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Healthy choices

Early Stage 1

Connected Outcomes Group (D)

Connection focus: making informed and positive health choices by learning about nutrition, preventative health strategies and how the sun’s energy can affect us.

PDHPE

Creative Arts

Within PDHPE, students begin to make health decisions and choices for themselves. They begin to explore options for healthy eating and to identify healthy and unhealthy foods. Students take part in different types of physical activity and begin to develop an awareness of how physical activity affects their body. They describe ways they refuel their body such as eating, resting and relaxing.

Lyrics of songs can provide discussion on the types of choices people make about health and nutrition.

Students will be engaged in: • • • • •

performing songs, chants and rhymes making a sun-safe shelter for a toy participating in healthy living scenarios investigating the effects of the sun’s energy creating a healthy lifestyle presentation for a school assembly.

SciTech

HSIE

Students recognise that energy from the sun causes changes e.g. keep us warm, allow us to see, allow us and plants to grow.

HSIE outcomes are addressed in other units within this Stage. There are no HSIE outcomes linked to this unit.

Students observe changes in their daily lives caused by the energy from the sun.

Planned assessment: • • • •

observation of singing and playing activities classification of food groups participation in physical activity observation of, and responses to, an investigation.

© State of NSW, Department of Education and Training, Curriculum K–12 Directorate (2006) Not part of NEALS Page 1 of 10 COGs unit ES1 Healthy choices (D) Version published 25/7/06 http://www.curriculumsupport.education.nsw.gov.au/timetoteach


Planning page Student work:

Resources needed: • The very hungry caterpillar by Eric Carle • Vocal-Ease modules 1 and 2 (DET) # (teachers’ book is available as a pdf on arts action CD-ROM [DET]#) • Australian guide to healthy eating (available at: http://www.health.gov.au/internet/wcms/publishing.nsf/Content/ health-pubhlth-strateg-food-guide-materials.htm) • Slip, Slop, Slap and Wrap (available at: http://www.cancercouncil.com.au/) • literary texts referred to in the units • a variety of magazines • a digital camera.

Literacy links include: • participates in rhyming activities and songs that explore sound and word patterns • identifies foods by packaging – focusing on colour, text and images • responds to questions during discussion and solving problems in pairs • observes and records information throughout an experiment.

Numeracy links include: • describes the duration of events using everyday language • interprets data on food choices in lunch boxes.

Collaborate with your teacher-librarian for teaching and resource support. #

Additional copies of these DET resources are available from DET sales at: https://www.det.nsw.edu.au/doingbusiness/product_service/schcur resource/index.htm

Term planner (this is a suggestion for how the term may be planned) Week

Creative Arts

PDHPE

1

Music - Songs about food (Weeks 1–8)

2 3

Music – (cont.) Visual Arts – Modelling food Music – (cont.)

My health Nutrition and food groups A canteen visit/scenarios

4

Music – (cont.)

5

Music – (cont.) Dance – sun and rain dance Music – (cont.)

6

Types of physical activity Physical education sessions (Weeks 3–6) Caring for your body

SciTech

Investigating the sun’s energy (Weeks 3–6)

Sun safety/scenarios (to follow investigation) Culminating activity

7 8

© State of New South Wales through the NSW Department of Education and Training, 2007. All rights reserved. Not part of NEALS COGs unit ES1 Healthy choices (D)

Version published 25/7/06

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Unit of work

Š State of New South Wales through the NSW Department of Education and Training, 2007. All rights reserved. Not part of NEALS COGs unit ES1 Healthy choices (D)

Version published 25/7/06

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Outcomes

Learning experience

PDHPE

My health • Read the story The very hungry caterpillar by Eric Carle. Discuss what happened to the caterpillar as he ate his way through lots of different foods. Ask: - did he always eat the right food? - what happened to him? Why did he feel sick? - was all of the food he ate healthy food? - why do we need food? - how does food help our bodies? • As a class, discuss and brainstorm: what do we need to help keep our bodies healthy? Responses may include: food, water, physical activity/exercise, sleep. Record student responses on a mind map around the outline of a body. Ask students questions such as: - why is it important to drink plenty of water, eat healthy food? - why do we need sleep? - why do we need to be active? - what do you do to keep healthy? (Literacy link: reads and relates the events in a picture book to personal experiences) Songs about food These activities can be taught as short lesson breaks through the unit.

PHES1.12 Displays basic positive health practices • talks about what keeps them healthy.

English RES1.5 Demonstrates developing reading skills to read short, predictable written texts on familiar topics. TES1.2 Demonstrates basic skills of classroom and group interaction, makes brief oral presentations and listens with reasonable attentiveness.

Creative Arts: Music MUES1.1 Participates in simple speech, singing, playing and moving activities, demonstrating an awareness of musical concepts • performs simple songs and chants with actions • varies tempo and dynamics in performance. MUES1.2 Creates own rhymes, games, songs and simple compositions • varies text of known songs. MUES1.4 Listens to and responds to music • echoes phrases of songs and chants • responds to variations in tempo and dynamics.

English TES1.1 Communicates with peers and known adults in informal situations and structured activities dealing briefly with familiar topics.

Planned assessment

NB shaded text is background information for teachers.

• Sing songs, chants and rhymes about different foods and eating. Accompany them with actions, body percussion and percussion instruments e.g. from Vocal Ease modules 1 and 2 (DET) ‘Dig a potato’ and ‘Peanut butter and jelly’; from the ABC Sing series ‘I love pumpkin’ and ‘Caterpillar of society’, or ‘Aeroplane jelly’, ‘Happy little vegemites’ and ‘Hot cross buns’. • Suggested sequence: - use imitation to teach the song one phrase at a time e.g. students repeat the words and tune, phrase by phrase - use body percussion to reinforce beat and movements to reinforce phrase and pitch direction - experiment with changing the tempo (fast/slow) and dynamics (loud/soft). - vary the text of known rhymes to construct songs about healthy foods, for example: Mary had a little apple, its skin was red and crunchy And every where that Mary went she had a little munchy. (Literacy link: participates in rhyming activities and songs that explore sound and word patterns)

Assessment strategy The teacher: • observes student participation in class activities.

Assessment criteria The student: • participates in singing, playing and moving activities • responds to changes in tempo and dynamics • listens for rhyming patterns and participates in group work. These criteria relate to outcomes MUES1.1, MUES1.2, MUES1.4. TES1.1

© State of New South Wales through the NSW Department of Education and Training, 2007. All rights reserved. Not part of NEALS COGs unit ES1 Healthy choices (D)

Version published 25/7/06

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Outcomes

Learning experience

Creative Arts: Visual Arts

Modelling food • Show students a range of different foods as well as images of foods. Many still life artworks include fruits and vegetables. Discuss words that describe: - colours (primary and secondary colours) - shapes (round, long, circle) - textures (rough, smooth, spiky, bumpy) - the relative size of objects (larger, smaller, bigger, smaller). • Ask students whether they have seen, felt, and tasted these foods before. • Select three or four foods that have different shapes (e.g. banana, apple, pumpkin, pear, mushroom, pineapple) and carefully note the various shapes and textures. • Students make drawings from observation of several of the foods using a variety of media such as pencil, crayon, chalk, or felt tip pen. • Students then make 3D models of some of the foods using playdough or plasticine. • Students show their models to the class and discuss the various features, e.g. ‘this apple is round’, ‘my pineapple is rough and bumpy’. (Numeracy link: describes features of 3D objects using everyday language) Nutrition and food groups • Ask students what they had for breakfast. Record data. Repeat the activity after each break (recess and lunch). • Display a poster of the Australian guide to healthy eating from http://www.health.gov.au/internet/wcms/publishing.nsf/content/health-pubhlth-strateg-foodguide-index.htm. Discuss the different food groups on the chart. Question students: - which foods do you think you should eat the most of? Why? - what foods are healthy? - what foods are least healthy? - what is the difference between healthy and unhealthy food? - who chooses what you have for breakfast … lunch … dinner? Reinforce that each family is different and may have different preferences. • Review the recorded data. • Using a variety of magazines, students cut out pictures of different foods. As a class, sort the pictures of food into different groups as indicated on the Australian guide to healthy eating chart: - breads/cereals/rice/pasta/noodles - vegetables - fruit - dairy/milk - meats. • Glue pictures onto a large blank Australian guide to healthy eating. Display these around the classroom. Ask students questions such as: - what are your favourite foods from each of these groups? - which foods do you think you eat the most of?

VAES1.1 Makes simple pictures and other kinds of artworks about things and experiences • explores the characteristics of fruits and vegetables VAES1.2 Experiments with a range of media in selected forms • explores the quality of different drawing media • makes 3D models of a range of foods.

Mathematics SGES1.1 Manipulates, sorts and represents three-dimensional objects and describes them using everyday language.

PDHPE PHES1.12 Displays basic positive health practices • talks about what keeps them healthy. DMES1.2 Identifies some options available when making simple decisions • classifies food as healthy and unhealthy.

English RES1.6 Demonstrates developing reading skills and strategies when reading books, dealing with print and comprehending texts. RES1.7 Demonstrates an emerging awareness that written and visual texts convey meaning and recognises that there are different kinds of texts that serve different purposes. TES1.2 Demonstrates basic skills of classroom and group interaction, makes brief oral presentations and listens with reasonable attentiveness.

Mathematics DES1.1 represents and interprets data displays made from objects and pictures.

Planned assessment

Assessment strategy •

observation of student classification of foods.

Assessment criteria • • • • •

identifies healthy and unhealthy foods looks at charts and packaging for information uses images and picture clues to predict content of packaging makes connections between the print and the image on packaging recognises common sight words on packaging.

These criteria relate to outcomes: PHES1.12, DMES1.2, RES1.6, RES1.7

© State of New South Wales through the NSW Department of Education and Training, 2007. All rights reserved. Not part of NEALS COGs unit ES1 Healthy choices (D)

Version published 25/7/06

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Outcomes

Learning experience

Planned assessment

A canteen visit • Visit the school canteen (or bring packaging from home) and collect some samples and packaging of the different foods available for students to buy. Sort the canteen foods into healthy and less healthy groups. Discuss: - what is the healthiest food you can choose at the canteen? - what food is least healthy? - which foods can you find on the healthy eating chart? (Literacy link: identifies foods by packaging – identifying the images and written text (including common sight words) and how they bring meaning to the packaging) (Numeracy link: interprets data on food choices from students’ lunch boxes)

PDHPE ALES1.6 Develops a repertoire of physical activities in which they can participate • explains how physical activity affects the body • describes the things they need for their body, e.g. rest, relaxation, nutrition.

English TES1.2 Demonstrates basic skills of classroom and group interaction, makes brief oral presentations and listens with reasonable attentiveness.

Scenarios • Pose healthy eating scenarios Have students work in pairs to identify the problems and give suggestions for possible scenarios. For example: - David did not have any breakfast this morning. He ran around the playground and felt sick. What could he do? Should he tell someone? - Cassie had a vegemite sandwich, an apple and some water for lunch. Is this a healthy lunch? How do you know? - Linh only had a packet of chips for lunch today. Is this a healthy lunch? How do you think she would feel after lunch? What could she do? - Kim had lots of food but nothing to drink on a very hot day. Why did she feel sick and tired? Refer to food, sleep, water and exercise as giving the body energy and the effects on our body when we do not receive this energy. (Literacy link: talks through problems with a partner) Types of physical activity • Students identify activities they participate in at school and at home that are: - highly active (running, soccer) - active (walking, frisbee) - not active/passive (reading a book, watching TV, playing the computer). • Record student responses on a class retrieval chart. Students can also contribute by adding pictures about these activities. Discuss: - which activities make you huff and puff? - which activities are good for your health? - why do we need to be active? - how does your body feel when you are active? What happens to your body? - what activities do we do on our own? What do we do with others? - what are your favourite active and passive activities?

Assessment strategy The teacher: •

observation of student responses.

Assessment criteria The student: • •

explains how their body feels after physical activity contributes to class discussions and partner activities.

This criteria relates to outcomes: ALES1.6, TES1.2

© State of New South Wales through the NSW Department of Education and Training, 2007. All rights reserved. Not part of NEALS COGs unit ES1 Healthy choices (D)

Version published 25/7/06

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Outcomes

Learning experience

PDHPE PHES1.12 Displays basic positive health practices • talks about good hygiene and preventative health practices. DMES1.2 Identifies some options available when making simple decisions • makes simple decisions about caring for their body.

English WES1.9 Engages in writing texts with the intention of conveying an idea or message.

Planned assessment

Physical education sessions During physical education, organise a variety of fun and engaging activities, including games and sports, dance and gymnastics. Within these activities, students have the opportunity to explore and discuss how physical activity affects their body. • During a vigorous game, discuss with students the way their body feels after being active. Ask questions such as: - how does your skin feel? (hot or cold) - is your skin dry or wet? Why do you think this is? - is your breathing fast or slow? Why? - do you feel thirsty, hot, tired, full of energy? - what does your heart feel like? • Discuss the benefits of taking part in games and other physical activities: - what do you like about it? - what games do you like? Reinforce the benefits of physical activity such as enjoyment, friendship, good health and introduce the concept of a balanced lifestyle. • Pose a scenario about being active, where students can make suggestions of solutions. For example, Ahmed watches TV everyday after school. Discuss: - is this good for him? - does he have a balance of active and passive activities? - what could he do after school to be active? - what could you do to be more active after school? • Direct role play (one student as Ahmed, the others as Ahmed’s friend, mother, teacher …) (Literacy link: responds to focus questions in a class discussion and acts out a problem in pairs) Caring for your body • Review and discuss the class mind map completed during the discussion: ‘What do we need to help keep our bodies healthy?’In small groups, ask students to draw pictures and write about the things that they already know that help keep our bodies’ healthy e.g. balanced diet of healthy foods, water, sleep, variety of regular physical activity. Attach group responses to make a class chart. • Look at the poster as a class to see what responses the groups had in common. • Ask students to think of other things we need to know that will help to stop our bodies getting sick e.g. washing hands, wearing sunscreen, brushing teeth, blowing noses, clean faces, not sharing drinks, hats. We already know

Assessment strategy The teacher: • analyses student’s responses to questioning.

Assessment criteria The student: • describes appropriate hygiene practices and gives reasons. This criterion relates to outcomes PHES1.12, DMES1.2.

We need to know

© State of New South Wales through the NSW Department of Education and Training, 2007. All rights reserved. Not part of NEALS COGs unit ES1 Healthy choices (D)

Version published 25/7/06

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Outcomes

Learning experience

Planned assessment

SciTech

• Using a large outline of a body, ask students to suggest protective and hygienic activities that help different parts of the body stay healthy, e.g. sunscreen on the skin, blowing your nose, wearing a hat, washing hands. Label the chart with students’ responses. Ask students questions such as: - how does wearing a hat … washing your hands … help your health? - what happens to your skin if you do not wear sunscreen or a hat? - why is it important to look after your body? - who helps to take care of your body’s health? - what decisions do you have to make about keeping yourself healthy? (Literacy link: jointly constructs a chart and questions for investigation) The sun’s energy Observing and exploring (ask questions, pose problems, find out what is currently known) • Take students outside to observe the energy from the sun. Ask students to stand in a shaded area for several minutes, and then ask students to stand in a sunny area for several minutes. Discuss how the two areas are different e.g. the sunny area was warmer and brighter than the shaded area. Ask: - where do they think the warmth is coming from? (sun) - where do they think the light is coming from? (sun) • Discuss the concept that the sun is a source of energy. When something changes, energy is used. Revise the changes observed between the shaded and sunny areas i.e. temperature and light.

Assessment strategy

PPES1.4 Explores and identifies ways some forms of energy are used in their daily lives • when changes occur, energy is used, e.g. to cook food, melt ice, blow up a balloon • people can sense various energy forms (when something changes), e.g. feel heat, see light, hear sound. INVES1.7 Investigates their surroundings by observing, questioning, exploring and reporting • makes observations using all senses and responds to questions about ways to find out • suggests simple cause-and-effect associations • tells others about what has been found out • explains own ideas about reasons for patterns and trends in items collected. UTES1.9 Identifies and uses a limited range of equipment, computer-based technology, materials and other resources when undertaking exploration and production • uses a limited range of classroom equipment and materials to design and make things and to explore and investigate • follows established procedures with equipment and materials to produce desired results.

English WES1.9 Engages in writing texts with the intention of conveying an idea or message. WES1.10 Produces simple texts that show the emergence of the grammar and punctuation needed to achieve the purpose of the text.

Hypothesising and predicting (define a problem that can be investigated scientifically) • Ask students what may happen to an ice cube that is left in the sun. Would an ice cube left in the sun melt faster than an ice cube left in the shade? Why do you think this would happen?

The teacher: • observes students during the investigation • asks questions to determine knowledge of energy and some of its uses.

Assessment criteria The student: • responds to questions describing energy uses • recalls a sequence of events. These criteria relate to outcomes PPES1.4, INVES1.7, WS1.9, WS10.

Devising and testing (describe a procedure for collecting data, identify appropriate equipment to carry out the procedure) • Explain that we can check to see if their predictions are correct by conducting a scientific investigation. A scientific investigation is used to test people’s ideas. We will need to make the test fair and make careful observations or measurements. • Discuss with students about some of the things that are needed to keep the same so as to ensure that the test is fair i.e. same size ice cubes, measuring the time. • Use two ice cubes, placing one in the sunny area and one in the shady area to observe. Collecting and recording data (use the procedure and equipment to collect and record data) • Explain that they will be observing and taking a digital photograph of the ice cubes every 10 minutes. Use a sand timer or a stopwatch for every five minutes. Use a time stamp on the digital camera to assist the students when analysing the results. • Students can also record what they see with drawings and notes.

© State of New South Wales through the NSW Department of Education and Training, 2007. All rights reserved. Not part of NEALS COGs unit ES1 Healthy choices (D)

Version published 25/7/06

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Outcomes

Learning experience

WES1.13 Recognises some different purposes for writing and that own texts differ in various ways.

Mathematics MES1.5 Sequences events and uses everyday language to describe the duration of activities

PDHPE PHES1.12 Displays basic positive health practices • describes safe sun practices. DMES1.2 Identifies some options available when making simple decisions • makes simple decisions about where to play, e.g. in the shade.

SciTech DMES1.8 Generates own ideas and designs through trial and error, play, modelling and making • uses common classroom equipment, materials and processes to make or model products and places..

English TES1.1 Communicates with peers and known adults in informal situations and structured activities dealing briefly with familiar topics. TES1.2 Demonstrates basic skills of classroom and group interaction, makes brief oral presentations and listens with reasonable attentiveness.

Planned assessment

Analysing and drawing conclusions (reach a conclusion which is communicated to others) • Discuss the results of the investigation by comparing the two ice cubes. What happened to the ice cubes? (Melted, changed state: solid to liquid). Which ice cube melted faster? Were your predictions correct? Use selected digital photographs to prepare a student worksheet that requires students to sequence the images and write a jointly constructed description of the image. (Literacy link: observes and records information throughout an experiment) (Numeracy link: describes the duration of events using everyday language) Conclusion – the sun’s energy • Supply students with a worksheet and an open statement such as ‘the sun’s energy can be used to _________________. Have students draw a picture indicating an application of the sun’s energy. Applications may include drying things (clothes line), growing plants. Collect the completed worksheets to create a class book. Sun safety • Discuss what happened to the ice cubes in the previous experiment. Ask: - what could the sun do to our skin over a long period? (sun tan, sun burn) - how can we protect our skin? (clothing, staying out of sun when it is at its hottest, sun cream, hats, sunglasses, umbrellas, play in shade) - in what ways can we protect our skin at school … at home? - what are the school rules for sun safety? (play in the shade, wear a hat) - if there were no shady areas, what would you do? • Teach the song ‘Slip, slop, slap and wrap’. Words and music available through the NSW Cancer Council http://www.cancercouncil.com.au/ • Design a hat for a toy (doll, teddy bear, etc.) that would protect the toy from the sun. Use a variety of construction materials (blocks, cardboard, Lego) and test the effectiveness of the shelter by shining a torch over the shelter to see if the light reaches the toy. Scenarios • Pose preventative health scenarios where students work in pairs to identify the problems and give suggestions for possible solutions. Devise scenarios that are relevant to the needs and context of the class/school. Examples of scenarios: - Sarah is going to play outside in the sun. What does she need to remember to help keep herself sun safe? - Hannah has a cold and is sneezing. What does she need to do to keep healthy? • In pairs, students role play their scenarios (one student as Sarah, the other as Sarah’s friend) and present to the class. (Literacy link: works in pairs to solve a problem and present solution to the class)

© State of New South Wales through the NSW Department of Education and Training, 2007. All rights reserved. Not part of NEALS COGs unit ES1 Healthy choices (D)

Version published 25/7/06

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Outcomes

Learning experience

Creative Arts: Dance

Sun and rain dance • Play musical statues for a warm-up. Students travel around the room to music. When the music stops, students assume a shape and freeze, as statues. • Ask students to name activities they can do on a sunny day compared to a wet rainy day. • Discuss sun safety (refer to previous PDHPE activity). Demonstrate to students a movement sequence of actions related to ‘slip, slop, slap and wrap’. Direct students’ attention to carefully copy the shapes and movements ensuring there is a smooth transition between the separate actions. • Discuss with students some things they may do to stop getting wet when it is raining such as wearing a raincoat, using an umbrella and putting on gumboots, galoshes or Wellingtons. Demonstrate to students a sequence of actions and movements related to putting on these items of clothing. Ensure the students perform the sequence of actions in a fluid motion, as well as clearly articulating the movements. For example, when pulling on their boots, they should really stretch. • Discuss with students the problems of walking on hot sand at the beach. Demonstrate a short sequence of movements. • Discuss with students the movements of jumping over, or splashing in puddles in the rain. Demonstrate a short sequence of movements. • Show students a blue and yellow card. When the yellow card is raised, the students perform the sun sequence of movements. When the blue card is raised, the students perform the rain movement sequence. Ensure that students are aware of their movement space and prohibit contact with other students. Continually direct students’ attention to the quality of their movements which should be fluid with a sense of balance. The focus of this activity is the quality of movement. Culminating activity • As a class, ask students to suggest ways in which they can share what they have learnt about healthy choices with other people in the school. Ideas for this include: - teaching a song to another class or to the assembly - performing a role play and song at assembly - creating posters to display around the school - using digital images of student work and class displays in a PowerPoint presention (Literacy link: applies information from previous experiences to persuade other students)

DAES1.1 Participates in dance activities and demonstrates an awareness of body parts, control over movement and expressive qualities • performs basic movement sequences demonstrating control. DAES1.2 Explores movement, using the elements of dance in response to a stimulus to express ideas, feelings or moods • uses the elements of dance to reflect the idea of sun and rain related movements.

PDHPE PHES1.12 Displays basic positive health practices • identifies activities and practices that keeps them healthy DMES1.2 Identifies some options available when making simple decisions • makes simple decisions about ways to keep their body healthy.

Planned assessment

English WES1.9 Engages in writing texts with the intention of conveying an idea or message. WES1.10 Produces simple texts that show the emergence of the grammar and punctuation needed to achieve the purpose of the text. WES1.13 Recognises some different purposes for writing and that own texts differ in various ways.

© State of New South Wales through the NSW Department of Education and Training, 2007. All rights reserved. Not part of NEALS COGs unit ES1 Healthy choices (D)

Version published 25/7/06

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Healthy Habits ES1  

Healthy Habits COGS unit from the DEC

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