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T H E M AG A Z I N E O F H U D S O N VA L L E Y FA R M S , F O O D A N D C U I S I N E

THE VALLEY

NUMBER 77 MARCH–MAY 2017 VALLEYTABLE.COM

INSIDE: HUDSON VALLEY RESTAURANT WEEK


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MAGNIFICENT VIEWS, EXTRAORDINARY FOOD ALWAYS AT VALLEY RESTAURANT CALL OR EMAIL TODAY TO MAKE YOUR RESERVATIONS 845.424.3604 x39 jamesb@thegarrison.com Dinner: Thurs through Sat from 5pm-9pm. Brunch: Sat & Sun from 11:30am-2:30pm.

thegarrison.com | 2015 US 9, Garrison NY

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EAT • DRINK • STAY 20 South Front St • Hudson NY 12534 R E S E R VAT I O N S 5 1 8 . 8 2 8 .1 6 3 5

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featured articles 23 up close: dottie audrey’s bakery kitchen

You can head north or south on the Thruway, whiz right past Tuxedo and never even know it, but you’d miss the best new eating spot to hit these parts in a long time. Everything here spells homestyle—that means fresh breads, soups, salads and, well, eveything else, every day. Is it worth skipping an exit for? You bet your EZ Pass it is. by Kristen Warfield

31 special section: hudson valley restaurant week

We’re rarely at a loss for words, but Wow! is just about all that comes to mind when considering the latest incarnation of Hudson Valley Restaurant Week. From Croation to Irish, from New American to Rustic Italian—the spring edition of Restuarant Week quite literally has something for everyone.

55 waste not

Abundance, the hallmark of agriculture in this country, means little to those without access. Food insecurity are the new buzzwords dominating discussions about the economics and politics of food. New organizations are cooperating in gleaning surplus crops from fields and markets, and to cut waste, chefs are using innovative preparation and cooking techniques that are redefining “nose-to-tail” cooking. by Leander Schaerlaeckens

75 spring: a multicultural celebration

Since before recorded history, spring has held special meaning for religions and cultures around the world, and many still honor the season in traditional ways—which, of course, usually involves food. We asked chefs from a variety of cultural backgrounds to share some of their traditional seasonal dishes with us in a celebration of spring—and of the diversity that makes the Hudson Valley so rich. by Kristen Warfield PHOTO : EVA DEITCH

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departments 11 Good Stuff Middletown speakeasy, Hudson Street moves, Hawthorne Valley at the top, a milestone for Orange County Land Trust, really good food in a package (really), recycling corks, Bedford cuts waste, kimchi, events and more 19 Openings Red Zebra, Beacon Hotel Restaurant, Knaus Gallery & Wine Bar 47 Drink A wine rennaissance, by Timothy Buzinski 75 Locally Grown Murder in the coop, by Keith Stewart 41 Farms, Food & Markets: 2017 Hudson Valley CSAs 83 Index of advertisers 84 Directory 96 Last Call Think spring

recipes

18 Caramelized sea scallops with spinach; Roasted garlic-wilted spinach (Stacey Hawkins) 27 Mushroom toast; Caraway Irish soda bread (Jennifer & Patrick Jenkins / Dottie Audrey’s) 28

Vegan chickpea, barley and mushroom soup; Garibaldi cookies (Jennifer & Patrick Jenkins / Dottie Audrey’s)

76 Guinness Stout lamb stew (Agnes Devereux / The Village Tea Room) 77 Croatian Easter bread (Zeljko Tomic / Dubrovnik) 78 Pizza rustica (David DiBari / The Cookery) 79 Carnitas pork (Ramiro Jimenez / Ramiro’s 954) 80 Mansaf (Kamel Jamal / Ziatun) 6

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EDITOR’S LETTER

Call it vernal Over the course of the year, no other season is anticipated more, or is host to as many celebrations, as spring. Across time, cultures and continents, the season has been, and is, universally commemorated as a time of rebirth, growth, promise and redemption. Technically, spring in the northern hemisphere begins with the vernal equinox, the moment the sun crosses the equator and begins its gradual drift northward—the moment when day and night are equal and “in balance” (equinox is Latin for equal night). This year that occurs at 6:29AM (EDT), March 20. The very nature of this equal division—of the duration of night and day/dark and light—have made the equinox both astronomically significant and an important spiritual marker for a wide range of belief systems. Buildings and other structures or indicators that in some way specify the exact moment of the equinox have been constructed by almost every significant culture around the globe. In Arkansas, 1,000-year-old Native American ceremonial mounds are aligned to mark the equinox sunrise. In Cambodia, the sun at equinox crowns the main temple tower at Angkor Wat, and it precisely aligns with markers on the 5,000-year-old Grianan of Aileach in County Donegal, Ireland. At the Mayan temple at Chichen Itza in Mexico, the equinox sunrise perfectly delineates the 120-foot-long shadow of the snake god Kukulan. The list goes on—marking the equinox, in fact, is a key element in the construction and/or alignment of countless ancient structures, from Stonehenge to the Great Pyramids. This cosmological spotlight has not been lost to modern cultures, however. Many of our modern religious and cultural holidays are, in fact, directly related to “pagan” celebrations, long forgotten, which in turn were likely scheduled to coincide with lunar or solar events. In a delightful conjunction of cultures and calendars, the Roman Catholic holy day of Easter (named for Eostre, the ancient Germanic goddess of fertility), for example, is always scheduled for the first Sunday (defined by the Gregorian calendar) after the first full moon (lunar calendar) following the vernal equinox (solar calendar). Food, of course, plays a big part in most major cultural celebrations. The ritual dinner of Passover, the joyous Easter feast, the Persian New Year—all fundamentally celebrate the season of rebirth and the growth that will mature and be harvested in the fall. The Hudson River was the original highway into the New World, and its shores have been home to multitudes of settlers from all parts of the globe, including Dutch, English, French, German, Irish, Indian, Italian, Hispanic and many others. Our heritage and our history are made of what these immigrants brought—and continue to bring—each adding another little bit to our wonderfully diverse culture. We celebrate that in this issue, just a little bit more than usual, with our own spring tradition, now beginning its second decade. It marks the end of winter and the beginning of spring, and celebrates the incredible diversity of food and people throughout our valley. It’s a two-week party called Spring Hudson Valley Restaurant Week, and it unofficially welcomes a new year of culinary pleasures. (We tried calling it Vernal Equinox Restaurant Week but that never caught on). Hope to see you there. —JN

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as a On the cover: The fascination with decorating eggs with intricate geometric designs began long before the Christian holiday of Easter popularized the art. Many of the intricate designs that adorn modern Ukrainian pysanka eggs are derived from Neolithic spiritual and ritualisic symbols, refined over millennia by Slavic cultures. Though most popular and common around Easter, decorated eggs often are gifted to signify health, love, wealth and fertility, and as special tokens of gratitude.

THE VALLEY TABLE THE MAGAZINE OF HUDSON VALLEY FARMS, FOOD AND CUISINE THE VALLEY TABLE, INC. 380 MAIN STREET, SUITE 202 BEACON, NY 12508 (845) 765-2600 valleytable.com hudsonvalleyrestaurantweek.com NUMBER 77 MARCH – MAY 2017 PUBLISHER Janet Crawshaw janetc@valleytable.com EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Jerry Novesky jerryn@valleytable.com Managing Director Jennifer Bannan jennifer@valleytable.com Content & Comunications Coordinator Kristen Warfield kristen@valleytable.com Office Administrator Meghan Merry Graphic Design Greg Simpson / Ephemera Design Production Specialist Stacie Merrill stacie@valleytable.com Website Coordinator Nate Diedrick Advertising Representative Maryellen Case / MCaseMedia Sales@valleytable.com

Contributors to this issue Flavia Bacarella Leander Schaerlaeckens Timothy Buzinski Colleen Stewart Eva Deitch Keith Stewart Jermaine Haughton Diana Waldron THE VALLEY TABLE is exclusively devoted to Hudson Valley agriculture, food and cuisine. We support sustainable agricultural practices and efforts to strengthen the links among regional producers, marketers, restaurateurs and consumers. We urge you to patronize businesses that feature Hudson Valley products and to support initiatives that benefit regional agriculture and related efforts. Letters to the editor regarding magazine content are welcome and will be published as space permits. Letters should be mailed to the address above, or emailed to editor@valleytable.com. To be considered for publication, letters must be signed. THE VALLEY TABLE is published four times a year (March, June, Sept and Dec). Distribution is free at selected sites throughout the Hudson Valley or by subscription. Subscriptions are $20 per year. To subscribe, mail a check or money order payable to The Valley Table, 380 Main St., Suite 202, Beacon, NY 12508 or visit valleytable.com. COPYRIGHT © 2017, THE VALLEY TABLE, INC. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced in any form, mechanical or electronic, without written permission of the publishers. Advertisements designed by The Valley Table are copyrighted and may not be reproduced in whole or in part without written permission. ISSN 1257-8417

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GOOD STUFF

SUSTAINABLE HARV E S T

PUT A RECORK IN IT

D ELIVER IN G TH E G OOD

EVERY LITTLE BIT In 2012, then 11-year-old Devin Juros learned that 20 percent of the people in Westchester were struggling with food insecurity. He imagined creating a community garden solely to benefit those who couldn’t afford meals, and after two months of brainstorming, Devin went to his father, David, with a notebook filled with ideas. Father and son developed a list of 500 potential supporters. After raising $11,000 and enlisting the help of 100 volunteers, in June 2014 they started building the 300-square-foot Pleasantville Community Garden at St. John’s Episcopal Church in Pleasantville. That first July, they harvested 30 pounds of peas and green beans and delivered them to Hillside Food Outreach. “That afternoon, the director of Hillside called to let us know that most of our first harvest was delivered to a mom with five kids who had no food in their house,” David Juros recalls. “It was very satisfying that our first delivery went right to someone in need.” The original garden has since tripled in size, and they have added summer produce from gardens at Pleasantville Middle School and Pleasantville High School. Volunteers also collect between 100 and 500 pounds of extra produce weekly from the Pleasantville Farmers’ Market. The produce goes to Hillside Food Outreach (Armonk), Neighbors Link (Mount Kisco), three A-Home houses and the Pleasantville Interfaith Food Pantry. Since the project began, 30,000 pounds of food have been donated; in 2016 alone, volunteers delivered more than 16,000 pounds of food. —DW

Harvesting real cork for a multitude of purposes—from flooring and display boards to bottle stoppers—is a sustainable practice. The trees are not destroyed during the process; if the cork layer is removed correctly, it may be harvested from a cork tree every seven to nine years over its 400-year lifespan without harm. Cork comes from Mediterranean climes—the best comes from Spain and Portugal—but that’s not to say the supply is unlimited or the resources unrestricted. And in the wine world, the debate over the efficacy of using natural cork versus artificial stoppers or screw caps continues. Enter ReCORK (recork.org), a project designed to recycle real (not plastic) bottle corks. The organization, started in 2008, has recycled more than 70 million corks to date. Now, Westchester’s Rosemary and Vine is joining in on the cause. Owners Berj Yeretzian and Tania Rahal grew up in the Mediterranean, and they celebrate vegetarian Mediterranean cuisine at the restaurant. Since partnering with ReCork six months ago, the couple has rolled out two major changes: The entire wine menu now includes only wines sealed with real cork, and the restaurant has become a public collection site. Corks can be deposited in a box located at the restaurant. Bar- and tabletops, room dividers and display boards aside, recycled cork is used to make yoga blocks and antislip pads for surf boards, and new uses for the material continue to be, well, uncorked constantly. Most ReCORK partners are wineries or merchants; Rosemary and Vine is the first restaurant in the Hudson Vally to become a partner, leading a trend here that is gaining momentum nationwide. —DW Rosemary and Vine 29 Purchase St, Rye (914) 481-8660; rosemaryandvine.com

Pleasantville Community Garden 8 Sunnyside Ave, Pleasantville (914) 741-5025; pvillegarden.org

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EVENT S INTRO TO SPICES FROM CLASSIC TO GLOBAL NIRMALA’S KITCHEN COOKING SCHOOL AT THE FARM, HIGHLAND March 3, 12-3pm Journey through the world of spices, flavor and texture, while learning to make classic masala, curry, rubs and dishes that can be made with an assortment of global spices. This threehour hands-on cooking class is led by Nirmala Narine who draws from her extensive knowledge of Ayurveda and her years spent traveling the world in search of unique spices. $105. Tickets available through eventbrite.com

WIN D FALL PR ESERVATION

KEEPING COUNT A 142-acre easement on Windfall Farms, in the Town of Hamptonburgh, has helped raise the total number of protected farmland acres in Orange County to more than 1,600, according to Orange County Land Trust Executive Director Jim Delaune. Windfall owner Morse Pitts says he didn’t want his farm to be lost to real estate development. “As I watched neighboring farms disappear over time,” Pitts says, “I became growingly concerned that my farm would face a similar fate.” New York State has lost half a million acres of farmland to real estate development over the past 40 years, according to the American Farmland Trust. Delaune notes the easement, funded by a state Farmland Protection Implementation Grant, will keep the farmland in agricultural use. “This has been a startling problem, not only in the Hudson Valley, but across the country,” Delaune notes. “Once a farm is converted to other forms of land use—such as residential housing—it’s lost for good. Lands that are meant for agriculture should stay in agricultural use.” The land trust currently is working with another $300,000 in state grant funding to preserve Topp Farm in Otisville. With the help of the land trust, farmers currently leasing the land will be able to purchase development rights and continue farming. “Not only does this easement permanently protect the farm, but it now allows the Farmer’s Daughter [a farmers’ market they manage] to increase production and grow as a company,” Delaune says. “This will be a win-win for everyone.” —KW Orange County Land Trust 50 Ogden Dr, New Windsor (845) 534-3690; oclt.org

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HUDSON VALLEY RESTAURANT WEEK HUDSON VALLEY March 6-19 Over 200 restaurants in the mid- and lower-Hudson Valley offer special 3-course meals for a fraction of the price during this two-week event. No tickets required. Lunch: $22.95, dinner: $32.95. See dining directory in this magazine or go online for participating restaurants. Reservations strongly recommended. hudsonvalleyrestaurantweek.com MAPLE WEEKENDS MADAVA FARMS, DOVER PLAINS March 18-19, 25-26 Sugar farms and sugar shacks across the valley open their grounds and their shack to visitors to experience the maple sugar harvest first hand. Sample the sweet stuff. Start your tradition here. Mapleweekend.com CAPITAL DISTRICT GARDEN AND FLOWER SHOW HUDSON VALLEY COMMUNITY COLLEGE,TROY March 24, 10am-8pm; March 25, 9am-7pm; March 26, 10am-5pm Enjoy explosions of color and floral arrangements, browse through a selection of plants, bulbs and seeds for sale, and attend lectures, workshops and more at this luscious garden event. gardenandflowershow.com STREET FOODS OF FRANCE CULINARY INSTITUTE OF AMERICA, HYDE PARK March 30, 12pm France is home to many cultural influences reflected throughout the variety of its food. Visit the CIA to wander through the essence of French street food, sampling foods like bánh mi, kebabs, classic crêpes and many more. $55 prepaid, all-inclusive. bocuserestaurant.com/events


BULL M ARKET

SPEAKING EASY

If The Bullroom cocktail lounge and restaurant had been open during Prohibition, it might have been the region’s best-kept secret. Red leather seats, a ritzy golden bar top and chandeliers overhead create an atmosphere straight out of the days when moonshiners and bootleggers peddled spirits without the law’s consent. The discrete entrance, tucked in the back of Nina Restaurant in Middletown, is unassuming—but once inside, a bursting, modernday speakeasy offers up local craft cocktails and eclectic American cuisine that won’t remain on the QT for long. Opened in November 2016, The Bullroom is the latest venture of chef and owner Franz Brendle, who founded the upscale Nina Restaurant 15 years ago. With its own menu and entrance, The Bullroom is a major change of atmosphere from its next-door neighbor: playful, imaginative and founded on locally sourced spirits. “It’s the place to go for someone looking to try something new,” Brendle says, seated with a spread of New York spirits along the bar behind him. “What I really like is seeing a bottle and knowing the person I purchased it from.” Names like Bootlegger, Neversink and Beacon Bourbon sit on the shelf alongside house-made bitters in mason jars. In addition to the bitters, Brendle also makes his own grenadine and fresh juices. “I believe in the craft movement, straight down to ingredients,” Brendle stresses. “With the industry booming now more than ever, the interest in it is increasing, too. That means good things for our economy and our progression as a community.” Though he admits he can’t pinpoint one “signature” drink on the menu, a growing number of guests favor the

New York to Moscow—Tuthilltown Distillery Indigenous Apple Vodka, Barrow’s Ginger Liqueur and lime juice. Brendle’s locavore mindset isn’t limited to elegant elixirs: Local meat, cheese and seasonal produce are at the core of The Bullroom’s menu. From Hudson Valley Duck empenadas with McGrath Farm fresco cheese and caramelized onions to the No Bull Burger featuring Hudson Valley Cattle Company beef and house-cut fries, the entrées are fresh and filling. For small-plate grazing, the ricottaand mozzarella-stuffed meatballs, or grilled Romaine salad dressed with herbed lemon and olive oil fit the bill. “People can come in for a drink and a burger, or get a bit fancier and go for the porterhouse,” Brendle says. “I want The Bullroom to be a place of both comfort and sophistication.” Exposed brick walls (one with a large bull mural looking over the space) provide hints of the building’s historic roots—it was once home to Bull’s Opera House, the inspiration for its name. Historic records show the theater once featured the soon-to-be-infamous John Wilkes Booth alongside his brother, Edwin, in a November 1864 performance of Julius Caesar. The Bullroom joins Nina and the beer- and tapas-centered Craft 47, in Goshen, on Brendle’s roster of restaurants, and the easy-going restaurateur admits the three spots show hints that they’re related. “People have said before that The Bullroom is the in-between of Nina, which is fine dining, and Craft 47, which is totally laid back,” Brendle says. “I just love the creative end of opening a restaurant and putting out food that makes people happy. That’s what brought me here.” —KW

The Bullroom at Nina Restaurant 27 West Main St, Middletown (845) 344-6800; thebullroomatnina.com

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EVENT S DAFFODIL TEA AT WILDERSTEIN RHINEBECK April 1, 1pm An afternoon of tea, finger sandwiches and homemade cakes and cookies. After tea, take a tour of the Wilderstein Mansion. $30 for adults; $20 for kids. Reservations required. wilderstein.org LAGUNITAS BEER PAIRING DINNER HOLY SMOKE BBQ, CROTON April 7, 6-11pm Lagunitas Brewmaster Jeremy Marshall hosts this event, featuring a five-course meal paired with Lagunitas beer. $85. holysmokebbq.net

R ESU R G EN T

MOVIN’ ON UP

Donna Hammond chose to relocate her much-loved Hudson Street Cafe to a completely different venue when her lease expired late last year. The new spot—a busy, commercial stretch of Rt. 52 in the Town of Newburgh—is a far cry from the quiet, sidewalk cafe-style setting of Cornwall-on-Hudson, but Hammond sees good things happening with the move. “I wanted it to be a really nice space, a space I could be proud of,” she says, adding that one significant change will be a beer and wine license that “will give us more opportunities to work with local producers, especially the breweries, wineries and cideries in the area. I am really looking forward to expanding our reach.” Hammond stresses her menu will remain unchanged, though she is looking to the new neighborhood to help her shape future menu decisions. (The most requested item thus far is the return of dinner service; the new, 50-seat dining room is currently open only for breakfast and lunch.) Why Newburgh? “After Mike Kelly opened Liberty Street Bistro right alongside other great spots like Ms. Fairfax, I realized they had found their niches,” she notes. “With this new location, I want to do the same—to get involved. To drive a healthy community, you need places where people can live and work and eat. I like to give back to the community we work in and to see a resurgence in the area.” Mon-Sat am-3pm; Sun 7am-2pm. —CS Hudson Street Cafe 190 South Plank Rd (Rt 52), Newburgh (845) 565-2450; hudsonstreetcafe.com

PASTA PRIMO VINO SHAWANGUNK WINE TRAIL April 8-9, 10am-5pm Wander along the Shawangunk Wine Trail as you celebrate spring with this self-guided tour, visiting 15 different Hudson Valley wineries. Each winery will serve wine paired with a special pasta dish. Each ticket includes a souvenir wine glass, wine tastings and pasta samplings. shawangunkwinetrail.com/pastaprimo-vino ROSES IN FULL BLOOM WHITECLIFF VINEYARD, GARDINER April 22-23, noon-5pm Celebrate spring in full Rosés. Sample the region's rose resurgence. Tastings paired with local and seasonal food samples. Enough to make you blush. whitecliffwine.com TAP-NY CRAFT BEER AND FOOD FESTIVAL HUNTER MOUNTAIN April 29-30 Over 100 breweries, cideries, distilleries and vendors will gather for a celebration of hops, hot dogs and hors d’oeuvres. This year’s food theme is hot dog creations from ballparks across the country. Tickets range from $30-$219. See website for times and pricing details. tap-ny.com BASILICA FARM & FLEA SPRING MARKET BASILICA HUDSON May 6, 10am-6pm; May 7, 10am-5pm Artisans, collectors, farmers and others come together in this old glue factory to celebrate all things spring. From spring apparel to garden supplies to wild edibles, this event is like a treasure hunt of vintage and timeless products. $5 entry fee for entire weekend. basilicahudson.org/farmandflea/ Visit ValleyTable.com for updates

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FOCAL P OINT

EAT, SHARE, GROW & BUY

IN TH E FLOW

NEW BREW Craft beer lovers can now add Hudson Valley Brewery to their tasting-room sipping roster. The brewery, part of the restoration of an 1820s brick factory in Beacon’s east-end industrial district, started production in late 2016; the fullystocked tasting room opened in early February. “Since we started brewing, people have been tapping on the doors wanting to come in,” says founder John-Anthony Gargiulo, a Highland native. “It’s great to finally be able to invite them in.” Former Bacchus brewmasters Michael Renganeschi and Jason Synan developed the lineup of five beers currently on tap: Amulet (a sour farmhouse ale conditioned with blueberries and hibiscus flowers); Forever Overhead (a sour India pale ale brewed with wheat and hopped with Citra and Simcoe); Incandeza (a sour ale brewed with two-row barley and raw white wheat); Make Believe (a sour farmhouse ale aged in oak); and Soliel (a sour farmhouse brew with pineapple and marigold flowers). Plans for expansion of the facility are ongoing, and include conversion of the adjoining three-story building into a restaurant and event space by next year. “We had to concentrate on getting the beer flowing first,” Gargiulo notes. “Our plan is to build up the public space as time goes on.” Tasting room hours: Fri 5-10pm, Sat-Sun 2-10pm. —KW

Last year, Bedford 2020, a Westchester County non-profit with a goal to reduce greenhouse gas emissions in the town by 2020, consulted local farmers, food purveyors and residents about their environmental concerns. What they learned was that people had an overwhelming desire to become more informed about their food. As a result, the group created the Bedford 2020 Food Forum, a program of interactive workshops, panel discussions and demonstrations through which people can learn about food, farming and cooking. Among the goals of the forum is to suggest relevant actions people can take regarding their health and food choices. The forum is focused around four topics—Eat, Share, Grow and Buy. Workshops will include how people can influence policies regarding local food, ways to avoid wasting food, the benefits of buying local, how to grow food naturally and much more. New York Times food journalist Mark Bittman and sustainable food educator Michel Nischan will address the forum. The Bedford 2020 Food Forum will be held 8:15am to 3pm on Saturday, March 4, at Fox Lane High School in Bedford. Tickets are $25 and include a “locally-inspired” lunch. For more information, visit bedford2020.org or call (914) 620-2411. —DW

Hudson Valley Brewery 2 Churchill St, Beacon (845) 218-9156; hudsonvalleybrewery.com

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FER MENTAT ION CELEBRAT ION

PICKLED SEOUL FOOD

Salty, spicy, garlicky, healthy—Kimchi has arrived in the Hudson Valley. Insook Cheon, of Insook’s Kimchee & Produce in Plattekil, and Heewon Marshall, of Newburgh’s newest hot spot, Seoul Kitchen, are ready to meet the region’s growing taste for this Korean snack. The blend of spicy, fermented vegetables (traditionally Napa cabbage, onion and garlic) is high in vitamins A and C and loaded with healthy probiotics. Its pungent, funky smell makes it an acquired taste, but once acquired, it can be addictive. More than a condiment but less than a stand-alone dish, kimchi is a staple of the Korean diet. Most Koreans eat kimchi at least twice a day, providing the same (arguably better) health benefits than dairy. “Kimchi is a part of our daily lives. It’s a very traditional dish,” Marshall says. “Each table in every family has a unique kimchi.” There are endless variations of kimchi, from traditional Napa cabbage, Korean daikon radish, even white kimchi made without the traditional chili pepper-based sauce. Both Cheon and Marshall admit that making kimchi involves time-consuming preparation, patience and science. “It depends on the weather,” Marshall confides. “In the wintertime when I make kimchi, it takes about three to five days of non-refrigerated fermentation before you can smell something starting to happen. During the summer, it only takes one day without refrigeration for the fermentation to begin.” Cheon adds that temperatures between 60 and 70 degrees are optimal for making kimchi.

After the laborious process of salting, washing, grinding, squeezing, straining, layering and fermenting up to 15 ingredients for a batch of kimchi, it must ferment before it can be enjoyed. Cheon lets her kimchi ferment for about four days; Marshall’s sits for three to five days. Both prefer longfermented kimchi, some which may ferment up to a year. If kimchi becomes dried out or “old,” it can be incorporated into other traditional Korean dishes like kimchee stew, a widely known and loved Korean dish. Cheon offers her customers a few recipes, from a simple sautée with onions and garlic over rice, to dumplings, or rolling it into kimbap, a Korean-style cooked sushi roll. Cheon and Marshall are happy to see the popularity and interest in kimchi and Korean food sprouting in the Hudson Valley. "Usually, diners that come from the city already know about kimchi, but I have found that local people don't know or have never had it," Marshall says. "From my experience, though, people are wowed when they try it." At Seoul Kitchen, Marshall serves kimchi with many dishes, including bibimbap, a rice-based dish with various vegetables, pork, fermented chili sauce and a fried egg; kimchi is served on the side. Cheon, who makes kimchi weekly to keep up with the demand in her store, also takes custom kimchi orders. Currently, she sells six types of kimchi seasonally at $6 for 16 ounces or $10 for 32 ounces. —CS

Insook’s Kimchee & Produce 36 Deyo Dr, Plattekill (845) 797-7637; kimcheenproduce@gmail.com Seoul Kitchen 71 Liberty St, Newburgh (845) 563-0796

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BREW U

BEER-CENTRIC FARE

R AISIN G STAN DAR D S

CREAM OF THE CREAM The Cornucopia Institute, a national nonprofit family farming advocacy group, has named Hawthorne Valley Farm a pioneering biodynamic farm and education center based in Ghent (Columbia County), fifth on a list of more than 150 of the best organic dairies in the country. The list, intended to help consumers find the best milk from small-scale organic farms and to identify farms that promote ethical treatment of animals, is based on how well the dairies meet key organic management practices and criteria. The list, updated annually, is an outgrowth of the institute’s Organic Integrity Project, which examines the intent and implementation of National Organic Standards and acts as a watchdog against corporate and governmental attempts to weaken those standards to benefit industrial dairies. The report also details the threats large industrial organic operations pose to legitimate, small-scale organic dairies. Maintaining the Integrity of Organic Milk: Showcasing Ethical Family Farms Producers and Exposing the Corporate Takeover of Factory Farm Production is available online at cornucopia.org.

Get ready to indulge in beer and food as comfortable as its pub-style atmosphere. The Culinary Institute of America has unveiled its newest pop-up restaurant on campus: the casual, craft beer-driven Post Road Brew House. As an extension of the CIA’s brewery, the restaurant boasts a broad selection of New York beer in addition to brews created right on campus. Incorporating seasonal Hudson Valley fare, its a la carte menu offers staple American comfort food alongside European gastro-classics, from pastrami Reuben sandwiches and burgers to cassoulet and ale-battered fish & chips. Post Road Brew House will remain open for dinner through June 15, and offers lunch from March 24 through May 2. —KW Post Road Brewhouse 1946 Campus Drive, Hyde Park (845) 451-1015 ciarestaurantgroup.com

Hawthorne Valley Farm 327 County Route 21C, Ghent (518) 672-7500; hawthornevalleyfarm.org

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R ECIP E FOR M OT IVAT ION

SPICE IT UP

CARAMELIZED SEA SCALLOPS WITH SPINACH Ingredients 2 tablespoons Stacey Hawkins Luscious Lemon Oil 1 3/4 pounds large sea scallops 1/2 cup vegetable or chicken broth 4 tablespoons Stacey Hawkins Balsamic Mosto Cotto serves 4

In 2003, Stacey Hawkins weighed almost 300 pounds. Overburdened with stress and tired of feeling mentally and physically out of shape, she decided to make changes in her diet. “I realized that the secret to making great-tasting, good food that didn’t leave me feeling bored, fat and frustrated was flavor,” Hawkins says. After identifying the chemicals, preservatives and artificial ingredients used in most flavor enhancers, she created her own flavoring blends of herbs and spices. “One day, one of my friends told me she’d offer me 10 bucks for a bag of ‘the garlic stuff,’” she recalls. “Before I knew it, my product line had been born.” Now 100 pounds lighter, the “Motivational Chef” offers her line of spices and seasoning mixes as a way for people to enjoy food more and feel better about themselves. Based in Newburgh, her preservative-free spice blends are designed to be used with fresh vegetables and meats to make even the simplest dishes delicious. Products include flavoring mixes like Toasted Sesame Ginger Blend, Kickin’ Cajun Seasoning, Cinnamon Chipotle BBQ Dust, Tasty Thai Blend and many more. Hawkins, a CIA-trained chef and author of five cookbooks, encourages people to break out of “food boredom” by trying simple recipes and adding novel or unique flavors. To save time in the kitchen, she suggests taking 15 minutes to plan meals ahead of time. “Dinner can often be made in 20 minutes—but not if you don’t have a plan,” she says. Hawkins recommends working out a weekly schedule. “If you know Tuesday night is a late night, then you need to plan a meal that allows you to throw everything in the crockpot in the morning, so dinner will be ready when you come home.” Spice mixes, flavorings, oils, cookbooks and other products are available online at staceyhawkins.com. —DW Stacey Hawkins (800) 524-0868 staceyhawkins.com

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Method 1. In a large sauté pan, heat oil over high heat until sizzling. 2. Place scallops in the pan one at a time, flat side down. 3. Cook scallops over high heat until they are brown and caramelized--about 3 to 4 minutes. (They are ready to flip over when they release without sticking to the pan--if they stick, they’re not ready.) 5. Flip scallops over and cook for 1 more minute, then remove them from the pan to a serving plate. 6. Put the pan back over high heat and add broth. Deglaze by gently scraping all brown bits off the bottom. 6. Add Balsamic Mosto Cotto, stir and simmer until liquid is reduced by half. To serve: Place scallops over a portion of garlic-wilted spinach or cauliflower rice and drizzle with sauce. ROASTED GARLIC-WILTED SPINACH

Ingredients 2 tablespoons Stacey Hawkins Roasted Garlic Oil 12 cups baby spinach, rinsed 1 tablespoon Stacey Hawkins Garlic and Spring Onion Seasoning serves 4 Method 1. In an 8-quart pot, heat oil over high heat until sizzling. 2. Add spinach and seasoning and toss to coat. 3. Put a lid on the pot and remove from heat. Let stand for 3 minutes. 4. Remove lid and toss the spinach well. It should be bright green and just wilted.


OPENINGS

Red Zebra 31 Beekman Ave, Sleepy Hollow (914) 909-6151 redzebrasleepyhollow.com “It’s not Italian-American—it’s not just spaghetti and meatballs,” says Beau Widener, Director of Culinary Operations for ERL Hospitality, the restaurant group responsible for opening Red Zebra in Sleepy Hollow. Widener, along with restaurant owners David Starkey and Neil Benson, and Chef de Cuisine Matt Raymond, are providing Hudson Valley diners with a modern approach to Italian cuisine. Already famous for its daily handmade pastas, Red Zebra is incorporating regional flavors and ingredients to create unique Italian dishes. Widener and his team source from all over the valley— including Stone Barns Center in Pocantico Hills, Blooming Hill Farm in Blooming Grove, Hilltop Hanover in Yorktown Heights and Fazio Farms in Modena—to create menu items like pappardelle with braised oxtail ragu and local soft poached egg. Guests can relax for lunch and dinner in the 40-seat dining room or grab a beverage at the bar and cocktail space. The beverage program complements Red Zebra’s high-end cuisine as well. “We have a wine cellar that feeds an extensive Italian wine list,” Widener notes. “There are also some really great cocktails at the bar, as well as a selection of Italian and domestic beers.” Starting this spring, Red Zebra will offer patio dining, as well as a weekend brunch service. Sun-Thu 11:30 am –9:30 pm; Fri, Sat 11:30am –10 pm

Knaus Gallery & Wine Bar 76 Vineyard Ave, Highland (845) 834-3144 The Beacon Hotel Restaurant 424 Main St, Beacon (845) 765-2208 Housed in the shell of the nineteenthcentury Dibble House on Main Street, the newly-debuted Beacon Hotel Restaurant is continuing the site’s historic record for hospitality. Owners Greg Trautman, a Brooklyn restaurateur, and Alla Kormilitsyna, an Upper West Side restoration specialist, emphasize eloquence with this hip bar and restaurant downstairs from the renovated 12-room hotel, set to open this spring. The interior by Clodagh Design evokes the city’s industrial past, while high ceilings mixed with warm wood tones, exposed brick and elegant backlighting make for a sophisticated but comfortable setting. “Local” is emphasized throughout, from a New York cheese board and small plates (like pork belly and scallop with maple gastrique and sweet potato purée), to the Locals Only cocktail (Beacon Bourbon from Dennings Point Distillery, Drink More Good Orange Pop and Dutch’s Spirits Colonial Bitters). Executive Chef Matt Hutchins, formerly of The Hop, offers an array of large plates, too, including his signature chicken liver pâté. While the drink and dinner scene is a focus, watch for brunch offerings in the near future. Bar: Wed-Thu 4 –11pm; Fri 4 – midnight; Sat 5– midnight; Sun 5 –11pm. Dinner: Wed, Thu, Sun 5 –10 pm; Fri, Sat 5 –11pm

“Honestly, it’s all about the wine,” says Sarah Knaus, the owner of Highland’s newest art/nosh/wine spot. In late December, she and her daughter, Nisa (chef/co-owner), opened Knaus Gallery & Wine Bar to bring a multi-sensual experience to the area. “We really want to represent local artists, while also providing visitors with a relaxing atmosphere to enjoy the art,” Sarah says. Nisa’s menu will stress seasonal and local products. A self-taught chef, she says her dishes are “comfort food,” inspired by how she and her mom eat at home: vegetarian soups, home-made flatbreads, housemade hummus, smoked salmon and trout, and daily cheese and charcuterie boards featuring homemade wine crackers from local baker Jennifer Dellerba. The wine list is expansive and a point of pride for Sarah. “My wine lists have always been very well rounded,” she stresses. “I like to find really good, affordable but high quality wines from all over the world.” Also offered are lunch specials, wine-andcheese pairings and flights of wine. Wed-Sun, noon –9 pm

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ZAGAT RATED “EXTRAORDINARY”

$1995

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Modern American Cuisine + Inspired Cocktails 12 Beers on Tap Private Banquet Room

Serving Lunch + Dinner Sunday Brunch Closed Tues

63 North Front St. in historic Uptown Kingston 845.259.5868 • redwooduptown.com

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UP CLOSE

dottie audrey’ s bakery kitchen

by kristen warfield photos by eva deitch MARCH march –– MAY may

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J

UST INSIDE THE DOORS TO D OTTIE A UDREY ’ S Bakery Kitchen in Tuxedo, Jennifer Jenkins, who coowns the eatery with her husband Patrick, buzzes away at the baker’s station behind a wall of refurbished, mismatched windows. Overhead lights made from old tea kettles shine down on the bakery case and a fire-engine red espresso machine. The blue-gray main counter, crafted from old doors, stretches across the front, seamlessly joining the clusters of barnwood tables in the dining area. Family heirlooms and old photographs cover the walls. Dottie and Audrey would approve. “That’s my mother, shaking her butcher knife at us!” Patrick laughs, pointing to a photo of Dottie. “This is sort of a way of them staying with us every day.” Jennifer and Patrick moved to the area from Philadelphia 11 years ago, settling into an old farmhouse in Highland Mills, from where Patrick commuted every day to his job as an executive with the Manhattan branch of Belgium’s famed Le Pain Quotidien. (The commuting ordeal eventually took its toll, however: Patrick retired before turning 50. “There’s a point of diminishing return,” he says, then admits, “I was itching to get back into the kitchen.”)

Patrick’s mother was well known for having a seat at the table for every stray there was, human or animal. The couple recognized the need for good, wholesome food in Tuxedo, a high-traffic area with only a handful of dining options, none of them offering farm-fresh, home-style fare. They set their eyes on the newly built Duck Cedar Plaza, just north of Tuxedo Park on Route 17. “The biggest leap of faith for us was whether people would want to eat the way we eat,” Jennifer, a Cornell School of Hotel Management graduate, says. “People told us that since there wasn’t much else around, everyone would just fly by us at 65 miles per hour. We gave them a reason to hit the brakes.” Business at Dottie Audrey’s quickly bustled soon after it opened in October 2015. Two months later, the couple unveiled Keystone Hoagies, a retro, 24 24

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Pennsylvania-inspired hoagie and grinder joint right next door. The husband-wife duo blended their strong suits (he cooks, she bakes) to create a well-thought, bistrostyle menu centered around good, fresh, simple ingredients. Local eggs and seasonal produce from Blooming Hill Farm are featured throughout the always-evolving menu. Aromatic spreads of scratchmade muffins, scones and cookies are daily features, as are the house-made beverages (assorted teas, limeand lemonades and kombucha). Dottie Audrey’s offers a balanced mix of health and comfort food; at Keystone, diners can get their fill of piled-high, meaty hoagies with fresh-cut fries. Both spots enforce the legacy of Dottie and Audrey: good meals made from equal parts love and muscle. Growing up in western Pennsylvania, Patrick says he was constantly surrounded by good food, and a lot of it. His mother was well known for having a seat at the table for every stray there was, human or animal. The mother of seven children (23 grandkids), she was always cooking for a full house. “Dottie never cooked for less than 20 people at once,” Patrick says. “That’s just who she was—right up until her passing, she was cooking that much.” (A love for hosting seems to run in the family: Patrick fondly remembers his tiny grandmother, Violet, who could “cook like a Viking.”) Jennifer, born and raised on Long Island, had a similarly talented home chef in her life. Audrey, her mother, was a full-time teacher raised in England, had a knack for baking bread, scones and other treats and found joy in having a house filled with people to feed and entertain. Jennifer remembers the special, scratch-made birthday cakes her mother made each year. “For my mom, it was just as much about the good food as it was about getting people together around the table,” she says. “[At Dottie Audrey’s], we’re doing the same thing.” All the food at Dottie

the old neighborhood The stretch of Route 17 just north of the gates to Tuxedo Park historically had been home to two dining spots, each famous in its own right, but for different reasons. The near-legendary Duck Cedar Inn, opened in 1960, was on the short list of the Hudson Valley’s finest restaurants for nearly 40 years. It is the namesake of Duck Cedar Plaza, which includes Dottie Audrey’s and Keystone Hoagies. A couple of miles farther north, the Red Apple Rest, opened in 1931, defined the term “fast food” long before it was popularized by chain restaurants. Before the Thruway bypassed traffic around the village, it was an immensely popular halfway-stop for sports figures, entertainers and weekenders headed from the City and northern Jersey to the Catskills. It closed in 2006; the remains of the famous (or infamous, depending on your taste) restaurant have been condemned. —JN

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Simple but meaningful touches emit charm and comfort, and are central to making Dottie Audrey’s feel like home.

Audrey’s is scratchmade, straight down to each salad dressing—“simple goodness,” Jennifer calls it. Limited ingredients, with unlimited flavor and ease, make for food and a sense of place wrapped in familiarity and warmth. Inspired by family bread-making talents and Patrick’s experience, it seems only natural that housemade bread be featured in nearly every dish, as well. Wholesome and crisp, the breads are naturally leavened and baked with King Arthur’s organic flour. The malted wheat bread (a family recipe) hosts many sandwiches and toasts; a sliced baguette accompanies soups, salads and omelets. “Traditionally, sourdough rye pairs well with a Reuben, but we really love it with our wild mushroom toast,” Patrick says. “You get this really delicious, crunchy, mushroom-y sandwich. And that all started from wondering, ‘What does this bread taste like it wants to be?’” The breakfast menu is both meaningful and rich, from the seasonally available shishito pepper scramble to Piper’s Pancakes (named after their 13-year-old daughter)—fluffy, homemade buttermilk pancakes served with maple syrup, housemade caramel butter and house-cured Irish bacon. The Gardener’s Wife, a best seller for both breakfast and brunch, is a clean vegetarian trio of seasoned ricotta, herbed egg salad and avocado mash served with house-made bread and greens. Classic lunch combos of soup, salad and sandwich range from vegan chickpea, barley and mushroom stew to hot, shaved Angus beef on a brioche roll. “One thing you won’t find here, though, are heaps of fried potatoes,” Patrick stresses. “A nice side of greens with most dishes keeps you from feeling like you need to take a nap afterwards.” Simple but meaningful touches, like the rack of Etch-a-Sketches in the dining room and the small cartoons lacquered onto the undersides of tables, emit charm and comfort, and are central to making Dottie Audrey’s feel like home—something the family matriarchs always did for others. “We love the feeling of having people around,” Jennifer says. “This morning, I walked in to see customers—strangers before we opened—just chatting and getting along. I thought how nice it is to have created this place where people can gather and enjoy food.” When asked what Dottie and Audrey would think of the restaurant if they could see it today, Patrick grins. “I’m sure they would have pointers,” he says. 4 Dottie Audrey’s Bakery Kitchen 549 Route 17, Tuxedo Park (845) 915-3088; dottieaudreys.com

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MUSHROOM TOAST DOTTIE AUDREY’S BAKERY KITCHEN Ingredients 31⁄2 cups all-purpose flour 1 tablespoon baking powder 1 ⁄2 teaspoon kosher salt 8 tablespoons unsalted butter, softened 1 ⁄2 cup granulated sugar 3 ⁄4 cup whole milk (you may need an additional 1 to 2 tablespoons milk) 1 to 2 cups currants 1 egg, beaten 2 tablespoons decorating sugar Method Preheat oven to 400˚F. 1. In a mixing bowl fitted with a paddle attachment, combine the flour, baking powder, salt and butter until it reaches the fine crumb stage. 2. Add the sugar and combine. 3. Add enough milk to form a firm dough that leaves the sides of the mixing bowl clean. If it is too dry, you may need to add 1 to 2 tablespoons additional milk. 4. Transfer the dough to a lightly floured work surface and roll into a rectangle about 16 inches by 20 inches. 5. Sprinkle currants over half the surface. Fold the other half over it and roll it out again into a large rectangle. The dough should be about 1⁄8inch thick. 6. Cut dough into rectangular pieces. Lightly score each rectangle in half on both the vertical and horizontal axis (be careful to not cut all the way through). This will allow the cookie to be easily broken into smaller pieces. 7. Place on a lined baking sheet and brush with egg wash. 8. Sprinkle with sugar. 9. Bake at 400˚F for 10 minutes or until just slightly brown. Cool on a wire rack and enjoy with a cup of tea.

CARAWAY IRISH SODA BREAD DOTTIE AUDREY’S BAKERY KITCHEN Ingredients 31⁄2 cups all purpose flour (King Arthur “Sir Galahad”) 11⁄4 cups cake flour (King Arthur “Guinevere”) 1 ⁄2 cup granulated sugar 3 ⁄4 teaspoon baking soda 3 ⁄4 teaspoon cream of tartar 3 ⁄4 teaspoon kosher salt 4 tablespoons unsalted butter, softened slightly 1 egg, large 11⁄4 cups buttermilk 1 cup raisins 1 tablespoon caraway seeds 1 tablespoon salted butter, melted Method Preheat oven to 350°F. 1. In a mixing bowl, combine flours, sugar, baking soda, cream of tartar and salt. 2. Break butter into small pieces and cut into flour mixture until butter is in pea-size pieces. 3. In a separate bowl, combine egg, buttermilk, raisins and caraway seeds. 4. Add wet ingredients to dry. Be careful to not overmix. 5. Shape dough into a round and score with a simple X. 6. Bake in 350˚F oven 30 to 35 minutes. Immediately after taking bread from oven, brush it with the melted butter and allow to cool.

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GARIBALDI COOKIES DOTTIE AUDREY’S BAKERY KITCHEN

VEGAN CHICKPEA, BARLEY & MUSHROOM SOUP DOTTIE AUDREY’S BAKERY KITCHEN Ingredients 2 tablespoons Canola oil 2 cups white onion, diced 1 cup carrot, 1⁄4-inch dice ½ cup celery, diced (include leafy centers and tops) 2 pounds button mushrooms, thin slice 1 clove fresh garlic, minced 1 teaspoon fresh thyme, chopped 2 14-ounce cans chickpeas or garbanzos, drained and rinsed (save the liquid for vegan meringue) 4 cups vegetable stock (or use low-sodium chicken stock for non-vegan version) 2 cups water 1 cup pearled barley 1 tablespoon fresh parsley, chopped salt and pepper to taste serves 6–8 Method 1. Heat oil in stock pot or Dutch oven. Add onions, celery and carrots and sauté over medium-high heat for 5 minutes. Season with salt and pepper. 2. Add mushrooms and thyme and continue to sauté until most of the water has been purged from the mushrooms, about 8 to 10 minutes. 3. Add garlic and sauté until fragrant, about 30 seconds. 4. Add the drained, rinsed chickpeas to the pot, then immediately add vegetable stock and heat through. Scrape up any bits from the bottom of the pot. 5. Add the water and barley and bring to a boil. 6. Reduce heat cover and simmer 20 to 30 minutes, until the barley has taken up liquid and softened.

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Ingredients 31⁄2 cups all-purpose flour 1 tablespoon baking powder 1 ⁄2 teaspoon kosher salt 8 tablespoons unsalted butter, softened 1 ⁄2 cup granulated sugar 3 ⁄4 cup whole milk (you may need an additional 1 to 2 tablespoons milk) 1 to 2 cups currants 1 egg, beaten 2 tablespoons decorating sugar Method Preheat oven to 400°F. 1. In a mixing bowl fitted with a paddle attachment, combine the flour, baking powder, salt and butter until it reaches the fine crumb stage. 2. Add the sugar and combine. 3. Add enough milk to form a firm dough that leaves the sides of the mixing bowl clean. If it is too dry, you may need to add 1 to 2 tablespoons additional milk. 4. Transfer the dough to a lightly floured work surface and roll into a rectangle about 16 inches by 20 inches. 5. Sprinkle currants over half the surface. Fold the other half over it and roll it out again into a large rectangle. The dough should be about 1 ⁄8-inch thick. 6. Cut dough into rectangular pieces. Lightly score each rectangle in half on both the vertical and horizontal axis (be careful to not cut all the way through). This will allow the cookie to be easily broken into smaller pieces. 7. Place on a lined baking sheet and brush with egg wash. 8. Sprinkle with sugar. 9. Bake at 400˚F for 10 minutes or until just slightly brown. Cool on a wire rack and enjoy with a cup of tea.


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to dine and delight

Reserve your spot at Westchester’s top tables. Westchester County is a premiere dining destination with a robust menu of restaurants to satisfy every appetite. Whether you’re in the mood for breathtaking waterfront views, charming historic ambiance, sleek and modern new spaces or farm-to-table freshness, Westchester is a culinary gem in the Hudson Valley.

Founded in 1945, you may know the Supreme Oil Company. We are a world leader in high quality vegetable oil-related products for the food services market. What you may not know is that we also offer hundreds of retail packaged food products, made with farm fresh ingredients, that are reversing the trend of high cost for quality food in America’s local markets.

Meet and explore Westchester County at VisitWestchesterNY.com

WHERE BEER AND FUN ARE ALWAYS ON TAP! Unique CIA Brews • Local Craft Beers • Adventurous Wine and Spirits • Exceptional Gastro Pub Fare

POP-UP RESTAURANT IS OPEN TUESDAY–SATURDAY Dinner: February 16–June 15 • 5–8:30 p.m. | Lunch: March 24–May 4 • 11:30 a.m.– 1 p.m.

DROP IN OR MAKE A RESERVATION postroadbrewhouse.com or 845-451-1015 1946 Campus Drive (Route 9), Hyde Park, NY on the campus of The Culinary Institute of America

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$22.95 $32.95 LUNCH DINNER

The Valley Table Presents Hudson Valley Restaurant Week

I

t’s a celebration. it’s an adventure. it’s a chance

to cross everything off your bucket list. It’s Hudson Valley Restaurant Week. Whether you’re a local, a daytripper or a tourist, this week is a must-do. It’s when the top restaurants, producers and purveyors in the Hudson Valley—all that you’ve been savoring in this magazine— make a place for you at their table. With prix fixe menus, locally sourced ingredients and

exquisitely crafted libations, it’s time to experience the full circle food revolution happening in the Hudson Valley. As always, The Valley Table is pleased to be your guide. Check out our participating restaurants and the sponsors that make it all possible. Visit hudsonvalleyrestaurantweek.com for details and to make your reservations. In the Hudson Valley, you don’t have to travel far to be transported. Enjoy! march

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THE VALLE Y TABLE’S HUDSON VALLE Y RESTAUR ANT WEEK

PARTICIPATING RESTAURANTS AS OF PRESS TIME

KEY: L LUNCH $22.95  D DINNER $32.95   T CONVENIENT TO METRO-NORTH X EXCLUSIONS APPLY

Visit HudsonValleyRestaurantWeek.com for menus, directions, updates and last-minute changes. 121 RESTAURANT L D X 2 Dingle Ridge Rd, North Salem (914) 669-0121; 121restaurant.com This popular gathering spot embraces comfort foods, with freshness and simplicity in a farmhouse setting. 251 LEX L D T 251 Lexington Ave, Mount Kisco (914) 218-8156; 251lex.com From the owner of 8 North Broadway comes locally inspired Mediterranean cuisine in a twostory, century-old Victorian transformed to a warm contemporary setting. 273 KITCHEN L D T 273 Halstead Ave, Harrison (914) 732-3333; 273kitchen.com An intimate Mediterranean bistro offers a locally sourced, super-seasonal menu of fresh seafood and grass-fed meats. Known for its small plates. 76 HOUSE L D X 110 Main St, Tappan (845) 359-5476; 76house.com "America's oldest tavern," built in 1686, features the cuisine of celebrated chef Doug Mulholland and live entertainment. 8 NORTH BROADWAY L D X 8 N Broadway, Nyack (845) 353-1200; 8northbroadway.com This Mediterranean restaurant offers a changing menu “inspired by local farms and neighborhood friends.” 808 BISTRO L D T 808 Scarsdale Ave, Scarsdale (914) 722-0808; the808bistro.com This “neighborhood restaurant with a downtown feel” serves chicken, fish, shrimp and veal with a light Italian touch.

HOW IT WORKS

AMICI’S L D T 35 Main St, Poughkeepsie (845) 452-4700; amicis-restaurant.com Enjoy Italian-American cuisine and views of the Mid-Hudson Bridge and the Hudson River. Restaurant, pizzeria and a downstairs lounge with a full bar and casual dining. AMERICAN BOUNTY L D 1946 Campus Dr, Hyde Park 845-471-6608; ciarestaurants.com By consciously focusing on regional and seasonal products, the American Bounty Restaurant offers contemporary and traditional dishes brought to life in an honest and flavorful way. A TAVOLA TRATTORIA D 46 Main St, New Paltz (845) 255-1426; atavolany.com A simple Italian trattoria, focusing on fresh, local produce and ingredients in a rustic, family-style atmosphere. AQUATERRA GRILLE L D X 420 N Middletown Rd, Pearl River (845) 920-1340; aquaterragrille.com Casual family eatery boasting an extensive menu of modern American fare from the sea (Aqua) and land (Terra). ARMONK HOUSE L D 111 Bedford Rd, Armonk (914) 219-5860; armonkhouseny.com Serving up American cuisine in a relaxed, convivial setting with a wide craft beer and wine selection. AROMA OSTERIA D X 114 Old Post Rd, Wappingers Falls (845) 298-6790; aromaosteriarestaurant.com Classic rustic Italian with an emphasis on Southern Italy. Enjoy a romantic and relaxed atmosphere with an elegant cocktail bar.

A LOOK AT WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW FOR SPRING 2017 HVRW

Participating restaurants offer a three-course, prix fixe dinner menu for $32.95 per person, and may offer a three-course lunch menu for $22.95 per person (plus tax, beverage and gratuity). Find the complete listing of Spring HVRW restaurant participants at HudsonValleyRestaurantWeek.com. Reservations are strongly encouraged (and required by many restaurants). For those offering on-line reservations through Open Table, simply click on “Book Now.” For others, simply call the restaurant directly to make reservations.

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AUGIE’S PRIME CUT D 3436 Lexington Ave, Mohegan Lake (914) 743-1357; augiesprimecut.com A staple in the local community, favorites at this popular steak and seafood house include prime rib, Porterhouse and fresh lobster. BAJA 328 TEQUILA BAR L D T X 328 Main St, Beacon (845) 838-2252; baja328.com Beacon hot spot offering over 110 tequilas to accompany authentic Southwestern cuisine. BEEHIVE RESTAURANT L D 30 Old Rt 22, Armonk (914) 765-0688; beehive-restaurant.com Designed by a family that loves to cook, this family-friendly restaurant serves Continental and American classics in the heart of Armonk. BENJAMIN STEAKHOUSE D X 610 Hartsdale Ave, White Plains (914) 428-6868; benjaminsteakhouse.com Serious steaks created by an alumnus of the venerable Peter Luger restaurant in a handsome setting with a central fireplace. BISTRO Z D 455 S Broadway, Tarrytown (914) 524-6411; bistroz.com Conveniently located in the DoubleTree Hotel, offering casual comfort, fireside dining and an American menu blending fresh ingredients with an imaginative presentation. BIRDSALL HOUSE L D T 970 Main St, Peekskill (914) 930-1880; birdsallhouse.net New American cuisine with a twist in a craftbeer gastropub. The menu brings together extraordinary local farming resources and seasonal foods of New York State. BLU POINTE L D X 120 Front St, Newburgh (845) 568-0100; blu-pointe.com This seafood-focused venue features a menu of the freshest products available, a contemporary lounge with fireplace, set right on the Hudson River. BOCUSE RESTAURANT L D 1946 Campus Dr, Hyde Park (845) 471-6608; bocuserestaurant.com This Culinary Institute of America restaurant re-imagines classic French cuisine using modern techniques with a new style accompanied by casual yet sophisticated service. BORO 6 WINE BAR L D X 548 Warburton Ave, Hastings on Hudson (914) 231-9200; boro6winebar.com Intimate wine bar and restaurant serving over 20 wines by the glass in addition to craft beers and ciders. Offering small plates in addition to dinner menu.

KEY: l LUNCH $22.95  d DINNER $32.95  t CONVENIENT TO METRO-NORTH x EXCLUSIONS APPLY


M ARCH 6 –19, 2017

BRASSERIE 292 D 292 Main St, Poughkeepsie (845) 473-0292; brasserie292.com Serving classic brasserie fare: duck confit, steak frites and cassoulet. Transports diners to the heart of Paris, right down to the look of the menu.

CHOPHOUSE GRILLE D X 957 Rt 6, Mahopac (845) 628-8300; thechophousegrille.com A comfortable bar/lounge offers a selection of craft beers and specialty cocktails to go along with handpicked, aged steaks and fresh seafood offerings.

THE BRIAR’S RESTAURANT L D 512 North State Road, Briarcliff Manor (914) 762-3424; thebriarsrestaurant.com Offering “down-home” traditional American fare with a touch of Mediterranean influence.

CITY LIMITS DINER L D T X 200 Central Ave, White Plains (914) 686-9000; citylimitsdiner.com Redefining the American diner with a menu of comforting, sophisticated dishes, from housesmoked meats to gourmet pastries.

BROADWAY BISTRO L D X 3 S Broadway, Nyack (845) 353-8361; 3broadwaybistro.com Authentic Tuscan cuisine with dishes ranging from terrine of eggplant to cavatelli, broccoli rabe pesto and sweet Italian sausage. BV’S GRILL AT THE TIME NYACK L D X 400 High Ave, Nyack (845) 675-8740; bvsgrill.com A modern take on the classic American Grill featuring fresh fish and 28-day dry-aged steaks, local draft beer, cocktails, and an extensive wine list. CAFE AMARCORD D X 276 Main St, Beacon (845) 440-0050; cafeamarcord.com Creative New American cuisine with Italian undertones, served in a warm atmosphere. Enjoy an artisanal cocktail at the onyx bar before having dinner in the bistro-style dining room or on the Main Street terrace. Bring colleagues for a casual lunch, or a date for a romantic night out.

Eastchester Fish Gourmet CATSKILL MOUNTAINS RESORT D 211 Mail Rd, Barryville (845) 456-0195; catskillmountainresort.com From the Mountains of Lorraine, France, to the Catskill Mountains. Enjoy American French Fusion cuisine at this relaxing mountainside resort. CEDAR STREET GRILL L D T X 23 Cedar St, Dobbs Ferry (914) 674-0706; cedarstreetgrillny.com A fine selection of American-themed fare and artisanal beers. Cozy and welcoming offering dishes made with simple, honest ingredients.

CAFÉ OF LOVE L D T 38 E Main St, Mount Kisco (914) 242-1002; cafeofloveny.com New American fare taking local ingredients on a global adventure. #localtastesbetter

CELLAR 49 L D X 49 East Sunnyside Ln, Tarrytown (914) 591-3183; tarrytownhouseestate.com Fine “tavern food” in the cellar of the Biddle Mansion within the Tarrytown House Estate. Offers a casual, energetic atmosphere and wine cellar.

CAFFE REGATTA D 133 Wolfs Ln, Pelham (914) 738-8686; cafferegatta.com Ready to redefine American cuisine with Italian influences, Chef Anthony Labriola is working with the freshest seafood to create dishes like Seafood Spaghetti.

CENA 2000 L D 50 Front St, Newburgh (845) 561-7676; cena2000.com Cena 2000 juxtaposes an upscale Mediterranean menu and a serious wine list with Hudson River views on the Newburgh waterfront.

CANTERBURY BROOK INN D X 331 Main St, Cornwall (845) 534-9658; canterburybrookinn.com Hosts Hans and Kim Baumann offer fine Swiss continental cuisine featuring veal, duck, chicken, Schnitzel, pasta, filet mignon, fresh fish and much more. Enjoy a fabulous dessert while sipping a frothing cappuccino or espresso. Specializing in both on- and off-premise catering. Outdoor brookside dining available, reservations suggested.

CHAR D T X 2 S Water St, Greenwich, CT (203) 900-1100; charct.com A sister restaurant to Dolphin, this upscale yet casual restaurant offers contemporary American cuisine in a setting to match.

CARLO’S ITALIAN RESTAURANT L D 179 Main St, New Rochelle (914) 793-1458; carlosrestaurant.net A family-run Italian restaurant serving all the classics including chicken Paolo, shrimp oreganata, and veal Portofino. CATHRYN’S TUSCAN GRILL L D T 91 Main St, Cold Spring (845) 265-5582; tuscangrill.com Romantic and whimsical with an Italian menu that leans toward the north. The wine list is extensive and the welcome is warm.

HUDSONVALLEYRESTAURANTWEEK.COM

CHAR STEAKHOUSE & BAR D 151 Bryant Pond Rd, Mahopac (845) 526-1200; charsteakhouseandbar.com Casual dining with a classic steakhouse feel. The menu centers on dry-aged steaks and fresh seafood yet offers options for every taste.

CLOCK TOWER GRILL L D X 512 Clock Tower Dr, Brewster (845) 582-0574; clocktowergrill.com In a renovated barn setting, the atmosphere is casual yet sophisticated. A farm-to-table menu features rustic American cuisine, including prime burgers, lobster mac and cheese, and osso buco. COMMUNAL KITCHEN D X 162 Main St, Nyack (845) 535-3133; communalkitchennyack.com Drawing inspiration from local, organic products, chef and owner, Jed Gidaly, serves globally inspired cuisine accompanied by handcrafted cocktails, small production wines and local craft beers. THE COOKERY D T 39 Chestnut St, Dobbs Ferry (914) 305-2336; thecookeryrestaurant.com Neighborhood eatery serves a neo-nostalgic menu, capturing the warmth of Italian comfort food while using sustainable products. COOPER’S MILL L D 670 White Plains Rd, Tarrytown 914-333-1216; coopersmillrestaurant.com A diverse menu ranging from signature flatbreads to entrees featuring meat and seafood from local purveyors. Offers the regions best bourbons and vodkas and features a diverse and eclectic wine list. COPACABANA STEAKHOUSE L D 29 N Main St, Port Chester (914) 939-6894; copacabanasteakhouse.com Authentic Brazilian steakhouse offering the traditional all-you-can-eat meat parade, or rodizio. THE CORNER RESTAURANT AT HOTEL TIVOLI D 53 Broadway, Tivoli 845-757-2100; hoteltivoli.org Just east of the Hudson River lies the Corner Restaurant at Hotel Tivoli. Stop in for a Mediterranean-inspired menu prepared with local meat, dairy and produce.

EAT. SHARE. WIN. Dine out at your favorite HVRW restaurant

CHAT 19 L D T 19 Chatsworth Ave, Larchmont (914) 833-8871; chat19.net A casual, relaxed atmosphere to enjoy owner Mario Fava’s selection of grilled food, seafood, appetizers and salads.

Photograph your meal, your classy cocktail or that perfect bite—then share it! Tag us @valleytable & #HVRW

CHAT AMERICAN GRILL L D T 1 Christie Pl, Scarsdale (914) 722-4000; chatamericangrill.com Enjoy a meal by the fireplace, or watch the game on one of three flat-screen TVs at this allAmerican grill, sister to Chat 19. #HVRW

You’ll be automatically entered to win some tasty prizes.

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CORTLANDT COLONIAL MANOR D 714 Old Albany Post Rd, Cortlandt Manor (914) 739-3900; cortlandtcolonial.com Reminiscent of a private country estate, the menu offers a wide range of American favorites, from seafood to beef.

DISH BISTRO & WINE BAR L D X 947 S Lake Blvd, Mahopac (845) 621-3474; dishmahopac.com Chef Peter A. Milano adds his own flair to classic and modern cuisines, with dishes capitalizing on local seasonal produce.

COSIMO’S WOODBURY L D 100 County Rt 32, Central Valley (845) 928-8265; cosimoswoodbury.com Casual and contemporary Italian cuisine with some of the world’s best wines. Warm, friendly and sophisticated atmosphere in four uniquely designed locations.

DOLPHIN L D T 1 Van Der Donck St, Yonkers (914) 751-8170; dolphinrbl.com On the banks of the Hudson River and decorated in dramatic, modern fashion, Dolphin’s menu draws liberally and fittingly from the sea.

COSIMO’S BRICK OVEN L D 620 Rt 211 E, Middletown (845) 692-3242; cosimosmiddletown.com COSIMO’S ON UNION L D 1217 Rt 300 (Union Ave) Newburgh (845) 567-1556; cosimosunion.com COSIMO’S TRATTORIA L D X 120 Delafield St, Poughkeepsie (845) 485-7172; cosimospoughkeepsie.com CRABTREE’S KITTLE HOUSE L D X 11 Kittle Rd, Chappaqua (914) 666-8044; kittlehouse.com Stately country inn, emphasizing hospitality, offering a modern American menu and one of the world’s finest wine lists.

Ramiro’s 954 CRAVE RESTAURANT & LOUNGE D T 129 Washington St, Poughkeepsie (845) 452-3501; craverestaurantandlounge.com Known for its contemporary American cuisine, new-urban setting, attentive service and warmth. Located just under the Walkway Over the Hudson. DELFINO’S ITALIAN RESTAURANT L D 60 Halstead Ave, Harrison (914) 835-2535; dineatdelfinosny.com Italian cuisine in a laid-back atmosphere with an extensive selection of fine wines. DINO’S VIGNETO CAFE L D X 80 Vineyard Ave, Highland (845) 834-2828; vignetocafe.com A neighborhood Italian eatery. Stop in for freshly homemade pasta and classic dishes. Whole wheat and gluten-free pastas available.

DUBROVNIK RESTAURANT L D T X 721 Main St, New Rochelle (914) 637-3777; dubrovnikny.com Authentic Croatian cuisine with a farm-to-table, sea-to-table approach. Known for its seafood and its authentic wine list. EASTCHESTER FISH GOURMET L D X 837 White Plains Rd, Scarsdale (914) 725-3450; eastchesterfish.com This popular cosmopolitan restaurant (and fish market) provides a bounty of seafood praised by even the staunchest New England foodies and delicious house-made pastas too. ELEVEN 11 GRILLE & SPIRITS D X 1111 Main St, Fishkill (845) 896-0011; eleven11grille.com Comfort food, pub favorites, pasta, steaks and daily specials in a homey tavern complete with exposed beams and bricks.

Good times . . . Good people . . . At HVFCU, we support the businesses and organizations that make our community a great place to live, work, and dine. It’s one of the reasons we’re the financial partner trusted by so many of our neighbors for more than 50 years.

There’s a Reason People Bank Here

hvfcu.org | 845.463.3011

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EMILIO RISTORANTE L D T X 1 Colonial Pl, Harrison (914) 835-3100; emilioristorante.com Set in a century old colonial home with rambling dining rooms, featuring house-made pastas, classic antipasto table and seasonal regional Italian menu.

GIULIO’S D 154 Washington St, Tappan (845) 359-3657; giulios.biz A romantic setting complete with fireplaces and candlelight; serves Italian-inspired continental cuisine with extensive gluten-free options.

ELM STREET OYSTER HOUSE L D 11 W. Elm St, Greenwich, CT (203) 629-5795; elmstreetoysterhouse.com Located in the heart of downtown Greenwich, a lively atmosphere with tasty seafood cuisine including clam chowder, crab quesadillas and roasted oysters.

GRAZIELLA’S ITALIAN BISTRO L D T X 99 Church St, White Plains (914) 761-5721; graziellasrestaurant.com Pasta, chicken, lamb, veal, steaks and seafood prepared with an Italian flair and served in a dramatically modern dining room.

FARM TO TABLE BISTRO L D X 1083 Rt. 9, Fishkill (845) 297-1111; Ftbistro.com New American menu is committed to crafted food and the community of farmers and purveyors that provide the freshest seasonally available ingredients.

HALF MOON L D T X 1 High St, Dobbs Ferry (914) 693-4130; halfmoonhudson.com Casual American restaurant with panoramic views as far as Manhattan. Favorites include fresh Montauk seafood and burgers with creative flair.

The Roundhouse

FAT SAL’S BAR & GRILL L D 265 Tate Ave, Buchanan (914) 930-1770; fatsalsbarandgrill.com Whether it's Fat Sal's Porterhouse Chili or Grandma’s Homemade Meatballs, Fat Sal's Bar & Grill has something for everyone.

FRANKIE & JOHNNIE’S STEAKHOUSE L D T X 77 Purchase St, Rye (914) 925-3900; frankieandjohnnies.com Distinguished reputation for the finest steaks, chops and seafood, the menu is classic steakhouse fare. Stylish, sophisticated ambiance.

HARPER’S D T X 92 Main St, Dobbs Ferry (914) 693-2306; harpersonmain.com A hip neighborhood tavern serving American food with an all-American wine list. Simple home cooking using local, seasonal ingredients.

FIG & OLIVE L D T X 696 White Plains Rd, Scarsdale (914) 725-2900; figandolive.com The impossibly chic environs of Manhattan’s meatpacking district transported to suburban Scarsdale, with an invigorated Mediterranean menu.

GAUCHO GRILL L D T X 1 N Broadway, White Plains (914) 437-9966; gauchogrillnewyork.com A one-of-a-kind Argentinean steakhouse with traditional cuisine, international wines and liquors served with impeccable service.

HARVEST-ON-HUDSON L D T X 1 River St, Hastings-on-Hudson (914) 478-2800; harvesthudson.com Overlooking the Hudson River and Palisades, a magnificent Tuscan farmhouse is the perfect setting for inspired Mediterranean cuisine.

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The Hudson Valley

Mill House Brewing Company

FREE TIME? Actually, it’s priceless. Make sure you’re spending it wisely. Come the Hudson Valley. Distinctly Dutchess getaways include local bounty, award-winning wines, farmers’ markets, specialty food shops, The Culinary Institute of America, and multi-ethnic restaurants.

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IL BARILOTTO D X 1113 Main St, Fishkill (845) 897-4300; ilbarilottorestaurant.com An Italian trattoria and wine bar serving an innovative menu with influences from France and Spain in a warm, upbeat setting.

HENRY’S AT THE FARM L D 220 North Rd, Milton (845) 795-1500; henrysatbuttermilk.com A dining destination at the Buttermilk Falls Inn, Henry’s sources locally and from its own 40-acre farm. Elegant cuisine in a charming setting. HITO JAPANESE RESTAURANT L D T 26 E Main St, Mt. Kisco (914) 241-8488; hitorestaurant.com Voted best sushi in Westchester, the menu focuses on a modern interpretation of classic dishes using fresh, quality ingredients.

IL CASTELLO L D X 576 Mamaroneck Ave, Mamaroneck (914) 777-2200; ilcastellomenu.com Specializes in handmade pastas and tableside presentation. Brimming with Old World Italian charm. Serving large portions that “make Mama proud.”

HUDSON HOUSE OF NYACK D X 134 Main St, Nyack (845) 353-1355; hudsonhousenyack.com An antique village hall/jailhouse turned restaurant and bar sets the stage for enjoying refined American cuisine and delicious desserts.

IL CENACOLO L D X 228 S Plank Rd, Newburgh (845) 564-4494; ilcenacolorestaurant.com A dining landmark in the Hudson Valley since 1988, celebrating the simplicity of classic Tuscan cuisine.

HUDSON HOUSE RIVER INN L D T X 2 Main St, Cold Spring (845) 265-9355; hudsonhouseinn.com A historic 1832 landmark serving dry-aged, hand-cut steaks and market-fresh fish on the riverfront. HUDSON’S RIBS AND FISH D 1099 Rt 9, Fishkill (845) 297-5002; hudsonsribsandfish.com Popular steakhouse specializing in hand-cut, aged choice meats, fresh seafood and trademark homemade popovers with strawberry butter.

HUDSONVALLEYRESTAURANTWEEK.COM

Tarry Lodge

THE HUDSON ROOM D T X 23 S Division St, Peekskill (914) 788-3663; hudsonroom.com Dedicated to Hudson Valley sources, serving fresh, fusion cuisine including dishes like grilled sliced bavette steak, seared organic vegetable stir-fry and a wide variety of sushi.

IL SORRISO L D 5 N. Buckhout St, Irvington (914) 591-2525 Warm and inviting, popular Italian restaurant situated on a steep hill overlooking the shores of the Hudson. A unique wine cellar for private parties.

IL FORNO TRATTORIA L D 343 Rt 202, Somers 914-277-7575; ilfornosomers.com Offering traditional Italian cuisine, house-made pastas, brick oven pizza and more. Wide beer and wine selection.

INN AT POUND RIDGE L T X 258 Westchester Ave, Pound Ridge (914) 764-1400; innatpoundridge.com Chef Jean-Georges brings casual elegance to Pound Ridge with a seasonal, farm-to-table menu and a contemporary country atmosphere.

#HVRW

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JORDAN HALL 1083 L D T X 142 Fifth Ave, Pelham (914) 222-5494; jordanhall10803.com Combining sexy New York City chic with a little southern charm, and integrating a truly unique and spectacular combination of Southern Italian specialties with traditional chophouse fare.

MADISON KITCHEN L D T X 7 Madison Ave, Larchmont (914) 732-3024; mklarchmont.com Seasonally inspired cocktails and craft beer complement Chef Di Bona’s assortment of small plates, charcuterie boards and entrées. MELTING POT L D T L X 30 Mamaroneck Ave, White Plains (914) 993-6358; meltingpot.com/white-plains Fun and interactive dining experience featuring a menu of signature fondue dinners.

JOSEPH’S STEAKHOUSE L D 728 Violet Ave (Rt 9G), Hyde Park (845) 473-2333; josephs-steakhouse.com Quality Angus beef selections served with generous sides like garlic mashed potatoes and wild rice. Vintage images of the Sinatra era. KITCHEN SINK FOOD & DRINK D T X 157 Main St, Beacon (845) 765-0240; kitchensinkny.com One of Beacon’s culinary gems features an eclectic mix of global and family-influenced dishes with local ingredients and modern technique. L’INIZIO D X 698 Saw Mill River Rd, Ardsley (914) 693-5400; liniziony.com New York City chefs Scott and Heather Fratangelo offer inventive Italian-inspired, farm-to-table fare with creative desserts and a carefully selected wine menu. LA BOCCA L D T X 8 Church St, White Plains (914) 948-3281; laboccaristorante.com A premium variety of Italian dishes that incorporate ingredients imported from Italy, paired with an expansive selection of local craft beverages and wine served in a cozy atmosphere. LAKEVIEW HOUSE L D X 343 Lakeside Rd, Newburgh (845) 566-7100; thelakeviewhouse.com Enjoy views of Orange Lake while browsing a menu of classic favorites, modern fare and daily specials. Excellent service and cozy atmosphere.

MERITAGE D X 1505 Weaver St, Scarsdale (914) 472-8484; meritagerestaurant.net Chef Chris Vergara brings a New American menu sourced from local purveyors to diners in a warm, comfortable neighborhood restaurant.

Corner Restaurant LE PROVENÇAL BISTRO L D T X 436 Mamaroneck Ave, Mamaroneck (914) 777-2324; provencalbistro.com Mediterranean-French bistro food with a flair that lives up to the French tradition, served in a charming, tastefully decorated dining room. LENNY’S SEAFOOD & STEAKHOUSE L D T 2047 Boston Post Rd, Larchmont (914) 630-7800; lennyssteakhouse.com From Lenny Balidemaj (Il Castello), a popular seafood and steakhouse with Italian flavors and hospitality. LEXINGTON SQUARE CAFE L D T 510 Lexington Ave, Mount Kisco (914) 244-3663; lexingtonsquarecafe.com A unique combination of spacious dining with an intimate feeling. Offers an eclectic menu of American fusion cuisine and a lively bar.

LA LANTERNA L D 23 Grey Oaks Ave, Yonkers (914) 476-3060; lalanterna.com Executive chef Valterio Tarone offers a unique Italian-Swiss menu served in an elegant yet cozy atmosphere.

LIBERTY STREET BISTRO D X 97 Liberty St, Newburgh (845) 562-3900; libertystreetbistro.com Chef/Owner Michael Kelly offers classic Frenchinfluenced cuisine within a contemporary American style restaurant, embracing local flavors in each dish on his menu.

LA PANETIÈRE L D X 530 Milton Rd, Rye (914) 967-8140; lapanetiere.com Southern French cuisine, complemented by an exceptional wine cellar, fresh baked breads and pastries. A Westchester landmark restaurant.

LIMONCELLO AT ORANGE INN L D 159–167 Main St, Goshen (845) 294-1880; limoncelloatorangeinn.com The historic Orange Inn (the oldest operating in Orange County) offers a northern Italian menu with an international twist.

LE FONTANE RISTORANTE L D X 137 Rt 100, Katonah (914) 232-9619; lefontane.net Authentic Southern Italian cuisine and hospitality headed by talented Neapolitan chef.

LITTLE CREPE STREET L D 29 Main St, Mount Kisco (914) 242-0200 A casual funky downtown restaurant offering an assortment of colorful crepes, salads, soups and more.

LE EXPRESS BISTRO & BAR L D 1820 New Hackensack Rd, Wappingers Falls (845) 849-3565; lexpresshv.com Warm, contemporary bistro in a suburban plaza setting, offers ingredient-driven, FrenchAmerican bistro fare. LE JARDIN DU ROI L D T 95 King St, Chappaqua (914) 238-1368; lejardinchappaqua.com A local favorite, this cozy, French Bistro is perfect for a romantic meal or a night out with the family.

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LITTLE DRUNKEN CHEF L D 36 Main St, Mount Kisco (914) 242-8800 This rustic-style eatery offers flavorful globallyinfluenced food with live music, an oyster bar, internationally-sourced craft beer and more. LUSARDI’S RESTAURANT L D T X 1885 Palmer Ave, Larchmont (914) 834-5555; lusardislarchmont.com A favorite neighborhood eatery with a reputation for flavorful Mediterranean dishes in a warm, friendly atmosphere.

THE MILL L D T 46 Vassar Rd, Poughkeepsie (845) 214-0000; millpk.com Casual and upbeat atmosphere coupled with knowledgeable staff, cozy indoor and outdoor dining and fresh, seasonal, local artisanal foods. MILL HOUSE BREWING COMPANY L D T X 289 Mill St, Poughkeepsie (845) 485-2739; millhousebrewing.com A spacious upscale gastropub serving innovative locally sourced dishes. A wide selection of ales (brewed on site) and cocktails. MIMA VINOTECA L D T X 63 Main St, Irvington (914) 591-1300; mimasrestaurant.com A charming, simply decorated neighborhood restaurant and wine bar serving rustic fare. MODERNE BARN L D X 430 Bedford Rd, Armonk (914) 730-0001; modernebarn.com From the Livanos family, this urban-country-chic restaurant is casual but sophisticated. American menu with global influences. MONTE’S LOCAL KITCHEN AND TAP ROOM L D X 3330 Rt 343, Amenia (845) 789-1818; monteskitchen.com Chef Dafna Mizrahi takes locally sourced ingredients and artfully prepares New American dishes like Taconic bourbon glazed duck. MORGAN’S FISH HOUSE L D T 22 Elm Pl, Rye (914) 921-8190 Casual, upscale restaurant in a contemporary space that is warm and sophisticated. Fresh seafood served in a classic style along with steaks and chicken dishes. MORTON’S STEAKHOUSE D X 9 Maple Ave, White Plains (914) 683-6101; mortons.com/whiteplains This popular nightspot is all about aged, prime beef, served in elegance. The menu offers seafood, chicken, chops and gluten-sensitive options. MOSCATO RESTAURANT L D T X 874 Scarsdale Ave, Scarsdale (914) 723-5700; moscatorestaurant.com Named for the sweet, floral grape of the muscat family, enjoy sweet service and Mediterranean fare in the casual dining room.

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MOUNT IVY CAFE D 14 Theills St, Pomona 845-354-4746 Known for generous portions of continental cuisine including tender steaks and fresh seafood, Rockland’s fine dining destination has been “simply the best” for 30 years. MP TAVERNA L D T X 1 Bridge St, Irvington (914) 231-7854; michaelpsilakis.com A modern interpretation of a traditional Greek tavern by Chef Michael Psilakis, awarded Food & Wine’s Best New Chef and Bon Appétit’s Chef of the Year. MURPHY’S BAR & GRILL L D 355 Kear St, Yorktown Heights (914) 962-1800; murphysyorktown.net Chef Rob Del Balzo cooks up burgers, sandwiches, nachos, ribs, steak and more in Westchester. NINA L D X 27 W Main St, Middletown (845) 344-6800; nina-restaurant.com Charm and ambiance in a vintage 1800s storefront (and former opera house). International cuisine, a relaxed atmosphere and hip late-night vibe. THE OLDE STONE MILL L D T X 2 Scarsdale Rd, Tuckahoe (914) 771-7661; theoldestonemill.com Traditional American steakhouse cuisine in a historic stone mill overlooking the banks of the Bronx River.

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PERCH D X 1 King St, Marlboro (845) 236-3663; perchmarlboro.com From the owner of Cathryn’s Tuscan Grill, offering a globally inspired, locally sourced menu. An eclectic list of wine and beer. PETER PRATT’S INN D X 673 Croton Rd, Yorktown (914) 962-4090; prattsinn.com Guests can enjoy regional American cuisine by the fireside with dishes like venison-boar chili or char su duck spring rolls.

Tuthill House OLE SAVANNAH SOUTHERN TABLE & BAR L D 100 Rondout Lndg, Kingston (845) 331-4283; olesavannah.com Celebrating the fresh and inspired cooking and culture of the American South, Ole Savannah offers an inventive twist on classic Southern cuisine, from fall-off-the bone barbecue, fried chicken and pecan pie to great bourbon and craft beer. THE PARLOR L D T 14 Cedar St, Dobbs Ferry (914) 478-8200; theparlordf.com David DiBari, of The Cookery, serving a small plates and wood-fired pizza menu in a relaxed, industrial setting.

#HVRW

PICCOLA TRATTORIA L D 41 Cedar St, Dobbs Ferry (914) 674-8427; piccolany.com Chef and owner Sergio Pennachio delivers authentic Italian cuisine in an inviting, intimate atmosphere. Melt-in-your-mouth Bistecca, Boulliobese di Pesce and Branzino. PICCOLO MULINO L D 136 Mamaroneck Ave, Mamaroneck (914) 777-0481; piccolomulino.com Puttanesca, cacciatore, carbonara, primavera— all prepared at this Italian restaurant, along with mussels, clams and more. PIER 701 RESTAURANT & BAR L D X 701 Piermont Ave, Piermont (845) 848-2550; pier701ny.com Chef-owner Denis Whitton offers traditional French cuisine with Mediterranean influences at this waterfront spot.

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POST ROAD BREW HOUSE D 1946 Campus Dr, Hyde Park (845) 451-1015; ciarestaurantgroup.com The CIA’s contemporary American beer-driven pop-up restaurant serves up classic Europeanstyle food, like house-made charcuterie, classic cassoulet and fish & chips.

REDWOOD RESTAURANT D 63 N. Front St, Kingston (845) 259-5868; redwooduptown.com A bit of California in the Hudson Valley. Redwood’s rooftop deck allows for an enjoyable, scenic dining experience overlooking the mountains. Venison, duck, lobster, vegetable dishes and more.

POUGHKEEPSIE ICE HOUSE L D T 1 Main St, Poughkeepsie (845) 232-5783; poughkeepsieicehouse.com An historic Hudson Valley waterfront with Old World charm. Casually sophisticated cuisine with seasonal and locally inspired menus. PRIMAVERA RESTAURANT AND BAR L D T X 592 Rt 22, Croton Falls (914) 277-4580; primaverarestaurantandbar.com A friendly atmosphere and fine dining experience, with a small-town spirit that is warm, welcoming and inclusive. PURDY’S FARMER AND THE FISH D L T X 100 Titicus Rd, North Salem (914) 617-8380; farmerandthefish.com When a fishmonger partners with a chef who studied agriculture, the result is a communityoriented restaurant with locally grown produce and high-quality seafood.

RESTAURANT 1915 L D 3020 Seven Lakes Dr, Bear Mountain (845) 786-2731 Located at the historic Bear Mountain Inn, enjoy a seasonal menu in a beautiful lodge setting.

Broadway Bistro

RESTAURANT X & THE BULLY BOY BAR L D 117 N Rt 303, Congers (845) 268-6555; xaviars.com Peter Kelly’s elegant roadside restaurant features four dining rooms, a welcoming bar, a menu of classic dishes, and modern American cuisine.

RED HAT ON THE RIVER L D T X 1 Bridge St, Irvington (914) 591-5888; redhatontheriver.com A bustling, multi-level eatery, affording 180˚ views of the Hudson. French bistro classics mixed with seasonally changing dishes.

RINIS RESTAURANT & WINE BAR L D 12 W. Main St, Elmsford (914) 592-6799; rinisristorante.com Classic Italian dishes including pork chops with sweet and hot peppers and eggplant parmigiana in a warm and friendly atmosphere.

RAMIRO’S 954 D X 954 Rt 6, Mahopac (845) 621-3333; ramiros954.com Nuevo Latino cuisine with a contemporary approach and creativity. Hospitality and warmth reign supreme.

RED ZEBRA L D T 31 Beekman Ave, Sleepy Hollow (914) 909-6151; redzebrasleepyhollow.com Modern look at Italian with locavore integrity. Hand-cut pastas, fresh baked breads, Italian small-batch wines, micro beers, craft cocktails and more.

RISOTTO D 788 Commerce St, Thornwood (914) 769-6000 ; risotto-restaurant.com Authentic Italian cuisine in a cozy neighborhood restaurant. Known for braised meats, homemade pastas and specialty soups; save room for dessert.

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RISTORANTE CATERINA DE’ MEDICI L D 1946 Campus Dr, Hyde Park (845) 471-6608; ristorantecaterinademedici.com Authentic regional Italian cuisine crafted at the Culinary Institute of America includes woodfired pizza and other simple rustic dishes.

RUTH’S CHRIS STEAK HOUSE L D X 670 White Plains Rd, Tarrytown (914) 631-3311; ruthschris.com The classic steakhouse, complete with mahogany bar and lounge, offers aged steaks and fresh seafood. Located in the Westchester Marriott.

RIVER CITY GRILLE L D T X 6 S Broadway, Irvington (914) 591-2033; rivercitygrille.com Eclectic American cuisine served in a vibrant bistro setting. Over a dozen wines by the glass and the bottle. Cocktails are both modern and classic.

RYE HOUSE L D T X 126 North Main St, Port Chester (914) 481-8771; ryehousepc.com A Port Chester newcomer offers an American menu filled with cuisine from the Southeast, Southwest, Heartland and Rust Belt, as well as artisanal spirits, craft cocktails and domestic craft beer.

RIVERMARKET BAR & KITCHEN L D T X 127 W Main St, Tarrytown (914) 631-3100; rivermarketbarandkitchen.com Veritable epicurean hub across from the MetroNorth train station features a farm-to-table restaurant, wood-fired pizzeria and wine shop.

SAINT GEORGE BISTRO D T X 155 Southside Ave, Hastings-on-Hudson (914) 478-1671; saintgeorgebistro.com This French bistro offers reworked classics, local seafood, fine meats, seasonal vegetables and French wine.

RIVER STATION L D 1 North Water St, Poughkeepsie (845) 452-9207;riverstationrest.com Dine out at one of the 320 seats overlooking the Walkway Over the Hudson at Poughkeepsie's only full service waterfront restaurant. ROSIE’S BISTRO ITALIANO L D T X 10 Palmer Ave, Bronxville (914) 793-2000; rosiesbronxville.com Vintage posters in a festive dining room with splashes of yellow and wood accents. The Italian menu is designed to keep things fresh and seasonal.

Le Provençal Bistro THE ROUNDHOUSE L D T 2 E Main St, Beacon (845) 765-8369; roundhousebeacon.com A locally inspired seasonal menu, craft beers and creative artisanal cocktails. Floor-to-ceiling windows yield stunning waterfall views. RUBY’S OYSTER BAR & BISTRO L D T 45 Purchase St, Rye (914) 921-4166; rubysoysterbar.com Chic, casual and classic oyster bar brasserie; features a varied menu with professional service and a lively atmosphere.

SALTAIRE OYSTER BAR & FISH HOUSE L D T X 55 Abendroth Ave, Port Chester (914) 939-2425; saltaireoysterbar.com A Westchester fish and oyster bar serving 10 varieties of oysters and five signature sauces alongside craft cocktails. SAM’S OF GEDNEY WAY L D X 50 Gedney Way, White Plains (914) 949-0978; samsofgedneyway.com A modern American bistro with room for everyone offering a variety of atmospheres for any dining occasion.

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SAMMY’S DOWNTOWN BISTRO L D T X 124 Pondfield Rd, Bronxville (914) 337-3200; sammysbronxville.com A neighborhood favorite serving American and continental cuisine with Italian accents in an inviting, modern setting.

TERRA RUSTICA L D 77 South Moger Ave, Mount Kisco (914) 666-7005;terrarusticaristorante.com Offering Italian favorites from Orecchiette Gaeta to Ossobuco Di Angello to the diners of Mount Kisco and the Hudson Valley.

SAPORE STEAKHOUSE L D X 1108 Main St, Fishkill (845) 897-3300; saporesteakhouse.com Dry-aged beef cooked to your instructions in a spacious, comfortable, club setting.

TEXAS DE BRAZIL, YONKERS D X 1 Ridge Hill Blvd, Yonkers (914) 652-9660; texasdebrazil.com TEXAS DE BRAZIL, WEST NYACK D X 1584 Palisades Center Dr, West Nyack (845) 727-1313; texasdebrazil.com An authentic Brazilian-American churrascaria (steakhouse) combines the cuisine of Southern Brazil with the spirit of Texas.

SAPORI ITALIAN RESTAURANT 324 Central Ave, White Plains (914) 684-8855; saporiofwhiteplains.com Traditional cuisine and cocktails offered in a fine-dining atmosphere with sidewalk seating. SCALIA & CO CRAFT KITCHEN & BAR L D 785 ShopRite Plaza, State Rt 17M, Suite 2, Monroe (845) 395-0906; scaliaandco.com Chef Mark Glielmi’s open kitchen turns out classic Italian cuisine including homemade burrata, mozzarella and cannoli in a casual, upbeat setting. SERGIO’S RISTORANTE L D X 503 Fifth Ave, Pelham (914) 278-9771; sergiosofpelham.com Enjoy fine Italian cuisine in a newly designed space and savor classic dishes like Linguini alle vongole or Trenete al tartufo. SHADOWS ON THE HUDSON L D T X 176 Rinaldi Blvd, Poughkeepsie (845) 486-9500; shadowsonthehudson.com An expansive restaurant set on a 40-foot cliff overlooking the Hudson River and the MidHudson Bridge offers a varied menu of steak and seafood. SHIP LANTERN INN D 1725 Rt 9W, Milton (845) 795-5400; shiplanterninn.com Since 1925, genuine hospitality and gracious black-tie service, white tablecloths and fine American cuisine for a relaxing experience. SIXTY 5 ON MAIN D X 65 Main St, Nyack (845) 358-5200; sixty5onmain.com Chef Moshe Grundman using seasonal ingredients and international influences offers upscale, small plate dining to Nyack. SOFRITO L D T X 175 Main St, White Plains (914) 428-5500; sofritowhiteplains.com The aromatic mix of onions, garlic, and tomato are the essence of authentic Puerto Rican cuisine in this colorful, contemporary dining scene. SONORA RESTAURANT D T X 179 Rectory St, Port Chester (914) 933-0200; sonorarestaurant.net South American flavors with French-Asian infusion, complemented by a great wine list, delightful cocktails and attentive service. SOUR KRAUT L D 118 Main St, Nyack (845) 358-3122; sour-kraut.com Hudson Valley’s favorite German-style restaurant is back, ready to serve up favorites including wiener schnitzel and wild mushroom strudel.

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Benjamin Steakhouse SPARKILL STEAKHOUSE L D X 500 Route 340, Sparkill (845) 398-3300; sparkillsteakhouse.com Traditional steakhouse experience with classic sides and fresh, expertly butchered cuts of meat and seafood.

THYME STEAK & SEAFOOD L D X 3605 Crompond Rd, Yorktown Heights (914) 788-8700; thymesteakandseafood.com American fare served with genuine, neighborly hospitality in a warm and inviting setting, with a dedicated focus on gluten-free offerings. TOSCANA RISTORANTE L D X 214 Main St, Eastchester (914) 361-1119; toscana-ristorante.com Chef Michele Lepore prepares a wide variety of classic Italian dishes, from medaglioni di pollo to bistecca di manzo.

THE STONE MANOR @ 101 L D X 101 Saw Mill River Rd, Hawthorne (914) 703-4112;thestonemanor101.com Fine Mediterranean steakhouse with a commitment to quality and gracious service.

TRADITIONS 118 D X 11 Old Tomahawk St, Somers (914) 248-7200; traditions118restaurant.com Traditional cuisine with classic Italian influences in an eclectic and comfortable atmosphere. Extensive martini menu.

STORM KING TAVERN L D 18 Ridge Rd, Cornwall (845) 458-5361; stormkingrestaurant.com Boasting views of Black Rock Forest, the tavern menu offers American food in a casual atmosphere.

TRATTORIA LOCANDA L D 1105 Main St, Fishkill (845) 896-4100; locandarestaurant.com Known for its comfortable neighborhood charm and serves fine southern Italian cuisine in a casual, brick-walled dining room.

SUNSET COVE L D X 238 Green St, Tarrytown (914) 366-7889; sunsetcove.net Enjoy the raw bar and hand crafted dishes with a distinctive Italian flair while overlooking the Hudson River and Tappan Zee Bridge.

TRATTORIA SAN GIORGIO L D 3279 Franklin Ave, Millbrook (845) 677-4566; trattoriasangiorgio.com Trattoria San Giorgio showcases Italian American cuisine with dishes including freshly made pastas, cappuccinos and brick oven pizzas.

TAGINE RESTAURANT & WINE BAR D 120 Grand St, Croton-on-Hudson (914) 827-9393; taginecroton.com A unique bistro where French favorites, like steak frites and salade niçoise mix with Moroccan classics.

TREVI RISTORANTE L D 11 Taylor Sq, West Harrison (914) 949-5810; treviofharrison.com A trendy and sleek restaurant featuring an extensive menu of modern Italian dishes from every region of Italy.

TAP HOUSE L D T 16 Depot Sq, Tuckahoe (914) 337-6941; thetaphouseny.com Upscale pub fare (pot pies, burgers and steak), 100 craft and premium imported beers, a neighborhood atmosphere, cozy fireplace and bar.

TUTHILL HOUSE AT THE MILL L D X 20 Grist Mill Ln, Gardiner (845) 255-4151; tuthillhouse.com Seasonal American and Italian dishes prepared with local ingredients in the restored, historic Grist Mill on the Tuthilltown Distillery property.

TARRY LODGE L D T X 18 Mill St, Port Chester (914) 939-3111; tarrylodge.com A suburban outpost of New York’s BataliBastianich outfit, famous for thin-crust pizza, house-made pasta and authentic Italian cooking.

TUTTA BELLA TRATTORIA L D X 754 White Plains Rd, Scarsdale (914) 725-0566; tuttabellatrattoria.com A relaxed atmosphere to enjoy classic Italian cuisine with friends and family.

TERRAPIN RESTAURANT D X 6426 Montgomery St, Rhinebeck (845) 876-3330; terrapinrestaurant.com Italian, Asian and French influences and local products served in a creative interpretation of New American cuisine.

THE TWISTED OAK L D T 61 Main St, Tarrytown (914) 332-1992; thetwistedoakny.com Italian influenced American farmhouse cuisine with homemade pasta and charcuterie pair nicely with ingredient-driven cocktails, craft beer and modest wine list.

KEY: l LUNCH $22.95  d DINNER $32.95  t CONVENIENT TO METRO-NORTH x EXCLUSIONS APPLY


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VILLAGE TEAROOM RESTAURANT & BAKE SHOP L D 10 Plattekill Ave, New Paltz (845) 255-3434; thevillagetearoom.com A European-style tearoom offering a full menu of sophisticated foods, showcasing Irish roots and a commitment to local farms. WASABI L D X 110 Main St, Nyack (845) 358-7977; wasabinyack.com Chef Doug Chi Nguyen brings his international influence and love of food to Nyack, serving artfully plated sushi and entrées. WILDFIRE GRILL L D 74 Clinton St, Montgomery (845) 457-3770; wildfireny.com A popular local eatery featauring an eclectic, predominantly American menu with Asian, Mexican and Italian influences.

Copacabana Steakhouse TWO SPEAR STREET L D X 2 Spear St, Nyack (845) 353-7733; 2spearstreet.com New American cuisine in a romantic setting on the river overlooking the Tappan Zee. UNION RESTAURANT & BAR LATINO L D X 22-24 New Main St, Haverstraw (845) 429-4354; unionrestaurant.net Continental cuisine with a Latin twist in an upscale hacienda setting. Friendly staff offer specialty cocktails and sangrias. UNOODLES SNACK BAR D X 14 Main St, Haverstraw (845) 947-7625; unoodles.net Set in a 1950s-style bar, taste some of the best noodle dishes in the valley while enjoying creative cocktails and live entertainment. VALLEY RESTAURANT AT THE GARRISON D X 2015 Rt 9, Garrison (845) 424-3604; thegarrison.com American farm-to-table cuisine showcasing ingredients from its own 3-acre farm as well as from area farms and producers, served with elegance in a country setting with river views. VEGA MEXICAN CUISINE L D T 189 E. Hartsdale Ave, Hartsdale (914) 723-0010; vegamexican.com Expand your palate and immerse your tastebuds in the culinary delights of Mexico—carne asada, flautas, ceviche, chile rellenos and other flavorpacked dishes. VELO BISTRO & WINE BAR L D X 12 N. Broadway, Nyack (845) 353-7667; velonyack.com Food and wine pairing is elevated to an art form at this trendy yet consistent Nyack mainstay offering adventurous good cooking and 20 different wines by the glass.

Peter Kelly Co-Chair

xaviars restaurant group

Dr. Tim Ryan Co-Chair

the culinary institute of america

WINSTON RESTAURANT D T X 130 E Main St, Mount Kisco (914) 244-9780; winstonrestaurant.com Diners can enjoy New American fare on the three levels of the restaurant: the gastropub, the dining room, and the seasonal rooftop bar. WOOD AND FIRE L D T 59 Marble Ave, Pleasantville (914) 747-2611 Offering traditional Neapolitan cuisine with a modern flair. WOULD RESTAURANT D 120 North Rd, Highland (845) 691-9883; thewould.com New American cuisine with a French flair and a long history of warm hospitality in the heart of apple country. X20 – XAVIARS ON THE HUDSON L D T 71 Water Grant St, Yonkers (914) 965-1111; xaviars.com Classic French technique with Italian and Spanish influences and Asian embellishments yields an original cuisine unique to the Hudson Valley. ZERO OTTO NOVE L D X 55 Old Rt. 22, Armonk (914) 273-0089; 089armonk.roberto089.com Chef Roberto Paciullo provides the a taste of Southern Italy in abundant portions fueled by local products brought directly to the restaurant’s quaint farmhouse tables.

Tim and Nina Zagat Honorary Co-Chairs

zagat

Vincent Barcelona

supreme oil company/ admiration foods

Nick Citera

cosimo’s restaurant group

John Crabtree

crabtree’s kittle house

Janet Crawshaw

the valley table

Agnes Devereux

the village tea room restaurant and bake shop

Cathryn Fadde

cathry n’s tuscan grill perch

David DiBari

the cookery

ZUPPA L D T 59 Main St, Yonkers (914) 376-6500; zupparestaurant.com A white-tablecloth Italian restaurant presents a refined collection of dishes in one of three dining rooms and an equally refined 2,500-bottle wine cellar Visit HudsonValleyRestaurantWeek.com for the latest restaurant additions, menus, reservations policies and more.

VILLAGE SOCIAL KITCHEN & BAR L D T X 251 E Main St, Mount Kisco (914) 864-1255; villagesocialkb.com An upbeat, inviting atmosphere with locally sourced ingredients from cheeses and produce to meat.

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HVRW Board of Advisors

Josh Kroner

terrapin restaurant

Rich Parente

clock tower grill

Glenn Vogt

rivermarket bar & kitchen

MaryKay Vrba

dutchess tourism

Kevin Zraly

windows on the world wine school

#HVRW

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The Hudson Valley We’re Local, We’re Legendary

VA L L EY TA BL E.COM

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Ethan Harrison

The Finest Southwestern Cuisine

Paired with the region’s Premier Selection of Tequila

www.baja328.com

328 Main Street, Beacon, NY 845.838.BAJA


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W

hen you drink craft beverages made in New York, more money is fueled back into the local economy in the form of jobs, taxes and investments. The Valley Table, along with the endorsements of the following local business leaders, is proud to present the “Support the Craft – Drink NY” campaign to help O

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DRINK

wine

a hudson valley

renaissance by timothy buzinski

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H I L E M A N Y I N T H E H U D S O N V A L L E Y H AV E been enjoying the boom in local craft beer, craft spirits and, of course, craft cider, subtle but no less significant changes are afoot on many levels of the region’s wine landscape, as well. They’re just not as dramatic or obvious—after all, there’s only a single harvest of grapes each year compared to the multiple fermentations and distillations of beer and spirits.

Above: Yancy and Michael Migliore, Whitecliff Winery PHOTO : EVA DEITCH

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Whitecliff Winery

One of the major reasons for the improvements in the regional wine scene has been experimentation with new grape varieties.

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Both new and mature wine producers are helping to refocus attention on the region’s wine industry. One third of the region’s established wineries reportedly are expanding, and new ones start up each year. “Money,” as Carlo DeVito, owner of Hudson-Chatham Winery and president of Hudson Valley Wine Country, puts it, “has driven the improvements.” There is more money flowing into the region’s wine industry than ever, DeVito claims, fueled by owners, vintners and investors with greater knowledge in both grape growing and wine making, as well as the most effective impetus of all—the community of winemakers themselves. Growers and winemakers are increasingly working together, DeVito says, helping each other, sharing information about successful techniques and potential pitfalls. In addition, producers regularly gather to blind taste wines, offering feedback and ideas about how to handle problematic batches. Winemaker and Milea Estate Vineyard co-owner Bruce Tripp calls it “cross pollination” among winemakers.


One of the major reasons for the improvements in the regional wine scene has been experimentation with new grape varieties. Michael Migliore, co-owner of Whitecliff Winery in Gardiner with his wife Yancey, has been working with plantings of Gamay on the winery property at the base of the Shawangunk Ridge since 1979. At first, yields at Whitecliff were so small the wines were simply kept as private stock, but experiments with various batches paid off. The Migliores found that Gamay, a grape known for making Beaujolais and some of the great Cru wines, such as Moulin a Vent and Morgon, “was a reliable producer, with good yields, good ripeness and tolerant of the weather,” Yancey notes. By the early 2000s, they had developed a significant, workable crop and released their first bottling. The wine was dynamic, with beautiful redberried fruit, an elegant texture and just a hint of oak. Subsequent vintages have continued this expression—the current release is reminiscent of a Cru Beaujolais, with red berries and earth packed around a robust structure. PHOTO : DAVID HANDSCHUH

The Migliores also are physically expanding their plantings. Michael had managed a vineyard in Greendale, near Olana, south of Hudson (Columbia County), and he was convinced of the potential of this area. Despite the site’s location, “It’s warmer overall—the river has a big impact there,” Yancey explains. “It’s quite sloped and directly above the water, so the warm air rises into the site.” The Migliores planted a few acres, primarily Gamay—they report the new site seems promising and will yield its first crop next year. Gamay isn’t the only new grape sprouting roots in the Hudson Valley. In 2013, Matt Spaccarelli, winemaker at Benmarl Winery, in Marlboro, planted a single acre of Albariño, a white grape best known in Galicia, Spain, and widely acknowledged for producing some of that country’s best white wines. Spaccarelli’s inspiration came from former consulting winemaker, Kristop Brown (now the winemaker at Glorie Farm Winery, also in Marlboro). Spaccarelli was impressed with the grape’s resistance to moisture and humidity and its cold-hardy nature. The new MARCH march –– MAY may

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Matt Spaccarelli / Benmarl Winery Kristop Brown / Glorie Farm Winery

Ben Peacock / Tousey Wiinery

Brad Martz / Whitecliff Winery 50 50

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PHOTOS MID - RIGHT, BOTTOM - CENTER : JERRY NOVESKY. ALL OTHER PHOTOS : EVA DEITCH


planting spurred Spaccarelli to partner with Casey Erdmann to create Fjord Vineyards, where the focus is on “wild fermentation” and other experiments. “[At] Fjord, I have free reign,” Spaccarelli explains, admitting his approach has “pluses and minuses.” Nonetheless, he says he generally finds the wines “lighter and more dynamic, in a way.” The 2015 Albariño inaugural release is a case in point—lively and fresh, it offers texture and depth, surprising attributes coming from such young vines.

Doug Glorie / Glorie Farm Winery

Wine lovers, certainly, now have even more reasons to drink local.

PHOTO : EVA DEITCH

Cathryn Fadde / Cathryn’s Tuscan Bistro

Another new addition to the region is Milea Estate Vineyard, in Staatsburg (Dutchess County). While Barry Milea has owned the property since the 1980s, the family only recently became interested in growing grapes. After planting a small vineyard about nine years ago, Milea, along with partners Ed Evans and seasoned winemaker Bruce Tripp, expanded the plantings. Among their first commercial release, in the fall of 2016, was a 2015 Chardonnay. It is fresh and clean, with a creamy texture but without the oak; a Riesling from the same vintage is drier, with just a hint of residual sugar, making it perfect for spicy dishes or a plate of local charcuterie. For many, the star of Milea’s lineup is its Pinot Noir—bright, with clean cherry fruit, plenty of acidity and a mineral component that extends the finish. While these new wines and wineries may mark a shift in the regional wine lexicon, the Hudson Valley wine community recently saw the retirement of one of its pioneers. John Bruno, founder of Oak Summit Vineyard in Millbrook, was known for his meticulous work in the vineyard—his chardonnay and pinot noir inevitably were part of any discussion about the valley’s best wines. Bruno’s retirement, however, is just the end of a chapter, not the book: Some of the fruit from his vineyard now goes to Milea, and some to Tousey Winery, owned by Ben Peacock and his wife Kimberly Tousey, daughter of winery founder Ray MARCH march –– MAY may

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Tousey. Tousey Winery’s current Chardonnay offers a whiff of butterscotch while the palate remains true to the apple-y character of the grape; the pinot noir is both expressive of the grape and the region, with bright, cherry fruit and delicate mineral notes—a wine equally at home with rich fish as with roasted chicken or pork. Hudson-Chatham Winery, in Ghent (Columbia County), is another operation that has quietly renewed its focus on quality. While many of the valley’s newer wineries are working mainly with classic European grapes, HudsonChatham owners Dominique and Carlo DeVito are exploring more commonly planted hybrids. The couple credits amateur winemaker Steve Casscles as a significant contributor to their success. “We started working with Steve from the beginning—he gave us fruit but also advice on winemaking,” Dominique recalls. Carlo eventually supplemented Casscles’ Baco Noir vines with old vines he found in the Finger Lakes. The winery, a converted dairy farm, has found its footing— the Seyval Blanc, de Chaunac and Baco Noir vines all have performed well despite harsh winters. Hudson-Chatham’s range of Baco Noir bottlings are expressive of all the grape offers, with subtle but distinct differences. The Estate Block 3, for example, shows delicate aromatics and texture, while the Reserve is more robust, offering more black fruit. The Old Vine Cuvée is a powerful, age-worthy expression. Other hybrids also have been successful, especially Chelois, which Carlo describes as having “lots of beautiful cherries—red cherries, bing cherries—and lots of bright acidity keeping it fresh.” Is there a renaissance for Hudson Valley wine on the horizon? Well, with local producers fully committed to developing quality wines and continuing to push boundaries—working, for example, with grapes like Zweigelt and Blaufränkisch—it is clear that there has never been a better time to explore local wineries. And wine lovers, certainly, now have even more reasons to drink local. 4 52 52

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Wineries mentioned in this article Benmarl Winery 156 Highland Ave, Marlboro (845) 236-4265; benmarl.com Fjord Vineyards 156 Highland Ave, Marlboro (516) 807-3218; fjordvineyards.com Glorie Farm Winery 40 Mountain Rd, Marlboro (845) 236-3265; gloriewine.com Hudson-Chatham Winery 1900 NY66, Ghent (518) 392-9463; hudsonchathamwinery.com Milea Estate Vineyard 46 Rymph Rd, Staatsburg (845) 264-0403; mileaestatevineyard.com Tousey Winery 1774 Rt 9, Germantown (518) 567-5462; touseywinery.com Whitecliff Vineyard 331 McKinstry Rd, Gardiner (845) 255-4613; whitecliffwine.com

PHOTO : EVA DEITCH


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not waste T

by leander schaerlaeckens

he back of kim buchanan’s ford explorer offers plenty of real estate for bumper stickers. One of them displayed on her tailgate declares Evil will triumph when good people do nothing. Buchanan, a veterinarian and mother of two teenagers, isn’t good at doing nothing. That particular sticker is appropriate to what she’s doing on a chilly November afternoon: rescuing food. She arrives at the Culinary Institute of America in Hyde Park, where staff and students are waiting for her with the yield from a food drive at the Thanksgiving holiday party—a carload of boxes, cans and jars. It’s been designated for the Hillcrest House, which offers transitional housing for the homeless, a few miles away. “To me, it’s just a really important thing to do—to be able to feed people,” Buchanan remarks. “It’s such a basic thing. There’s so much to go around and it just doesn’t get there.”

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Hunger is a huge global crisis, but you have to act locally if you can. I think it’s a crime that so many people are so hungry and we waste so much food. —KIM BUC HA NA N

Buchanan volunteers a few times a week as a food rescuer for Rescuing Leftover Cuisine (RLC), a New York City non-profit that opened a Mid-Hudson chapter in 2015. Serving Dutchess and Ulster counties, RLC takes food that would otherwise be discarded by restaurants, farms, schools, bakeries and other businesses that produce or prepare food, and finds a place where it is needed. Non-perishable foods go to food pantries; prepared foods and produce go to soup kitchens or shelters. The word “waste” is not in Buchanan’s vocabulary: She also picks up leftovers from a soup kitchen and ferries them back to a farm, where they will feed the animals. A few dozen volunteers put in about an hour apiece each week. Their combined efforts collect two to three tons of food a month. Since last June, RLC Poughkeepsie has rescued 62,000 pounds of food. Buchanan, a town of Poughkeepsie resident, mostly volunteers on Thursdays for food deliveries. “Hunger is a huge global crisis, but you have to act locally if you can,” she continues. “I think it’s a crime that so many people are so hungry and we waste so much food.”

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photos : long table harvest


Buchanan is part of an increasingly visible “zero-waste” food movement that is concerned primarily with viable, edible food that is unharvested, unsold, unused and, ultimately, uneaten. Feeding America®, a 35-year-old non-profit that runs a nationwide network of more than 200 food banks, puts the amount of edible produce that never reaches consumers at more than six billion pounds per year—up to 40 percent of our national food supply, according to a 2010 U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) report. Ultimately, 63 million tons of perfectly good food gets tossed into landfills, according to ReFED, a consortium of businesses “committed to reducing food waste in the United States.” (The problem has repercussions not just for the hungry, but also for the environment: That much volume of decomposing food is responsible for 16 percent of our methane output, says the Environmental Protection Agency.) Yet, in 2015, 42.2 million Americans lived in food insecure households, which the USDA defines as “a diet of reduced quality, variety or desirability,” while another 6.3 million households had very low food security, which, in addition to the above, includes “disrupted eating patterns and reduced food intake.” Locally, in Orange County in 2015, 13 percent of the population was eligible for the federal Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP, or food stamps), while that number was 12 percent in Ulster County and 8 percent in Dutchess County. The Mid-Hudson regional average number of SNAP recipients is slightly lower than the national average of 14 percent, but it still comprises more than 10 percent of the population of Orange and Ulster Counties. (The Natural Resources Defense Council, on the other hand, puts the number of food insecure Americans at nearly 17 percent—one out of six.) For children, the figures are alarming: The percentage of students in public schools eligible for free or reduced-price school lunches during the 2015-16 school year was 45 percent in Ulster, 42 percent in Orange and 31 percent in Dutchess, according to the Office of Temporary and Disability Assistance.

zerowastesolutions

CHEF TERRANCE BRENNAN THE ROUNDHOUSE When it comes to cooking sustainably, “nose-to-tail” philosophy demands using an entire animal or vegetable (or as much of it as possible) instead of only certain choice parts. Chef Terrance Brennan, of The Roundhouse in Beacon, adheres to the philosophy as part of the restaurant’s “whole-farm cuisine” approach. “Whatever farmers are producing, I want to use—and use sustainably,” Brennan says. Utilizing what other chefs may throw away— from vegetable tops to oxtails—the approach encourages creativity in the kitchen (and sometimes a bit of bravery at the dining table). Brennan offers a special nose-to-tail tasting menu that showcases dishes like beef heart tartare or tripe stew. Repurposed ingredients also make an appearance—vegetable peels are used to smoke the duck breast and to create rich broths. At the restaurant and catered events, Brennan looks for new ways to put his philosophy to use. “At an event last year, I fed 240 people with only one steer,” he recalls. “The impact of using one steer—versus using 16 for sirloins or rib eyes—is a big difference for the environment.” —KW photo by eva deitch

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Historically, the emergency food system offered mostly canned and boxed foods high in sugar, fats and salts (like canned soups), but provided little in the way of fresh produce that could offer high-level vitamins and nutrients. Assistance programs were meant to be temporary, but as the population systemically relying on food pantries for basic sustenance grows (in 2008, Feeding America® assisted 25 million Americans; by 2014, that number was up to 46 million), the nutritional content of the food becomes a more significant issue, particularly for children. There’s a disconnect in the supply chain once the economic incentive to keep moving the food through its stages is removed. The problem isn’t that there’s a lack of food—there’s plenty of it. Collecting and distributing it is problematic. The NRDC argues that if food waste was cut by a mere 15 percent nationally, 25 million citizens would no longer be food insecure. But if there’s no economic incentive or advantage offered to take the food to where it can be used, it gets stuck and eventually rots or gets hauled off as garbage. Many farmers, chefs, wholesalers, distributors and others are willing to give surplus or unused food to those who need it. Most, however, have neither the time, the money nor the resources to do it. That’s the gap between excess supply and increased need. Plainly, it’s a logistical issue. The notion of zero waste has been around at least since the 1970s, but gains have only begun to be made on the food front in recent years. The USDA and the EPA have set a target of reducing food waste by half before 2030, by partnering up with charities, businesses and local governments. “There’s an incredible amount of waste in our food system and it’s at every level,” explains Susan Paykin, manager of Common Ground Farm in

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Unless the market demand for a specific crop increases, it makes no economic sense (especially for small, market farmers) to pick it, pack it, haul it to market, then pack the unsold surplus up again and bring it back.

photo above : long table harvest ; right : stiles najak


Beacon, a non-profit farm that attempts to serve as a model for the best use of food and a reduction of waste. “Beginning with the production and going through the distribution process, the preparation and then the consumption of food, every single level in the current way that food is viewed and produced, grown, distributed and consumed wastes a lot.” In fact, waste is essentially built into our food-production system. Planning the harvest begins before the food is actually planted. As the industry standard, farmers typically plant about 20 percent more than they plan to meet anticipated market demand—a surplus that usually covers losses due to bad weather, pests, disease or, rarely, a sudden spike in demand for the crop. Technically, if the season is successful, there’s already up to a 20 percent surplus in the field. Unless the market demand for a specific crop increases, it makes no economic sense (especially for small, market farmers) to pick it, pack it, haul it to market, then pack the unsold surplus up again and bring it back—so the excess usually is left to rot in the field. In a typical year, that means about a fifth of the harvest doesn’t make it off the farms, Paykin says. Food also is culled in the next stages—at the wholesale, distribution or consumer levels, where meats, fruits or vegetables that don’t conform perfectly to a preferred shape or color may be sifted out and discarded. In response to this disparity, local organizations eager to help fight waste and hunger have mushroomed. The all-organic Common Ground Farm donates produce to schools in Beacon and works with teachers and organizations like Hudson Valley Seed to offer farm-based educational programs. It sells produce at below-market rates in low-income areas and halves the prices for those using SNAP vouchers. During the 2016 season, Common Ground Farm donated about five tons of produce to food pantries, soup kitchens and schools. It wasted almost nothing.

zerowastesolutions

CHEF DAFNA MIZRAHI MONTE'S LOCAL KITCHEN + TAPHOUSE Despite intensive efforts by chefs to cut down on food waste, it’s nearly impossible to completely eliminate it at a restaurant. Composting, however, is one more step toward eliminating as much waste as possible. Chef Dafna Mizrahi, of Monte’s Local Kitchen & Taphouse in Amenia, views composting as a way to keep otherwise unusable byproducts, like eggshells, out of the landfill. “We always utilize a product as much as we can,” Mizrahi says, stressing that she, like most chefs, uses leftover vegetable peels and scraps for soups and stocks. “After that,” she adds, “practically anything that can’t be used again is composted.” Once the compost bin is filled and “cooked,” Mizrahi brings the nutrient-rich mixture to her home garden to fertilize herbs and produce used at the farm-to-table restaurant. —KW

photo : eva deitch

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zero to go A grassroots effort by a group of friends six years ago to get styrofoam out of Beacon has blossomed into an “educational” waste management company whose goal is helping people in the valley learn how to responsibly handle their waste and byproducts. Zero to Go started in Beacon, where it initially set out to turn several different events in Beacon to “zero waste” events. “People all over the region love to see us,” says Atticus Lanigan, Zero to Go general manager. “It brings them hope that a better way of doing things is within reach.” This past summer, the group kicked off a new composting project, offering compost drop-off options at the Beacon Farmers’ Market for any Hudson Valley resident. Door-to-door pickup service for Beacon residents also is available. “Once you start dividing your waste, it feels downright funny to throw food scraps in the trash,” Lanigan says. “We'd like to get many more households in the habit.” The green factor doesn’t stop there—to avoid trucking emissions and gas costs, the team does their Beacon pickup routes on heavyduty cargo bikes with attached trailers. Outside of Beacon, Zero to Go is signing on businesses, as well. “Hometown Deli and AllSport in Fishkill both compost their food scraps every week,” Lanigan notes. “With the help of our hauler— Empire Zero—we hope we can always provide this service to the people of Beacon and beyond.” In addition to residential and business pick ups, the group now offers sustainable waste management services to about 25 events yearly. –KW zerotogo.org

A rising demand for free or discounted food has made these upstart nonprofits vital. “After the recession, the number of people who were using the soup kitchens and food pantries tripled. Since then, they’ve kind of leveled off,” says Stiles Najac, food security coordinator at Cornell Cooperative Extension in Orange County, who also runs the “GleanMobile” and farm-to-school programs. “For the most part, I never have enough on my truck,” Najak comments. “Everyone is always requesting more than I have.” Her GleanMobile is part of the latest trend in the movement—scouring fields for unharvested crops. “Gleaning,” which often consists simply of picking up excess harvest that was never picked, packed or shipped, fills a deep need in the emergency food system. “It’s important to make sure that everyone has a right to great food,” says Audrey Berman, of Long Table Harvest, a gleaning charity founded in 2015. Berman organizes volunteers to glean from 25 mostly organic farms in Columbia and Dutchess Counties and then distributes the produce—and sometimes meats—to 15 emergency food sites or after-school programs. “Even those who are struggling should have access to this good food, not just those who have the means. That’s why we do it,” she says.

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photos l - r : zero - to - go , long table harvest , rescuing leftover cuisine


In professional kitchens, chefs are increasingly attempting to minimize waste by using as much of their meat and produce in as many was as they can. “The no-waste movement really began in traditional food cultures hundreds of years ago—it’s the idea of taking something that might otherwise be thrown away and transforming it into something tasty and nutritious,” says Chef Dan Barber, winner of several James Beard Awards and the founder of WastED, a community of chefs and other members of the food industry who publicize efforts to produce great meals made from “off” ingredients—things like kale ribs, misshapen vegetables, fish cartilage and offal. “That’s something every chef does—it’s a basic principle of good cooking,” Barber emphasizes. “Today, there’s an awareness around this issue that wasn’t there even a year ago. But I think we’ll only be successful when we stop thinking in terms of things like peelings and offcuts as ‘waste’ and instead make them an expected part of people’s everyday eating.” At Barber’s Blue Hill Restaurant in Manhattan and Blue Hill at Stone Barns in Pocantico Hills (Westchester County), he and his team “constantly audit our waste,” Barber says. Rather than shove whatever isn’t being used off the cutting boards and into the trash, the crew picks through the scraps and tries to work out how they might be repurposed. “It forces us to be much more mindful and creative as cooks,” Barber says. “Otherwise, we might fall into a kind of grocery-store mentality—cherry-picking only the most desirable ingredients for our menus.” In the end, Paykin concludes, the food we eat has “come [to be] viewed as, and considered, a commodity rather than this living, breathing thing that’s so necessary to our health and happiness.” Until we change our basic point of view, the solution to the food waste problem—and, by extension, the growing food security disparity—will be to create economic incentives that preclude it. Chefs and restaurateurs may see a reward for finding innovative ways of using scraps with an improved bottom line, but it all starts with the farmers, who are no better off financially whether their leftover produce is delivered to a soup kitchen or left to rot. 4

zerowastesolutions

CHEF MOGAN ANTHONY VILLAGE SOCIAL KITCHEN + BAR As the dominant byproduct of the beer industry, spent grain accounts for up to 85 percent of a brewery’s total waste. The majority of the leftovers from many breweries is shipped or picked up and goes to feed livestock and hogs. Chef Mogan Anthony, of the Village Social in Mount Kisco, has a different, tasty and sustainable use for the spent grain. “About a year ago, I started using spent grain as a crispy component—like a breadcrumbtype coating for chicken and other protein,” he explains. “It has a very earthy tone to it, depending on the type of beer, and can also sometimes have a very strong flavor of the beer that it was produced from.” Depending on how often he picks up the grain from local craft breweries, Anthony also uses the versatile, fiber-rich ingredient for a nutty grain purée for pralines and in fresh-made pasta (though “it’s very difficult,” he admits). He currently sources pasta from Sfoglini Pasta Shop in New York City, which uses spent grain from Bronx Brewery. Anthony’s “zero waste” pasta will premier on the Village Social’s spring Hudson Valley Restaurant Week menu. —KW photo : jermaine haughton

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LOCALLY GROWN

O

n av e r ag e , w e h av e a b o u t 20 c h i c k e n s living on the farm at any one time. Most are hens, though we always keep one or two roosters to maintain the natural order. The hens are layers, not meat birds—they provide my wife, me and our resident farm crew with eggs for eight months of the year. (As the days shorten, the hens stop laying; we could induce them to lay year-round if we supplied artificial light and heat, but prefer to give them the winters off.) Aside from their male panache, the roosters’ main functions are to announce daybreak, watch over the flock and compete with each other for the hens’ affections. They occasionally engage in violent, even mortal, combat. The chickens’ diet varies over the course of the growing season. Cracked corn and “layer pellets” are the standard fare, but they consume much else besides: They get their first taste of fresh greens in the form of edible grasses and weeds, or leftover salad makings in spring; they enjoy voluminous amounts of over-ripe tomatoes, jumbo zucchini and squash in mid-summer; they devour wilted kale, collards and broccoli leaves in the fall. They appreciate kitchen scraps, especially rice, spaghetti and stale bread, any time of year. We’ve noticed the yokes of the eggs are brighter and more orange the more fresh food the hens eat, especially dark leafy greens. In the winter months, when we become dependent on supermarket eggs, a poached or sunny-sideup egg holds little appeal—better to scramble and liven up those pallid, watery ova with fresh herbs or grated cheese. For several years, I’ve taken responsibility for looking after the chickens—gathering eggs, providing the birds with food and water and attending to their general well being. I’ve observed the more subtle aspects of chicken society and behavior. Each bird, it turns out, is an individual— some are tame, some skittish; some are more dominant and aggressive, some yielding and retiring. The birds establish friendships or compatibilities and each has a preferred place to roost at night. Occasionally, a hen will choose to sit on her eggs and hatch them into chicks. Overall, one senses that this is a community of feathered individuals with its own pecking order and set of mores and rules. It’s not difficult to feel some commonality with them. It was, therefore, with pained surprise that I visited the coop one crisp, mid-November morning to discover first one, then two, then three, then a total of seven dead hens

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murder

by keith stewart illustrations by flavia bacarella

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strewn about inside their fenced enclosure. At first, I could see nothing wrong with them aside from the fact that they were lying prostrate on the ground, obviously something live birds never do. Had they been struck by lightning? Unlikely, since no electrical storms were recorded during the night. Might they have consumed poisonous plants? Unlikely, too, since chickens have an unerring sense of what is palatable and what is not. Closer inspection revealed a few feathers missing on their necks, along with small, lateral incisions. On a couple of birds a little flesh was removed. It became evident that some blood-thirsty creature had paid them a visit during the night. I gathered the dead hens and laid them on the ground outside the enclosure so the surviving birds would no longer have to endure the sight of their slaughtered companions (though, to be honest, I’m not sure they were paying much attention to them). While my back was turned, Kobe, the dog, snatched one of them and ran off. (He expertly plucked and ate his booty, leaving behind only the beak, wings, feet and a pile of feathers.) The remaining corpses went into the overgrown cow pasture behind the barn, from which Kobe is excluded by virtue of an invisible dog fence. The carcasses would become food for foxes, coyotes, crows and other resident flesh eaters soon enough. My co-manager, Joshua, and I agreed that the perpetrator of this criminal act would likely return in a night or two and continue its grisly work. So we waited until after sundown (when chickens are easy to catch—they are practically blind at night), gathered them up and relocated them to their more secure, albeit less roomy, winter quarters in the lower barn. A couple of weeks passed without incident. Then Joshua sighted a sleek, dark brown, bushy-tailed creature running behind some crates in the barn. A few days later, he discovered a large decapitated bullfrog and suspicious animal droppings among folded row cover stored in one of the barn’s horse stalls. More worrying were the scratches or tooth marks at the bottom of the door to the coop, as well as splinters of wood scattered on the floor. Some animal appeared to be living in the barn and trying to gain access to the chickens. That night, we set a Havahart® live trap just outside the coop. The murdered chickens from a few weeks earlier were long gone, so we baited the trap with half a rabbit (borrowed from Kobe when he wasn’t looking). Two days later, the doors of the trap were tripped shut. Inside, a slender, darkcoated, ferret-like creature with small yellowish-green eyes anxiously paced back and forth, searching in vain for an exit. Every so often, it poked its whiskered little nose through the lattice of the trap. The animal in the trap was a mink. When most people hear the word mink they think of a coat. But, of course, mink are animals in their own right. The long-bodied, short-legged carnivores of the mustelid family, usually weighing less than three pounds, are found in the wild throughout much of the US and Canada. They are solitary and territorial. Members of the opposite sex get together just once a year (in late winter to early spring) to mate. At all other times, they aggressively defend their territories. Though they are land animals, mink are good swimmers and prefer to live

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Could I allow the murderous spree it had engaged in to go unpunished?


in dens along stream banks or near ponds, where they catch fish, muskrats, snakes, frogs, young turtles and marsh-dwelling birds. They are also happy to kill and eat mice, rabbits and chipmunks (and, as we discovered to our chagrin, chickens). They kill by attacking the necks of their prey with their sharp teeth and powerful jaws. The mink’s lustrous, dense brown coat has been a terrible liability for them and many wild mink suffered a grisly fate in service to the fashion industry. Trapping still occurs, but today, mink populations in North America are relatively stable since most animals destined for the coat rack are raised on farms. For the best part of the next day, the captured mink stayed with us, periodically feasting on the remnants of the rabbit while I pondered its fate. Could I allow the murderous spree it had engaged in to go unpunished? But killing a trapped animal is not something I care to do, even one so culpable. Moreover, this mink was a strikingly beautiful creature and, in killing the chickens, it was doing what minks do: fulfilling its role in the wild, sometimes joyous, but often frightening and violent dance of life, that we are all a party to. Why should I, who have done some killing in my time, bear it malice? That afternoon, my wife and I drove several miles from the farm to a relatively uninhabited, wooded area with a small stream running through it. I put on a pair of heavy gloves (a precaution against getting bitten), lifted the trap from the back of my pickup, tilted it almost upright and opened one of the doors. For a few moments the mink held on, perhaps fearful of falling. Then, seeing the opportunity, it rolled out of the trap, paused for a split second on the solid earth, then bounded off in the direction of the stream. It delighted me to watch it. 4

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farms, food & markets

community supported agriculture

C

o m m u n i t y s u p p o r t e d a g r i c u lt u r e ( c s a ) p r o g r a m s c r e a t e a symbiotic relationship between farmers and community members. Members pay for their shares before the season starts, allowing the farmers the resources to start growing. CSA members receive fresh, seasonal produce either weekly or bi-weekly. Each share is priced differently, depending on the size and the farm. Many varieties of shares are available, from vegetables and fruit to meat, dairy and eggs. Maple products and other items are also available. Shares are usually picked up at the farm, though some CSAs offer delivery to specified locations. CSAs offer a way for local consumers to bond with farms and support continued agricultural growth and service to the community. Joining a local CSA is one way consumers can be certain about where, how and who is growing the food they’re eating, while simultaneously helping to strengthen the region’s agricultural economy by dealing directly with a local producer. march

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2017 csa farms

COLUMBIA COUNTY

DUTCHESS COUNTY

Hawthorne Valley Farm 327 Rt 21C, Ghent Demeter-certified biodynamic farm offering seasonal vegetable and fruit shares. Pick up: Friday at farm in Ghent; Thursday at city locations (Riverdale, Inwood, Garden City). Vegetable share: $550-$600 depending on pick up location. June-November. hawthornevalleyfarm.org The Farm at Miller’s Crossing 81 Roxbury Rd, Hudson Vegetable and beef shares with maple products also available. Members can pick up their shares at the farm every Tuesday, in Long Island City on Wednesdays or in Brooklyn on Wednesdays and Saturdays. farmatmillerscrossing.com Hawk Dance Farm 362 Rodman Rd, Hillsdale Assortment of heirloom vegetables, greens, ginger, turmeric and root vegetables that are grown using organic practices. A half share (1-2 adults) is $300. A full share (3-4 adults) is $600. Share pick up is from 9am to 1pm at the Copake Hillsdale Farmers’ Market (9140 Rt 22, Hillsdale). May-October. hawkdancefarm.com Lineage Farm 67 Pinewood Rd, Hudson Small and large vegetable shares available, delivered to member sites from June through October: Saturdays in Copake, Brooklyn, and White Plains; Wednesdays in Hudson; Thursdays in Croton. All produce is grown without pesticides, herbicides or artificial fertilizers. Prices vary upon location. See website for details. lineagefarmcsa.com

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Little Seed Gardens PO Box 195, Chatham Certified organic vegetables and herbs. Full share is $500; half share is $300 (pick up every other week). Pick up: Tuesdays (4-6:30pm) in Chatham or Thursdays (4-6pm) in Rhinebeck. June-October. littleseedgardens.com

Common Ground Farm 79 Farmstead Ln, Wappingers Falls Non-profit educational farm project. Ecologically grown without chemical fertilizers, herbicides or pesticides. Herbs, vegetables and flowers. U-Pick shares are $175. See website for updated information. commongroundfarm.org

Red Oak Farm 1921 US Rt 9, Stuyvesant Seasonal selection of certified organic vegetables, berries, fruit, herbs, dried herbs and teas. Members have the option to select the items in their share each week. May-November. $495 for 25 weeks. Pick up: Tuesdays at the Albany Public Library on Delaware Ave; Saturdays at the farm in Stuyvesant, at the Hudson Farmers’ market (corner of 6th and Columbia) and at the Kinderhook Farmers’ Market (Kinderhook Village Green). redoakfarmny.com

Fishkill Farms 9 Fishkill Farm Rd, Hopewell Junction Seasonal fruit, vegetables and pick-your-own produce. Regular and small shares are available. Pick up is every Saturday at the farm store in Fishkill and at the Old Stone House in Park Slope (Brooklyn). June-November. Winter shares are also available from December through March. fishkillfarms.com

Roxbury Farm 2501 Rt 9H, Kinderhook Vegetable shares from June through November. Price averages $640 for a share. Fruit and meat shares can also be added. Pick up locations throughout the Capital District, Westchester County, New York City and Columbia County. Monthly winter shares (December-February) also available. roxburyfarm.com Tiny Hearts Farm County Rt 7A, Copake A large arranged bouquet of cut flowers, vase ready. Depending on the bounty, single bunches and extras are included. 18 weeks in the summer season: $320. tinyheartsfarm.com

Great Song Farm 475 Milan Hill Rd, Red Hook Offers fresh, seasonal produce such as lettuce, squash, carrots, cucumbers, melons, onions, greens and fruit. Regular weekly, bi-weekly and larger shares are available. Share distribution: Tuesdays and Saturdays at the farm. SNAP benefits are accepted, and further financial assistance is available if needed. greatsongfarm.com Hearty Roots Community Farm 1830 Rt 9, Germantown Salad greens, cooking greens, root vegetables, seasonal vegetables and herbs. Weekly shares cost $600; bi-weekly shares cost $325. Pick up: Woodstock, Kingston, Red Hook or at the farm in Clermont. Eggs and meat available at an additional cost. June-November. The farm’s pickyour-own garden is also open to members on Wednesdays and Saturdays. heartyroots.com


Meadowland Farm 689 Schultzville Rd, Clinton Corners Fruit and vegetable shares available, $500 per share. Farm-raised lamb and/or pork also available in addition to the share ($750). Pickup is every Friday evening at the farm. JuneSeptember. meadowlandfarmny.com Northwind Farms 185 W Kerley Corners Rd, Tivoli All-natural, antibiotic-free meat and poultry shares. Multiple share sizes available. Contact for prices and share details. Cash or check only. northwindfarmsallnatural.com Obercreek Farm 81 New Hamburg Rd, Wappingers Falls USDA certified organic produce and herbs. A full share is $675, and a half share is $375 if you sign up by March 31. Pick-up at the farm on Wednesdays and Saturdays. Meat and eggs can be added to each share. Boxed delivery shares are also available. Members have access to the pick-your-own fields. June-October. obercreekfarm.com Paisley Farm Rt 9, Tivoli A variety of squash, beets, carrots, potatoes and other organic vegetables. $240 for a full share; $130 for a half share. Pick-up at the farm and also in Brooklyn. Egg shares in addition to vegetable shares are also available. OctoberNovember. Poughkeepsie Farm Project Vassar College Farm, Poughkeepsie A non-profit farm project offering weekly seasonal vegetables, berries and flowers. Large shares range from $690 to $834; small shares range from $380 to $452. Work-trade shares available for lower prices. Fruit and winter shares available. Pick-up: Tuesdays and Saturdays at the farm. June-November. farmproject.org Pri Haemek Bounty of the Valley CSA Local farm providing sustainably grown produce. Full share is $500; small share is $300. Membership fee is $36. Distributions on Thursdays at Temple Beth-El in Poughkeepsie. June-October. botvcsa.wixsite.com Sisters Hill Farm 127 Sisters Hill Rd, Stanfordville Weekly and bi-weekly shares available. Pickup Tuesdays (4-6pm) and Saturdays (8-11am) at the farm. Weekly sliding scale: $675– $775. Bi-weekly sliding scale: $360-$410. sistershillfarm.org Sol Flower Farm Store 41 Kaye Rd, Millerton Certified naturally grown fresh produce and cut flowers; other local products including meat, dairy, cheese and fresh bread. New farm store open May through November. CSA Store Card Memberships available. solflowerfarm.com march

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Starling Yards 81 Echo Valley Rd, Red Hook Sustainable farm offering vegetable, egg and flower shares from June through October. Regular share is $475; large share is $585. Pickup: Tuesday and Friday at Starling Yards in Red Hook. Thanksgiving packages available. Add-on options: meat, mushrooms, dairy and other local produce. starlingyards.com

GREENE COUNTY Stoneledge Farm 145 Garcia Ln, Leeds USDA certified organic vegetable shares available. Optional fruit, mushroom and coffee shares can be added. June-November. View website for various pick up locations. stoneledge.farm

ORANGE COUNTY Bialas Farms 75 Celery Ave, New Hampton Summer and winter vegetable shares are available from June 2017 through January 2018. Several pricing and pick up options including at the farm. bialasfarms.com Blooming Hill Farm 1251 Rt 208, Blooming Grove Fruit, vegetable, herbs, flowers and plants included in a share. Sign up anytime during the year and receive credit towards share items plus an extra 10 percent. Farm open year-round. Purchase $250 half share for $275 of credit or $500 full share for $550 of credit. Credit is used to choose your own produce on Saturdays (10am-2pm) at the farm. bloominghillfarm.com Gray Family Farm 261 Otterkill Rd, New Windsor Members receive a weekly basket with a combination of meats (chicken, beef, pork), vegetables, eggs and specialty items. $1,275 for 15 weeks. grayfamilyfarm.com Peace and Carrots Farm 168 Johnson Rd, Chester A variety of seasonal vegetables such as potatoes, lettuce, squash, tomatoes, kohlrabi, fennel and more. $650 for the Veggie Lover’s share (four adult omnivores); $390 for the Party of Two Share (two adult omnivores). Farm pick up: Mondays from 2-7pm. West Point delivery Mondays at 3pm. June-October. peaceandcarrotsfarm.com Royal Acres Farm & CSA 621 Scotchtown Collabar Rd, Middletown Vegetable shares. A half share is $270, and a full share is $440. June-October. Pick-up: Wednesdays and Fridays from 3:30-6:30pm at the farm. Also available for pick up at Crystal Run Healthcare (155 Crystal Run Rd, Middletown) on Thursdays from 3:30 to 5:30pm. Find the farm on Facebook for more details.

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PUTNAM COUNTY Glynwood Center 362 Glynwood Rd, Cold Spring Each share contains a diverse selection of seasonal vegetables, which usually feeds a family of four or two vegetarian adults. Pick up on the farm, Tuesdays or Fridays from 3-6pm. One drop off location at the Garrison Café in Garrison on Tuesdays from 4-6pm. A full share is $720, and a half share (bi-weekly) is $375. May 30-November 6. glynwood.org Longhaul Farm 69 South Mountain Pass, Garrison Full share $650; half share $325. Community shares $1,250. Pick-up at farm on Tuesdays or Fridays. June-September. longhauling.blogspot.com Ryder Farm 400 Starr Ridge Rd, Brewster Full share $450; half share $300. A bi-weekly share is $225. Pick-up on farm. June-October. ryderfarmorganic.com

Farm Market & Bakery

ROCKLAND COUNTY Cropsey Community Farm 220 S Little Tor Rd, New City General vegetable shares are $750. Prepackaged vegetable shares available for $790 with pick up at Hungry Hollow Co-op, Nyack Farmers’ Market or the Valley Cottage Library. Cut-your-own flower shares are $100, and cutyour-own herb shares are $100. Work shares are also available. rocklandfarm.org

Certified Organic Meats & Produce Daily Lunch Specials Nursery Plant Starts Family owned and organic since 1987

MARKET HOURS: Monday, Wednesday, Thursday & Saturday: 9a-5p Friday & Sunday 9a-5:30p (Closed Tuesday) 5409 Route 22 | Tel: 518.789.4191

ULSTER COUNTY Evolutionary Organics 283 Springtown Rd, New Paltz Certified naturally grown heirloom vegetables, baby greens, herbs and pasture-raised eggs. Market-style CSA June-November, including local fruit. Find the farm on Facebook for more details. Phillies Bridge Farm Project 45 Phillies Bridge Rd, New Paltz Organically grown vegetables, herbs and flowers. Big share: $675, 3-4 people; small share: $450, 1-2 people. Members receive free admission to the farm’s seasonal festivities, discounts on several education programs and more. See website for other share options and prices. June-November. philliesbridge.org Rondout Valley Organics 331 Dowe Rd, Ellenville An online marketplace managed by Rusty Plough Farm. Offering produce, berries, eggs, meats, cheeses, honey, maple syrup and more from local producers. $50 annual membership fee plus $100 initial account deposit. Add more funds as you need, choose your items from the weekly list. Yearround. Pick-ups throughout the Rondout Valley. rondoutvalleyorganics.com

Organic Soils & Compost

BULK SOIL & COMPOST HOURS: Monday-Friday 8a-12p; 1p-5p 194 Coleman Station Road | Tel: 518.789.3252

MILLERTON, NY 12546

mcenroeorganicfarm.com

Drink local this Spring! THURS- MON

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Second Wind CSA at Four Winds Farm 158 Marabac Rd, Gardiner Certified organic and no-till. Full shares: $550. Also offers local fruit when available and an optional local egg share. Pick-up locations at the farm in Gardiner and at the drop-off location in Garrison. June-October. secondwindcsa.com Taliaferro Farms 187 Plains Rd, New Paltz Full share: $1,000; half share: $550. Threeseason, long-term full share: $2,700. 3-season, long-term half shares are also available. taliaferrofarms.com Trapani Farms 730 Lattintown Rd, Milton Full share $400; half share $220. June-October. Find the farm on Facebook for more details.

WESTCHESTER COUNTY Harvest Moon Farm & Orchard 130 Hardscrabble Rd, North Salem Each share includes a variety of vegetables grown using organic practices. Milk shares from Ronnybrook Farm are also available. Pick-up: Thursdays at the farm store from 8:00am-6:00pm. Partial and full season shares available. Prices range from $325-$810. harvestmoonfarmandorchard.com J&A Farm Indiana Rd, Goshen CSA members choose from a wide selection of mixed vegetables each week. Prices range from $400-$600 for a share. Pick-up: Friday mornings at W 97th St in Manhattan and Saturday Mornings in Pleasantville. May-November. jafarm.com Pound Ridge Organics 22 Westchester Ave, Pound Ridge Organic and local produce, meat, eggs and artisanal products. Members are emailed a weekly harvest/inventory list from which they can choose exactly what they want. Orders are assembled each week for pick up or delivery at the end of each week. Find the farm on Facebook for more details.

FARMS FOODS MARKETS VA L L E Y TA B L E . C O M

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EATING BY THE SEASON

spring: a multi-cultural

W

by kristen warfield

e comm e m or at e t h e o ns e t o f s p r in g b y

inviting chefs from diverse cultural backgrounds to share a dish typical of one they would serve on a seasonal cultural holiday. From Muslim mansaf to Irish lamb stew to Italian pizza rustica—this is food meant for sharing and for joyous celebration (which, by the way, often is accompanied by singing). march

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GUINNESS STOUT LAMB STEW AGNES DEVEREUX Ingredients Olive oil 10 pounds lamb shoulder, cut into 3-inch pieces, trimmed of fat, pre-seasoned with salt and pepper 6 medium onions, chopped 10 large carrots, cut into 3-inch pieces 7 large parsnips, cut into 3-inch pieces 10 to 12 large Yukon gold potatoes, cut into 2-inch pieces 1/2 pound butter 1 cup flour salt fresh ground pepper 4 cloves garlic, smashed 1 sprig of thyme 1 sprig of Rosemary 3 quarts hot lamb stock 4 cups Guinness stout serves 8 Method 1. Heat 3 tablespoons of olive oil over medium high heat in one or two large sauté pans. When oil is hot, place lamb pieces in a single layer in each pan to brown. Do not crowd the pieces; allow to brown evenly without moving the pieces of meat around. 2. When a batch of lamb is browned, remove pieces from pot and continue with another batch until all the lamb is browned. 3. When the last batch of lamb has been browned and removed, add onions and garlic to the pan(s). Season with salt; cook until onions are softened. (Stir/scrape the pan while cooking over low heat to loosen any caramelized bits stuck to the bottom.) 4. Dump all the contents of the sauté pan into a large, stainless steel pot that will fit into your oven. Place the pot on the stove over medium heat. 5. Add the butter and stir in until melted. Add the flour and cook until the roux is browned, about 15 minutes. 6. Add the stout and stock, raise the temperature until the mixture comes to a fast simmer, and stir constantly until a smooth sauce is created. 7. Add the lamb pieces, herbs, salt and pepper and bring mixture back to a simmer. 8. Cover the pot tightly with tin foil and place in a 250˚F oven for 90 minutes. 9. Remove pot from the oven; add potatoes, carrots and parsnips, return pot to oven and cook another 30 minutes. Garnish servings with chopped parsley.

While corned beef and cabbage may be the go-to dinner across the U.S. on St. Patrick’s Day, that dish was never on the table when chef Agnes Devereux was a young girl growing up on the Emerald Isle. On her menu at The Village Tea Room and Bake Shop in New Paltz, she uses the holiday as an opportunity to highlight her country’s most prized (and delicious) ingredients: butter, cheese, lamb and, of course, Guinness. “Ireland has a much more rich and varied cuisine than corned beef and cabbage,” Devereux notes. “It’s almost disappointing to see people reaching for it each St. Patrick’s Day.” This lamb stew, while using traditional ingredients, offers a little twist—the addition of Guinness stout is “appropriate,” Devereux says, though admittedly not traditional. The lamb is the focal point of the stew. “Lambs born in winter are around three months old in the spring, making them perfect for St. Patrick’s Day or Easter,” Devereux says. A medley of potatoes, carrots and parsnips (not nearly as common here as in Ireland, Devereux says) make for a hearty and quite simple way to celebrate on March 17.

The Village TeaRoom, Restaurant & Bake Shop 10 Plattekille Ave, New Paltz (845) 255-3434, villagetearoom.com

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photo top : jerry novesky ; bottom : provided


CROATIAN EASTER BREAD ZELJKO TOMIC Ingredients DOUGH

26 1/2 ounces all purpose flour 2 sachets dry yeast 6 ounces sugar pinch of salt 1 tablespoon vanilla sugar 2 1/2 ounces butter 2 1/2 ounces lard 1/2 cup warm milk 3 ounces sour cream 3 eggs 1 egg yolk 2 to 3 tablespoon rum 1 1/2 ounces raisins 1 3/4 ounces mixed candied fruit zest of one orange, finely grated zest of half lemon, finely grated makes 5 loaves EGG WASH

1 egg sugar Method Pre-soak raisins in the rum for about an hour before making the bread. Preheat oven to 350˚F 1. Sift flour into a large mixing bowl. 2. Add salt, sugar and vanilla sugar. 3. Dissolve yeast in warm milk and add to the flour mixture. 4. Add 3 whole eggs, one extra egg yolk, sour cream and citrus zest and mix in well, then add candied fruit, raisins and rum. 5. Knead mixture for at least 10 minutes until ingredients are evenly distributed and a soft dough forms. 6. Cover the dough with a clean kitchen towel and let it rise in a warm place until doubled in size (this should take about an hour). 7. Punch the dough down, then knead it another 10 minutes, adding (cooled) melted butter and lard. Cover with a clean kitchen towel and let rise in warm place until again doubled in size. 8. Shape the dough into 5 round loaves, place them on a baking sheet covered with parchment paper and let them rest 30 minutes. 9. Using kitchen scissors, cut a cross into the surface of each bun. Brush the surface with whisked egg, then set breads aside for 10 minutes. 10. Bake in 350˚F oven 30 to 35 minutes. 11. Remove bread from oven. While the loaves are still hot, brush again with whisked egg and sprinkle with vanilla sugar.

Baking is the ultimate opportunity for families to showcase their unique twists on an ancient recipe, and it’s a big part of the Roman Catholic celebration of Easter in Croatia. “As a child, we were always looking forward to having Easter bread,” says Zeljko “Jerry” Tomic, owner of Dubrovnik in New Rochelle. On the small Croatian island of Lopud that was Tomic’s home for part of his childhood, the small, round loaves of Easter bread—each one with the sign of the cross cut into the top before baking—were shared with neighbors and friends, “and maybe they would give some of theirs in return,” he recalls. “Making Easter bread was almost like a competition [to see] who was going to make it best.” Tomic and chef Antonio Salandic now share the tradition with the Hudson Valley at the restaurant during Easter. The aromatic bread has notes of citrus, vanilla and rum, yet, despite the addition of raisins and candied fruit, its cake-like texture is not overly sweet. “We have two types of customers that order it,” Tomic notes. “The first are the people who have never tried it, and the second are those that crave it. It brings them back home and to their childhood.”

Dubrovnik 721 Main St, New Rochelle (914) 637-3777, dubrovnikny.com

photos : jermaine haughton

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PIZZA RUSTICA DAVID DIBARI Ingredients 12 ounces Montena Taranto ricotta cheese 3 ounces hot sopressata 3 ounces sweet sopressata 2 ounces Genoa salami 1/2 cup Grana Padano cheese, grated pinch cayenne pepper 2 eggs 1 egg yolk serves 8

For nearly every Easter that Chef David DiBari can remember, Easter pie “was always a staple on the kitchen counter during the holiday—when guests unexpectedly dropped by, we always had something festive to serve them,” he recalls. He now serves up the dish in the same spirit to his guests during Easter at The Cookery, and as an “Easter pizza pie” at his Neapolitan pizza restaurant, The Parlor. True to Italian tradition, the dense pie combines a savory medley of cheese and meat enclosed under a Parmigiano short dough. It comes out of the oven piping hot, but it’s intended to be served at room temperature. Like an old and familiar friend, the company of this family dish is meant to be shared. “For me, it is true Italian comfort food,” DiBari says.

Method Preheat oven to 300˚F 1. Peel and dice the sopressata and salami. (Run the hot and sweet sopressata under warm water to loosen the skin--this will make the peeling easier.) 2. In a mixing bowl, combine the meat, ricotta, one of the eggs plus the egg yolk, Grana Padano and cayenne. 3. Roll out savory Parmigiano short dough and use it to line a 9-inch pie plate. 4. Fill the lined pie plate with the meat mixture. Fold the edges of the dough onto the filling. 5. Lightly beat the remaining egg. Using a pastry brush, brush the edges of the dough. 6. Bake at 300˚F for about 40 minutes. Cool, chill and slice. The Cookery 39 Chestnut St, Dobbs Ferry (914) 305-2336

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CARNITAS PORK RAMIRO JIMENEZ Ingredients 2 gallons water, or enough to cover the pork 1 cup white sugar 1 cup coarse kosher salt 1 chopped white onion 10 garlic cloves 3 or 4 bay leaves 1/2 tablespoon dry oregano 1/2 tablespoon cumin 1/2 tablespoon chili powder 1 tablespoon dry thyme 2 oranges 16 ounces orange soda 5 chunks of fresh pork shoulder, 16 to 24 ounces each 1 gallon vegetable oil, olive oil, or 4 pounds leaf lard serves 6 to 8 Method BRINE

The day before you prepare this dish, brine the pork to keep it moist, flavorful and tender: Combine water, sugar, salt and herbs in a pot or container large enough to hold all the pork shanks. Soak the pork for 24 hours, refrigerated, in the brining liquid. The next day, remove the pork from the brine, paper-towel dry and discard the brining liquid. PORK CONFIT

Pre-heat oven to 275°F. 1. Place the pork in a roasting pan large enough to allow it to be submerged in the vegetable oil or lard. 2. Add chopped onion, garlic, cumin, chili powder, oregano, oranges (halved and squeezed), thyme, bay leaves and orange soda. 3. Pour the oil into the roasting pan with the pork. Place the full roasting pan in the center of the oven and cook at 275˚F for 4 hours, occasionally turning the pork while keeping the meat as submerged as possible. Be very careful of the hot oil or lard. 4. Carefully remove the shanks from the oven. CAUTION: The cooking fat will be dangerously hot. 5. Shred the pork; serve as tacos with tortillas and pico de gallo. Buen provecho! (Bon appetite!)

Cinco de Mayo is the joyous celebration of the Mexican victory over French soldiers in the May 5, 1862 Battle of Puebla-the celebration is so enthusiastic, in fact, that the festivities have crossed over to the U.S. “Cinco de Mayo has become so big across the country,” says Ramiro Jimenez, chef/owner of Ramiro’s 954, in Mahopac. “On that day, America becomes a part of our Mexican and Mexican-American cultures.” Jimenez, who was born in Mexico City and came to the United States at age 18, helps celebrate the day by preparing hand-made, traditional Mexican cuisine and honoring Puebla--“the state that beat an army without an army.” This truly uncomplicated pork dish combines spices and citrus to make for a lively, tender filling for tacos. The addition of orange soda along with fresh oranges allows the pork (a meat most Mexicans grow up with) to caramelize while it slow cooks. “It’s a family recipe with my own twist,” Jimenez notes. But his home-grown commemoration of Cinco de Mayo at Ramiro’s doesn’t stop there. “We throw a real traditional celebration, with loud mariachi music, a lot of tequila and Mexican dishes from tacos to tostadas,” he says. “It’s not just a celebration about the battle, but of life itself.”

Ramiro's 954 954 Rt 6, Mahopac (845) 621-3333

photos : jermaine haughton

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MANSAF EATING NOTES To master the traditional method of eating mansaf takes some practice (like learning to eat with chopsticks, only more enjoyable). You’ll understand the reason for making a small rice/lamb/jameed ball when you’re ready to eat it: The ball should be dropped into your mouth— your fingers should not touch your mouth or your lips during the meal. (This isn’t a ritualistic move, it’s a sanitary one—those fingers are going right back into the big communal platter for the next helping, and the next, and the next.) The real fun part of the meal comes when you are finished eating: Then, and only then, you get to lick your fingers and hands of all the delicious remnants. The dish also is served with a bowl, spoon and knife and may be eaten in a more familiar manner without judgment. —VT

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MANSAF KAMEL JAMAL Ingredients 10 pound lamb leg 1 1/2 large onions, diced 1 1/2 quarts liquid jameed* 1 1/2 quarts water salt and white pepper 4 cups long grain white rice 1/2 clove garlic parsley almonds, toasted serves 15-20 *Jameed is goat- or sheep-milk yogurt that is dried, then reconstituted for use. It is difficult to find outside of the Mideast, though there are sources on the web (where the quality may be sketchy). Most people make their own, but it can also be ordered from Ziatun in Beacon.

Method 1. Place lamb, onions and water in a large pot. Bring to a boil, season with salt and white pepper, then let simmer for 1 hour with lamb in the stock. 2. While the lamb stock is cooking, prepare rice. 3. When stock is complete, add the jameed and bring to a boil while continuing to stir. 4. Line a serving platter with open-faced pita bread and soak the pita with the lamb stock. 5. Distribute the rice on top of the pita. 6. Place pieces of lamb evenly atop the rice. 7. Garnish with toasted almonds, parsley and pan-fried minced garlic. Pour creamy jameed sauce over all. Ziatun 244 Main St, Beacon (845) 765-8268

Mansaf is the meal of celebration in Islamic culture—if it’s a wedding, a birth or a major holiday, this traditional lamb dish will be on the table. The meal is so popular that it is considered the national dish of Jordan. “The name of the dish comes from the term ‘large tray’ or ‘large dish,’” says Kamel Jamal, chef/ owner of Ziatun restaurant in Beacon. As one of a handful of Palestinian restaurants in the Hudson Valley, Jamal and his wife Lena serve mansaf on special occasions at their restaurant. Simply seasoned, the lamb is slow cooked in a tangy, fermented yogurt sauce called jameed. “It is a hard, dry yogurt that is prepared by boiling sheep milk, which is then left to dry and ferment,” Jamal explains. The dish is served on a platter with a thin layer of pita bread, topped with rice and garnished with toasted almonds. Along with the traditional ingredients and preparation of the dish, it is always eaten in a specific manner. “A tray of mansaf is placed on a table, where people gather around it while standing,” Jamal says. “Mansaf should be eaten with the use of a person's right hand only, while the left [hand] is behind the person's back. The right hand is used to create balls of rice and then the ball is placed in the mouth through the use of three fingers.” To which he adds a word of advice: “It is frowned upon to blow on the ball of rice, no matter how hot.”

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The Hudson Valley

VA L L EY TA BL E.COM

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Eva Deitch

We’re Artisans, We’re Advocates


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INDEX TO ADVERTISERS

PAGE 1 Adams Fairacre Farms / adamsfarms.com 30 Admiration Foods / 201.567.3177 / www.admirationfoods.com 54 Aroma Osteria / 845.298.6790 / aromaosteriarestaurant.com 44 Baja 328 / 845.838.BAJA / baja328.com 90 Barb’s Butchery / 845.831.8050 / barbsbutchery.com 53 Beacon Natural Market / 845.838.1288 / beaconnaturalmarket.com 53 Beacon Pantry / 845.440.8923 / beaconpantry.com 2 Café Amarcord / 845.440.0050 / cafeamarcord.com 91 Caffe Macchiato / 845.565.4616 / addressyourapetite.com 92 Café Mio / 845.255.4949 / miogardiner.com C2 California Closets / 855.336.9590 / californiaclosets.com 20 Canterbury Brook Inn / 845.534.9658 / canterburybrookinn.com 94 Cathryn’s Tuscan Grill / 845.265.5582 / tuscangrill.com 90 Cheese Plate / 845.255.2444 / cheeseplatenewpaltz.com 87 Clock Tower Grill / 845.582.0574 / clocktowergrill.com C4 Cosimo’s / cosimosrestaurantgroup.com 85 County Fare / 845.297.3300 / countyfareny.com 7 Craft 47 / 845.360.5253 / craft47.com 3 Crave Restaurant & Lounge / 845.452.3501 / craverestaurantandlounge.com 53 Crooked Rooster / thecrookedrooster.com 30 Culinary Institute of America / 845.471.6608 / ciarestaurants.com C3 Daily Planet Diner / 845.452.0110 / dailyplanetdiner.com 94 Dino’s Vigneto Café / 845.834.2828 / www.vignetocafe.com 45 Dish Bistro & Wine Bar / 845.621.3474 / dishmahopac.com 44 Dogwood Bar / 845.202.7500 / dogwoodbar.com 3 Dubrovnik / 914.637.3777 / Dubrovnikny.com 78 Dutchess County Tourism/ www.dutchesstourism.com/ 52 Ella’s Bellas / 845.765.8502 / ellasbellasbeacon.com 3 Farmer and Sons / 518.828.1635 82 Farm to Table Bistro / 845.297.1111 / ftbistro.com 71 Fishkill Farms / 845.897.4377 / fishkillfarms.com 22 Fresh Company / 845.424.8204 / freshcompany.net 93 Gino’s Restaurant / 845.297.8061 / ginoswappingers.com 74 Hahn Farm / 845.266.3680 04 Half Moon / 914.693.4130 84 Harry’s Hot Sandwiches / 845.765.8111 / harrysbeacon.com 77 Harvest Real Food Catering / 845.687.4492 / elmrockinn.com 74 Harvest Spirits / 518.758.1776 / harvestspirits.com 73 Hawthorne Valley Farm / 518.672.7500 / hawthornevalleyfarm.org 72 Hemlock Hill / 914.737.2810 / hemlockhillfarm.com 32 Henry’s at the Farm / 845.795.1500 / buttermilkfallsinn.com/henrys 92 Hudson St. Café / 845.565-2450 / hudsonstreetcafe.com 34 Hudson Valley Federal Credit Union / 845.463.3011 / hvfcu.org 71 Hudson Valley Fresh / hudsonvalleyfresh.com 39 Hudson Whiskey / hudsonwhiskey.com 21 Il Barilotto / 845.897.4300 / ilbarilottorestaurant.com 92 J&J Gourmet / 845.758.9030 / jandjgourmet.com 45 Jacobowitz & Gubits / 866.993.7575 / jacobowitz.com

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PAGE 74 Jones Farm / 845.534.4445 / jonesfarminc.com 85 Joseph’s Steakhouse / 845.473.2333 / josephs-steakhouse.com 85 Le Express / 845.849.3365 / lexpresshv.com 29 Leo’s Ristorante & Bar / leospizzeria.com 10 Love Apple Farm / 518.828.5048/ www.loveapplefarm.com 94 Mexicali Blue / 845.298.8226 / mexicali-blue.com 67 Mill House Brewing Company / 845.485.BREW / millhousebrewing.com 68 Mother Earth’s / motherearthstorehouse.com 83 National Farm Viability Conference / farmviabilityconference.com 20 N&S Supply / nssupply.com 92 New Paltz Wine & Spirits / 845.255.8528 21 Nic L Inn / 845.452.5649 / nliwinecellar.com 7 Nina / 845.344.6800 / nina-restaurant.com C3 Palace Diner / 845.473.1576 / thepalacediner.com 40 Pamal Broadcasting / pamal.com 66 Pamela’s Traveling Feast / pamelastravelingfeast.com 53 Poughkeepsie Ice House / 845.232.5783 / pkicehouse.com 66 Putnam County Tourism / 845.808.1015 / www.tourputnam.org 68 Red Barn Produce / 845.691.7428 C3 Red Line Diner / 845.765.8401 / dineatredline.com 21 Redwood / 845.259.5868 / www.redwooduptown.com 88 Restaurant 1915 / 845.786.2731 x.1915 95 RiverMarket Bar & Kitchen / 914.631.3100 / rivermarketbarandkitchen.com 10 Riverview Restaurant / 845.265.4778 / riverdining.com 85 Roundhouse, The / 845.765.8369 29 Seoul Kitchen / 845.765.8596 45 Scarborough Fare / 845.831.7247 / www.scarboroughfarenp.com 54 Shawangunk Wine Trail / gunkswine.com 72 Stoutridge Vineyard / 845.236.7620 / stoutridge.com 21 Sunflower Natural Foods Market / 845.679.5361 / sunflowernatural.com 67 A Tavola / 845.255.1436 / www.atavolany.com C3 Table Talk Diner / 845.849.2839 / tabletalkdiner.com 72 TasteNY Store at Todd Hill / 845.849.0247 89 Terrapin Restaurant / 845.876.3330 / terrapinrestaurant.com 39 Tuthill House at the Mill / 845.255.1527/ www.tuthillhouse.com 2 Valley at the Garrison / 845.424.3604 x39 / thegarrison.com 92 Village Tea Room / 845.255.3434 / thevillagetearoom.com 20 Walden Savings Bank / 845.457.7700 / www.waldensavingsbank.com 09 Warren Kitchen & Cutlery / 845.876.6208 / warrenkitchentools.com 75 Warwick Valley Winery & Distillery / wvwinery.com 30 Westchester Tourism / www.westchestertourism.com 83 Wine & Chocolate Festival / 845.278.7272 / hvwineandchocolate.com 73 Whitecliff Vineyard / 845.255.4613 / whitecliffwine.com 94 Wildfire Grill / 845.457.3770 80 William Farm & Sons / 518.828.1635 7 Williams Lumber & Home Center / 845.876.WOOD / williamslumber.com 82 Woody’s Farm to Table / 845.534.1111 / woodysfarmtotable.com 66 Ziatun / 845.765.8265 / ziatun.com


H OTE L | RE STAU RA N T | E VE N TS

Whole-farm cuisine by Michelin starred Chef Terrance Brennan. Cocktails featuring local breweries, distilleries, cideries and wineries.

2 EAST M AI N STREET, BEACON NY 8 45 76 5 8 3 69 | ROU NDH OU SEBEACON.COM

E PRIVAT OM O R T E U BANQ UR O Y K BOO RTY! A P Y HOLIDA

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DIRECTORY

A C C O M M O D A T I O N S

Elmrock Inn 4496 Rt 209, Stone Ridge (845) 687-4492; elmrockinn.com Boutique farmhouse bed & breakfast William Farmer & Sons 20 S Front St, Hudson (518) 828-1635; wmfarmerandsons.com William Farmer & Sons renovated a historic boarding house in downtown Hudson and imbues it with a spirit of hospitality to provide a unique place to stay, a mercantile, a bar and a restaurant. “Stay happy. Enjoy craft cocktails and a gratifying meal.” A R T

Newburgh Art Supply 5 Grand St, Newburgh (845) 561-5552; newburghartsupply.com Mon-Thur 10–6; Fri 11–7; Sat 10–6; Closed Sun See, feel and experience quality art materials in one of Newburgh’s restored landmarks in the heart of the Washington Market neighborhood. Your local source for essential creative supplies for the student, professional and enthusiast. Newly renovated and stocked! B A K E R I E S

The Alternative Baker 407 Main St, Rosendale (845) 658-3355; lemoncakes.com Thur-Mon 7–5; Closed Tue-Wed Twenty years of small-batch, scratch, homemade all-butter baked goods. We offer gluten-free and allergyfriendly options, plus made-to-order sandwiches. Vegan vegetable soups in season, hot mulled New York cider, JB Peel coffees and Harney teas, artisanal drinks, and our award-winning Belgian hot chocolate. Special-occasion cakes and desserts. Unique wedding cakes. All ”Worth a detour”—(NY Times). Ella’s Bellas 418–420 Main St, Beacon (845) 765-8502

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Mon & Wed 8–5; Thu–Sat 8–7; Sun 9–4; closed Tue Ella’s Bellas believes that an indulgence should taste like an indulgence regardless of our dietary restrictions. We specialize in gluten-free products, but we promise you won’t know the difference. C A T E R I N G

Fresh Company PO Box 187, Garrison (845) 424-8204; freshcompany.net At our kitchen one hour north of Manhattan in the Hudson Highlands, we gather great local and imported ingredients for events of all sizes and pocketbooks, from grand affairs to drop-off parties. We emphasize the freshest, finest ingredients, because great food is the spark that ignites a convivial gathering. Executive chef Shelley Boris draws inspiration from cooking styles from around the world. Her distinct, warm style is reflected in meals that encourage hospitality and leisure at the table.

Harvest Real Foods Catering 4496 Rt 209, Stone Ridge (845) 697-4492; harvestrealfoodcatering.com Wed-Fri 10–4 Chef Mark Suszczynski known for his culinary vision, offers farm-to-table catering and unique locations like the Elmrock Inn, the perfect setting for farmstyle celebration: weddings, rehearsal dinners, showers, birthday parties, bar and bat mitzvahs. J&J Gourmet 1 E Market St, Red Hook (845) 758-9030; jandjgourmet.com Tue-Thu 7:30–5; Fri-Sat 7:30–8 Serving Red Hook, Rhinebeck, Pough-keepsie, Hyde Park and surrounding areas in Dutchess County, J&J offers high-quality and precise catering prepared with the freshest ingredients from local farmers and specialty food producers. Pamela’s Traveling Feast & Pamela’s Bird and Bottle 1123 Old Albany Post Rd, Garrison (845) 424-2333 pamelastravelingfeast.com

2017

Adding to her custom crafted cuisine with exceptional service, Pamela Resch, owner of Pamela’s Traveling Feast, announces her acquisition of the Bird & Bottle Inn. This historic, charming, and spirited 1761 colonial inn features four guest rooms with expansive grounds and permanent tent structure for weddings and private events. Offering Special Wine Paring Dinners several times a month, please call for dates and information. Weddings, private events, corporate events and holiday parties.

Terrapin Restaurant Catering & Events 6426 Montgomery St, Rhinebeck (845) 889-8831; terrapincatering.com Enjoy the same high-quality ingredients and service that you know at Terrapin Restaurant anywhere in the Hudson Valley. Catering events of all types and sizes, Terrapin prepares custom menus for every event, using local, organic ingredients whenever possible. Contact Catering Director Hugh Piney. C O F F E E

Irving Farm Coffee Roasters 23 Reagan Rd, Millerton (518) 789-3276; irvingfarm.com A quintessentially New York Company, at Irving Farm Coffee Roasters we know what the country means to the city—and vice versa. In 1999, Irving Farm established its farmhouse roastery in the town of Millerton. Now Irving Farm supplies carefully selected, handcrafted coffees to three cafes in the same metropolis, as well as our own small-town coffee house in Millerton. D I N E R S

Daily Planet 1202 Rt 55, Lagrangeville (845) 452-0110; dailyplanetdiner.com Palace Diner 194 Washington St, Poughkeepsie (845) 473-1576; thepalacediner.com

Red Line Diner 588 Rt 9, Fishkill (845) 765-8401; dineatredline.com Table Talk Diner 2519 South Rd (Rt 9), Poughkeepsie (845) 849-2839; tabletalkdiner.com H O M E

California Closets 16 Saw Mill River Rd, Hawthorne (914) 592-1001; californiaclosets.com Showroom open Mon–Fri, 9–5; Sat 10–3. A pioneer in custom closets and personalized home storage. Let us help you transform the organization of your space, and design a solution that will fit your budget and your home’s aesthetic.

N&S Supply, Inc. 205 Old Rt 9, Fishkill (845) 896-6291; nssupply.com Your one-stop resource for all plumbing, heating and HVAC needs, including specialty products designed and manufactured to meet your lifestyle needs; the latest innovative products, including cutting-edge bathroom technology from remote flushing toilets to hands-free faucets. Six locations: Fishkill, Brewster, Kingston, Catskill, Hudson and Danbury. Williams Lumber 6760 Rt 9, Rhinebeck (845) 876-9663 34 Blommer Rd, Tannersvile (518) 589-5200 2424 Rt 44, Pleasant Valley (845) 605-3520 908 Rt 82, Hopewell Junction (845) 221-2751 9-11 E Market St, Red Hook (845) 758-5615 317 Kyserike Rd, High Falls (845) 687-7676 3679 Rt 9, Hudson (518) 851-3641 4246 Albany Post Rd, Hyde Park (845) 698-1004; williamslumber.com The largest independent home center in the area.


K I T C H E N

Warren Kitchen & Cutlery 6934 Rt 9, Rhinebeck (845) 876-6208; warrenkitchentools.com Mon–Sat 9:30–5:30; Sun 11–4:30 The Hudson Valley’s complete source for professional kitchen knives and tools, commercial quality cookware, bakeware, pocketknives and woodcarving tools. We stock the largest selection of name-brand cutlery in the region at prices well below retail. Knife sets, knife blocks and carving boards. Professional knife sharpening while you wait. M A R K E T S

Adams Fairacre Farms 1560 Ulster Ave, Kingston (845) 336-6300 1240 Rt 300, Newburgh (845) 569-0303 765 Dutchess Tnpk, Poughkeepsie (845) 454-4330 160 Old Post Rd, Wappinger (845) 632-9955 adamsfarms.com Open daily A family-owned farm market/garden center. A cornucopia of fresh produce, meats, fish, deli, and prepared foods. Featuring Hudson Valley products, a great selection of the best local cheese, meat, produce and more.

Barb’s Butchery 69 Spring St, Beacon (845) 831-8050; barbsbutchery.com Mon–Fri 11–7:30; Sat 10–6; lunch Tue–Sat; closed Sun & Mon Your new neighborhood butcher shop providing local, Hudson Valley– raised meat and poultry. Practicing nose-to-tail butchery, we are proud to offer fresh and smoked meats, specialty cuts, charcuterie, house-made stocks, craft bacon and more. Beacon Pantry 382 Main St, Beacon (845) 440-8923; beaconpantry.com Mon–Sat 7–8; Sun 7–6 Providing artisan food and artisan service to Beacon and beyond, Beacon Pantry features more than 50 varieties of cut-to-order domestic and imported cheese and charcuterie. Large selection of local, Italian and hard-to-find French pantry items, grass-fed local meats and dairy. Stumptown coffee, unique chocolates, fine pastries and desserts. Serving European-style sandwiches and cheese plates. Catering for any size event. The Cheese Plate Water Street Market 10 Main St., New Paltz (845) 255-2444;

CheesePlateNewPaltz.com Cheeses from around the world including our own backyard, along with everything that goes with them-pate, jam, chutney, pickles crackers and bread. Gifts too. Fishkill Farms 9 Fishkill Farm Rd., Hopewell Jct. (845)-897-4377; fishkillfarms.com Open 7 days, 9am-6pm, year-round. Organic vegetables, eco certified apples, fresh donuts and homemade pies.

Scarborough Fare 8 North Front St., New Paltz 257 Main St., Beacon (845) 255-0061; scarboroughfarenp.com Olive oil and vinegar tap room. Also imported pasta, gift baskets, glassware, loose leaf tea and more.

TasteNY Store at Todd Hill Taconic State Pkwy, Lagrange Located 10 miles north of I-84 and 1 mile south of Rt 55 (845) 849-0247; ccedutchess.org Open Mon, Wed, Thu, Sat 10–7; Fri 10–8; Sun 11–7; closed Tue An asset along the Taconic State Parkway, find a vast array of foods and products grown or made in the Hudson Valley. Outdoor farmers’ market open Jun–Oct: Fri 3–7, Sun 2–6.

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Beacon Natural Market 348 Main St, Beacon (845) 838-1288; beaconnaturalmarket.com Mon–Sat 9–7; Sun 10–5 Lighting the way for a healthier world. Featuring organic prepared foods, deli and juice bar, organic and regional produce, meats and cheeses. Open since 2005, proprietors L.T. and Kitty Sherpa are dedicated to serving the Hudson Valley with a complete selection of products that are good for you and good for the planet, including an extensive alternative health department. Nutritionist on staff. Catering available. Mother Earth’s 300 Kings Mall Ct, Kingston (845) 336-5541 249 Main St, Saugerties (845) 246-9614 1955 South Rd, Poughkeepsie (845) 296-1069 motherearthstorehouse.com Open daily Offering the finest natural foods, bulk spices, herbs, vitamins, supplements and organic produce. The valley’s best organic, hot and cold takeout at our Kingston and Poughkeepsie locations.

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Sunflower Natural Market 75 Mill Hill Rd, Woodstock 24 Garden St, Rhinebeck (845) 679-5361; (845) 876-0798 sunflowernatural.com Mon–Fri 8–9; Sat 9–9; Sun 10–7 The area’s most complete natural foods market, featuring certified organic produce, organic milk, cheeses and eggs, a wide range of bulk organic grains and nuts, non-irradiated herbs and spices, plus vitamins, homeopathic and body care products. R E S T A U R A N T S

Angelina’s 43 Chestnut St., Cold Spring (845) 265-7078 Lunch & dinner Mon-Sat 11–9; Sun noon-9 This family friendly eatery serves up Italian comfort foods, pizzas and burgers. Save room for the homemade tiramisu. Aroma Osteria 114 Old Post Rd, Wappingers Falls (845) 298-6790; aromaosteriarestaurant.com Lunch Tue–Sat 11:30–2:30; Dinner Tue–Thu 5–10, Fri–Sat 5–11, Sun 4–9

Voted Best Italian Restaurant by Hudson Valley magazine; Poughkeepsie Journal awards four stars. A romantic, relaxed atmosphere with an elegant cocktail bar in a beautiful setting. Here, rustic Italian cuisine is served with a unique and extensive selection of Italian wines (many available by the glass). Catering for all occasions available on or off premises. Baja 328 328 Main St, Beacon (845) 838-BAJA; baja328.com Lunch & dinner Tue–Thu 11–10, Fri–Sat 11–11, Sun noon–8 Main Street’s newest hot spot, Baja 328 offers the finest authentic Southwestern food couples with 110-plus tequilas, the largest selection in the area. Beacon Bread Company 193 Main St., Beacon (845) 838-2867; beaconbread.com Breakfast & lunch daily 7-5 pm Bakery and bistro. Everything from scratch.

Café Amarcord 276 Main St, Beacon (845) 440-0050; cafeamarcord.com Lunch & dinner Tue–Thu noon–10; Fri–Sat noon–11; Sun noon–9 Creative New American cuisine with Italian undertones, served in a warm atmosphere. Enjoy an artisanal cocktail at the onyx bar before having dinner in the bistro-style din-

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ing room or on our Main Street terrace. Bring colleagues for a casual lunch, or a date for a romantic night out. Café Mio 2356 Rt 44/55, Gardiner (845) 255-4949; miogardiner.com Breakfast & lunch Wed–Sun 8:30–4:30 A popular, casual café overlooking the Shawangunk Mountains. We are proud to offer the freshest local fare, drawing from our many surrounding farms—something that is at the core of our food philosophy. A varied selection of wines and craft beers. Caffe Macchiato 99 Liberty St, Newburgh (845) 565-4616; addressyourappetite.com Breakfast & lunch Tue–Fri 9–3; Sat–Sun 9–4 Located in the historic district of Newburgh, Caffe Macchiato is a European-style café offering an all-day breakfast and lunch along with a fair-trade coffee beverage selection. The menu focuses on seasonal items and chef/owner Jodi Cummings highlights several local farms and producers on the menu. All desserts and pastries are baked from scratch in-house. Canterbury Brook Inn 331 Main St, Cornwall (845) 534-9658; canterburybrookinn.com Dinner Tue–Thu 5–9; Fri–Sat 5–9:30 Hosts Hans and Kim Baumann offer fine Swiss continental cuisine featuring veal, duck, chicken, Schnitzel, pasta, filet mignon, fresh fish and much more. Enjoy a fabulous dessert while sipping a frothing cappuccino or espresso. We specialize in both on- and off-premise catering. Outdoor brookside dining. Reservations suggested. Cathryn’s Tuscan Grill 91 Main St, Cold Spring (845) 265-5582; tuscangrill.com Lunch daily noon–4:30; Dinner daily 4:30–10:30; Brunch Sun noon–3; Flight Night Tue 7–9:30 Follow the red brick walk off Main Street through a landscaped garden into a romantic dining scene. Choose from an array of Northern Italian dishes such as pulled rabbit with fresh pappardelle pasta, seedless grapes and grappa sauce; and grilled partridge with blackberries, pearl onions and pancetta with a red wine sauce. Reasonably priced wines. Small private party room is a memorable, festive Tuscan accent.


Clock Tower Grill Kitchen & Bar 512 Clock Tower Dr, Brewster (845) 582-0574; clocktowergrill.com Lunch & dinner Tue–Thu noon–9, Fri noon–11; dinner Sat 5–11, Sun 3–9 Set in a renovated barn, the atmosphere is casual yet sophisticated; the menu “rustic American” with many ingredients drawn from area farms. Cosimo’s Restaurant Group Cosimo’s On Union 1217 Rt 300, Newburgh (845) 567-1556; fax (845) 567-9246 Cosimo’s Middletown 620 Rt 211 East, Middletown (845) 692-3242 Cosimo’s Poughkeepsie 120 Delafield St, Poughkeepsie (845) 485-7172 Cosimo’s Woodbury Rt 32, Central Valley (845) 928-5222 cosimosrestaurantgroup.com Lunch & dinner daily Casual trattoria-style dining with some of the world’s best wines. Old-style Italian cuisine with a New World twist. Daily specials, pasta, fish and meat dishes. Distinctive cocktail lounges, a unique wine cellar for private dinner parties and beautiful catering facilities. County Fare 2652 E Main St, Wappingers Falls (845) 297-3300; facebook.com/countyfareny Mon-Fri 11-8; Sat 11-2; Sun 11-1:30 Locally sourced comfort food paired with craft brews on tap, a well-curated wine list and craft cocktails. Local and regional beers, as well as national and global craft brewers. Great service and outdoor seating available.

Craft 47 47 W Main St, Goshen (845) 360-5253; craft47.com Lunch & dinner Tue–Thu noon–10, Fri–Sat noon–midnight; Sun noon–10 Kick back, relax and sample the best of the Hudson Valley at Craft 47. We offer small-plate American tapas, craft wine and 12 craft beers on tap, with even more in the cooler. Crave Restaurant & Lounge 129 Washington St, Poughkeepsie (845) 452-3501; craverestaurantandlounge.com Dinner Wed–Sat 4–10, Sun 4:30–9; Brunch Sun 11:30–3 Chef Ed Kowalski serves contemporary food with modern twists in a romantic and intimate setting located directly under the Walkway Over The Hudson. Crooked Rooster 399 Manchester Rd., Poughkeepsie (845) 204-9900; thecrookedrooster.com

Mon-Thu 11–7; Fri 11–8; Sat 11–4 With a fun, family-friendly vibe this new eater offers an equally fun and eclectic menu of noodle bowls, flatbreads, sandwiches, salads, burgers and wings to eat in or take out. Catering too. The Culinary Institute of America 1946 Campus Dr (off Rt 9), Hyde Park The premier culinary college offers exceptional global cuisine in its award-winning restaurants: American Bounty Restaurant (845) 451-1011; americanbountyrestaurant.com The Bocuse Restaurant (845) 451-1012; bocuserestaurant.com Reimagines classic French cuisine using modern techniques. Ristorante Caterina de’ Medici (845) 451-1013; ristorantecaterinademedici.com The Apple Pie Bakery Café (845) 905-4500; applepiebakerycafe.com Daughters Fare & Ale 7466 S Broadway, Red Hook (845) 835-8365; daughtersfareandale.com Lunch & dinner Wed–Thu 10–7, Fri 10–9, Sat 10–8, Sun 10–6 Five-star restaurant quality food in an 18-seat cafe setting. Eat in or take out fresh goods featuring local ingredients, and grab a craft beer, wine or specialty coffee. Catering is also available. Don’t miss Burger Fridays from 9–5pm when we shift our focus to burgers. Dino’s Vigneto Café 80 Vineyard Ave., Highland (845) 834-2828; vignetocafe.com Lunch Tue-Sun 10:30-4; Dinner nightly 4-10 Intimate Italian eatery specializing in homemade pasta, gourmet personal pizza and a varied menu of chicken, veal and seafood dishes. Live music on the weekends after 6pm.

Dish Bistro & Wine Bar 947 S Lake Blvd, Mahopac (845) 621-3474; dishmahopac.com Mon-Thu 4-9; Fri–Sat 3-10; closed Sun Chef Peter A. Milano adds his own flair to both classic and modern cuisine, with dishes focused on local seasonal produce.

Dogwood Bar & Restaurant 47 E Main St, Beacon (845) 202-7500; dogwoodbar.com Mon-Thu 5–12; Fri 4–2; Sat–Sun 3–2 Off the beaten path, Beacon's local gem. Inviting atmosphere. Great locally sourced food. Fine selection of 16 craft beers and specialty cocktails. Eclectic music and live performances. Family and vegetarian friendly. No TVs.

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Dubrovnik 721 Main St., New Rochelle (914) 637-3777; dubrovnikny.com Authentic Croatian cuisine with a farm-to-table, sea-to-table approach. Essie’s Restaurant 14 Mount Carmel Pl, Poughkeepsie (845) 452-7181; essiesrestaurantpk.com Dinner Tue-Sat 5:30–10:30 A welcome and hip addition to Poughkeepsie’s Little Italy shows the chef’s American South and Caribbean roots in dishes prepared with a modern flair. Favorites include crispy jerk pork lardons; chicken and dumplings; coconut passion fruit panna cotta.

Farm To Table Bistro 1083 Rt 9, Fishkill (845) 297-1111; ftbistro.com Mon-Thu 11:30–9:30; Fri–Sat 11:30–10; Sun 11:30–9 The focus is always finding the best the world has to offer: the best produce, wine, beef and certainly, the best fish and seafood. Patio dining available.

Gino’s Restaurant 1671 Rt 9, Wappingers Falls (845) 297-8061; ginoswappingers.com Lunch & dinner Tue–Thu 11:30–9, Fri–Sat 11:30–10; Sun 1–9 Serving the Hudson Valley since 1984. Traditional southern Italian cuisine in a casual environment. Only the freshest ingredients used to prepare your favorite veal, chicken, seafood and pasta dishes. Catering on- and off-premise. Half Moon 1 High St., Dobbs Ferry (914)-693-4131; harvest2000.com Montauk seafood, Hudson Valley farm to table, sunset views, raw bar and tiki bar.

Harry’s Hot Sandwiches 449 Main St, Beacon (845) 765-8111; harrysbeacon.com Tue-Fri 8-4; Sat–Sun 11-4; Closed Mon Sandwich heaven in the heart of Beacon, serving classic sandwiches with a twist. Now serving breakfast all day.

Henry’s At Buttermilk Falls 220 North Rd, Milton (845) 795-1500; henrysatbuttermilk.com Lunch Fri–Sat 11:30–3; Dinner Sun– Thu 5–9; Brunch Sun 11–3 Local comes alive at this bucolic Inn & Spa, where the main ingredients are sourced from local producers and purveyors. An inventive menu features a fresh selection of large and small plates from casual burger and fries to refined New American dishes. Enjoy a pre-dinner stroll through the organic gardens and orchards or a drink overlooking the Hudson River and sweeping lawns. Al fresco dining available.

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Hudson Street Café 237 Hudson St, Cornwall-on-Hudson (845) 534-2450; hudsonstreetcafe.com Breakfast Mon–Fri 6–11:30; lunch Mon–Fri 11–3; brunch Sat 7–3, Sun 7–2 Good food served here. Breakfast includes hourmase corn and oat bran pancakes, huevos rancheros and scones baked fresh every morning. Lunches inclue a turkey brie panini and housemade empanadas. Delicious dinners with comfort classics like Donna’s meatloaf and buttermilk fried chicken, as well as seasonal specials. Custom catering available. Il Barilotto 1113 Main St, Fishkill (845) 897-4300; ilbarilottorestaurant.com Lunch Mon–Sat 11–2:30; dinner Mon–Thu 5–10, Fri–Sat 5–11 Blending the old with the new, Eduardo Lauria, chef-owner of Aroma Osteria, transformed an historic brick building in the heart of Fishkill to a trattoria and wine bar. The fare is Italian peasant with a contemporary flair. The selection of regional wines from Italy—available by the glass or flight—is extensive. Catering on- and off-premises. Le Express 1820 New Hackensack Rd, Wappingers Falls (845) 849-3565 Lunch & dinner Mon–Thu 11–10, Fri 11–11, Sat 4–11 A modern French American bistro that focuses on using foods from local Hudson Valley purveyors. Our goal is to have fun and create a small, special place that will provide you with a memorable dining experience. Leo’s Ristorante Rt 9D, Wappingers Falls (845) 838-3446 22 Quaker Ave, Cornwall (845) 534-3446 1433 Rt 300, Newburgh (845) 564-3446 leospizzeria.com Lunch & dinner Mon–Sat 11–10; Sun 2–9 A family favorite since 1981, Leo’s offers traditional classic Italian dishes, pizza, hot/cold subs, pasta, veal, chicken and appetizers. Daily specials and catering for all occasions whether in our location or yours. Great food served in a comfortable and relaxed atmosphere. Mexicali Blue 87 Main St, New Paltz (845) 255-5551 1571 Rt 9, Wappingers Falls (845) 298-8226; mexicali-blue.com Sun–Thu 11–9; Fri–Sat 11–10


Using fresh, natural ingredients, Mexicali Blue serves up delicious Southwestern and Californian cuisine in a fun, colorful setting. Tacos and burritos top the menu. Mexican beer and margaritas rule the drinks list.

The Mill 46 Vassar Rd, Poughkeepsie (845) 214-0000; millpk.com Lunch & dinner Tue–Thu 11:30–9, Fri–Sat 11:30–10; dinner Sun 4–9; brunch Sun 11–4 Executive chef and Hudson Valley native Mark Haslam features fresh seasonal and local artisanal foods. Our casual and upbeat atmosphere coupled with our knowledgeable staff, acoustic entertainment and cozy indoor and outdoor dining make us the destination that serves all of our guests the dining experience they deserve. Mill House Brewing Company 289 Mill St, Poughkeepsie (845) 485-2739; millhousebrewing.com Lunch & dinner Mon, Wed-Sun; closed Tue Offers a warm, historic and visually appealing setting, with casual, yet professional service, food cooked from as close to the source as possible, and artfully crafted ales. Nic L Inn 135 N Water St., Poughkeepsie (845) 452-5649; nickelinn.com Lunch & dinner; Tue-Thu 12–9; Fri-Sat 12–10; Sun 1-9 An inviting neighborhood eatery with locally sourced menu, pouryour-own wine system and outdoor seating (in season). Nina 27 W. Main St, Middletown (845) 344-6800; nina-restaurant.com Lunch Mon–Sat 11:30–2:30; dinner Mon–Sun from 5; brunch Sun 9:30–2 New York City–trained chef Franz Brendle brings an elegant flair to classic American cuisine. Features include filet mignon Roquefort, shrimp asparagus risotto and seafood specials. Nice selection of wines in various price ranges. Friendly staff, cozy décor. Hearty Sun brunch. Pamela’s on the Hudson 1 Park Place, Newburgh (845) 562-4505 Dinner Thur-Sun 4–til close pamelasonthehudson.com Contemporary American bistro and bar on the Hudson River. A warm, cozy and casual atmosphere with live music every evening and Happy Hour food and drink specials Thursday-Saturday 4:30pm-6:30pm. Pamela’s features an expansive wine by the glass menu as well as nightly dinner specials. Catering is available for weddings, corporate events, private events, and holiday parties.

Perch 1 King St, Marlboro (845) 236-3663 Lunch & Dinner; Closed Mon New from the owner of Cathryn’s Tuscan Grill in Cold Spring, offering a globally inspired, locally sourced menu. The eclectic list of wine and beer represents the best of the Hudson Valley. Poughkeepsie Ice House 1 Main St, Poughkeepsie (845) 232-5783; pkicehouse.com Sun–Wed 11:30–10; Thu–Sat til 11 The Poughkeepsie Ice House is the anchor for the Queen Bee City. The historic Hudson Valley waterfront brick building features old world charm and walking distance to the Poughkeepsie Train Station and the Walkway over the Hudson. Public boat docking and waterfront dining are available. The food is casually sophisticated with seasonal and local inspired menus. Redwood 63 N. Front St., Kingston (845) 259-5868 Lunch 11:30-3; Dinner 5-10; Sun Brunch. Closed Tue. The best of California cuisine and the Hudson Valley in a fun and relaxing atmosphere. Rooftop dining in season.

Restaurant 1915 55 Hessian Dr, Bear Mountain (845) 786-2731 ext. 1915; visitbearmountain.com Thu–Sat 5–9, Sun 11–9 Located at the historic Bear Mountain Inn, enjoy a seasonal menu in a beautiful lodge setting. Riverview Restaurant 45 Fair St, Cold Spring (845) 265-4778; riverdining.com Lunch Tue–Fri noon–2:30, Sat noon–4; dinner Tue–Fri 5:30–9:30, Sat 5–10; Lunch & dinner Sun noon–9 Contemporary American cuisine with beautiful river views. Seasonally inspired menus featuring market fresh seafood, brick oven pizza and creative daily specials. No credit cards; checks OK. Reservations suggested. The Roundhouse 2 E Main St, Beacon (845) 765-8369; roundhousebeacon.com Lunch & dinner Wed-Sat 11:30Close; Sun Brunch 11-3; Lunch 3-8 Set in a historic textile mill transformed into boutique hotel, the restaurant serves elegant, locally inspired American fare and offers a well-curated list of craft beers, cocktails and wines. The main dining room, lounge and seasonal patio all overlook Beacon Falls.

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Seoul Kitchen 71 Liberty St., Newburgh (845)795-8596 All natural authentic Korean cuisine.

A Tavola Trattoria 46 Main St. New Paltz Th-M 5:30-10pm (845)255-1426 Seasonally inspired Italian cuisine with a focus on fresh, local produce and ingredients in a rustic, familystyle atmosphere. Terrapin Restaurant & Red Bistro 6426 Montgomery St, Rhinebeck (845) 876-3330; terrapinrestaurant.com Lunch & dinner daily 11:30– midnight; dining room daily 5–9pm From far-flung origins, the world’s most diverse flavors meet and mingle here. From elements both historic and eclectic comes something surprising, fresh and dynamic: dishes to delight body and soul. Choose fine dining in Terrapin’s dining room or casual fare in Red Bistro & Bar. From good burgers and quesadillas to wild salmon and local filet mignon. Terrapin’s local organic and authentic menu satisfies all.

Breakfast & Lunch Daily Available evenings for catering

Custom Catering 190 S. Plank Road, Newburgh 845.565.2450 www.hudsonstreetcafe.com

Tito Santana Taqueria 142 Main St., Beacon (845) 765-2350; tacosantana.com Lunch & dinner Mon-Sun 11-9 Classic tacos and Mexican food in a colorful setting. The $2 taco Tuesday can’t be beat. Valley at the Garrison 2015 Rt 9, Garrison (845) 424-3604; thegarrison.com/restaurants Valley: Dinner Thu–Sun 5–9; midday menu Sat–Sun 11:30–2:30 Terrace: Mon–Thu 8–6; Fri–Sun 7–7 The Garrison’s signature fine-dining restaurant offering seasonal American Cuisine and an extensive international wine list of great accolade. Regional and NYS Craft breweries and distilleries to match the seasonal-regional focus of the kitchen. Our spectacular view will enhance any dining experience. Tuthill House at the Mill 20 Grist Mill Lane, Gardiner (845) 255-1527; tuthillhouse.com The finest cuisine with the best bourbon in the Hudson Valley. Enjoy fresh, local ingredients and craft spirits in the rustic splendor of our historic mill. The Village Tearoom 10 Plattekill Ave, New Paltz (845) 255-3434; thevillagetearoom.com Breakast, lunch & dinner Tues–Sat 8–9, Sun 8–8 The Village Tea Room is a unique gathering place, serving breakfast,

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lunch and dinner as well as a variety of teas. Tantalizing cakes and cookies. Organic honey, pot pies and roast chicken. Zagat survey says “Irish ex-pat Agnes Devereux has a real winner.” Wildfire Grill 74 Clinton St, Montgomery (845) 457-3770; wildfireny.com Lunch Mon–Sat 11:30–3; Sun noon–3; dinner Sun–Thu 5–9; Fri & Sat 5–10 Eclectic is the buzzword at this popular local eatery, where patrons can feast on a predominantly American menu with Asian, Mexican and Italian influences in a rustic Victorian setting. Woody’s Farm to Table 30 Quaker Ave, Cornwall (845) 534-1111; woodysfarmtotable.com Open Wed–Mon 11:30–8:30; closed Tue A “new old-fashioned” burger joint located in a restored 1910 building in picturesque Cornwall. Casual, family place offering fast, simple meals for people on the go using fresh, wholesome ingredients with a local emphasis.

Xaviar’s Restaurant Group Chef-owner Peter Kelly offers his signature service and exceptional cuisine to four locations. Critics agree: Dining in the valley will never be the same. Xaviar’s at Piermont 506 Piermont Ave, Piermont (845) 359-7007 Lunch Fri, Sun noon–2; dinner Wed–Fri 6–9, Sat seatings 6 & 9, Sun 5–8 Freelance Café & Wine Bar 506 Piermont Ave, Piermont (845) 365-3250 Lunch Tue–Sun noon–3; dinner Tue–Thu 5:30–10, Fri 5:30–10:30, Sat 5:30–11, Sun 5–10 Restaurant X & Bully Boy Bar 117 North Rt 303, Congers (845) 268-6555 Lunch Tue–Fri noon–2:30; dinner Tue–Thu 5:30–10, Fri 5:30–10:30, Sat 5–11, Sun 5–8; brunch Sun seating 1pm X2O Xaviars on the Hudson 71 Water Grant Way, Yonkers (914) 965-1111 Lunch Tue–Fri noon–2; dinner Tue– Fri 5:30–10, Sat 5–10, Sun 5–9; brunch Sun noon–2 Ziatun 244 Main St., Beacon (845) 765-8268; ziatun.com Lunch & dinner Thu-Mon 11-9 From the owners of Beacon Bread Company comes this little gem, serving authentic Palestinian-Arabic-Middle Eastern fare with many vegan and vegetarian options.


S E R V I C E S

W I N E R I E S

Hudson Valley Federal Credit Union (845) 463-3011; hvfcu.org Full-service financial cooperative serving individuals and business in Dutchess, Orange, Ulster and Putnam Counties. 17 local branches and contact center avaiulable late on weekdays and all day on Saturdays. Over 82,000 conveniently located surcharge-free nationwide ATMs and a full siute of online, movile and text banking services. HVFCU is federally insured by the NCUA and is an Equal Housing Lender.

Shawangunk Wine Trail (845) 256-8456; (845) 291-1927; gunkswine.com Nestled between the Shawangunks and the Hudson River, just 60 miles north of NYC is a trail of 14 familyowned wineries from New Paltz to Warwick. The wineries offer tours and tastings amidst scenic beauty. A complete listing of wineries and events is available on our website.

Jacobowitz and Gubits, LLP 158 Orange Ave., Walden (845) 778-2121; jacobowitz.com Mon-Thu 8:30-5:30 Expert legal services for restaurateurs includes business planning, succession planning, licenses and permits, employment, immigration, real estate, financing, contracts and taxation. Walden Savings Bank (845)457-7700; waldensavingsbank. com T O U R I S M

Dutchess Tourism 3 Neptune Rd, Suite A11A, Poughkeepsie (845) 463-4000; dutchesstourism.com Putnam County Tourism (845) 808-1015; Tourputnam.org Westchester County Tourism (800) 833-9282; visitwestchesterny.com W H O L E S A L E

Red Barn Produce 217 Upper North Rd, Highland (845) 691-7428 Full-service, family owned and operated wholesaler servicing restaurants and institutions with a complete selection of fruits and vegetables for 20 years. A proud distributor of local, New York, highquality produce at competitive prices emphasizing reliable and personal service. Pick-up or delivery available to Dutchess, Columbia, Ulster and Orange counties. W I N E

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New Paltz Wine 245 Main St., New Paltz (845) 255-8528; newpaltzwine.com Mon-Sat 10-9; Sun noon-6 Full-service wine and spirit shop. Large local selection. Friendly, knowledgeable staff. Case discounts. Special orders.

Stoutridge Vineyard 10 Ann Kaley Ln, Marlboro (845) 236-7620; stoutridge.com Many of our wines and spirits are locally grown, and all are from New York fruits and grains. Our wines are sold exclusively at the winery. Enjoy an authentic taste of the Hudson Valley at our winery, distillery and grounds. Warwick Valley Winery & Distillery 114 Little York Rd, Warwick (845) 258-4858; wvwinery.com Daily 11–6 for tastings Food & Wine magazine calls our draft cider “clean, vibrant” with a “sweet finish.” We produce wine for every occasion: Chardonnay, Riesling, Harvest Moon, Black Dirt Blush and Red, Cabernet Franc, Pinot Noir. As the Valley’s first distillery, we produce a line of fine brandies and liqueurs. Bakery Café serves lunch and fresh breads on weekends. Whitecliff Vineyard 331 McKinstry Rd, Gardiner (845) 255-4613; whitecliffwine.com Daily 11:30–5:30; Sat til 6 One of the valley’s largest vineyards boasts beautiful views of the Shawangunk Ridge. Owner/wine maker Michael Migliore produces award-winning wines from European vinifera varietals such as Chardonnay, Cabernet Franc and Riesling, as well as new hybrids. Visit our friendly tasting room. Winery tours 4 by appointment, special events.

LOVE YOUR TABLE VA L L E Y TA B L E . C O M

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Dino’s

Vigneto Cafe

Fresh Homemade Pasta • Gluten Free Available Alfresco Dining • Full Bar

80 Vineyard Avenue, Highland, NY 845.834.2828 Open 7 days a week 10am-10pm www.vignetocafe.com • Visit us on Facebook

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LAST CALL

think spring

If you can’t go to the peonies, bring the peonies to you, we always say. A selection of peony photographs by Jerry Novesky is on display through March at The Valley Table Gallery, at our offices in Beacon. No scratch & sniff yet, but we’re working on it. 96 96

THE VALLEY table TABLE march MARCH– –may MAY2017 2017 the valley

PHOTO : JERRY NOVESKY


CENTRAL VALLEY (845) 928-5222

NEWBURGH (845) 567-1556

POUGHKEEPSIE (845) 485-7172

MIDDLETOWN (845) 692-3242

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The Valley Table 77, March-May 2017  
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