residential, 70% for the commercial, 80% for the industrial sector, and as 25% for the transportation sector. Totals may not equal sum of components due to independent rounding. LLNL-MI-410527


Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

Estimated Rhode Island Energy Use In 2008 ~201.1 Trillion BTU Solar 0.1 Net Electricity Imports

Nuclear 0.0

Hydro 0.0

0.0

Wind 0.0

8.8

Electricity Generation 56.3 2.0

17.9

38.5

0.1

0.2

Geothermal 0.0

Residential 47.4

1.5 54.1

16.6

10.4

30.8

17.4 18.1

8.7

12.6 Natural Gas 91.2

11.1

0.2

Rejected Energy 116.5

Commercial 28.8 4.9

20.2 Energy Services 84.6

6.9

3.7

Coal 0.0

0.1

4.3 Industrial 21.7

17.4

11.0

1.0 Biomass 7.3 3.4 60.2 Petroleum 93.7

Transportation 64.6

48.5

16.2

Source: LLNL 2010. Data is based on DOE/EIA-0214(2008), June 2010. If this information or a reproduction of it is used, credit must be given to the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and the Department of Energy, under whose auspices the work was performed. Distributed electricity represents only retail electricity sales and does not include self-generation. EIA reports flows for non-thermal resources (i.e., hydro, wind and solar) in BTU-equivalent values by assuming a typical fossil fuel plant "heat rate." The efficiency of electricity production is calculated as the total retail electricity delivered divided by the primary energy input into electricity generation. Interstate and international electricity trade are lumped into net imports or exports and are calculated using a system-wide generation efficiency. End use efficiency is estimated as 65% for the residential, 70% for the commercial, 80% for the industrial sector, and as 25% for the transportation sector. Totals may not equal sum of components due to independent rounding. LLNL-MI-410527


Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

Estimated South Carolina Energy Use In 2008 ~1815.5 Trillion BTU Solar 0.0

541.1 49.5

Nuclear 541.1

Hydro 11.1

Net Electricity Exports

11.1

Wind 0.0

Electricity Generation 1023.7

6.8

Geothermal 0.4

324.6 699.1

101.4 1.6

0.0

0.4

6.8

Residential 143.5

50.2

6.8

93.3

74.0

31.9

Rejected Energy 1190.2

28.0 47.8 Natural Gas 175.9

0.3

23.0

2.2

7.0

Commercial 106.5

74.5 Energy Services 575.8

415.4 74.3

99.8

Coal 445.5

29.7

74.1 Industrial 370.5

65.5

296.4

101.1 2.7 Biomass 96.2 14.9 Petroleum 545.4

428.9

Transportation 446.5

334.9 111.6

Source: LLNL 2010. Data is based on DOE/EIA-0214(2008), June 2010. If this information or a reproduction of it is used, credit must be given to the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and the Department of Energy, under whose auspices the work was performed. Distributed electricity represents only retail electricity sales and does not include self-generation. EIA reports flows for non-thermal resources (i.e., hydro, wind and solar) in BTU-equivalent values by assuming a typical fossil fuel plant "heat rate." The efficiency of electricity production is calculated as the total retail electricity delivered divided by the primary energy input into electricity generation. Interstate and international electricity trade are lumped into net imports or exports and are calculated using a system-wide generation efficiency. End use efficiency is estimated as 65% for the residential, 70% for the commercial, 80% for the industrial sector, and as 25% for the transportation sector. Totals may not equal sum of components due to independent rounding. LLNL-MI-410527


Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

Estimated South Dakota Energy Use In 2008 ~273.8 Trillion BTU Solar 0.0 Net Electricity Imports

Nuclear 0.0 29.5

Geothermal 1.5

23.3

Electricity Generation 73.5

Hydro 29.5 Wind 1.4

14.1

50.2

1.4

13.3

15.0 Residential 38.0

0.3

2.6

1.7

0.3

13.6

7.2

24.7

14.5

8.8

0.8

Natural Gas 64.6

11.4 39.6

0.2

0.3

0.3

Commercial 29.5

2.3

20.6

7.9

32.2 Coal 43.1 3.3

13.4 Industrial 66.8

0.3

53.5

22.7

4.7 Biomass 5.6 3.3

81.3 Petroleum 113.9

Rejected Energy 152.7

Transportation 89.3

67.0

22.3

Source: LLNL 2010. Data is based on DOE/EIA-0214(2008), June 2010. If this information or a reproduction of it is used, credit must be given to the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and the Department of Energy, under whose auspices the work was performed. Distributed electricity represents only retail electricity sales and does not include self-generation. EIA reports flows for non-thermal resources (i.e., hydro, wind and solar) in BTU-equivalent values by assuming a typical fossil fuel plant "heat rate." The efficiency of electricity production is calculated as the total retail electricity delivered divided by the primary energy input into electricity generation. Interstate and international electricity trade are lumped into net imports or exports and are calculated using a system-wide generation efficiency. End use efficiency is estimated as 65% for the residential, 70% for the commercial, 80% for the industrial sector, and as 25% for the transportation sector. Totals may not equal sum of components due to independent rounding. LLNL-MI-410527

Energy Services 121.1


Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

Estimated Tennessee Energy Use In 2008 ~2112.8 Trillion BTU Solar 0.0 282.5

Net Electricity Imports

Nuclear 282.5

Hydro 55.6

66.6

288.8

55.6

Electricity Generation 910.6

621.8

0.5 Wind 0.5

0.3

Geothermal 0.1

143.1 2.3

0.2

0.1 71.8 4.5

Natural Gas 238.5

2.1

56.1

1.8

11.0

82.2 Residential 235.0

8.6

152.7

100.4

50.0

6.2

Commercial 166.6

116.6 Energy Services 802.8

564.8 111.9

95.5 Coal 643.8

76.6 10.6

94.9 Industrial 474.7

49.0

379.8

141.8

Biomass 84.1 22.0 582.1 Petroleum 741.0

Rejected Energy 1310.0

Transportation 614.7

461.0

153.7

Source: LLNL 2010. Data is based on DOE/EIA-0214(2008), June 2010. If this information or a reproduction of it is used, credit must be given to the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and the Department of Energy, under whose auspices the work was performed. Distributed electricity represents only retail electricity sales and does not include self-generation. EIA reports flows for non-thermal resources (i.e., hydro, wind and solar) in BTU-equivalent values by assuming a typical fossil fuel plant "heat rate." The efficiency of electricity production is calculated as the total retail electricity delivered divided by the primary energy input into electricity generation. Interstate and international electricity trade are lumped into net imports or exports and are calculated using a system-wide generation efficiency. End use efficiency is estimated as 65% for the residential, 70% for the commercial, 80% for the industrial sector, and as 25% for the transportation sector. Totals may not equal sum of components due to independent rounding. LLNL-MI-410527


Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

Estimated Texas Energy Use In 2008 ~11485.4 Trillion BTU Solar 0.8 425.7

Net Electricity Imports

Nuclear 425.7

Hydro 10.2

10.2

Geothermal 1.7

1158.2

Electricity Generation 3652.3

159.9 Wind 159.9

26.0

4.9

2494.1

435.8

0.8

12.3

19.2

1.1 1472.7

Residential 677.3

22.6

440.2

387.2

175.9

197.8

Natural Gas 3656.2

0.6 0.3

171.5

1566.6

237.0

3.6

23.1

Commercial 586.3

410.4 972.7

361.0

1699.7

Coal 1605.9

39.0

Industrial 4863.4

73.4 2690.3

3890.7

114.6 Biomass 165.6

0.2 64.6 2685.0

Petroleum 5433.3

Rejected Energy 6028.0

Transportation 2864.4

2148.3

716.1

Source: LLNL 2010. Data is based on DOE/EIA-0214(2008), June 2010. If this information or a reproduction of it is used, credit must be given to the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and the Department of Energy, under whose auspices the work was performed. Distributed electricity represents only retail electricity sales and does not include self-generation. EIA reports flows for non-thermal resources (i.e., hydro, wind and solar) in BTU-equivalent values by assuming a typical fossil fuel plant "heat rate." The efficiency of electricity production is calculated as the total retail electricity delivered divided by the primary energy input into electricity generation. Interstate and international electricity trade are lumped into net imports or exports and are calculated using a system-wide generation efficiency. End use efficiency is estimated as 65% for the residential, 70% for the commercial, 80% for the industrial sector, and as 25% for the transportation sector. Totals may not equal sum of components due to independent rounding. LLNL-MI-410527

Energy Services 5457.4


Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

Estimated Utah Energy Use In 2008 ~943.8 Trillion BTU Solar 0.1 45.8

Nuclear 0.0

Hydro 6.6

142.0

6.6

Electricity Generation 447.7

0.2 Wind 0.2

Net Electricity Exports

5.3

Geothermal 6.1 58.1

1.0

305.7

30.0

0.1 0.5

4.7 70.1 0.3

Natural Gas 237.4

0.8

40.0

37.6 Residential 107.4

2.5

69.8

35.1

24.1

4.3

Commercial 80.4 56.3 Energy Services 313.9

376.1 0.5 31.0

56.8 Coal 395.9

0.3

19.8

31.5 Industrial 157.7

126.1

49.2

12.5 Biomass 10.6

0.1

3.8

Petroleum 286.8

Rejected Energy 584.0

230.3

Transportation 246.7

185.0 61.7

Source: LLNL 2010. Data is based on DOE/EIA-0214(2008), June 2010. If this information or a reproduction of it is used, credit must be given to the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and the Department of Energy, under whose auspices the work was performed. Distributed electricity represents only retail electricity sales and does not include self-generation. EIA reports flows for non-thermal resources (i.e., hydro, wind and solar) in BTU-equivalent values by assuming a typical fossil fuel plant "heat rate." The efficiency of electricity production is calculated as the total retail electricity delivered divided by the primary energy input into electricity generation. Interstate and international electricity trade are lumped into net imports or exports and are calculated using a system-wide generation efficiency. End use efficiency is estimated as 65% for the residential, 70% for the commercial, 80% for the industrial sector, and as 25% for the transportation sector. Totals may not equal sum of components due to independent rounding. LLNL-MI-410527


Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

Estimated Vermont Energy Use In 2008 ~164.1 Trillion BTU Solar 0.1

51.2

Nuclear 51.2

Hydro 14.7 Wind 0.1 Geothermal 0.0

Net Electricity Exports

3.1

14.5

0.1

22.7

Electricity Generation 71.5 5.6

48.8

7.3

0.1 1.0

9.9 Residential 28.3 18.4

16.7

3.1

7.0

Natural Gas 8.7

0.2

2.5

7.0

Rejected Energy 105.8

Commercial 16.7

5.0 11.7 Energy Services 55.3

Coal 0.0

5.3

0.2

3.0

1.3

Industrial 15.3

3.1 12.3

5.5

Biomass 9.9 1.8

Petroleum 79.5

50.2

Transportation 52.0

39.0 13.0

Source: LLNL 2010. Data is based on DOE/EIA-0214(2008), June 2010. If this information or a reproduction of it is used, credit must be given to the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and the Department of Energy, under whose auspices the work was performed. Distributed electricity represents only retail electricity sales and does not include self-generation. EIA reports flows for non-thermal resources (i.e., hydro, wind and solar) in BTU-equivalent values by assuming a typical fossil fuel plant "heat rate." The efficiency of electricity production is calculated as the total retail electricity delivered divided by the primary energy input into electricity generation. Interstate and international electricity trade are lumped into net imports or exports and are calculated using a system-wide generation efficiency. End use efficiency is estimated as 65% for the residential, 70% for the commercial, 80% for the industrial sector, and as 25% for the transportation sector. Totals may not equal sum of components due to independent rounding. LLNL-MI-410527


Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

Estimated Virginia Energy Use In 2008 ~2211.2 Trillion BTU Solar 0.7 292.0

Net Electricity Imports

Nuclear 292.0

Wind 0.0

235.2

Electricity Generation 741.5

9.9

Hydro 10.0

140.5

16.2

506.4

Residential 283.8

0.7

12.1

Geothermal 1.2

0.2

0.6 80.1

99.3

152.2

82.7

Natural Gas 310.8

11.1

36.3

184.5

159.9

76.1

0.6 1.8

69.5

6.8

Commercial 253.5

14.9

177.5 Energy Services 874.2

331.3 69.5

62.9

0.1

Coal 415.1

81.8 9.0

Industrial 400.7

68.0

320.5

118.3

23.7 733.4 Petroleum 915.1

80.1

0.7

Biomass 125.8

Rejected Energy 1337.0

Transportation 766.7

575.1

191.7

Source: LLNL 2010. Data is based on DOE/EIA-0214(2008), June 2010. If this information or a reproduction of it is used, credit must be given to the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and the Department of Energy, under whose auspices the work was performed. Distributed electricity represents only retail electricity sales and does not include self-generation. EIA reports flows for non-thermal resources (i.e., hydro, wind and solar) in BTU-equivalent values by assuming a typical fossil fuel plant "heat rate." The efficiency of electricity production is calculated as the total retail electricity delivered divided by the primary energy input into electricity generation. Interstate and international electricity trade are lumped into net imports or exports and are calculated using a system-wide generation efficiency. End use efficiency is estimated as 65% for the residential, 70% for the commercial, 80% for the industrial sector, and as 25% for the transportation sector. Totals may not equal sum of components due to independent rounding. LLNL-MI-410527


Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

Estimated Washington Energy Use In 2008 ~2184.4 Trillion BTU Solar 0.2 Nuclear 96.9

Hydro 765.0 Wind 36.0

96.9

Net Electricity Exports

42.6

764.6

340.6

Electricity Generation 1073.9

733.3

36.0 7.7

124.0

0.2

0.3

Geothermal 0.8

13.9

0.1

83.8

Rejected Energy 1410.4

Residential 239.4

14.2

155.6

101.9

52.3

87.1 76.8 0.7

0.4

Natural Gas 307.2

2.3

57.9

11.2

Commercial 174.5

122.1 Energy Services 731.5

91.7 78.0 Coal 94.6

72.1 Industrial 372.8

56.1

3.0

74.6 298.3

163.7 7.4

Biomass 97.8 17.9 Petroleum 786.0

596.6

Transportation 621.8

466.4 155.5

Source: LLNL 2010. Data is based on DOE/EIA-0214(2008), June 2010. If this information or a reproduction of it is used, credit must be given to the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and the Department of Energy, under whose auspices the work was performed. Distributed electricity represents only retail electricity sales and does not include self-generation. EIA reports flows for non-thermal resources (i.e., hydro, wind and solar) in BTU-equivalent values by assuming a typical fossil fuel plant "heat rate." The efficiency of electricity production is calculated as the total retail electricity delivered divided by the primary energy input into electricity generation. Interstate and international electricity trade are lumped into net imports or exports and are calculated using a system-wide generation efficiency. End use efficiency is estimated as 65% for the residential, 70% for the commercial, 80% for the industrial sector, and as 25% for the transportation sector. Totals may not equal sum of components due to independent rounding. LLNL-MI-410527


Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

Estimated West Virginia Energy Use In 2008 ~1369.8 Trillion BTU Solar 0.1 170.9

Nuclear 0.0

Hydro 12.3

Net Electricity Exports

8.1

Electricity Generation 907.2

3.9 Wind 3.9

2.0

Rejected Energy 842.1

619.5

40.1

0.1

1.4

Geothermal 0.0

287.7

3.1

Residential 78.2

27.4

5.3

50.8

26.3

16.7

29.6

Natural Gas 119.7

0.5

27.2

1.8

Commercial 55.8

39.0 Energy Services 356.8

891.9 41.4 Coal 955.6

50.3

4.2

63.8

1.7

56.6 Industrial 282.9

226.3

Transportation 162.6

121.9

121.6

19.7 Biomass 9.6

4.3 Petroleum 268.6

138.6

40.6

Source: LLNL 2010. Data is based on DOE/EIA-0214(2008), June 2010. If this information or a reproduction of it is used, credit must be given to the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and the Department of Energy, under whose auspices the work was performed. Distributed electricity represents only retail electricity sales and does not include self-generation. EIA reports flows for non-thermal resources (i.e., hydro, wind and solar) in BTU-equivalent values by assuming a typical fossil fuel plant "heat rate." The efficiency of electricity production is calculated as the total retail electricity delivered divided by the primary energy input into electricity generation. Interstate and international electricity trade are lumped into net imports or exports and are calculated using a system-wide generation efficiency. End use efficiency is estimated as 65% for the residential, 70% for the commercial, 80% for the industrial sector, and as 25% for the transportation sector. Totals may not equal sum of components due to independent rounding. LLNL-MI-410527


Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

Estimated Wisconsin Energy Use In 2008 ~1760.8 Trillion BTU Solar 0.3 127.1

Net Electricity Imports

Nuclear 127.1

Hydro 15.9

14.3

9.2

Geothermal 0.4 41.7

204.0

Electricity Generation 643.4

4.8 Wind 4.8

35.2

439.4

93.9

75.0

0.3

Residential 268.2

8.8 0.5

0.4

142.5

12.0

174.3

37.5

58.9

80.1 Natural Gas 415.0

98.5

4.3

2.3

Commercial 196.4 11.1

137.5

437.5 129.5

84.2

1.6

Coal 480.7

38.3 2.8

82.4 Industrial 412.0

57.2

329.6

101.2

Biomass 100.5 19.8 422.2 Petroleum 580.9

Rejected Energy 1008.2

Transportation 444.8

333.6

111.2

Source: LLNL 2010. Data is based on DOE/EIA-0214(2008), June 2010. If this information or a reproduction of it is used, credit must be given to the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and the Department of Energy, under whose auspices the work was performed. Distributed electricity represents only retail electricity sales and does not include self-generation. EIA reports flows for non-thermal resources (i.e., hydro, wind and solar) in BTU-equivalent values by assuming a typical fossil fuel plant "heat rate." The efficiency of electricity production is calculated as the total retail electricity delivered divided by the primary energy input into electricity generation. Interstate and international electricity trade are lumped into net imports or exports and are calculated using a system-wide generation efficiency. End use efficiency is estimated as 65% for the residential, 70% for the commercial, 80% for the industrial sector, and as 25% for the transportation sector. Totals may not equal sum of components due to independent rounding. LLNL-MI-410527

Energy Services 752.6


Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

Estimated Wyoming Energy Use In 2008 ~845.8 Trillion BTU Solar 0.0 96.6

Nuclear 0.0

Hydro 8.2

Net Electricity Exports

153.5

8.2

Electricity Generation 484.2

9.5

330.6

Wind 9.5

9.3 0.5

Geothermal 0.6 1.1

0.1 13.7

0.4

Natural Gas 147.1

0.5

10.5

0.3

1.3

Residential 27.8

Rejected Energy 492.3 9.7

3.5

18.1

15.1

9.1

3.7

Commercial 30.5

21.3 Energy Services 256.9

465.0 0.1

32.6

104.2 Coal 500.1 34.6

0.2

46.3 Industrial 231.6

185.3

59.9

17.7 Biomass 2.9

1.2 Petroleum 177.3

109.8

Transportation 128.7

96.5 32.2

Source: LLNL 2010. Data is based on DOE/EIA-0214(2008), June 2010. If this information or a reproduction of it is used, credit must be given to the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and the Department of Energy, under whose auspices the work was performed. Distributed electricity represents only retail electricity sales and does not include self-generation. EIA reports flows for non-thermal resources (i.e., hydro, wind and solar) in BTU-equivalent values by assuming a typical fossil fuel plant "heat rate." The efficiency of electricity production is calculated as the total retail electricity delivered divided by the primary energy input into electricity generation. Interstate and international electricity trade are lumped into net imports or exports and are calculated using a system-wide generation efficiency. End use efficiency is estimated as 65% for the residential, 70% for the commercial, 80% for the industrial sector, and as 25% for the transportation sector. Totals may not equal sum of components due to independent rounding. LLNL-MI-410527


Analysis    SEDS reports many of the flows depicted on the state‐level charts directly.      CLACB  CLCCB  CLEIB  CLICB  CLRCB  ENACB  ESACB  ESCCB  ESICB  ESRCB  GECCB  GEEGB  GEICB  GERCB  HYCCB  HYEGB  HYICB  NGACB  NGCCB  NGEIB  NGICB  NGRCB  NUEGB  PAEIB  PARCB  SOEGB  SOHCB  WDRCB  WWEIB  WYEGB 

   

Coal consumed by the transportation sector.  Coal consumed by the commercial sector.  Coal consumed by the electric power sector.  Coal consumed by the industrial sector.  Coal consumed by the residential sector.  Ethanol (biomass) consumed by the transportation sector.  Electricity consumed by the transportation sector.  Electricity consumed by the commercial sector.  Electricity consumed by the industrial sector.  Electricity consumed by the residential sector.  Direct use of geothermal energy and heat pumps in the commercial sector.  Thermal input to electricity produced from geothermal energy by the  electric power sector.  Direct use of geothermal energy and heat pumps in the industrial sector.  Direct use of geothermal energy and heat pumps in the residential sector.  Thermal equivalent of hydroelectricity produced in the commercial sector.  Thermal equivalent of hydroelectricity produced by the electric power  sector.  Thermal equivalent of hydroelectricity produced in the industrial sector.  Natural gas consumed by the transportation sector.   Natural gas consumed by the commercial sector.  Natural gas consumed by the electric power sector.  Natural gas consumed by the industrial sector.  Natural gas consumed by the residential sector.  Thermal input to electricity produced from nuclear power by the electric  power sector.  All petroleum products consumed by the electric power sector.  All petroleum products consumed by the residential sector.  Thermal equivalent of electricity produced from photovoltaic and solar  thermal energy by the electric power sector.  Thermal equivalent of photovoltaic and solar thermal energy consumed by the  residential and commercial sectors.  Wood (biomass) consumed by the residential sector.  Wood and waste (biomass) consumed by the electric power sector.  Thermal equivalent of electricity produced from wind energy by the electric  power sector. 

 


Those that are not reported directly are calculated from the following data:    ELISB  ELNIB  ENCCB  ENICB  ESTCB  LOTCB  PAACB  PACCB  PAICB  TEACB  TECCB  TEICB  TERCB  WWCCB  WWICB 

Net interstate sales of electricity and associated losses.  Net imports of electricity into the United States.  Fuel ethanol consumed by the commercial sector.  Fuel ethanol consumed by the industrial sector.  Electricity total consumption.  Total electrical system energy losses.  All petroleum products consumed by the transportation sector.  All petroleum products consumed by the commercial sector.  All petroleum products consumed by the industrial sector.  Total energy consumed by the transportation sector including electrical  system losses.  Total energy consumed by the commercial sector including electrical system  losses.  Total energy consumed by the industrial sector including electrical system  losses.  Total energy consumed by the residential sector including electrical system  losses.  Wood and waste consumed by the commercial sector.  Wood and waste consumed by the industrial sector. 

  Certain other flows are computed as functions of directly reported energy use in SEDS:    SEDS reports petroleum consumption in certain sectors as the total of consumption petroleum products  including blended ethanol.  Therefore, petroleum consumption is computed for the following sectors as:    PACCB – ENCCB  (Commercial)  PAICB – ENICB  (Industrial)  PAACB – ENACB  (Transportation)    Biomass consumption is computed for the following sectors as:    WWCCB + ENCCB  (Commercial)  WWICB + ENICB  (Industrial)    SEDS separates interstate and international imports/exports of electricity.  Furthermore, those statistics  are reported as the thermal equivalent required to generate the imported/exported electricity.  In order  to represent the total net import/export of electrical energy, electric imports/exports are computed as:    (ELISB + ELNIB)/ (1+LOTCB/ESTCB)       


Total state energy use is calculated as:    CLACB + PAACB + NGACB +   CLCCB + PACCB + GECCB + HYCCB + NGCCB + WWCCB +  CLICB + PAICB + GEICB + HYICB + NGICB + WWICB +  CLRCB + PARCB + GERCB + NGRCB + WDRCB + SOHCB +   CLEIB + GEEGB + HYEGB + NGEIB + NUEGB + PAEIB + SOEGB + WWEIB + WYEGB +  (ELISB + ELNIB)/ (1+LOTCB/ESTCB)    The end use service sectors are assumed to have the following efficiencies:    65%  Residential  70%  Commercial  80%  Industrial  25%  Transportation    Conclusion    The flow charts described in this report are compact depictions of the energy use at the state level in  2008.  These diagrams will be made available at:    http://flowcharts.llnl.gov    References    EIA’s State Energy Data System available at: http://www.eia.doe.gov/states/_seds.html    Lawrence Livermore National Lab, 2009, Energy Flow Chart.  Available at : http://flowcharts.llnl.gov  (Livermore, 2009)   


2008StateEnergy