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Mele Kalikimaka takes its title from the Hawaiian phrase that means “Merry Christmas”. The phrase is borrowed directly from English, but, owing to the Hawaiian phonological system, which does not possess “r” or “s” sounds, nor allows for consonants at the end of any syllable, “Merry Christmas” becomes “Mele Kalikimaka”! The song was written in 1949 by R. Alex Anderson, and recorded by Bing Crosby and the Andrews Sisters the following year. It also featured in the movie National Lampoon’s Christmas Vacation. A Christmas Festival - Leroy Anderson, arr. Edward Connell Leroy Anderson (1908-1975) was an American composer of such celebrated light concert works as, The Typewriter, The Syncopated Clock, Burglar’s Holiday, and the perennial Christmas favourite Sleigh Ride. Many of Anderson’s works were introduced by the Boston Pops Orchestra under the Direction of Arthur Fiedler, including the original 1950 version of A Christmas Festival. Our version features duo-pianists, and the gentleman of the chorus would be delighted if you’d join us in singing these familiar Christmas melodies. The Huron Carol - Canadian traditional, arr. Edward Connell Twas in the Moon of Wintertime is a world famous Canadian carol. Dating from 1641, it is also one of the oldest carols which we still sing today. It was originally written in the native language of the Huron/Wendat people with the title “Jesous Ahatonhia” (”Jesus is born”), and set to an old French tune by Jean de Brèbeuf, a Christian missionary at Sainte-Marie among the Hurons. In retelling the story of the Nativity, Brèbeuf used symbols and figures that could be understood by the Hurons; Jesus is born in “a lodge of broken bark”, and surrounded by “hunter braves” instead of shepherds. The hymn also uses the traditional Algonquin name, Gitchi Manitou, for God. It was sung by the Hurons in Ontario until 1649, when the Iroquois killed Father Brèbeuf, wiped out the Jesuit mission, and drove the Hurons from their home. In Quebec, to which many of the Hurons escaped, the carol re-emerged and was translated into French, and eventually, English. Today. the Huron Carol is considered a Canadian national treasure. As we conclude our Canadian musical journey, we once again look to the poetic wisdom of Stan Rogers to sum up our adventure, which has brought us back home again, filled with new knowledge, deeper understanding and love for our beautiful land. How then am I so different from the first men through this way? Like them, I left a settled life, I threw it all away, to seek a Northwest Passage at the call of many men; to find there but the road back home again.

at a donation of $250 - $499 This level includes all the benefits of the previous level, plus 2 tickets to our 15th season December concert, and you may bring up to 8 guests to the exclusive Studio Evening. at a donation of $500 - $999 This level once again receives all the benefits of the previous levels, but also includes 2 tickets each to all our 15th season performances (up to June 2012!), and you may bring up to 12 guests to the Studio Evening. at a donation of $1000 and up This level once again receives the benefits of the previous levels, plus allows the dedication of a specific track on the CD, and to attend the Studio Evening with an unlimited number of your guests. The dedication will be written by you and will appear on the CD jacket. It is a lovely way to commemorate an event or honour a special person or persons in your life. Choice of tracks to dedicate will be on a first come basis, so choose to make a donation at this level early! at a donation of $5000+ Be a supporting visionary of the chorus and imagine a unique musical work done in your name and dedicated to you on the CD! This top level receives all donor benefits, with our director Edward Connell being commissioned to write a full choral arrangement of a song of your own choice for the CD. For further information on any donor level, please contact drswatson@hotmail.com Charitable tax receipts will be issued (less the value of benefits). A payment plan can be arranged, however, all monies need to be received no later than March 1st, 2011.


photo of chorus?


Mele Kalikimaka takes its title from the Hawaiian phrase that means “Merry Christmas”. The phrase is borrowed directly from English, but, owing to the Hawaiian phonological system, which does not possess “r” or “s” sounds, nor allows for consonants at the end of any syllable, “Merry Christmas” becomes “Mele Kalikimaka”! The song was written in 1949 by R. Alex Anderson, and recorded by Bing Crosby and the Andrews Sisters the following year. It also featured in the movie National Lampoon’s Christmas Vacation. A Christmas Festival - Leroy Anderson, arr. Edward Connell Leroy Anderson (1908-1975) was an American composer of such celebrated light concert works as, The Typewriter, The Syncopated Clock, Burglar’s Holiday, and the perennial Christmas favourite Sleigh Ride. Many of Anderson’s works were introduced by the Boston Pops Orchestra under the Direction of Arthur Fiedler, including the original 1950 version of A Christmas Festival. Our version features duo-pianists, and the gentleman of the chorus would be delighted if you’d join us in singing these familiar Christmas melodies.

Please bid in our silent auction FORTE appreciates the support we receive from so many individuals, small businesses, and corporations. Their contributions make it possible for us to be here tonight, and for that we are truly grateful. Whenever possible, please let these generous supporters know that you also appreciate their support of FORTE - The Toronto Men’s Chorus. And our thanks to Eric Lahey as auction organizer. And, please bid at least once, (and often!) this evening!

The Huron Carol - Canadian traditional, arr. Edward Connell Twas in the Moon of Wintertime is a world famous Canadian carol. Dating from 1641, it is also one of the oldest carols which we still sing today. It was originally written in the native language of the Huron/Wendat people with the title “Jesous Ahatonhia” (”Jesus is born”), and set to an old French tune by Jean de Brèbeuf, a Christian missionary at Sainte-Marie among the Hurons. In retelling the story of the Nativity, Brèbeuf used symbols and figures that could be understood by the Hurons; Jesus is born in “a lodge of broken bark”, and surrounded by “hunter braves” instead of shepherds. The hymn also uses the traditional Algonquin name, Gitchi Manitou, for God. It was sung by the Hurons in Ontario until 1649, when the Iroquois killed Father Brèbeuf, wiped out the Jesuit mission, and drove the Hurons from their home. In Quebec, to which many of the Hurons escaped, the carol re-emerged and was translated into French, and eventually, English. Today. the Huron Carol is considered a Canadian national treasure. As we conclude our Canadian musical journey, we once again look to the poetic wisdom of Stan Rogers to sum up our adventure, which has brought us back home again, filled with new knowledge, deeper understanding and love for our beautiful land. How then am I so different from the first men through this way? Like them, I left a settled life, I threw it all away, to seek a Northwest Passage at the call of many men; to find there but the road back home again.

THE TORONTO MEN’S CHORUS

16

9


iStockphotoŠCameron Pashak


Northwest Passage

Stan Rogers, arr. Ron Smail

soloists: Drew Post, Stewart Montgomery

Trois mélodies Canadien

arr. Bruno Cormier

Mon pays Gilles Vigneault soloists: Manzi Kalisi, with Bruno Cormier, Alain Delaune, Patrick Lam Partons, la mer est belle Traditional Acadian soloist: Alain Delaune Un Canadien errant Antoine Gérin-Lajoie soloist: Bruno Cormier

Two Christmas Songs

Peter Krochak

Birth Lyrics by Lori Vos soloist: Tim Yeung Hodie Christus Natus Est (Today Christ Is Born)

Angel

Sarah McLachlan, arr. Trevor McLain

River

Joni Mitchell, arr. Edward Connell

Four Strong Winds

Ian Tyson, arr. Edward Connell

Magic Songs

R. Murray Schafer

Chant to bring back the wolf Chant to make fences fall down Chant for clear water Chant for the spirits of hunted animals Chant to keep bees warm in winter Chant to make bears dance Chant to make the magic work

Intermission

The Canadian Railroad Trilogy

soloist: Eric Lahey, with Big Al’s Kitchen Party

Frobisher Bay

Gordon Lightfoot

Traditional, arr. Diane Loomer

soloists: Bruno Cormier, Stephen Erickson, Patrick Lam

Away From the Roll of the Sea We Rise Again

Allister Macillivray arr. Diane Loomer

Leon Dubinsky, arr. Stephen Smith

soloist: Gerard Lewis

Big Al’s Kitchen Party

Gloomy Winter An East Coast Salute to a Toronto Christmas Sleepy Maggie Eric Lahey - vocals, rhythm guitar; Marcel Aucoin - piano, accordion; Dwayne Gale - guitar, mandolin

The Log Driver’s Waltz

soloists: Peter Krochak, Patrick Lam

An International Christmas Medley piano duo: Peter Krochak, Michael Rose

A Christmas Festival The Huron Carol

Wade Hemsworth arr.Edward Connell

Leroy Anderson, arr. Edward Connell

Canadian traditional, arr. Edward Connell


Northwest Passage

Stan Rogers, arr. Ron Smail

soloists: Drew Post, Stewart Montgomery

Trois mélodies Canadien

arr. Bruno Cormier

Mon pays Gilles Vigneault soloists: Manzi Kalisi, with Bruno Cormier, Alain Delaune, Patrick Lam Partons, la mer est belle Traditional Acadian soloist: Alain Delaune Un Canadien errant Antoine Gérin-Lajoie soloist: Bruno Cormier

Two Christmas Songs

Peter Krochak

Birth Lyrics by Lori Vos soloist: Tim Yeung Hodie Christus Natus Est (Today Christ Is Born)

Angel

Sarah McLachlan, arr. Trevor McLain

River

Joni Mitchell, arr. Edward Connell

Four Strong Winds

Ian Tyson, arr. Edward Connell

Magic Songs

R. Murray Schafer

Chant to bring back the wolf Chant to make fences fall down Chant for clear water Chant for the spirits of hunted animals Chant to keep bees warm in winter Chant to make bears dance Chant to make the magic work

Intermission

The Canadian Railroad Trilogy

soloist: Eric Lahey, with Big Al’s Kitchen Party

Frobisher Bay

Gordon Lightfoot

Traditional, arr. Diane Loomer

soloists: Bruno Cormier, Stephen Erickson, Patrick Lam

Away From the Roll of the Sea We Rise Again

Allister Macillivray arr. Diane Loomer

Leon Dubinsky, arr. Stephen Smith

soloist: Gerard Lewis

Big Al’s Kitchen Party

Gloomy Winter An East Coast Salute to a Toronto Christmas Sleepy Maggie Eric Lahey - vocals, rhythm guitar; Marcel Aucoin - piano, accordion; Dwayne Gale - guitar, mandolin

The Log Driver’s Waltz

soloists: Peter Krochak, Patrick Lam

An International Christmas Medley piano duo: Peter Krochak, Michael Rose

A Christmas Festival The Huron Carol

Wade Hemsworth arr.Edward Connell

Leroy Anderson, arr. Edward Connell

Canadian traditional, arr. Edward Connell


iStockphotoŠCameron Pashak


Mele Kalikimaka takes its title from the Hawaiian phrase that means “Merry Christmas”. The phrase is borrowed directly from English, but, owing to the Hawaiian phonological system, which does not possess “r” or “s” sounds, nor allows for consonants at the end of any syllable, “Merry Christmas” becomes “Mele Kalikimaka”! The song was written in 1949 by R. Alex Anderson, and recorded by Bing Crosby and the Andrews Sisters the following year. It also featured in the movie National Lampoon’s Christmas Vacation. A Christmas Festival - Leroy Anderson, arr. Edward Connell Leroy Anderson (1908-1975) was an American composer of such celebrated light concert works as, The Typewriter, The Syncopated Clock, Burglar’s Holiday, and the perennial Christmas favourite Sleigh Ride. Many of Anderson’s works were introduced by the Boston Pops Orchestra under the Direction of Arthur Fiedler, including the original 1950 version of A Christmas Festival. Our version features duo-pianists, and the gentleman of the chorus would be delighted if you’d join us in singing these familiar Christmas melodies.

Please bid in our silent auction FORTE appreciates the support we receive from so many individuals, small businesses, and corporations. Their contributions make it possible for us to be here tonight, and for that we are truly grateful. Whenever possible, please let these generous supporters know that you also appreciate their support of FORTE - The Toronto Men’s Chorus. And our thanks to Eric Lahey as auction organizer. And, please bid at least once, (and often!) this evening!

The Huron Carol - Canadian traditional, arr. Edward Connell Twas in the Moon of Wintertime is a world famous Canadian carol. Dating from 1641, it is also one of the oldest carols which we still sing today. It was originally written in the native language of the Huron/Wendat people with the title “Jesous Ahatonhia” (”Jesus is born”), and set to an old French tune by Jean de Brèbeuf, a Christian missionary at Sainte-Marie among the Hurons. In retelling the story of the Nativity, Brèbeuf used symbols and figures that could be understood by the Hurons; Jesus is born in “a lodge of broken bark”, and surrounded by “hunter braves” instead of shepherds. The hymn also uses the traditional Algonquin name, Gitchi Manitou, for God. It was sung by the Hurons in Ontario until 1649, when the Iroquois killed Father Brèbeuf, wiped out the Jesuit mission, and drove the Hurons from their home. In Quebec, to which many of the Hurons escaped, the carol re-emerged and was translated into French, and eventually, English. Today. the Huron Carol is considered a Canadian national treasure. As we conclude our Canadian musical journey, we once again look to the poetic wisdom of Stan Rogers to sum up our adventure, which has brought us back home again, filled with new knowledge, deeper understanding and love for our beautiful land. How then am I so different from the first men through this way? Like them, I left a settled life, I threw it all away, to seek a Northwest Passage at the call of many men; to find there but the road back home again.

THE TORONTO MEN’S CHORUS

16

9


photo of chorus?


Mele Kalikimaka takes its title from the Hawaiian phrase that means “Merry Christmas”. The phrase is borrowed directly from English, but, owing to the Hawaiian phonological system, which does not possess “r” or “s” sounds, nor allows for consonants at the end of any syllable, “Merry Christmas” becomes “Mele Kalikimaka”! The song was written in 1949 by R. Alex Anderson, and recorded by Bing Crosby and the Andrews Sisters the following year. It also featured in the movie National Lampoon’s Christmas Vacation. A Christmas Festival - Leroy Anderson, arr. Edward Connell Leroy Anderson (1908-1975) was an American composer of such celebrated light concert works as, The Typewriter, The Syncopated Clock, Burglar’s Holiday, and the perennial Christmas favourite Sleigh Ride. Many of Anderson’s works were introduced by the Boston Pops Orchestra under the Direction of Arthur Fiedler, including the original 1950 version of A Christmas Festival. Our version features duo-pianists, and the gentleman of the chorus would be delighted if you’d join us in singing these familiar Christmas melodies. The Huron Carol - Canadian traditional, arr. Edward Connell Twas in the Moon of Wintertime is a world famous Canadian carol. Dating from 1641, it is also one of the oldest carols which we still sing today. It was originally written in the native language of the Huron/Wendat people with the title “Jesous Ahatonhia” (”Jesus is born”), and set to an old French tune by Jean de Brèbeuf, a Christian missionary at Sainte-Marie among the Hurons. In retelling the story of the Nativity, Brèbeuf used symbols and figures that could be understood by the Hurons; Jesus is born in “a lodge of broken bark”, and surrounded by “hunter braves” instead of shepherds. The hymn also uses the traditional Algonquin name, Gitchi Manitou, for God. It was sung by the Hurons in Ontario until 1649, when the Iroquois killed Father Brèbeuf, wiped out the Jesuit mission, and drove the Hurons from their home. In Quebec, to which many of the Hurons escaped, the carol re-emerged and was translated into French, and eventually, English. Today. the Huron Carol is considered a Canadian national treasure. As we conclude our Canadian musical journey, we once again look to the poetic wisdom of Stan Rogers to sum up our adventure, which has brought us back home again, filled with new knowledge, deeper understanding and love for our beautiful land. How then am I so different from the first men through this way? Like them, I left a settled life, I threw it all away, to seek a Northwest Passage at the call of many men; to find there but the road back home again.

at a donation of $250 - $499 This level includes all the benefits of the previous level, plus 2 tickets to our 15th season December concert, and you may bring up to 8 guests to the exclusive Studio Evening. at a donation of $500 - $999 This level once again receives all the benefits of the previous levels, but also includes 2 tickets each to all our 15th season performances (up to June 2012!), and you may bring up to 12 guests to the Studio Evening. at a donation of $1000 and up This level once again receives the benefits of the previous levels, plus allows the dedication of a specific track on the CD, and to attend the Studio Evening with an unlimited number of your guests. The dedication will be written by you and will appear on the CD jacket. It is a lovely way to commemorate an event or honour a special person or persons in your life. Choice of tracks to dedicate will be on a first come basis, so choose to make a donation at this level early! at a donation of $5000+ Be a supporting visionary of the chorus and imagine a unique musical work done in your name and dedicated to you on the CD! This top level receives all donor benefits, with our director Edward Connell being commissioned to write a full choral arrangement of a song of your own choice for the CD. For further information on any donor level, please contact drswatson@hotmail.com Charitable tax receipts will be issued (less the value of benefits). A payment plan can be arranged, however, all monies need to be received no later than March 1st, 2011.



Forte-FourStrongWinds-December2010