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Joseph D’Angelo academic architectural portfolio

Joseph D’Angelo Education

Skills

Contact

New Jersey Institute of Technology ‘12 bachelor of architecture cum laude

*physical model making

Joseph D’Angelo 689 birch hill drive bridgewater, nj 08807

phi eta sigma honors society 2009 kss architects endowed scholarship award recipient

*adobe suite: photoshop,illustrator,indesign *autodesk autocad *rhinoceros,rhinocam,grasshopper *3d studio max *ecotect *microsoft office: word, excel *photography, sketching, graphics

c. 908.304.4489 jdangelo17@gmail.com

Select Works Hoboken Public Library

UrbanGlass-Glass Factory

hoboken,new jersey spring 2009

dumbo brooklyn,new york fall 2010

Academia Acoustica

Venetian Contemporarist Canaletto, Vivaldi, & Biennale

long island city, new york spring 2011

venice, italy spring 2012

HOBOKEN PUBLIC LIBRARY Hoboken is a city with a unique physical and cultural identity bounded by two defining geographical features: the Hudson River to the East and the Palisades Cliff to the West. With a present population of almost 40 thousand residents, and the development of every corner of available land, the existing cultural, recreational, institutional, and educational resources of the city are reorganizing and expanding in order to meet the demands of its citizens. In an effort to meet the cultural needs of this new focal area of the city, the local government has proposed with educational initiatives the construction of a public library. ---------------------------------------The design approach is inspired by the site itself, growing out of the shifted and rotated grids of hoboken and manhattan. The design of the building connects Jersey City and Hoboken through the reciprocity of form, program, and site. The library program is redefined based on the neighborhood’s needs as well as an idea about the library’s role in the future. A community center and light rail station were added to the projects program. The programmatic elements are arranged to allow for circulation flow as well as visual interactions. The use of shifting and rotating of the structure as a tectonic element allows for transition, views, and light to filter ino the building.

The iconic stance of the building as it cantilevers over the light rail stop, allowing for a clear visibility to all that arrive to this neighborhood.

ROTATION OF GRIDS

detail isometricpublic library space

KIDS SECTION

READING & PC STATION

CAFE & MAGAZINE

LIBRARY CATALOG

Longitudinal section through main cantilever

COMMUNITY CENTER LIBRARY LIGHT RAIL STATION

OVERLAY OF GRIDS

INTERSECTING POINTS

CIRCULATION PATHS

PATH CONNECTIONS

APPLYING CIRCULATION PATHS TO SITE

PROGRAM RELATION TO SITE / SLOPE

6” Precast Concrete Panels

1/2” Finished Wood Floor 1 1/2” Plywood Subfloor

4” Waterjet Cut Steel Ribs

6” Precast Concrete Panels

0 .5

2

6

12

Light Rail Station Public Entry Space Copy Center Area Cafe Convenience Store

Library Grown Up Section Library Catalog Area Reference Area Magazine/ Periodical Area Reading Area Computer Stations Stacks Check-out/Control Area Children Section Library Catalog Area Reading Area Computer Stations Young Reader Display Area Stacks Check-out/Control Area

main circulation cross section

Community Center Public Entry Multi-use Room plus Storage Terrace/Patio Dance & Music Room Performance Room Art Room Meeting Spaces longitudinal section through public entry and recreation

The annual masonry build design competition bet opportunity for students to work in teams, work construct a design for the first time. An inter the single project to compete against the other a panel for an overall winner. The masonry build is to be a fragment of the communicate the design concept. it should take project that allows for the expression of the structure. As lead studio designer, it was my task to make clearly understood and constructed as intended. coming together, it is difficult to maintain a isn’t as each student tries to supplant their The competition gave a opportunity for real the success and difficulties of working in

ween the second year academic class is an with actual contractors, masons, and to studio design competion first determines eight design studios, and to be judged by building design intended to verify and a critical moment within the design architecture, space, materiality, and sure my original thoughts and ideas were With many different architectural ideas stronghold on what is necessary and what ideas over the next. world experience in the classroom and large design teams.

UrbanGlass-Glass Factory UrbanGlass is a not-for-profit international center for the creation and appreciation of new art made from glass. The center is currently located in the former Strand Theater building in downtown Brooklyn,NY. In 2011, the city will begin a $24 million renovation of the existing building, and UrbanGlass will be forced to find a temporary space for 18 months. A new temporary facility for UrbanGlass to house all of their operations during the renovation is needed. The facility will need to meet the rigorous technical and programmatic requirements of an art glass production facility, gallery, and work shop. ---------------------------------------The “process of construction” and the “process of design” were explored in use to manage the process and flows of design. An understanding of the role of technology in architecture as a question of process, drove the design decisions, as well as help become the generative system to drive the project. At the heart of the design studio, the artifact and its physical manifestation of thought and technique took precedence. The results were to be produced and presented to a group for discussion and criticism. The artifacts were produced by physical means: drawings, models, and photographs. The evaluation of these tools recalibrated the relationship between process and result to control the information and systems at hand.

The generative origins of the design process came from understanding a physical natural phenomenon. In more the one reason, the similarities of lava and the development of glass in nature allowed for a basis of study. To create an iterative machine to generate but yield different results based off of a change in the parameters, an understanding of the natural phenomenon needed to be instituted. Lava flows like any liquid to its lowest point. The terrain determines the path it shall take, as peaks and valleys deter the movement creating different moments of exploration. To recreate this in a systematic way, a series of points with predetermined heights allowing for adjustment, was issued, and than a surface covers those points representing a terrain. The use of wax was a necessary element due to the heating and cooling qualities it holds in relation to lava. By understanding these qualities, and the different variations that result through slight variation to the ‘terrain’ an architectural language can than be set up and replicated in the next phase of the design process.

Overlapping multiple streams crossover with similar attributes without disrupting the other stream

Intersecting

two or more streams meet, transitioning to a single stream

Bulbous

isolated overflow based off main streamline

Splitting single stream branches, generating multiple streams due to peak

Build-Up

Overlapping Intersecting Bulbous

collection of movement, generates more isolated areas and possible overflow which creates new streams

Splitting

Valley

Valley

low point, collection of movement

Build-Up

By understanding the language and parameters set in the previous step, the same rules can be applied to a new material. By generating a new system to yield the same results in terms of the architectural language, a form of architecture can than start to form. By taking strands, and connecting them systematically to one another, they begin to generate similar iterations in a three dimensional space. The terms of overlapping and splitting prevail strongest in this system, but also hold the strongest architectural meaning. The multi-colored strands start to determine internal connections and external connections. Through varied results, this allows for a control to the system that can begin to generate a form of architecture in the next phase of the design process and its manifestation.

The understanding in internal and external connections lead to the next phase. With internal connections having the thinnest strand, and the external widest, a spacial arrangement with enclosure ensues. The multi layering of the system is still prevalent in this model, as it was in the original study of lava. This understanding is carried throughout, and shows the driving force of the form. The layering begins from the outside ‘skin’ and shifts inwards towards a single programmatic space. In this case, a building kiosk could be translated from this as it is a single shelter with space for one internal program. The different iterations of this process lead to the arrangement of a single programmatic space, but also lead towards allowing for multiple spaces enclosed over one single external structure. This can lead to an actual architectural structure with different programmatic spaces meeting the project guidelines.

A spacial study is seen through the physical manifestation constructed through a series of rule sets generating The potential ‘Hot Shop’ programmatic space. Natural lighting, the spacial understanding, and circulation can be understood in these studies.

The architecture of the UrbanGlass Factory was generated through a systematic design process through material and spacial studies. The end result of the studies generated an architecture with many physical layers, all of which vary in scale throughout the project.

longitudinal section hotshop and museum exhibition space

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

 







ground floor plan

transverse section hotshop and building entry

Entry sequence into UrbanGlass Factory

Museum exhibition space for showcased glasswork

MSG

ACADEMIA ACOUSTICA There are few architectural forms with as many parameters as concert halls. The formative idea behind these types of buildings has little to do with the building, but relies more on the discourse of otherness as a means to direct their synthesis. The project is to design a new academy of music in Long Island City, New York. There will be three separate concert halls varying in size. 2500, 1200, and 700 people respectively. The project will also contain an educational academy with recital halls, classrooms, and offices. In order to understand the acoustical parameters necessary for designing a concert hall, the study of existing halls and their geometry will be conducted. The site itself is a peninsula located at the juncture of the East River and Newton Creek, allowing it to be highly visible to three distinct elevations. With Manhattan to the west, Long Island City to the East, and Brooklyn to the South, the project has the opportunity to add much excitement to the area, as well as a new crown to the city skyline.

ESB

UN

Academia acoustica

0

250

1000’

Fine Arts Center, Viterbo College Auditorium --------------------------------At first to understand how to design an acoustic hall, you need to understand the make up of an acoustic volume. Every surface, material, opening, balcony, ceiling, reflect and/or absorb sound to make the volume successful. This precedent study is an adjustable auditorium space. The shown set up is for a concert performance where the acoustics reverberate from the stage and outward to the audience. This auditorium space can also allow for opera and small theater performances by utilizing the fly tower above the end stage. These adjustable settings don’t make for prime acoustic sound stages, but allow for a multi-use platform. The size and shape of the volume has a affect of how sounds are reflected and reverberated, and with this study, an early understanding of that can be understood.

Utilizing one plan and one section of a theater on a solid block of wood, the interior acoustic volume can be excavated by following the external edges of each while maintaining the block as a solid. The cuts shape the volume. The removal of volume from the block allows for an understanding of the surfaces that make up the acoustic space. In three separate iterations, planar, transverse, and longitudinal, an acoustic study was performed.

block with cut lines and intial shifting

final planar section removed altering form

planar section removed reveiling void

cross section removed altering form

secondary planar section removed altering form

secondary cross section removed altering form

tertiary planar section removed altering form

final section removed altering form

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3

6 5

2

4

1.

2.

1.clear visibility and a large volume allows for the main concert hall to be established.

3.

2.below the main program, the main public access and lobby is developed with a 4. large gathering space. 3.a large void generated by shifting pieces creates a location for an outdoor theater, with potential site lines to the east and west.

The physical cut lines of the solid block allows for the generation of a rule set determining shifting movements along those lines to exaggerate and recreate a new found form around a pre-existing acoustic volume. the altering of the form and volume creates a new acoustic void and lead to a new design problem. This lead to the exploration of utilizing three concert halls in a single block and using each of the cut lines to determine the movement of pieces. When necessary, removal of chunks were utilized to create programatic spaces away from the acoustic volumes. the final results lead to the shifting and eliminating of chunks to fulfill the requirements of the programmatic functions.

4.program for parking is necessary with the amount of potential visitors. this allows for ground entry and access to main lobby.

5.

5.academy space along the 6. riverfront nearby the theater performance areas. 6.the enclosed volume allows for a function like the opera house to exist, and flytower to be constrained in the form.

OPERA HALL - 1400 seats CONCERT HALL - 700 seats

PUBLIC ARRIVAL AND DROP OFF

MAIN CONCERT HALL - 2800 seats

3.

2. 4.

Longitudinal Section: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7.

Main concert hall Opera Hall Concert Hall Public drop off Parking Garage Entry plaza Musuem

1.

6. 7.

5.

WATER TAXI ROUTE

APPROACH TO THE SITE

N

CAR ROUTE FROM: QUEENS BOROUGH BRIDGE QUEENS MIDTOWN TUNNEL PULASKI HIGHWAY

APPROACH VIA WATER TAXI DROP ENTRANCE

SITE SEQUENCES:

N

WATER TAXI ARRIVAL TO OUTDOOR THEATER PUBLIC DROP OFF TO MAIN CONCERT HALL CAR ARRIVAL TO ENTERTAINMENT PLAZA

SITE SEQUENCES: THREE APPROACHES TO THE BUILDING SITE AND SEQUENCES TO SEPARATE PROGRAMMATIC DESTINATIONS.

WATER TAXI ARRIVAL TO OUTDOOR THEATER

PUBLIC DROP OFF TO MAIN CONCERT HALL

CAR ARRIVAL TO ENTERTAINMENT PLAZA

VENETIAN CONTEMPORARIST CANALETTO, VIVALDI, & BIENNALE Hoboken is a city with a unique physical and cultural identity bounded by two defining geographical features: the Hudson River to the East and the Palisades Cliff to the West. With a present population of almost 40 thousand residents, and the development of every corner of available land, the existing cultural, recreational, institutional, and educational resources of the city are reorganizing and expanding in order to meet the demands of its citizens. In an effort to meet the cultural needs of this new focal area of the city, the local government has proposed with educational initiatives the construction of a public library. ---------------------------------------The design approach is inspired by the site itself, growing out of the shifting and rotating of grids of hoboken and manhattan. The design of the building connects Jersey City and Hoboken through the reciprocity of form, program, and site. The library program is redefined based on the neighborhood’s needs as well as an idea about the library’s role in the future. A community center and light rail station were added to the projects program. The programmatic elements are arranged to allow for circulation flow as well as visual interactions. The use of shifting and rotating of the structure as a tectonic element allows for transition, views, and light to filter into the building. In an effort to meet the cultural needs of this new focal area of the city, the local government has proposed with educational initiatives the construction of a public library. In an effort to meet the cultural needs of this new focal area of the city, the local government has proposed with educational initiatives the construction.

urban hinge

arsenale canal

HISTORIC canaletto + vivaldi

piazza san marco

CONTEMPORARY biennale

biennale grounds

 [grand arsenale was divided in half with many boat docks and warehouses extending into the large arsenale water for naval use and boat construction. the boat docks and private green landscaping make up the western border]



[the grand arsenale as it stands now, is part of a large continuous body of water with a canal t separating western venice to its eastern counter walls of the historic docks, remain memories of w

a unique situation to venice. it is that runs north to south completely part. the remnants of historical what the arsenale once was]

 [by re-using the historic ruins of the arsenale, the historical aspect of its past is reinvigorated in a new way. the private gardens that make up the western edge is reapplied as public gardens. private gardens are instituted into the museum. the axis once made by docks and warehouses, is connected again as a bridge allowing for boat docking and becomes an active spot for visitors to learn of the historic past. it also allows for access to the theater and museum.

vivaldi concert hall as anchor of repurposed historic axis

historical axis [re-presented through a bridge and public docks]

canaletto museum within historic walls

axis

the historic walls along the western edge of the arsenale allows for physical link between the historical past of the arsenale to the contemporary future it is to withhold with venetian art and worldwide biennale art. by utilizing the existing walls, a structure is set that can organize the flow of people throughout the site as well as connecting them to the past. the walls have a history with how they were used and constructed. using these methods an architectural language developed. the walls act as circulation control, historical landmarks, artwork supporters, roof rafters, and the urban hinge between historic venice and contemporary venice.

the walls set a certain scale for the museum as well as a systematic flow that allows the visitors to appreciate the history of venice. the artwork is placed along the walls with courtyards along the center to control the natural lighting, as well as creating private courtyards throughout the sequence.

when the historic walls separate, a newly constructed wall is supported between the two archways. This expresses the new architecture while maintaining the importance of the historic walls. paintings are placed in the same rhythm as they would be with historic archways.

the full length historic walls showcase the artwork of canaletto in each of the archways as well as a transitional space between the next paintings in the sequence. open archways act as thresholds but connect the entire museum together.

Typical Bay Construction

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CANALETTO MUSEUM GROUND FLOOR PLAN 0

10

30

70

150’

canaletto museum [courtyard]

canaletto museum [new wall]

canaletto museum [historic wall]

canaletto museum [longitudinal]

        

 





  

historic wall display exhibit wall section

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Internal Courtyard within Canaletto Museum

Canaletto painting exhibit display

Photography a series of photographs capturing the architecture from a single vantage point.

colonnades, newark, nj

colonnades, newark, nj

new museum of contemporary art, ny,ny

copper union, ny,ny

new york times building, ny,ny

iac building, ny,ny

museum of modern art, ny,ny

american folk art museum, ny,ny


Joseph D'Angelo Architectural Portfolio