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T H E M AG A Z I N E O F H U D S O N VA L L E Y FA R M S , F O O D A N D C U I S I N E

THE VALLEY

NUMBER 76

DECEMBER 2016–FEBRUARY 2017 VALLEYTABLE.COM


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number 76 december 2016–february 2017

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featured articles 25 up close: jodi cummings / caffe macchiato

Newburgh native Jodi Cummings has never strayed too far from the Hudson Valley. She chose a culinary education at the CIA over a career in fashion design, and she jumped at the opportunity to buy a little cafe in the heart of her hometown. Now she serves two kinds of customers: regulars and soon-to-become-regulars. They have one thing in common: They’re all treated like family. by Robin Cherry

33 the legacy of mohonk It began as a dream of two Quaker brothers to build a quiet little retreat. It grew into a world-renowned center for the study of peaceful arbitration, Native American civil rights, conservation and, oh yeah, quiet weekends away from it all. Keith Stewart and his wife Flavia Bacarella managed to steal away from the farm for a couple of days, and they discovered some amazing things up there, not the least of which was history. by Keith Stewart

41 a drone also rises David Handschuh is a photographer’s photographer, but when he’s not off covering a story somewhere, the three-time Pulitzer Prize nominee, seriously injured covering 9/11 in New York City, likes to sit back in his trailer in sight of the Shawangunk Ridge and breathe in the beauty. And this year he sent his drone up for a bird’s-eye view of the beauty of agriculture in the Hudson Valley. Take a look. photographs by David Handschuh DEC

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departments 13 Good Stuff

Industrial brew, McGath’s cheese, winning wines, Kittle House take-home, Captain Lawrence eat-in, intelligent IPA, ginger elixirs, Westchester’s new butcher, events and more

20 Openings

Paula’s Public House, Pho Corner Bistro, Redwood Bar and Restaurant

49 Drink 55 Farms, Food & Markets:

A toast to the holidays, by Tiimothy Buzinski

2016–17 Hudson Valley winter farmers’ markets and winter CSAs

61 Eating by the Season Pickling, by Maria Reina 67 Support the Craft A drink New York state of mind, by Colleen Stewart 73 Index of advertisers

76 Directory

88 Last call

70 Eating by the Season Venison

Farmer, future tense, photo by Ethan Harrison

recipes 30 Thai curry scramble (Jodi Cummings / Caffe Macchiato)

50 New Yorker (Janett Pabon / The Corner); The Shandy, Stout Flip (Paul Maloney / Stockade Tavern) 63 Giardiniera (Andy Nusser / Tarry Lodge) 64 Pickled red autumnal beets (Rio Alexander Hendrix / Beautiful Table) 66 Basic pickle recipe (Mogan Anthony / Village Social) 68–69 Lydia’s pumpkin spice moontini, Beacon’s bad pun cider, Autumn at Awosting, Whiskey over easy, Cardoso’s crow’s milk (Colin Bringman / Reckless Remedies)

71 Venison medallions with juniper demi-glace (Josh Kroner / Terrapin) 6

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EDITOR’S LETTER

Oh, what a lovely year So, how was your year? is a question that floats around a lot as we roll toward Thanksgiving and the hectic holiday weeks that follow. If you’re a Cubs fan, this year was undeniably better than the previous 108, but if you’re a Hudson Valley peach grower, it’s probably hard to imagine a worse one. The same comparison holds true for the Republicans and Democrats (but that’s the last mention of that subject this time out). Things started out well around here. Spring Restaurant Week (the first half of the tenth anniversary) showed strong, so we decided to take a rare but much-needed vacation in warmer climes—and returned to find everything dead from that freak April freeze. Of course, the denuded lemon magnolia in front of the house that greeted us on our return is trivial compared to the devastating effect the freeze had on the Hudson Valley peach crop—it was nearly totally destroyed, by most accounts—though equally dire predictions for the apple crop luckily proved spotty. Many of the farmers we spoke with had a banner year with their vegetables, provided they had enough water available. While we were blessed with plenty of sunshine throughout the summer, the same was not true for rainfall—some areas of the valley got three to seven inches less rainfall than they should have received. Those farmers who could get water to their crops seem to have had a great year. Others—well, don’t ask. Water, in fact, seemed to be on everyone’s mind this summer and fall. Major contamination crises hit several Hudson Valley locales, and Newburgh is again reeling with more contamination indications. Most of the blame seems to be aimed at Stewart Airport—or rather the former Stewart Air Force Base—and its jet fuel, deicing compounds and other chemicals. Interestingly, the crisis says as much about the Hudson Valley’s political state as it does about its environmental state. Why didn’t anyone spot this problem earlier? And New York City, which zealously guarded access to its Catskill aqueduct (with rare exception) has, over the past decade or so, become more amenable to sharing its resource with certain municipalities along the New Paltz-Newburgh-Monroe corridor. Thank the City for its generosity? Sure, but first find out what the strings are tied to. Meanwhile, rural residents without municipal hookups are left to fend for themselves. We don’t live under a rock, even though sometimes it may seem that way. What put a major kabash on a relatively good year was learning of a pipeline-fed power plant project already under construction in the Town of Minisink in Orange County. The plant, on 120+ acres, is frighteningly close to one of the richest agricultural areas in the Northeast, if not the country, and to the Wallkill River, which serves as a replenishing aquifer along its entire length to Kingston. The threat of pollution from leaks and spills has mobilized several citizens’ and environmental groups, but if you see the Wallkill burning, you’ll know they were too late. Which pretty much brings us back to where we started. As years go, it was not as good as some, but better than most. Here’s wishing all a healthy and prosperous New Year. Just remember, if you find yourself in a pickle (page 61), you can always support the craft (page 67)—it works for me. How ’bout those Cubs, huh? —JN

Cover: A selection of antique dinner plates from the collection of Caffe Macchiato owner Jodi Cummings (see page 25). Photo by Eva Deitch 8

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THE VALLEY TABLE THE MAGAZINE OF HUDSON VALLEY FARMS, FOOD AND CUISINE THE VALLEY TABLE, INC. 380 MAIN STREET, SUITE 202 BEACON, NY 12508 (845) 765-2600 www.valleytable.com www.hudsonvalleyrestaurantweek.com NUMBER 76 DEC 2016 – FEB 2017 PUBLISHER Janet Crawshaw janetc@valleytable.com EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Jerry Novesky jerryn@valleytable.com Graphic Design Greg Simpson / Ephemera Design Production Specialist Stacie Merrill stacie@valleytable.com Website Coordinator Nate Diedrick Marketing Coordinator Colleen Stewart colleen@valleytable.com Advertising Representative MCaseMedia info@mcasemedia.com Intern Emily Casey Contributors to this issue Timothy Buzinski Robin Cherry Eva Deitch David Handschuh Ethan Harrison Jermaine Haughton David Neilsen Maria Reina Keith Stewart Diana Waldron THE VALLEY TABLE is exclusively devoted to Hudson Valley agriculture, food and cuisine. We support sustainable agricultural practices and efforts to strengthen the links among regional producers, marketers, restaurateurs and consumers. We urge you to patronize businesses that feature Hudson Valley products and to support initiatives that benefit regional agriculture and related efforts. Letters to the editor regarding magazine content are welcome and will be published as space permits. Letters should be mailed to the address above, or emailed to editor@valleytable.com. To be considered for publication, letters must be signed. THE VALLEY TABLE is published four times a year (March, June, Sept and Dec). Distribution is free at selected sites throughout the Hudson Valley or by subscription. Subscriptions are $20 per year. To subscribe, mail a check or money order payable to The Valley Table, 380 Main St., Suite 202, Beacon, NY 12508 or visit valleytable.com. COPYRIGHT © 2016, THE VALLEY TABLE, INC. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced in any form, mechanical or electronic, without written permission of the publishers. Advertisements designed by The Valley Table are copyrighted and may not be reproduced in whole or in part without written permission. ISSN 1257-8417


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GOOD STUFF

TOOL S OF T HE T RADE

DON’T WORRY, BE HOPPY Jeff O’Neil, founder and proprietor of the recently opened Industrial Arts Brewing Company, in Garnerville (Rockland County), has spent most of his adult life swimming in beer. As the former head brewer of Peekskill Brewery, he previously ran the Ithaca Beer Company for a decade, and before that, he was brewing beer in the San Francisco Bay area. He has brewed every type of beer imaginable, yet he has always favored hoppier beers such as IPAs and pale ales. Now, O’Neil, a pioneer in the craft beer revolution in the Hudson Valley is putting all his experience to work at Industrial Arts, where he is creating the fresh, hoppy beers he’s always wanted to make. “Our mission is to make really nice beers that are stable and can really satisfy people who are into IPAs and pale ales and other hoppy beers,” he says. Located in the Garnerville Arts and Industrial Complex, a landmark, pre-Civil War era factory group, O’Neil’s brewery is an imposing brick building topped with a huge smokestack. Despite the historic nature of the site, O’Neil invested heavily in modern process and automation

equipment and spent the better part of a year renovating the space. “What you can expect to see,” he notes, “is a really cool juxtaposition of antique historic construction with state-ofthe-art brewing technology.” The best equipment in the world won’t make a good beer out of bad ingredients, though, and O’Neil carefully sources the ingredients for his beers. The secret is to keep the brewing process simple and clean, altering the ingredients as little as possible, he says. “We try not to muddle up the ingredients that we spend so much time and energy tracking down.” Industrial Arts currently is producing three main beers: Tools of the Trade, the company’s flagship product, is a low-gravity, single malt, hop-focused, very drinkable pale ale; Power Tools, a bolder IPA, essentially is a double version of Tools of the Trade; State of the Art is an IPA, but its exact makeup differs each time it is brewed. “The idea [with State of the Art] is that we’re exploring the breadth of style that IPA encompasses,” O’Neil says. The beer hall is open Wednesday through Sunday. —DN

Industrial Arts Brewing Company 55 West Railroad Ave #25, Garnerville (845) 942-8776; industrialartsbrewing.com

top photo : deise barbaresco ; left photo : susan stava ; right photo : christian gilliam

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GIT IT ’N’GO

WALKIN’ THE LOCAL WALK

Ask and you shall receive. That’s what Chef Jay Lippin has been telling diners at Crabtree’s Kittle House in Chappaqua. Now everyone is reaping the tasty benefits. After recognizing customers’ penchant for taking his culinary creations home, Chef Lippin launched take-home “Chef Jay’s” versions of his much-requested products under the Kittle Kitchens label. The product line ranges from granola to bacon jam, and includes two seasoning rubs (BBQ and Espresso), an apple cider mustard and an artisanal hot sauce. Each product is born from a dish served at the restaurant: The granola is a part of the Kittle House breakfast menu; the BBQ rub was created for the slowcooked meats prepared for the summer BBQ nights; and the bacon jam is featured in a few menu items. Lippin uses local ingredients to create each of his products. For the hot sauce, he sourced several varieties of locally grown peppers, giving each batch a unique flavor profile. The peppers are fermented 30 days in sauerkraut juice from Foods & Ferments (Truxton, Cortland County). The hot

sauce is aged in rye barrels used by Catskill Provisions (Long Eddy, Sullivan County) for its honey whiskey production. Similarly, Lippin’s apple cider mustard incorporates local cider; the bacon jam features product from Mountain Smokehouse (LaGrange, Dutchess County); and the granola gets its addicting sweetness from Catskill Provisions honey. Crabtree’s Kittle House owner John Crabtree lauds Lippin’s dedication. “Many chefs say they are ‘farm-to-table,’” Crabtree notes, “but Chef Jay is the only one who truly walks the walk.” Lippin says the products themselves make sourcing local easy. “We’re really loving the opportunity to do what we are doing here, while fostering great relationships along the way,” he says. “As I meet each farmer or producer, they turn me on to another local producer.” All Kittle Kitchens products are available at the Kittle House in Chappaqua. Prices range from $7 for a container of Chef’s Jay’s BBQ rub to $12 for the award-wining bacon jam or $12.50 for the granola. —CS

Crabtree’s Kittle House 11 Kittle House Rd, Chappaqua (914) 666-8044; kittlehouse.com/kittle-kitchens

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B IG R ED TAK EOVER

GET SM ART

VINTAGE KUDOS

HIGH IQ BREW

Whitecliff Vineyard & Winery’s 2014 Reserve Chardonnay continues its award-winning run in statewide and national wine competitions. The popular white wine won Best Chardonnay at the Atlantic Seaboard Wine Association’s Twelfth Atlantic Seaboard Wine Competition for a second time, as well as Best Oaked Chardonnay at the 2016 New York Wine & Food Classic. Whitecliff also copped a gold medal at the San Francisco International Wine Competition for its 2013 Sky Island Red Bordeaux. (Whitecliff co-founder and co-owner Yancy Stanforth-Migliore describes the award-winning blend of five classic grapes as the winery’s “big red,” living up to its nickname both literally and figuratively and gaining respect by overtaking the long-standing favorite “big reds” of Napa.) “The wines are bursting with flavor and very suitable paired with food,” Stanforth-Migliore says. “It is all a part of a long, ongoing educational process for people to change their perceptions about wines in New York and the Hudson Valley.” In the shadow of the Shawangunk Ridge not far from Whitecliff, Matt Spaccarelli, owner and head winemaker at Marlboro’s Fjord Vineyards, one of the newest wineries in the region, also is producing some award-winning wines. With its first vintage (2014), three of Fjord’s seven wines took home medals at the Hudson Valley Wine & Grape Association’s 2016 Hudson Valley Wine & Spirits Competition. Fjord’s 2015 Albarino won double gold (Best Overall Hudson Valley Wine and Best Sparkling Wine), its 2014 Merlot won another gold, and its 2014 Cabernet Franc won a silver. Fjord also took home Winery of the Year award. Both vineyards use the grapes grown locally—Spaccarelli’s Albariño grapes, a white varietal indigenous to the Galicia region of northwest Spain, are, in fact, among the few of that variety grown in New York State—and the resulting wines are helping to change perceptions of New York wines. “When [produced] with grapes [from] New York, you are talking about very balanced, very food-friendly wines,” Spaccarelli says. “And when you bring them to the table, they perform.” Whitecliff and Fjord wines are available online, at the wineries and in select retail locations throughout the Hudson Valley. —CS

New Paltz’s own Smart Beer is New York’s first organic beer company. Within its first year of production, the company’s beers, which are physically brewed upstate in Saratoga Springs, already are available at Whole Foods Market, Citifield and Madison Square Garden, as well as at numerous restaurants throughout the Hudson Valley. Founder Gabriel Heymann, however, does not intend to rest on his laurels. “I like to say we’re soon to be America’s organic beer brand,” he predicts. Heymann founded the company with the intent of crafting a beer that fit his lifestyle. “I just felt there was no reason anymore to feel like I had to compromise either my values or my healthy, active lifestyle just to celebrate and socialize with friends,” he says. He quickly found that many others felt the same. “The reception has been fantastic. It’s been amazing to me to see it spread so quickly.” Heymann believes the key to Smart Beer’s success is the quality of the organic ingredients. “Right now it’s all U.S. organic grains and hops,” he says. “Our goal is to work with local farmers so that, over time, production can be as local as possible, but right now the organic production in [New York] just isn’t there.” Smart Beer’s flagship product is a certified organic, non-GMO premium ale. “It’s a nice, pure, clean, fresh organic beer,” Heymann says. An organic IPA was recently added to the roster. Heymann anticipates Smart Beer’s continued expansion. “In addition to creating the beer company of today,” he says, “we really feel like we’re creating the beer company of tomorrow.” —DN Smart Beer, LLC smartbeercompany.com

Whitecliff Vineyard & Winery 331 McKinstry Rd, Gardiner 845-255-4613; whitecliffwine.com Fjord Vineyards 156 Highland Ave, Marlboro (845) 236-4265; facebook.com/Fjordvineyards/

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LOCAL SOU R CERY

MEATY MATTERS

Matt Campbell, owner/operator of Campbell Meats in Dobbs Ferry, was trained as a chef and worked at several Manhattan restaurants. He liked to spend time in the butcher shops in Brooklyn and Manhattan, however, and eventually decided he enjoyed that work more than he did being a chef. His career path took a sharp turn. Campbell moved to White Plains and quickly saw a glaring hole in Westchester County—the lack of a serious butcher shop featuring locally sourced products. “There’s a good [butcher] in Greenwich [CT],” he notes, “and there are some upstate in Putnam and Columbia and Dutchess Counties—but not in Westchester.” In August of this year, Campbell opened his own full-service butcher shop. “We source all of our meat, actually all of our products—groceries, produce, things like that—from the Hudson Valley,” he says. “Nothing’s [sourced] farther than 90 miles away. All our meat comes from small, family-operated farms that are working in the ‘correct’ way. All the animals are humanely raised without hormones or antibiotics; most of the farms are self-contained, which means they do all their own breeding.” Campbell sees himself as an all-important middleman in the farm-to-table chain. “I’m connecting these farms that have amazing products with people around here who don’t have the opportunity to go to those farms themselves,” he stresses. Staples in Campbell’s shop include beef, lamb, pork and chicken, but he also will offer rabbit, duck or other game birds if there’s a demand. Campbell Meats also offers value-added products, including house-made charcuterie, sausages, patés, dry-cured salami and bacon. Other featured local items include maple syrup from the Catskills, eggs, local milk—and anything else he can find within his self-imposed 90-mile radius. Campbell admits that his prices are a bit higher than one might find at the chain grocery stores, but he believes the quality of the product is worth the extra cost. “I’m happy to pay the farmers what they’re worth, and I pass [the quality] on to the customer,” he explains. “You can taste it—that’s the bottom line. It’s what it’s supposed to taste like. People have our chicken who are used to chicken being pretty bland and simple and boring. Once they taste ours, they realize that it’s different—it’s better meat. [The animals] are raised on the right diet. They say you are what you eat, but actually, you are what you eat eats.” —DN Campbell Meats 3 Cedar St, Dobbs Ferry (914) 231-5133; campbellmeats.com Tue-Fri noon–8; Sat, Sun noon–6

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EVENT S WORK:SHOP WICKHAM SOLID WOOD STUDIO, BEACON December 10 (10am-6pm) & December 11 (11am-5pm) A festive pop-up winter market of museum-store-quality, locally made, hand-crafted, small goods in wool, glass, clay, paper, linen, silk, wood, metal and beeswax. workshopwintermarket.com NEWBURGH CANDLELIGHT TOURS CRAWFORD HOUSE, NEWBURGH December 11, 12pm-5pm History is all decked out. Tour more than a dozen private homes and public spaces—from mid-century modern to historic landmark, thoroughly renovated or in-process, the spaces are splendidly decked for the holidays. Tickets $25 in advance; $30 at the door. newburghhistoricalsociety.com HUDSON VALLEY RAIL TRAIL WINTERFEST 11 CHURCH ST, HIGHLAND January 14, 11am-2pm Bundle up for and head outdoors for this celebration of winter. Warm up with the chili contest, roasted chestnuts, toasted marshmallows, snacks and drinks. Plenty of kids activities, plus wood carving demonstrations and wagon rides. Hudsonvalleyrailtrail.net BURNS NIGHT SUPPER THE ROUNDHOUSE, BEACON January 14, 7pm-11pm Hudson Highlands Pipe Band honors the Scottish icon/poet Robert Burns, (Auld Lang Syne) with its bag pipes, traditional Scottish-inspired fare, including haggis and whisky, and music from the T McCann band. Tickets $125. hhpb.org NOFA-NY WINTER CONFERENCE SARATOGA HILTON & CITY CENTER, SARATOGA SPRINGS January 20-22 Organic farmers and gardeners from across the state meet, confer, celebrate and exchange knowledge at this festive, information-filled annual conference. Keynote by CR Lawn of Fedco Seeds focusing on creating an ethical, sustainable seed system. Workshops on mushrooms, permaculture, homesteading, urban farming, social justice, and so much more. nofany.org


PAIRED UP

BREW FOOD One of the Hudson Valley’s pioneer craft breweries, Captain Lawrence Brewing Company, is getting serious about food. Chef Joseph Smith, former Executive Chef at The Ram’s Head Inn on Shelter Island, has been named the brewery’s new Executive Chef. Citing Smith’s experience and reputation for utilizing local ingredients in his dishes, Captain Lawrence founder Scott Vaccaro noted, “Joe’s appreciation of ingredients and craft mirrors what we do in the brewhouse. Creating a menu that emphasizes local ingredients and pairs with our beers is exactly what we were after.” Smith will extend the food service at the brewery to include catering for weddings, fundraisers and private parties, and he will develop a new series of

monthly beer-pairing dinners that will include a special menu designed to accentuate and compliment a selection of Captain Lawrence beers. The first beer dinner will be held December 8. “When we made the decision to expand our kitchen,” Vaccaro says, “we knew it was also time to bring on a chef who could develop a food program that would keep up with and compliment our diverse portfolio of beers.” For his part, Smith admits, “I was spoiled by the produce and great local proteins we got to use in our kitchen [at Ram’s Head]. I’m just as excited to have the rich bounty of the Hudson Valley available to our kitchen here at Captain Lawrence.” —CS

For more information, visit www.captainlawrencebrewing.com

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EVENT S WINTER HOOT THE ASHOKAN CENTER, OLIVEBRIDGE February 3-5 Folk, pop and Americana music by Natalie Merchant, Dan Bern, Jay Ungar and Molly Mason and many more artists. Local food, beer and wine. Children’s activities, winter hikes, square dance, film screening and blacksmithing tutorial. homeofthehoot.com CUPCAKE & WINE PAIRING ROBIBERO FAMILY VINEYARDS, NEW PALTZ February 4, 5, 11, & 12 Prepare for Valentine’s Day with this decadent, delicious event. Robibero’s wines paired with cupcakes. robiberofamilyvineyards.com

R OOT B OOST

ELIXIR FIXERS Ginger is an ancient spice that was, and still is, widely used for medicinal purposes, including aiding digestion, easing nausea and reducing inflammation. One Ulster County company is bringing ginger front and center and offering consumers a tasty and healthful way to boost their immune systems (and perhaps help recover from all the over-the-top holiday festivities, as well). ImmuneSchein Ginger Elixirs are made with organic ginger root, organic lemon juice and local wildflower honey. The company’s current line of handcrafted products includes a primary elixir—the Classic, which uses only three ingredients. Seven other elixirs are created by infusing the Classic with all-organic turmeric root, Ceylon cinnamon, lavender, elderberry, hibiscus flowers, cardamom or local garlic. Prepared as tea using a mug of hot water, or as fresh ginger ale using sparkling water, the elixirs also are effective added to other hot beverages, mixed drinks, salad dressings and smoothies. Corinna and Jason Geib founded the company in 2013. Corinna, originally from Germany, grew up inspired by health and natural healing from her grandfather. After attending an herbal remedy workshop in 2012, she reworked her recipe; shortly after, Jason inspired her to share the product beyond friends and family. The company has since grown to an eight-person team and will expand in early 2017 into a new production facility and tasting room in West Hurley. The elixirs cost $5 for a 2-ounce bottle or $15.95 for 8.5-ounces ($17.95 for 8.5-ounce Turmeric elixir). They are available at about 40 retail locations throughout the region and online. —DW

SARATOGA CHOWDERFEST SARATOGA SPRINGS February 4, 11am-4pm More than 80 vendors participate in this celebration of chowder. Local restaurants and caterers serve a wide selection of hot chowder to festivalgoers. Live music, family activities, and dog-friendly chowder for canine companions. discoversaratoga.org ICE HARVEST FESTIVAL HANDFORD MILLS MUSEUM EAST MEREDITH, CATSKILLS February 4, 10am-4pm Before there was refrigeration, ice was used to preserve food and keep it cold during warm months. The Handford Mills Museum celebrates the craft of ice harvesting with historic tools and techniques. Visitors can practice cutting blocks of ice from the Mill Pond and then transport the blocks using an ice sled. Ice sculpting, horse-drawn sleigh rides, blacksmithing and cooking demos, hot soups, local farmers and cool vendors. hanfordmills.org

ImmuneSchein LLC (828) 319-1844; immune-schein.com valleytable.com for updates

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YOUNG RASCAL

SAY PLEASING CHEESE Cheesemaker Colin McGrath has forged a successful career at Sprout Creek Farm in Poughkeepsie for more than 11 years. This past spring, he began offering cheeses under the McGrath Cheese Company label, a step he did not take impulsively or lightly. “It’s something that has always been a dream of mine—to have a company that I can influence and put my full style on, from branding to the cheeses to the packaging.” Though he maintains his position as cheesemaker at Sprout Creek, the move has given McGrath the opportunity and impetus to experiment and purchase milk from different sources, which has broadened his vision for his own company. “I’ve been able to work with all these different milks from many great producers in the Hudson Valley,” he says. “That’s probably been one of the most exciting things for me—the ability to meet the farmers, use their milk and see the rebirth in agriculture that’s taken place.” McGrath Cheese Company currently offers two varieties of cheese, with one in the works. Fresco, a fresh cheese that goes from milk to sellable product in only 48 hours, is “a really nice, soft, spreadable, luscious, buttery-type cheese that I love because it very much captures and exemplifies the milk that I’m using,” McGrath says. “It’s very pure and fresh and representative of the season I make it in.”

Also available is a cheese he calls Rascal, a raw cow’s milk cheese aged two to four months, with a unique rind. “I wash it in a brine solution and then I actually take a blowtorch to it at about a month old and burn the outside of the rind, which gives it this neat, toasty flavor,” McGrath explains. Victoria, not yet available, is a cow’s milk cheese aged five to seven weeks. Buttery and soft, its mixed rind encased in white mold gives it a more traditional taste, albeit with a bit of funk. McGrath expects it to be ready in early 2017. “I want to make cheeses that have character, have depth, have complexity, yet are approachable,” McGrath says. “That’s why I’ve been very pleased with the cheeses I’ve come up with—they have that versatility. They could be very ‘snackable’ cheeses for someone who doesn’t want to think about cheese too much, but they can also be very complex. They can either stand alone on a cheese plate, or they can be incorporated into a dish.” The cheeses are available in stores throughout the Hudson Valley, as well as at Whole Foods Market in Brooklyn and Port Chester, and through a home delivery service on Long Island. Fresco retails for about $16 per pound; Rascal retails for about $20 per pound (as will Victoria). —DN

McGrath Cheese Company 34 Lauer Rd, Poughkeepsie (845) 235-6259; mcgrathcheese.com

photos ethan harrison

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OPENINGS

Pho Corner Bistro 740 North Bedford Rd, Bedford Hills (914) 242-1662 phocornerbistro.com

Redwood Bar and Restaurant 63 North Front St, Kingston (845) 259-5868 Redwooduptown.com

Most people have very limited knowledge of Vietnamese cuisine, though they may have sampled it during a visit to Vietnam. “So, our main idea is to provide the same flavors and try to make it convenient to enjoy again—or try for the first time—the traditional dishes of the cuisine,” says Khang Nguyen, manager of Pho Corner Bistro, Westchester’s newest Vietnamese spot. Open for lunch and dinner, the family business offers 10 in-house seats, take out and delivery from a menu that features traditional noodle soup, pho, banh mih and various rice dishes. Chef Karen Nguyen returned to her Vietnamese roots to learn the craft of the cuisine. “I went back to my country to learn how to cook the noodle soup,” she says. “We really wanted authentic pho, a soup dish that mainly consists of beef bones, onions and other traditional ingredients, all cooked for 12 hours. It took a long time to learn how to execute just right.” The Nguyen siblings, along with partner Andy Hoang, say they are excited to bring authentic Vietnamese cuisine to Westchester, and Chef Nguyen assures that the menu will always be innovative (she currently is developing vegetarian and chicken versions of the classic pho).

As Kelly Jenkins Polston sees it, her new restaurant is bringing a taste of the West Coast to New York. This uptown dining destination is inspired by northern California cuisine, à la Alice Waters and Thomas Keller, emphasizing local, seasonal ingredients and seafood. Redwood’s focus, though is decidedly East Coast, emphasized by dishes like Maine mussels prepared with saffron, thyme, Dijon, Chablis, and finished with a baguette. One of the aspects that Kelly says makes Redwood’s cuisine particularly noteworthy is the four-course prix fixe menu available on Saturday and Sunday nights, spotlighting products from the Kingston Farmers’ Market. The menu changes seasonally—for the colder season expect ingredients like smoked pumpkin, crab apple and crème fraiche bisque. There’s a setting for an intimate meal with friends or family or for a large party (the expansive Pasadena Room accommodates up to 180 guests). There’s also a seasonal rooftop dining area “Up-Top.”

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Paula’s Public House 2186 New Hackensack Rd, Poughkeepsie (845) 454-7821 Paula Young, previously the owner of the diminutive Paula’s Stone Cottage Wine Bar, in Fishkill, is embarking on a new venture, throwing her love of good wine, food and people into a full-on gastropub where good wine and drink still take center stage: Paula’s Public House. Young upholds the 47-year legacy of what was formerly Mulligan’s Irish Pub and transforms it into an inviting gastropub sporting a cozy and friendly environment complemented by the warmth of a fireplace and a rustic ambiance. Paula’s offers lunch, supper and late-night fare and features live music, open mic and karaoke nights. The lunch menu centers on simple soups, salads and sandwiches. Supper ranges from light starters (hummus, wings, ahi tuna and sticky pork belly sliders) to 14-ounce rib eye, fish and chips or pasta. A customer favorite is the butter burger, an open-face burger with a butterand spice-filled center on a bun from Mario’s bakery, topped with a poached egg. (“It is divine,” Young comments.) Upcoming tasting events are scheduled to help familiarize patrons with Hudson Valley products.


Modern American Cuisine + Inspired Cocktails 12 Beers on Tap Private Banquet Room

Serving Lunch + Dinner Sunday Brunch Closed Tues

63 North Front St. in historic Uptown Kingston 845.259.5868 • redwooduptown.com

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MAGNIFICENT VIEWS, EXTRAORDINARY FOOD ALWAYS AT VALLEY RESTAURANT CALL OR EMAIL TODAY TO MAKE YOUR RESERVATIONS 845.424.3604 x39 jamesb@thegarrison.com Dinner: Thurs through Sat from 5pm-9pm. Brunch: Sat & Sun from 11:30am-2:30pm.

thegarrison.com | 2015 US 9, Garrison NY

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jodi cummings

caffe macchiato by robin cherry photos by eva deitch dec

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S

i t t i n g at a w i n d ow ta b l e w i t h b i s t r o ta b l e s

out front and a blackboard covered with coffee options over the bar, you might feel like you’re in the West Village, but with Washington’s Headquarters just across the street, it’s a good bet you’re not. You’re at Caffe Macchiato in Newburgh. Caffe Macchiato has been a Liberty Street anchor for over a decade. Founded by native Italian Barbara Ballerini and her husband Edwin, the cafe became known for casual Italian specialties and Edwin’s sensational desserts. In 2015, the cafe was purchased by Chef Jodi Cummings, a native of Newburgh (born half a mile away at St. Luke’s Hospital) who remembers a different, thriving Newburgh when she was growing up. She and her mother went food shopping downtown every Friday. “We would go to five or six shops, including the fish market, the meat market and a local farm stand,” Cummings recalls. “It was very European-style here, with mom-and-pop shops. Those memories and feeling of community have a lot to do with how I ended up here, running a cafe.” Cummings took a circuitous route to Caffe Macchiato. She attended the Fashion Institute of Technology in New York City and worked in the garment district designing menswear fabric, commuting the whole time because she loved the valley so much. Done in by the commute after seven years, however, she eventually worked in several restaurants in Connecticut and on Nantucket (where she worked for a Polish couple who served Italian food “worthy of a Tuscan grandmother”), and, ultimately, faced choosing a career as an art teacher or a chef. Always a CIA groupie, she chose food. “I went to the Culinary as an adult and was determined to get everything out of it that I could,” she beams. “I still think of all the things the chefs taught me—they took my cooking to another level. It was the best decision I ever made.” After graduation, Cummings got her first professional culinary job as the first full-time chef at Buttermilk Falls in Milton. She then worked as a private chef and at Glynwood, where she helped host the James Beard Foundation’s seventh Chef’s Boot Camp for Policy and Change (along with James Beard Award-winning chefs Rick Bayless and Michel Nischan, founder of the Chef’s Action

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Network). “It was amazing,” she recalls. “We spent most of the time sitting and discussing food challenges and how to solve them. Cooking was how we relaxed. I was very fortunate to be a participant.” When Cummings took over Caffe Macchiato in September 2015, she wanted to bring in her ideas but didn’t want to wipe the slate clean, so she asked her customers, “What did Barbara make that you loved?” She learned that Ballerini was known for her baked eggs and coconut waffles. Cummings transformed the baked eggs into eggs cocotte; the coconut waffles morphed into fried chicken and waffles. (Cummings spent a year in North Carolina, where she worked for a southern chef. “I picked up on some great staples like fried green tomatoes—which I’m obsessed with—fried pickles, and fried chicken and waffles, which really work together. It shouldn’t, but it does.”) Cummings updated the interior of the cafe with tin ceiling tiles, schoolhouse pendant lamps and quirky artwork, including a Spanish poster for Dr. Zhivago and an original menu from Newburgh’s Palatine Hotel. According to an 1893 article, the palatial hotel, now sadly demolished, once drew “throngs of handsome and stylishly attired ladies...and their chivalrous escorts” from New York City. Most chefs either cook or bake, but, unlike the majority, Cummings enjoys (and excels at) both. A self-described morning person, she gets up early and bakes for a couple of hours until switching her focus at about 8 o’clock to breakfast and her clientele, which include both tourists and regular customers, some of whom come in several times a week. One regular, a 92-year-old gentleman, comes in twice a day. “He comes in for breakfast, then comes back later in the day for lunch,” Cummings notes. “He’s lived here for 25 years, and we’ve become part of his daily routine—he’s comfortable here and thinks of us as family. That makes me so happy. We’re having his ninety-third birthday party here next week.” A couple walking by outside knocks on the front window and waves. “They were married here when it was owned by [Ballerini], and they just keep coming,”


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Cummings says. “We also have people who introduced themselves at the cafe—two months later, they come in together as great friends.” Cummings becomes animated when she talks about Newburgh. “When I moved back five years ago, everyone was asking if everything was alright. It was really frustrating. I love it. I love the architecture. I love the history—there’s one house here that actually was wired by Thomas Edison! When I was cooking for private clients in Rhinebeck and Millbrook and told them I was from Newburgh, they often said, ‘I’ve been hearing a lot about that place. What are your thoughts on buying a house there?’ I’d say, do it. Do it now.” She points to a beautiful building across from the cafe. “That building was just sold. There were 20 people who wanted to buy it.” From a breakfast sandwich of fried eggs, provolone, garlic tomatoes and arugula on brioche to the Thai curry scramble (scrambled eggs with house-made green curry, broccoli and potatoes), shrimp and grits (dusted with Turkish spices), or eggs cocotte with mushrooms, spinach and Gruyere, the menu at Caffe Macchiato is eclectic and compelling. The Thai scramble is a best seller—gloriously sweet, spicy and savory—as is her own Concord jam. “That jam is so special to me because the smell of it is childhood,” Cummings says. “When we peel and seed the grapes for the jam, it takes me back to when I was a child picking those grapes.” Because she relies heavily on local sources for her ingredients, as the seasons change, so does the menu. “I’m not one of those stubborn chefs that says, ‘My way or no

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Growing up in the Hudson Valley, I was surrounded by apple trees, grape vines and my friends’ fathers’ farms... I was in awe of farmers and have always leaned toward a place where there’s a short distance between where the food comes from and where it’s eaten. way,’” Cummings says, admitting that she has had some friendly debates with customers about seasonal ingredients. “They said they wanted [strawberries] on pancakes, and I would say, ‘I’m so sorry, but strawberries are only in season in June. I promise you strawberries in June when they taste amazing. Just wait—when I get them in and they’re local, then you’ll understand why my menus are the way they are.’ And they came back and said, ‘Okay, you’re right.’” Winter is no different. “I don’t shy away from winter,” Cummings says. “I think our bodies want the foods that are in season. I embrace all that. We’re getting into brisket and pulled pork season—and brunch season. In the summer, people come for brunch, but they come early so they can get outside. Now, they hang out and have a nice long brunch.” On the winter menu, look for squashes, potatoes (which she says “are not really delicious until January”) and spinach (“phenomenal in winter—December spinach tastes like candy”). Winter is also soup time and hers are always made from scratch. Cummings matter-of-factly concludes that she could never work in a restaurant where the menu never changes.

Beer and wine are available at the cafe, as is another one of Cummings’ obsessions—hard cider, which she looks forward to introducing to her customers, along with educating them with a cider tasting. “Some ciders are sweet; some are sour; some taste like beer; others taste like wine. People don’t know which ones to order and therefore don’t order any of them.” From its grits and scrambled eggs to desserts like millionaire’s shortbread, Caffe Macchiato effortlessly combines Cummings’ idealism with real-world pragmatism into a little restaurant that just feels good. “Growing up in the Hudson Valley, I was surrounded by apple trees, grape vines and my friends’ fathers’ farms,” she says. “I was in awe of farmers and have always leaned toward a place where there’s a short distance between where the food comes from and where it’s eaten.” 4 Caffe Macchiato 99 Liberty St, Newburgh (845) 565-4616 99libertystreet.com

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THAI CURRY SCRAMBLE JODY CUMMINGS / CAFFE MACCHIATO Ingredients

THAI CURRY SCRAMBLE

2 1 2 2 1 2 4 4 4

tablespoons grapeseed oil cup sliced white or red onions cups chopped red and/or yellow peppers tablespoons fine chop garlic cup large dice cooked potatoes cup blanched broccoli florets tablespoons Thai curry paste (see below) tablespoons coconut milk eggs, beaten lightly (option: substitute crumbled tofu for eggs to make this vegan) ¼ cup fresh cilantro leaves serves 4 THAI CURRY PASTE

The Thai scramble is a best seller— gloriously sweet spicy and savory.

1 stalk lemongrass, peeled, thin slice 3 cloves garlic 2 inch piece of fresh ginger root ½ jalapeño pepper, seeded, minced ½ cup basil 1 cup cilantro 1 teaspoon brown sugar ½ cup coconut milk 3 teaspoons fish sauce (option: substitute soy sauce for vegan) 2 tablespoons lime juice salt and pepper 1 teaspoon coriander Method

THAI CURRY SCRAMBLE

1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Heat a medium nonstick sauté pan, then add the grapeseed oil. Add onions, peppers and garlic and sauté for a few minutes until onions start to become translucent. Add potatoes and broccoli and continue to cook for two minutes. Fold in the Thai curry paste, eggs and coconut milk and stir ingredients around until eggs are cooked through, about 2 to 3 minutes. Serve over a bed of spinach for breakfast or lunch.

THAI CURRY PASTE

Combine all ingredients in a food processor. Can be stored in refrigerator for up to 2 weeks.

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Artisanal Cheese • Charcuterie • Fine Groceries Pastries & Desserts • Full Service Café with Beer & Wine

Holiday Catering is our specialty Visit us for your every day and holiday shopping. We also design custom gift crates and host events. 382 Main Street, Beacon, NY • 845-440-8923 • beaconpantry.com

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LOCALLY GROWN

the legacy of

mohonk A by keith stewart

c o u p l e o f y e a r s ag o , I wa s i n v i t e d by the head gardener at Mohonk Mountain House, just outside of New Paltz (Ulster County), to talk to the hotel’s guests about heirloom tomatoes and their enduring popularity. I don’t know if my words made much of an impression, but the samples I brought—mid-summer, vine-ripened Brandywine, Paul Robeson, Cherokee Purple, and other varieties—were happily devoured along with a few dashes of salt. Mohonk is a very special place, but as resort hotels go, it carries a hefty price tag. In lieu of payment, I received a coupon, and this fall my wife and I celebrated our thirtieth wedding anniversary with a two-night stay there. Sometimes it pays to talk tomato.

photo keith stewart

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MMHA

The Mountain House has been owned and managed by one family for nearly a century and a half.

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The sprawling, Victorian-style Mohonk Mountain House is situated on 1,325 acres of mountainous, wooded land beside a sparkling lake fed by rainfall. Guests can kick back and take in the stunning, rugged scenery of the Shawangunk Ridge and the Catskill Mountains to the north, or they can engage in hiking, swimming, boating, horseback riding, rock climbing, tennis, golf, croquet, carriage rides, nature walks and, in winter, ice skating and crosscountry skiing. Various cultural, historical and environmental tours are offered during the day; at night, there are talks, poetry readings, movies and other entertainment. A fitness center, spa and indoor swimming pool are also on hand. My only problem with the food was that I ate too much — in just two days I gained three or four pounds. The Mountain House has been owned and managed by one family for nearly a century and a half. The story begins in 1869, when Alfred Smiley, a Quaker schoolteacherturned-farmer, encountered Lake Mohonk and its spectacular surroundings while on an excursion with his family. For Alfred, a naturalist and outdoor enthusiast, it was love at first sight, and his interest intensified when he learned that the land, along with a small inn and tavern on the lakeshore, was for sale. But with a wife, six children and only a modest income, he was in no position to finance the

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purchase. He did, however, have a wild card up his sleeve—his twin brother Albert, who was looking for land and a new home. At the time, Albert was very busy at his job as principal of the Quaker Friends School in Providence, Rhode Island, and he dismissed initial telegrams from his brother urging him to come right away to look at his find. Alfred persisted, though, and when Albert eventually acquiesced, he too was greatly taken with the land’s natural beauty and potential, and agreed to put up his life savings to obtain a mortgage on Lake Mohonk and 280 acres of surrounding property. Today, the small inn and tavern have been transformed into a world-class, 260-room hotel reminiscent of a European castle. The descendants of the Smiley brothers remain committed to preserving the natural splendor of the place for which the twins had such affection. Their Quaker heritage imbued many of their offspring with a sense of service, a reverence for nature and the belief in peaceful resolution of conflict. These values continue to shape many endeavors at Mohonk. From the beginning, the hotel and surrounding land were more than just a treasured place for the Smiley family and a getaway for the wellheeled—they also provided an open venue for the discussion of major social, cultural and environmental issues.

photos these pages courtesy mohonk mountain house archives


mohonk mountain house archives

MMHA mohonk mountain house archives

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MMHA mohonk mountain house archives

The descendants of the Smiley brothers remain committed to preserving the natural splendor of the place for which the twins had such affection.

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From 1883 to 1916, for example, Mohonk hosted the Lake Mohonk Conference of Friends of the Indian, an annual, one-day meeting that included the Board of Indian Commissioners, a humanitarian advisory group established by Congress in 1869, and 50 prominent and influential guests invited by Albert Smiley. Albert and his younger half-brother, Daniel, were aware of the plight and ill-treatment of Native Americans. In step with the aims of the Board, they advocated for civil rights, equal opportunity and full citizenship for the native population in the post-Civil War westward expansion—a time when there was still national debate as to whether the indigenous population should be confined to reservations, assimilated or exterminated. Records from these conferences are available to scholars at Haverford College in Haverford, Pennsylvania. Given the Quakers’ opposition to war, it seems natural, too, that in 1895 Albert should organize and convene the first Lake Mohonk Conference on International Arbitration. Political and religious leaders from around the globe came to debate issues concerning

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peaceful conflict resolution, but America’s entry into World War I brought the conferences to an end in 1916. The work done at Mohonk over more than 20 years, however, served as a model for the establishment of the Permanent Court of Arbitration at the Hague in the Netherlands, a tribunal for peaceful arbitration of international disputes. In 1963, members of the Smiley family created The Mohonk Trust, a non-profit entity dedicated to land stewardship and discussion of social and environmental issues. In 1966, the family bequeathed several thousand acres to the Trust to preserve the open space. Now renamed the Mohonk Preserve, it protects some 8,000 acres of mountains, fields, lakes and streams up and down the Shawangunk Ridge. With 40 miles of hiking trails and 70 miles of carriage roads, the protected land is New York State’s largest private, non-profit nature preserve. It hosts 165,000 visitors each year: Hikers, nature buffs and birdwatchers find plenty to delight them; students at all levels come for outdoor education programs that focus on conservation and stewardship;

photo courtesy mohonk mountain house archives


rock climbers hone their skills on the worldfamous vertical cliffs of the Shawangunk Ridge. Volunteers help maintain the trails and act as interpretive guides. In 1973, the Mohonk Mountain House was listed on the National Register of Historic Places; 13 years later, the Mountain House, along with Mohonk Preserve, were designated a National Historic Landmark. In 1980, Albert K. Smiley, great-grandnephew of one of the original twin brothers, established Mohonk Consultations, a non-profit organization that provides a forum for the exchange of ideas on the sustainable use of natural resources while recognizing the value and interdependence of all life on earth. Mohonk agricultural enterprises, some more long-lived than others, included poultry, pig, sheep, and dairy operations on the hillsides and bottomlands below the Mountain House, much of it owned by the Smiley family. For 90 years, a good deal of the food and dairy consumed by Mohonk guests and employees was produced there, but by the 1960s most of the food and supplies for the Mountain House came from distant places. Today, in tune with the growing popularity of fresh and local produce, cheeses and meats, an effort is being made to source more food from within the Hudson Valley. If you’re driving on Route 32 in the vicinity of New Paltz, you can’t miss Skytop Tower, an imposing stone monument atop the Shawangunk Ridge almost directly above the Mountain House. It was built in 1923 in memory of Albert Smiley, after three earlier wooden towers either blew over or burned down. Even under an overcast sky, the views in all directions from the tower—a mildly strenuous, 20-minute hike from the Mountain House—were breathtaking. (In clear weather, it is possible to see six states from this one spot—New York, New Jersey, Connecticut, Massachusetts, Vermont and Pennsylvania.)

One can imagine a sunny day and cloudless sky in 1869 and the Smiley twins looking out to the horizon in all directions and experiencing a sense of awe at the stunning beauty of the natural world before them. The horse-drawn carriages that conveyed the brothers up the mountain to Lake Mohonk nearly 150 years ago have been supplanted by modern, climate-controlled vehicles with talking navigation systems. The morning prayer sessions held at the hotel well into the twentieth century have given way to nature walks and meditative strolls along the lakefront. But if the brothers were able to come back to their beloved Mountain House, one can imagine them nodding with approval. In many ways the spirit and good works of Mohonk are still strong. 4 Mohonk Mountain House 1000 Mountain Rest Rd, New Paltz (845) 255-1000; mohonk.com

If you’re driving on Route 32 in the vicinity of New Paltz, you can’t miss Skytop Tower, an imposing stone monument atop the Shawangunk Ridge almost directly above the Mountain House.

SKYTOP TOWER New Paltz, NY

photo keith stewart

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Thank you diners, restaurants and sponsors for making Fall Hudson Valley Restaurant Week such a delicious success.

TH

AN

Mark your calendars for Spring Hudson Valley Restaurant Week, March 6-19, 2017.

K YO U

Registration for restaurant participation and sponsorship is now open. Be part of it. Go to HudsonValleyRestaurantWeek.com or call 845.765.2600.

CELEBRATING FINE DINING IN THE HUDSON VALLEY 105-Ten Bar and Grill 121 Restaurant & Bar 251 Lex 273 Kitchen 8 North Broadway 808 Bistro A Tavola Angelo’s Family Style Italian Aquario AquaTerra Grille Aroma Osteria Augie’s Prime Cut Baja 328 Tequila Bar & Southwest Grill The Barn at Bedfordf Post Inn Bear Mountain Inn & Lodges/ Restaurant 1915 & The Blue Roof Tapas Inn Beehive Benjamin Steakhouse Billy Joe’s Ribworks Birdsall House Bistro Z Blu Pointe Bocuse Restaurant Bonefish Grill Nanuet Borland House Inn Brasserie 292 Broadway Bistro BV’s Grill @ The Time Nyack Cafe Amarcord Cafe of Love Caffe Regatta Carlo’s Italian Restaurant Carlo’s Trattoria Cathryn’s Tuscan Grill Catskill Mountains Resort

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Cedar Street Grill Cellar 49 Cena 2000 Char Char Steakhouse & Bar Chat 19 Chat American Grill Chatterbox 54 Chophouse Grille Cinnamon Indian Cuisine City Limits Diner Clock Tower Grill Cold Spring Depot Communal Kitchen The Cookery Cortlandt Colonial Restaurant Cosimo’s Brick Oven, Middletown Cosimo’s On Union, Newburgh Cosimo’s Trattoria, Poughkeepsie Cosimo’s Woodbury, Central Valley County Fare Crabtree’s Kittle House Crave Da Nina Italian Restaurant Dan Rooney’s at Empire City Casino Delfino’s Italian Restaurant Dino’s Vigneto Cafe Dish Bistro & Wine Bar Dolphin Restaurant Bar Lounge Dubrovnik Restaurant Eleven 11 Grille & Spirits Emilio Ristorante Exit 4 Food Hall Farm To Table Bistro Fat Sal’s Bar & Grill Fig & Olive

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Frankie & Augie’Z Frankie & Johnnie’s Steakhouse Gaucho Grill Argentinean Steakhouse Giulio’s Restaurant Graziella’s Italian Bistro Guadalajara Mexican Restaurant Half Moon Harper’s Restaurant & Bar Harvest On Hudson Henry’s at the Farm Hito Japanese Restaurant Hudson House Of Nyack Hudson House River Inn Hudson’s Ribs & Fish Il Barilotto Il Castello Il Cenacolo Il Laghetto Il Sorriso Inn at Pound Ridge by Jean-Georges Jordan Hall 10830 Joseph’s Steakhouse Kitchen Sink Food & Drink L’Inizio La Bocca La Casa Vicina La Lanterna Restaurant & Caffe La Panetiere La Riserva Trattoria Lakeview House Le Express Le Fontane Ristorante Le Jardin Du Roi Le Sirene Lenny’s Seafood & Steakhouse

Lexington Square Cafe Liberty Street Bistro Limoncello at the Orange Inn Lusardi’s Madison Kitchen Mamma Assunta Restaurant Mariachi Mexico Mario’s of Chappaqua MASSA COASTAL Mediterraneo Melike Mediterranean Restaurant Meritage Mill House Brewing Company The Mill Restaurant and Bar Mima Vinoteca Mix Cocktail Bar & Kitchen Modern on the Rails Moderne Barn Monte’s Local Kitchen & Bar Morton’s, The Steakhouse Moscato MP Taverna Mughal Palace Nina Nonno’s Trattoria at Empire City Casino The Olde Stone Mill Orfino’s Restaurant The Parlor Pax Romana Perch Peter Pratt’s Inn Pier 701 Restaurant & Bar Plates Poughkeepsie Ice House Primavera Restaurant & Bar Prohibition River

Pub Street Purdy’s Farmer & The Fish Ramiro’s 954 Rancho Grande Red Hat On The River Restaurant X / Bully Boy Bar Rinis Restaurant Risotto Ristorante Caterina de’ Medici River City Grille River Station Restaurant & Catering Rivermarket Bar & Kitchen Riverview Restaurant Rosemary & Vine Rosie’s Bistro Italiano The Roundhouse Route 100 Bar & Grill Ruth’s Chris Steak House Rye House Saint George Bistro Saltaire Oysterbar & Fish House Sam’s of Gedney Way Sammy’s Downtown Bistro Sapore Sapori Italian Restaurant Scalia and Co. Scalini Osteria Sergio’s Ristorante Shadows On The Hudson Ship Lantern Inn Sixty 5 on Main Sofrito Sonora Sour Kraut Sparkill Steakhouse Storm King Tavern

Sunset Cove Tagine Restaurant & Wine Bar Tarry Lodge Terrapin Restaurant Texas de Brazil, West Nyack Texas de Brazil, Yonkers The Melting Pot, White Plains The Stadium The Vault Three Little Pigs BBQ Thyme Steak & Seafood Toscana Ristorante Traditions 118 Trattoria Locanda Trattoria San Giorgio Trevi Ristorante Tuthill House At The Mill The Twisted Oak Two Spear Street Union Restaurant & Bar Latino UNoodles Snack Bar Valley Restaurant At The Garrison Velo Bistro & Wine Bar Vesuvio’s Ristorante Village Social Kitchen & Bar Village Tea Room Vintage 1891 Kitchen Wasabi Wildfire Grill Winston Restaurant Woodnotes Grille at the Emerson Would Restaurant X2O Xaviars On The Hudson Yefsi Estiatorio Zero Otto Nove Zoila’s Restaurant Zuppa’s Restaurant


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Since

1978

Always Warm, Fresh and Delicious Inside

Homemade Soups Enjoy our Café & Bakery Holiday Gift Cards are Available

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a drone also rises

photographs by david handschuh


DRINK

by timothy buzinski

T

a toast tothe

holidays

h i s i s t h e t i m e o f y e a r f o r t h o s e l a r g e a n d s m a l l g at h e r i n g s

with family and friends that happen all too infrequently much of the rest of the year. One traditional and hospitable way to begin these celebrations is with a few sips of a flavorful tipple, and the holidays offer opportunities to create distinctive, memorable drink experiences for guests. Whether a large party or intimate family gathering, holiday celebrations are an ideal time to experiment with new and local beverages. Not only will your guests be intrigued by the discoveries, they’ll be delighted by the flavors and versatility.

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NEW YORKER JANETT PABON / THE CORNER Ingredients 11/2 ounces bourbon 1/2 ounce lemon juice 3 ounces Fever-Tree Ginger Beer a splash of simple syrup Hetta Glögg lemon wheel mint sprig Method In a shaker filled with ice, combine bourbon, lemon juice and simple syrup. Shake. Strain into a Collins glass filled with ice. Top with the ginger beer and float Hetta Glögg. Garnish with the lemon wheel and mint sprig.

Sparkling wine always is welcome for celebrations, especially during the winter holidays. Clinton Vineyards (Clinton Corners) pioneered Hudson Valley sparkling wine in 1981 when Ben Feder, who founded the winery in 1976, bottled a mere 200 cases of his first version. Feder focused on Seyval Blanc, a French hybrid grape ideal for this region due to its early ripening and ability to produce and sustain in cooler climates. Feder had envisioned a vineyard estate similar to those he experienced in Europe, and, following the European sensibility, he created sparkling wines using the traditional méthode champenoise, which involves a secondary fermentation in the bottle, creating delicate bubbles and layers of toasty, yeasty, brioche-like character. Though Feder died in 2009, his vision is carried on by his wife, Phyllis, who still produces a few sparkling options based on Seyval Blanc, including the light, fruitful Seyval Naturel and the robust Jubilee. Baldwin Vineyards (Pine Bush), Benmarl Winery (Marlboro) and Whitecliff Vineyards (Gardiner) offer particularly clean, crisp sparklers. While sparkling wines may be enjoyed by themselves or paired with a range of food, one of the more celebratory ways to use them is in mixed drinks. One classic example is the Kir Royale—an ounce or so of cassis mixed in a glass of Champagne (technically it’s a Kir Pétillant when mixed with sparkling wine)—a simple but tasteful way to greet guests and invite a convivial mood. Cassis, layered with the rich flavor of black currants, returned to local production about 12 years ago when the ban on domestic growing of the berries was lifted. The lovely sweetness never overwhelms the palate, in part due to the cutting acidity. A growing number of Hudson Valley wineries, including Clinton Vineyards, Tousey Winery, Glorie Farm Winery, Hudson Chatham Winery and Warwick Valley Winery & Distillery, among others, currently produce cassis. While the pleasures of sparkling wine certainly aren’t limited to the cold-weather holidays, some other beverages have become identified with seasonal special occasions. Krupnikas, a centuries-old, honey-based spirit with

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Lithuanian origins (also known as krupnik in nearby Poland), is flavored with a complex recipe of herbs and spices. “People would make it even before the holidays— in September or October, when you could cook with the windows open. It would only come out [for] an important event,” says Kestutis J. Katinas, founder/owner of KAS Spirits in Mahopac. Though typically thought of as a wintertime specialty, krupnikas also is served at spring weddings and other special celebrations. The process of making krupnikas is relatively simple— spices and fruit rind are simmered in water; honey and grain-neutral spirits are added; the liquid is cooled, and then rested to complete the infusion of the flavors, filtered and bottled. The exact recipe for any given krupnikas, however, is individual and proprietary. Katinas has been familiar with krupnikas since he was a teenager. After being laid off from his job at Con Edison, he sold his house in the Catskills and founded KAS Spirits, with the goal of scaling his family recipe for krupnikas to commercial proportions. He hand-labeled the first bottle of KAS Krupnikas in 2014. Like many northern- and eastern-European ethnic drinks, krupnikas has a reputation as being sweet but powerfully strong. KAS’s version is smooth and refined, with abundant baking spice notes and a long, balanced finish—warming and comforting without being overwhelming. The spirit traditionally is served as a shot, but mixologists have discovered this old-time spirit creates interesting modern twists on everything from a French 75 to a Negroni, or even a sophisticated Boulevardier. Krupnikas has applications even beyond beverages. “We put it in peach pie—with all the extra spices, it just brings the flavors out tremendously,” Katinas extolls. “One of our neighbors made a glaze for ham; someone else made crème brûlée with it.”


Basically heated wine infused with spices and fortified with spirit, glögg, a Nordic concoction, often is associated with winter holidays. Traditionally, though, glögg isn't just a “holiday thing” in Nordic countries; it’s commonly served whenever family and friends gather, explains Hetta Glögg’s Darren M. Davidowich. “You have it on the stove or in the crockpot—as people come in the door, you’d hand them a small mug of it,” Davidowich notes. Davidowich founded Hetta (“heat”) in 2013; the company’s glögg is based on a family recipe, a mixture of herbs and spices that imbues the product with its distinctive aroma and flavor. Classic glögg is served piping hot in two-ounce portions (periodically refreshed). Like krupnikas, glögg is versatile enough to be used in mixed drinks as well. At The Corner, the restaurant inside the recently refurbished and stylishly appointed Hotel Tivoli, glögg is served both ways: When guests arrive on a cold night, they are offered a shot “right when they come in,” according to Assistant General Manager Janett Pabon; the restaurant also has incorporated glögg into a bourbon-based cocktail with equally warming properties.

THE SHANDY PAUL MALONEY / STOCKADE TAVERN Ingredients 1/2 ounce raspberry syrup (see below) 1/2 ounce fresh lemon juice 1/2 ounce fresh pineapple juice 3 ounces pilsner beer

Beer cocktails are a light, enjoyable, lower-alcohol alternative to the over-indulgence that is often the norm during the holidays. As the historically literate Paul Maloney at Kingston’s Stockade Tavern notes, “Even a stout is typically low in alcohol,” compared to the higher abv of spirit-based drinks. For this barkeep, beer cocktails open a light and refreshing realm of possibilities. Maloney’s Pilsner Punch, for example, is a bright, refreshing drink that, due to its carbonation, is appropriate as an aperitif. Maloney prefers Helga Pilsner, a beer from Kingston’s Keegan Ales named for the Helga hops that give it an aromatic, spicy profile—in the cocktail, these notes mingle with fresh fruit elements to create a highly drinkable beverage. For something a bit weightier, Maloney suggests a Stout Flip cocktail. “Flip” cocktails are known for rich flavors and creamy texture—the richness of the stout plays off the depth of the bourbon while crème de cacao elevates the chocolate notes of the beer. A full-flavored concoction, it’s satisfying and perfect with a rich holiday meal, or even as an after-dinner drink.

STOUT FLIP PAUL MALONEY / STOCKADE TAVERN Ingredients 1 1/2 ounces Hillrock Bourbon 1/2 ounce crème de cacao 1 whole egg 3 ounces Keegan Ales Mother’s Milk Stout Fruition chocolate Method In a cocktail shaker, add the whole egg, bourbon and crème de cacao and dry shake to combine. Add ice and shake again, then pour into a rocks glass. Add the chilled stout, gently stir and grate some of the chocolate over the top.

Clinton Vineyards 450 Schultzville Rd, Clinton Corners (845) 266-5372; clintonvineyards.com The Corner 53 Broadway, Tivoli (845) 757-2100; hoteltivoli.org/the-corner Hetta Glögg Box 605, Rhinebeck (845) 216-4801; hettaglogg.com

RASPBERRY SYRUP

In a sealable container, place 7 ounces fresh raspberries and 7 ounces sugar. Be certain to measure equal parts by weight. Close and gently rotate to combine; do not stir. Allow to sit 24 hours and strain. Method In a mixing glass filled with ice, combine the raspberry syrup, lemon and pineapple juices. Shake. Add ice to a clean pilsner glass and pour the mixture over the ice. Top with the beer and stir gently to combine.

KAS Spirits 46 Miller Rd, Mahopac (845) 750-6000; kasspirits.com Stockade Tavern 313 Fair St, Kingston (845) 514-2649; stockadetavern.com

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CASUAL DINING WITH GLOBAL INFLUENCES CREATING MEMORIES THROUGH SUPERB FOOD & SERVICE!!!! 14 Mount Carmel Place Poughkeepsie, NY 12601

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845-452-7181 www.essiesrestaurantpk.com


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FARMS, FOOD & MARKETS

hudson valley winter farmers’ markets 2016-2017

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bustling farmers’ market, but in the Hudson Valley you can buy local food products, including meats, eggs, high tunneland greenhouse-grown vegetables, root crops and fruit, as well as dairy, baked goods and prepared products direct from the farmers all year long. But bundle up—it’s cold out there.

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winter CSAs & farmers’ markets

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HUDSON VALLEY WINTER CSAs Bialas Farms 75 Celery Ave, New Hampton Nov-Jan (See website for date and time) bialasfarms.com The Farm Bridge 195 Huguenot St, New Paltz Dec-Apr (See website for distribution locations) thefarmbridgeshares.com Grass and Grit Farm (Meat & Eggs) Lenape Ln, New Paltz Jan-May (See website for distribution locations) grassgritfarm.com Glynwood (Meat & Eggs) 362 Glynwood Rd, Cold Spring Every other Thu 3-6pm; Dec 1-Apr 6 glynwood.org Hawthorne Valley Farm 327 Rt 21C, Ghent Dec 10, 24; Jan 14, 28; Feb 11, 25 (See website for pick-up locations) hawthornevalleystore.org Fishkill Farms 9 Fishkill Farm Rd, Hopewell Junction Dec-Mar (See website for dates) fishkillfarms.com Miller’s Crossing 81 Roxbury Rd, Hudson Nov 5, 19; December 3, 17; Jan 7, 21 (See website for time) farmatmillerscrossing.com/csa-winterveggies.html Red Oak Farm 331 Delaware Ave, Albany Public Library Nov 15, 29; Dec 13: 4:30-6:30 1921 Rt 9, Stuyvesant Nov 20; Dec 4, 18 (see website for time) redoakfarmny.com Roxbury Farm 2501 Rte 9H, Kinderhook: 3:30pm-7pm 98 Greene St, Hudson 5-7pm, Dec 2, Jan 6, Feb 3 roxburyfarm.com/store/2240 Sun Sprout Farm Green Onion Farmers’ Market 8 Greycourt Ave, Chester 10-4, Dec 3, Jan 7, Feb 4 Hastings-on-Hudson Farmers’ Market 7 Maple Ave, Hastings-on-Hudson 8:30-1:30, Dec 3, Jan 7, Feb 4 56 Broad Brook Lane Rd, Stamford, CT 4-6:30pm, Dec 7, Jan 4, Feb 1 sunsproutfarm.com

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winter farmers’ markets COLUMBIA COUNTY Chatham Real Food Market Co-op 15 Church St, Chatham Open daily, 10am chathamrealfoodcoop.net Hudson Indoor Market Elks Lodge, 601 Union St, Hudson Sat 10-1; Dec, Feb-Apr

DUTCHESS COUNTY Amenia Farmers’ Market Town Hall, 4988 Rt 22, Amenia Sat 10-2; Nov-Apr ameniafarmersmarket.com Beacon Farmers’ Market Memorial Building at 413 Main St Sun 10-2; Dec 4-Apr 9 (closed Dec 25, Jan 1) beaconfarmersmarket.org Hudson Valley Regional Farmers’ Market Hudson Valley Cerebral Palsy Association 15 Mount Ebo Rd S, Brewster Sun 11–2; year-round hudsonvalleyfarmersmarket.org Millerton Indoor Farmers’ Market Methodist Church, corner Dutchess and Main St, Millerton Sat 10-2; Nov 5-Dec 31 2nd & 4th Sat; Jan 14-Apr 8 millertonfarmersmarket.org Poughkeepsie—Vassar College Indoor Market College Center, 129 Raymond Ave, Poughkeepsie Thu 10-4; Nov-May sustainability.vassar.edu/campus-initiatives/ indoor-farmers-market/ Red Hook—Hudson Valley Farmers’ Market Greig Farm, 229 Pitcher Ln, Red Hook Sat 10-3, year-round greigfarm.com/hudson-valley-farmers-market.html Rhinebeck Winter Market Town Hall, 80 E Market St, Rhinebeck Sun 10-2; Dec 4, 11, 18; Jan 15, 29; Feb 12, 26; March 12, 26; April 9, 23 rhinebeckfarmersmarket.com

ORANGE COUNTY Bialas Farms Winter Market 75 Celery Ave, New Hampton Tue 3-6:30pm; Nov 1, 8, 15; Dec 6, 20; Jan 3, 17 bialasfarms.com Cornwall Farmers’ Market 40 Munger Dr, or weather permitting outside Town Hall, 183 Main St, Cornwall Sat 10:30–1; Nov 12, Dec 10 cornwallny.com/Departments/Farmers-Market

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Green Onion Farmers’ Market 8 Greycourt Ave, Chester Fri 5-7:30pm, Sat 10-4, Sun 10-2; year-round except Jan hudsonvalleygreenonion.com Monroe Winter Farmers’ Market Dec 3, 17; Jan 21; Feb 18; Mar 18 (845) 372-6550 Tuxedo Winter Farmers’ Market Tuxedo Train Station, 240 Rt 17, Tuxedo Sat 10-2; Dec 10, Jan 14, Feb 11, Mar 11, Apr 8 tuxedofarmersmarket.com Warwick Winter Farmers’ Market 115 Liberty Corners Rd, Pine Island Sun 10-2; Nov 27-May 7 (845) 258-4998

PUTNAM COUNTY Cold Spring Indoor Farmers’ Market Parish Hall, Episcopal Church of St. Mary-inthe-Highlands 1 Chestnut St, Cold Spring Sat 9:30-1:30; Nov-Apr csfarmmarket.org

ROCKLAND COUNTY Nyack Winter Farmers’ Market Nyack Center, 58 Depew Ave, Nyack Thu 8-2; Dec 1-Mar 30 Palisades Indoor Winter Farmers’ Market Palisades Community Center, 675 Oak Tree Rd, Palisades Sat 9-1; Jan 14-May 20 palisadesfm.org The SOUK in Piermont The OUTSIDE IN, 249 Ferdon Ave, Piermont Sun 11-3; Jan 8-Apr 9 theoutside.in

SULLIVAN COUNTY Callicoon Indoor Farmers’ Market Delaware Youth Center, 8 Creamery Rd, Calicoon Nov 13-Apr 30 Sun: 11-2 callicoonfarmersmarket.org

ULSTER COUNTY Kingston Farmers’ Market Old Dutch Church, 272 Wall St, Kingston Alternate Sat 9–2; Dec 3-Apr 22 kingstonfarmersmarket.org Rosendale Winter Farmers’ Market Rosendale Recreation Center, 1055 Rt 32, Rosendale Sun 10-2; Dec 11, Jan 8, Feb 12, Mar 12, Apr 9 rosendalefarmersmarketny.com

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Saugerties Indoor Farmers’ Market Senior Citizens’ Center, 207 Market St, Saugerties Sat 10-2; Dec 17 saugertiesfarmersmarket.com

WESTCHESTER COUNTY Chappaqua Farmers’ Market Chappaqua Train Station, Allen Pl Sat: 8:30-1 until Dec 17 chappaquafarmersmarket.org Gossett's Farm Market Gossett Brothers’ Nursery, 1202 Rt 35, South Salem Sat 9-1; year-round gossettbrothers.com Hastings-on-Hudson Winter Farmers’ Market Hastings-on-Hudson Public Library, 7 Maple Ave Sat 9-1; Dec 3, 17; Apr 1, 15; May 6, 20 James Harmon Community Center, 44 Main St Sat 9–1; Feb 4, 18; Mar 4, 18 hastingsfarmersmarket.org Mamaroneck Winter Down-to-Earth Farmers’ Market St. Thomas Episcopal Church, 168 W Boston Post Rd, Mamaroneck Sat 9-1; Jan 7-Apr 15 downtoearthmarkets.com Ossining Down-to-Earth Farmers’ Market First Presbyterian Church of Ossining, 34 S Highland Ave, Ossining Sat 9-1; Jan 7-Apr 15 downtoearthmarkets.com Pleasantville Indoor Farmers’ Market Pleasantville Middle School, 40 Romer Ave, Pleasantville Sat 9-1; Dec 3-Mar 25 pleasantvillefarmersmarket.org

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EATING BY THE SEASON

pickling

by maria reina photographs by jermaine haughton dec

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i c k l e s a r e i n . “ p i c k l e e l e m e n t s a r e fa s h i o n a b l e today—adding them to dishes brings a wow factor,” confirms Chef Rio ALexander Hendrix, of The Beacon Hotel Restaurant and Bar, heralded to open soon in Beacon. In fact, pickles may be the ultimate local, seasonal dish. As a food-preservation technique, the practice dates back millennia. Pickling recipes have evolved within cultures worldwide, resulting in a variety of ingredients and unique tastes, like kimchi in Asia, torshi in the Middle East and giardiniera in Europe. Some culture-specific pickling brines rely on simple ingredients (water, vinegar, salt and sugar); others utilize complex combinations of spices and flavorings specific to cultures or regions. In preparation for his restaurant opening later this year, Hendrix has been building a larder. He and Chef Brenda Steele pickled ramps and beans in the spring and systematically pickled and canned seasonal vegetables and fruit throughout the summer and fall, including figs, sour cherries and tomatoes, in addition to a variety of jams and chutneys. “Whether these become elements on our artisan cheese platters, house-made paté plates, or elements of menu items, we’ve created a wide range of flavor profiles to accent different palates and draw from as we move through the season,” Hendrix says. At Tarry Lodge, in Port Chester, Chef Andy Nusser regards pickles in a similar light. Like many chefs, he looks for seasonal ingredients to pickle. His pickling year starts early in the spring with fiddlehead ferns, then moves on to pickled ramp bulbs. (“There are so many you don't know what to do with them,” he laughs.) In summer, his paper-thin sliced watermelon rind takes center stage; in fall he transitions to butternut squash. All the while he is constantly replenishing his pickled pearl onions and baby peppers. The process of pickling comes in two forms: Submerge the ingredient in a vinegar-based liquid bath and hermetically seal or refrigerate it, or use a salt brine to ferment the ingredient (a method typically used for vegetables that have a lot of moisture, like cabbage). Chef Mogan Anthony, of Village Social, Kitchen & Bar, in Mount Kisco, likes to focus on vegetables he thinks “taste better once pickled—like ramps, onions tomatoes and mushrooms.” The key, he notes, is to balance the salt, acid and sugar in the pickling liquid before adding the vegetables. Start with the basics and add herbs and spices for different flavors: thyme, coriander and star anise for pickling oranges; thyme and pepper for oyster mushrooms. The most interesting thing he’s pickled? “Parmesan rind,” he says. “It had an amazing, subtle flavor.” 4

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GIARDINIERA ANDY NUSSER / TARRY LODGE Ingredients VEGETABLES

1 2 1 2 2 4

fennel bulb, matchstick cut carrots, matchstick cut cauliflower head, small florets celery stalks, matchstick cut Serrano chilis, thinly sliced, with seeds cloves garlic, thinly sliced

PICKLING MIX

1 teaspoon fennel seed, toasted 1 teaspoon red chili flakes 1 teaspoon crushed black pepper 1 teaspoon cumin seeds 1 teaspoon dried oregano 1 cup champagne vinegar 1 cup water 3 tablespoons sugar 1 tablespoon salt makes about 1 quart Method 1. Cut all the vegetables into the desired shapes and mix them up evenly. 2. Place mixed vegetables into a 1-quart sterilized glass preserve jar with lid. 2. Combine all the pickling mix ingredients in a heavy bottom pot and bring to a boil. Pour over the vegetables in the jar. 3. Add a few tablespoons of extra virgin olive oil to the mix, secure the lid and shake briefly to distribute. Set the jar aside to cool. 4. Cover and keep refrigerated for a few days before serving. Tarry Lodge 18 Mill St, Port Chester (914) 939-3111; tarrylodge.com

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PICKLED RED AUTUMNAL BEETS RIO ALEXANDER / THE BEAUTIFUL TABLE Ingredients 3 pounds beets, cleaned and trimmed, unpeeled 1 1/4 cups cider vinegar 3/4 cup rice vinegar 1/8 cup orange juice 1/2 cup water 4 slices ginger root, 1/4-inch thick 4 slices of orange peel, 2 inches wide, 1/8- to 1/4-inch thick 4 cinnamon sticks 12 whole cloves 4 star anise pods 1/3 cup dark brown sugar 1 tablespoon salt makes 4 pints Method PREPARE THE BEETS

Preheat oven to 400˚F. 1. Place beets in a baking pan and coat with a spoonful of olive oil. Cover tightly with aluminum foil. Roast in 400˚F oven until the beets are tender. 2. Remove beets from the oven and allow to cool. Remove skin (it should slip off easily), then cut beets into wedges. 3. To prepare jars, bring water to a rolling boil in a canning pot or other large pot and boil 4 1-pint canning jars and 4 new lids according to instructions. PREPARE THE BRINE

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8.

In a large pot, combine the vinegars, orange juice, water, ginger slices, orange peel, sugar and salt and bring to a boil. Reduce heat slightly but keep mixture hot. When ready to fill, remove canning jars from the canning pot to a countertop but keep water in the pot just at a boil. Place cinnamon sticks, star anise, and cloves equally in each jar. Fill each jar with beets. Transfer the hot brine into a heatproof pitcher or measuring cup and pour over the beets to about 1/2 inch from the top of the jar. Check for air pockets with a skewer or knife and add more brine if necessary. (Don’t discard leftover brine--save in a jar in the fridge. It can be used to make dressings and marinades.) Wipe the tops of the jars with a clean cloth or paper towel. Place a warm lid on top, then screw on the band until snug but not overly tight. Bring water in the canning pot back to a full boil and use canning tongs to place jars back into the canning pot. The boiling water should be an inch over the lids. Allow to process for 10 minutes. After processing, turn off the heat but let the jars sit in the pot for a few minutes. Using tongs, remove the jars (hot!) onto a dishtowel and let cool. Once completely cool, tighten the lids if necessary. The Beautiful Table 383 Main St, Beacon (203) 470-4806; thebeautifultable.com

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BASIC PICKLE RECIPE MOGAN ANTHONY / VILLAGE SOCIAL Ingredients 1/4 cup water 1 cup rice vinegar 1/4 cup sugar 2 tablespoons salt zest of 1/2 lemon Method Prepare the vegetable you want to pickle and place in a heat-proof glass jar with lid. 1. In a small saucepan, combine the water and rice wine vinegar and bring to a boil. 2. Add sugar and stir to dissolve. Remove from heat. 3. Add the remaining ingredients to the hot vinegar. 4. Pour the liquid mixture over the vegetables in the jar. Liquid must completely cover the vegetables and should come to about 1/2 inch from the top of the jar. 5. Allow jar to cool. Cover and refrigerate. This recipe is not meant for long-term, non-refrigerated storage. Village Social Kitchen & Bar 251 Main St, Mt Kisco (914) 241-6260; villagesocialkb.com

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W

hen you drink craft beverages made in New York, more money is fueled back into the local economy in the form of jobs, taxes and investments. The Valley Table, along with the endorsements of the following local business leaders, is proud to present the “Support the Craft – Drink NY” campaign to help O

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advance the sale of craft beer, wine, cider and spirits produced in New York.

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Artisan Wine Shop Barber’s Farm Distillery Black Dirt Distillery Bonura Hospitality Group The Cold Spring General Store Clocktower Grill Cosimo’s Restaurant Group The Culinary Institute of America Hudson Valley Distillers Hudson Valley Restaurant Week Advisory Board Industrial Arts Brewing Company Manhattan Beer Distributors Mid Valley Wine & Liquor Millbrook Vineyards & Winery New York State Brewers Association Pamal Broadcasting Terrapin Restaurant Whitecliff Vineyard

SupportTheCraft.com CHEERS!


a drink new york state of mind

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h e n t h e va l l e y ta b l e

tasked New Yorkers to “Support the Craft” this fall, #drinklocal manifested itself in some exciting ways. From consumers visiting local wineries, cideries, breweries and distilleries for tasting events to restaurants featuring local ciders and beers on their menus to retailers putting local spirits in their windows, it seemed that local craft beverages were in the spotlight everywhere. Local barman Collin Bringman, known for his imaginative and locally inspired cocktails, caught the bug. He immediately got behind the bar and began to hunt for a brand of each local craft beverage (wine, spirit, beer and cider) with the intention of creating a cocktail that would celebrate the uniqueness of the libation. “I wanted to showcase the nuances and flavor profiles of the small-batch products I chose to work with,” he says. Bringman eventually developed seven craft cocktails. Bringman started his bartending career at the Grand Hotel and the Bluestone Bistro (now closed), both in Poughkeepsie, and he is no stranger to local products. “The chefs at Bluestone were always creating different syrups and shrubs with the ingredients from the menu items and they would challenge me to make drinks using them, too,” he says. “I later realized that these cocktails were so vibrant not only because of the fresh ingredients but also because the craft beverages took on a life of their own in the drinks. That was what always raised the bar.” Bringman travelled to each distillery, winery, cidery, roastery and

brewery to meet with the producers, involving them in the crafting of the cocktail. “Everything you really need is right here—your neighbor is producing these products. When you get a bottle of mass-produced whiskey, you have no idea who made it or what’s in it. When I buy a bottle of Beacon Whiskey from Denning’s Point Distillery in Beacon, I can ask the head distiller about the product—I can shake his hand when I leave and know where the contents of that bottle came from.” It soon became clear that ingredients from local agricultural and artisanal producers in the area also could be incorporated into the recipes. “It only made sense to make the drinks completely local,” Bringman notes. “I picked up produce from Adams Fairacre Farms; I used honeycomb from Meadowbrook Farm in Wappingers Falls. I was even lucky to work with a local baker—Anthony Cardoso of Cardoso’s Cookies—to feature his S’mores cookies.” Drinking local became supporting local. Each cider, spirit, beer and wine he used led Bringman to think about flavors and ingredients in a new way. “I think that’s what ‘Support the Craft’ should be about—looking to these well-made and innovative products to reinvent the cocktail wheel,” he says. “New York State craft beverages are allowing both bartenders and consumers to enhance what they know and inspiring them to come up with something totally new, giving some of the best beers, ciders, wines and spirits made in New York a voice in the larger craft beverage conversation.”

text and photos by colleen stewart recipes by collin bringman

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LYDIA’S PUMPKIN SPICE MOONTINI Ingredients 11/2 ounces Dutch’s Spirits Sugar Wash Moonshine 2 ounces pumpkin purée 1 ounce spice syrup (see below) 1 cinnamon stick for garnish candied pumpkin seeds for garnish (see below) PUMPKIN PUREE

1 medium sugar pumpkin, cleaned, reserve seeds 1 teaspoon vanilla extract SPICE SYRUP

1/2 cup water 1/4 cup dark brown sugar 1/4 cup white sugar 1/2 whole nutmeg, grated 4 to 5 cinnamon sticks, broken 7 to 8 whole cloves CANDIED PUMPKIN SEEDS

seeds of 1 pumpkin, cleaned and dried thoroughly 1/4 cup white sugar 1/4 cup water 2 tablespoons brown sugar 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon Method PUMPKIN PURÉE

Preheat oven to 400˚F. 1. Cut pumpkin into equal pieces, salt slightly, and roast in 400˚ oven for 40 minutes or until fork tender. 2. Remove pumpkin from the oven, let cool until it can be handled. 3. Peel pumpkin outer skin and discard. 4. Purée flesh in a food processor until smooth. Add water as needed to reach a pudding-like consistency. 5. Transfer pumpkin purée to a storage container and stir in vanilla extract. Pumpkin can be stored in the refrigerator for up to 2 weeks. SPICE SYRUP

1. 2. 3.

In a small saucepan combine water, dark brown sugar, white sugar, nutmeg, cinnamon sticks and cloves. Cook over medium-high heat and reduce until consistency of maple syrup is reached. Remove from heat and let cool.

CANDIED PUMPKIN SEEDS

Preheat oven to 300˚F. 1. Spread pumpkin seeds in a single layer on a roasting tray and roast in a 300˚ oven for 20 minutes or until a light golden brown. 3. Remove seeds from oven and let cool slightly. 4. In a small oven-proof saucepan, whisk together white sugar and water. Add roasted pumpkin seeds, brown sugar and ground cinnamon. Toss to combine. 5. Spread coated seeds on baking sheet and bake at 350˚F for 15 minutes. To prepare cocktail 1. Combine puree and spirits in a cocktail shaker with ice. Shake vigorously. 2. Strain into a martini or champagne glass. Garnish with cinnamon stick and candied pumpkin seeds.

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BEACON’S BAD PUN CIDER Ingredients 3 ounces local apple cider 1 ounce Denning’s Point Beacon Bourbon 2 ounces Bad Seed Cider Ginga Roots hard cider pinch of brown sugar 1 small red apple, cleaned, cored, thin sliced lengthwise 4 to 5 cinnamon sticks, crushed 1/2 whole nutmeg, crushed Method Add crushed cinnamon and nutmeg to the bottle of Beacon Whiskey. Let infuse for at least 2 to 3 days. 1. Place an apple slice in the bottom of a whiskey snifter and sprinkle with brown sugar. 2. Combine apple cider and bourbon in a cocktail shaker with ice. Add pinch of brown sugar. Shake well. 3. Strain over the apple slice. Carefully top with the hard cider.


WHISKEY OVER EASY

CARDOSO’S CROW’S MILK

Ingredients 1 ounce pear purée (see below) 1 ounce Hudson Whiskey 1 ounce vanilla bean syrup (see below) 1 ounce water 1 egg white candied bacon (see below)

Ingredients 2 ounces bourbon cream or Irish cream (Bailey’s or Black Button) 2 ounces cold-brewed coffee (see below) 2 ounces Keegan Ales Mother’s Milk Marshmallow Creme (see below) 4 to 5 Cardoso’s S’mores cookies

PEAR PURÉE

COLD-BREWED COFFEE

4 to 5 ripe pears, peeled, cored, cut into small chunks juice of 1/2 lemon

2/3 cup Irving Farm Coffee Roasters’s HVRW Blend coffee, medium ground 2 cups cold water cinnamon stick (optional)

VANILLA BEAN SYRUP

2 vanilla bean pods, split and scraped clean 1 cup water 1 cup white sugar

MARSHMALLOW CREME

2 cups marshmallow spread 1/4 cup boiling water 1 teaspoon vanilla extract

CANDIED BACON

1/2 pound bacon, thick-cut 1/4 cup dark brown sugar 1 tablespoon maple syrup 1/4 teaspoon black pepper 1 teaspoon apple cider vinegar

Method

Method

MARSHMALLOW CREME

PEAR PURÉE

Whisk marshmallow spread with 1/4 cup boiling water. Add vanilla and let cool. Funnel into a squeeze bottle.

COLD BREW COFFEE

Mix coffee and water. Add cinnamon stick if using. Let sit at room temperature 12 to 24 hours. Strain coffee through cheese cloth and refrigerate.

Place pear chunks in a food processor and pulse until smooth. Stir in lemon juice to prevent browning.

AUTUMN AT AWOSTING

COOKIE CRUMB RIM VANILLA BEAN SYRUP

Combine vanilla, sugar and water in a small saucepan and bring to simmer over mediumhigh heat. Simmer until the syrup thickens to the consistence of maple syrup. Remove from heat and let cool completely. CANDIED BACON

Preheat oven to 325˚F. 1. Fit a baking rack onto a sheet pan and lay strips of bacon on the rack. 2. In a small bowl, combine brown sugar, pepper, maple syrup and apple cider vinegar. Stir well to combine. 3. Spoon mixture over the bacon strips. 4. Bake bacon for 20 minutes in 325˚ oven. 5. Flip the bacon strips over and baste other side with sugar mixture. Bake another 20 minutes or until edges are crispy. To prepare cocktail Combine pear purée, whiskey, vanilla syrup, water and egg white in a cocktail shaker with ice. Shake vigorously. Strain into a rocks glass. Garnish with candied bacon.

Ingredients 3 ounces fresh pomegranate juice 1/2 ounce honey-ginger syrup (see below) Whitecliff Vineyard Awosting white wine 1-inch-square piece of honeycomb (optional) HONEY-GINGER SYRUP

1/2 cup honey 1/2 cup water 1/2 cup peeled, diced fresh ginger zest of 1 orange

Freeze cookies for 30 minutes. Break cookies into pieces and pulse in a food processor until the size of large breadcrumbs. To prepare cocktail 1. Dip the rim of a tumbler glass in marshmallow creme and then into a plate of cookie crumbs. 2. Fill the glass with ice. 3. Combine coffee, bourbon cream and beer in a cocktail shaker with ice. Shake lightly and add to glass.

Method HONEY-GINGER SYRUP

Combine all ingredients in a small saucepan and simmer over medium-high heat, stirring often. Remove from heat when it reaches a maple syrup consistency, about 35 to 40 minutes. Let cool completely. To prepare cocktail 1. If using, place honeycomb in the bottom of a wine glass. 2. Combine pomegranate juice and honey-ginger syrup in a cocktail shaker. Shake vigorously to combine. 3. Pour over the honeycomb. Top generously with Awosting White wine.

Visit valleytable.com for all seven Bringman cocktail concoctions.

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EATING BY THE SEASON

venison

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o r o n e r e a s o n o r a n ot h e r , t h i s i s t h e t i m e of year when many people turn their attention to deer, whether to enjoy watching the beasts on the hoof in a snowy landscape or on a plate steaming alongside potatoes and red cabbage. Many localities throughout the Hudson Valley are seemingly overrun with deer—pastoral visions of Bambi aside, the growing populations of people and deer don’t seem to mix very well. Incursions by herds of deer can quickly cause thousands of dollars of damage to residential vegetation as well as innumerable traffic accidents. Peaceful coexistence and lots of insurance is one answer, though the other solution helps stock freezers around the region. Though it’s illegal to sell wild shot venison for consumption, many people have the opportunity to share the harvest with hunter friends. Alternatively, farm-raised venison becomes available at retailers and on restaurant menus more frequently in the winter, usually red or fallow deer from Europe, or Sika deer from Asia, all of which are much smaller than our indigenous whitetail variety. Europeans were farming deer more than 500 years ago, but it wasn’t until farmers in New Zealand refined the practice in the late 1960s that commercial deer farming began to flourish. The trend spread to America in 1979, when Peter Duekensbuehler opened the Robinia Hill Dear Farm in the Finger Lakes. New Zealand venison has the advantage of being slightly cheaper than domestic meat, and although the domestic market for venison grows 25 to 30 percent each year, according to the North American Deer Farmers Association, U.S. deer farmers supply only 20 percent of the U.S. market. Part of the growth of the market may be due to consumers becoming aware of venison’s exceptional nutritional qualities. The meat scores high in all nutritional categories compared to other meats: Based on a 3-ounce cooked serving, venison contains 22 grams of protein (compared to 27 grams for beef, 25 grams for lamb and 26 grams for chicken), but only 5 grams of fat (compared to 12 for beef, 13 for pork and 8 for lamb) and 62 milligrams of cholesterol (compared to 84 for beef, 80 for lamb, 112 for veal, 82 for pork and 72 for chicken),

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according to the USDA. In addition, venison is rich in iron, zinc and many of the B vitamins. Unlike commercial beef, pork or chicken, farm-raised deer generally are not given steroids or antibiotics, and there’s no need to use growth hormones—they only stimulate appetite, which is desirable in beef but not in venison. A diet of whole corn, grain pellets and hay helps to keep farmed venison clean tasting and rather mild, yet still possessing some of the well-rounded “game” characteristics. Wild-killed venison has a reputation for being tough and sometimes very gamey tasting and gritty. This may largely be due to how it’s cooked, but at least some of the strong flavor and toughness of wild venison may be due to the effects of stress hormones released into the meat if the deer is not killed instantly. (It’s not uncommon for an injured wild deer to struggle, sometimes for hours, before dying.) Stress hormones are known to affect the quality of beef and lamb, for instance. The traditional use of heavy marinades and seasoning is almost passé when cooking farm-raised venison. Marinades may be used on wild venison to break down muscle fiber and tenderize; on the other hand, most farm-raised venison, if cooked properly, is naturally tender and free from the gamey flavor that some think needs to be masked with an abundance of spices. Which cut of venison to choose for a meal largely depends on the planned cooking method. The body of a deer is similar to that of a lamb, but the butcher’s cuts treat it more like beef. The most popular cut is the loin; other cuts are the leg and hindquarter, and the front quarters, containing the shoulder, neck and ribs (generally used for stews). Most chefs agree there are really only two ways to cook venison: a little or a lot. High heat and short cooking time help preserve natural juices and the tenderness of an inherently lean cut (such as the loin). Use long, slow cooking for less-tender cuts, such as the shoulder. Sautéing or roasting to a maximum of medium rare (125˚F internal temperature) is a good rule of thumb. This article is based in part on “Venison, straight from the farm” by Scott Jones, which appeared in The Valley Table number 6 (November 1999).


VENISON MEDALLIONS WITH JUNIPER DEMI-GLACE CHEF JOSH KRONER, TERRAPIN Ingredients 2 pounds venison top round (upper leg meat) 1 quart chicken stock (preferably homemade) 1/2 cup gin 1/4 cup juniper berries, crushed 2 cinnamon sticks 1 tablespoon allspice, whole 2 tablespoons butter 1 1/2 tablespoons flour 1 tablespoon cooking oil salt and pepper to taste serves 2 to 4

Josh Kroner, chef/owner of Terrapin Restaurant in Rhinebeck, says venison is a popular dish on his winter menu. "People like venison up here," he says. "They associate being out in the country with deer, and deer hunting is popular." The success of this--or other venison dishes, for that matter--depends as much on the cooking method as it does the cut of meat, he confirms. "You want to start with a piece of meat that's long, with the grain (it should look like a pork tenderloin), so you can cut perpendicular to the grain to get perfect medallions. We use a cut from the top of the leg for the medallions--like a sirloin." For wine pairing, Kroner advises, "Go with a bigger wine." His choice with the venison? Tousey Cabernet Franc.

Method Preheat oven to 325˚F 1. In a large saucepan, bring chicken stock to a boil over high heat. 2. Add the gin, juniper berries, allspice and cinnamon. Continue to boil over high heat until mixture is reduced to 1 cup. 3. Strain sauce through a fine strainer. 4. In another saucepan, melt 1 tablespoon of butter over medium heat. Whisk in flour and cook for one minute. While whisking, add strained sauce and cook until thickened. 5. Whisk in the remaining tablespoon of butter, remove pan from heat and reserve. 6. Cut the venison lengthwise along the grain of the meat into 4 equal portions that are long and skinny. Season generously with salt and pepper to taste. 7. Heat a large, ovenproof sauté pan over high heat and add cooking oil. Place pieces of venison into the pan and cook, turning occasionally, until the pieces are evenly browned. 8. Place the pan in the oven and roast until the internal temperature of the venison is 125˚F (medium rare). 9. When finished, remove pan from oven and let rest 5 minutes. To serve, slice the meat across the grain into 1/2- to 3/4-inchthick slices. Serve with sautéed spinach, mashed potatoes and reserved sauce.

Terrapin Restaurant, 6426 Montgomery St, Rhinebeck (845) 876-3330; terrapinrestaurant.com

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E PRIVAT OM ET RO BANQU OUR BOOK Y ARTY! YP A ID L O H

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INDEX TO ADVERTISERS

PAGE 12 Adams Fairacre Farms / adamsfarms.com 01 Aroma Osteria / 845.298.6790 / aromaosteriarestaurant.com 11 Baja 328 / 845.838.BAJA / baja328.com 84 Barb’s Butchery / 845.831.8050 / barbsbutchery.com 54 Beacon Natural Market / 845.838.1288 / beaconnaturalmarket.com 31 Beacon Pantry / 845.440.8923 / beaconpantry.com 24 Café Amarcord / 845.440.0050 / cafeamarcord.com 84 Caffe Macchiato / 845.565.4616 / addressyourapetite.com 83 Café Mio / 845.255.4949 / miogardiner.com C2 California Closets / 855.336.9590 / californiaclosets.com 23 Canterbury Brook Inn / 845.534.9658 / canterburybrookinn.com 22 Cathryn’s Tuscan Grill / 845.265.5582 / tuscangrill.com 82 Cheese Plate / 845.255.2444 / cheeseplatenewpaltz.com 23 Clock Tower Grill / 845.582.0574 / clocktowergrill.com C4 Cosimo’s / cosimosrestaurantgroup.com 81 County Fare / 845.297.3300 / countyfareny.com 40 Craft 47 / 845.360.5253 / craft47.com 31 Crave Restaurant & Lounge / 845.452.3501 / craverestaurantandlounge.com 31 Crooked Rooster / thecrookedrooster.com 07 Culinary Institute of America / 845.471.6608 / ciarestaurants.com C3 Daily Planet Diner / 845.452.0110 / dailyplanetdiner.com 84 Daughters Fare & Ale / 845.835.8365 / daughtersfareandale.com 01 Dino’s Vigneto Café / 845.834.2828 / www.vignetocafe.com 39 Dish Bistro & Wine Bar / 845.621.3474 / dishmahopac.com 11 Dogwood Bar / 845.202.7500 / dogwoodbar.com 78 Dubrovnik / 914.637.3777 / Dubrovnikny.com 54 Dutchess Biercafe / 845.440.7747 / thedutchessbiercafe.com 52 Ella’s Bellas / 845.765.8502 / ellasbellasbeacon.com 52 Essie’s Restaurant / 845.452.7181 / essiesrestaurantpk.com 3 Ethan Allen / 845.565.6000 / ethanallen.com 23 Exposures Gallery / 845.469.9382 / theexposuresgallery.com 85 Farm to Table Bistro / 845.297.1111 / ftbistro.com 59 Fishkill Farms / 845.897.4377 / fishkillfarms.com 80 Fresh Company / 845.424.8204 / freshcompany.net 32 Frida’s Bakery & Cafe / 845.795.5550 / fridasbakeryny.com 75 Gino’s Restaurant / 845.297.8061 / ginoswappingers.com 82 Glynwood / glynwood.org 4 Grano Focacceria / 845.666.7007 / granofocacceria.com 58 Hahn Farm / 845.266.3680 84 Harry’s Hot Sandwiches / 845.765.8111 / harrysbeacon.com 77 Harvest Real Food Catering / 845.687.4492 / elmrockinn.com 60 Harvest Spirits / 518.758.1776 / harvestspirits.com 58 Hawthorne Valley Farm / 518.672.7500 / hawthornevalleyfarm.org 10 HealthQuest / 800.421.1220 / health-quest.org 59 Hemlock Hill / 914.737.2810 / hemlockhillfarm.com 32 Henry’s at the Farm / 845.795.1500 / buttermilkfallsinn.com/henrys 11 Hudson Valley Federal Credit Union / 845.463.3011 / hvfcu.org 57 Hudson Valley Fresh / hudsonvalleyfresh.com 85 Hudson Whiskey / hudsonwhiskey.com 86 Hyde Park Brewing Company / 845.229.8277 / hydeparkbrewing.com 04 Il Barilotto / 845.897.4300 / ilbarilottorestaurant.com 10 Irving Farm Coffee Roasters / irvingfarm.com 83 J&J Gourmet / 845.758.9030 / jandjgourmet.com

PAGE 72 Jacobowitz & Gubits / 866.993.7575 / jacobowitz.com 60 Jones Farm / 845.534.4445 / jonesfarminc.com 72 Joseph’s Steakhouse / 845.473.2333 / josephs-steakhouse.com 78 Judelson, Giordano & Siegal / 845.692.9500 / jgspc.com 84 Le Express / 845.849.3365 / lexpresshv.com 72 Leo’s Ristorante & Bar / leospizzeria.com 58 Lowland Farm / 212.867.6376 / lowlandfarm.com 86 Mexicali Blue / 845.298.8226 / mexicali-blue.com 74 Mill House Brewing Company / 845.485.BREW / millhousebrewing.com 40 Mother Earth’s / motherearthstorehouse.com 2 N&S Supply / nssupply.com 84 New Paltz Wine & Spirits / 845.255.8528 21 Nic L Inn / 845.452.5649 / nliwinecellar.com 40 Nina / 845.344.6800 / nina-restaurant.com 54 Orange County Farmers' Markets / orangecountygov.com C3 Palace Diner / 845.473.1576 / thepalacediner.com 52 Pamal Broadcasting / pamal.com 2 Pamela’s Traveling Feast / pamelastravelingfeast.com 22 Perch / 845.236.3663 / perchmarlboro.com 86 Poughkeepsie Ice House / 845.232.5783 / pkicehouse.com 58 Quattro’s Poultry Farm & Market / 845.635.2018 21 Red Barn Produce / 845.691.7428 C3 Red Line Diner / 845.765.8401 / dineatredline.com 21 Redwood / 845.259.5868 / www.redwooduptown.com 74 Restaurant 1915 / 845.786.2731 x.1915 60 Rhinebeck Farmers’ Market / www.rhinebeckfarmersmarket.com 53 RiverMarket Bar & Kitchen / 914.631.3100 / rivermarketbarandkitchen.com 39 Riverview Restaurant / 845.265.4778 / riverdining.com 74 Roundhouse, The / 845.765.8369 60 Sabellico Greenhouses / 845.226.5943 / sabellico.com 24 Scarborough Fare / 845.831.7247 / www.scarboroughfarenp.com 24 Shawangunk Wine Trail / gunkswine.com 10 Simply Gourmet Catering / 845.214.0300 / simplygourmetevents.com 81 The Souk / 845.398.0706 / www.theoutside.in/thesouk 59 Stoutridge Vineyard / 845.236.7620 / stoutridge.com 2 Sunflower Natural Foods Market / 845.679.5361 / sunflowernatural.com 86 A Tavola / 845.255.1436 / www.atavolany.com C3 Table Talk Diner / 845.849.2839 / tabletalkdiner.com 60 TasteNY Store at Todd Hill / 845.849.0247 79 Terrapin Restaurant / 845.876.3330 / terrapinrestaurant.com 83 Utensil / 845.202.7181 / utensilkitchenware.com 22 Valley at the Garrison / 845.424.3604 x39 / thegarrison.com 82 Village Tea Room / 845.255.3434 / thevillagetearoom.com 9 Warren Kitchen & Cutlery / 845.876.6208 / warrenkitchentools.com 75 Warwick Valley Winery & Distillery / wvwinery.com 75 Wickham Studios / www.jessicawickham.com 57 Whitecliff Vineyard / 845.255.4613 / whitecliffwine.com 72 Wildfire Grill / 845.457.3770 80 William Farm & Sons / 518.828.1635 3 Williams Lumber & Home Center / 845.876.WOOD / williamslumber.com 85 Woody’s Farm to Table / 845.534.1111 / woodysfarmtotable.com 32 Ziatun

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HOTEL | RESTAU RANT | EVENTS

CELEBRATE The Roundhouse by Terrance Brennan A farm inspired restaurant featuring whole farm cuisine and the agricultural richness of the Hudson Valley.

8 4 5 765 8 3 69 | R O U N D H O U S E B E ACO N .CO M 2 E AST M A I N ST R E E T, B E ACO N N Y

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DIRECTORY

A C C O M M O D A T I O N S

Elmrock Inn 4496 Rt 209, Stone Ridge (845) 687-4492; elmrockinn.com Boutique farmhouse bed & breakfast William Farmer & Sons 20 S Front St, Hudson (518) 828-1635; wmfarmerandsons.com William Farmer & Sons renovated a historic boarding house in downtown Hudson and imbues it with a spirit of hospitality to provide a unique place to stay, a mercantile, a bar and a restaurant. “Stay happy. Enjoy craft cocktails and a gratifying meal.” A R T

Newburgh Art Supply 5 Grand St, Newburgh (845) 561-5552; newburghartsupply.com Mon-Thur 10–6; Fri 11–7; Sat 10–6; Closed Sun See, feel and experience quality art materials in one of Newburgh’s restored landmarks in the heart of the Washington Market neighborhood. Your local source for essential creative supplies for the student, professional and enthusiast. Newly renovated and stocked! B A K E R I E S

The Alternative Baker 407 Main St, Rosendale (845) 658-3355; lemoncakes.com Thur-Mon 7–5; Closed Tue-Wed Twenty years of small-batch, scratch, homemade all-butter baked goods. We offer gluten-free and allergy-friendly options, plus made-to-order sandwiches. Vegan vegetable soups in season, hot mulled New York cider, JB Peel coffees and Harney teas, artisanal drinks, and our award-winning Belgian hot chocolate. Special-occasion cakes and desserts. Unique wedding cakes. All ”Worth a detour”—(NY Times). Ella’s Bellas 418–420 Main St, Beacon (845) 765-8502 Mon & Wed 8–5; Thu–Sat 8–7; Sun 9–4; closed Tue Ella’s Bellas believes that an indulgence should taste like an indulgence regardless of our dietary restrictions. We specialize in gluten-free products, but we promise you won’t know the difference.

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B R E W E R I E S

Hyde Park Brewing Co. 4076 Albany Post Rd, Hyde Park (845) 229-8277; hydeparkbrewing.com Mon & Tue 4–10; Wed & Thu 11–10; Fri & Sat 11–midnight; Sun 11–9 C A T E R I N G

Fresh Company PO Box 187, Garrison (845) 424-8204; freshcompany.net At our kitchen one hour north of Manhattan in the Hudson Highlands, we gather great local and imported ingredients for events of all sizes and pocketbooks, from grand affairs to drop-off parties. We emphasize the freshest, finest ingredients, because great food is the spark that ignites a convivial gathering. Executive chef Shelley Boris draws inspiration from cooking styles from around the world. Her distinct, warm style is reflected in meals that encourage hospitality and leisure at the table. Harvest Real Foods Catering 4496 Rt 209, Stone Ridge (845) 697-4492; harvestrealfoodcatering.com Wed-Fri 10–4 Chef Mark Suszczynski known for his culinary vision, offers farm-to-table catering and unique locations like the Elmrock Inn, the perfect setting for farmstyle celebration: weddings, rehearsal dinners, showers, birthday parties, bar and bat mitzvahs. J&J Gourmet 1 E Market St, Red Hook (845) 758-9030; jandjgourmet.com Tue-Thu 7:30–5; Fri-Sat 7:30–8 Serving Red Hook, Rhinebeck, Poughkeepsie, Hyde Park and surrounding areas in Dutchess County, J&J offers high-quality and precise catering prepared with the freshest ingredients from local farmers and specialty food producers. Pamela’s Traveling Feast & Pamela’s Bird and Bottle 1123 Old Albany Post Rd, Garrison (845) 424-2333 pamelastravelingfeast.com Adding to her custom crafted cuisine with exceptional service, Pamela Resch, owner of Pamela’s Traveling Feast, announces her acquisition of the Bird & Bottle Inn. This historic, charming, and spirited 1761 colonial inn features four guest rooms with

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expansive grounds and permanent tent structure for weddings and private events. Offering Special Wine Paring Dinners several times a month, please call for dates and information. Weddings, private events, corporate events and holiday parties. Simply Gourmet Events and Catering 10 IBM Rd, Poughkeepsie (845) 214-0300; simplygourmetevents.com Embracing the farm-to-table philosophy, Simply Gourmet offers customized off-site catering from full-service BBQ’s and buffets to a la carte breakfasts, lunches and cocktail parties. Terrapin Restaurant Catering & Events 6426 Montgomery St, Rhinebeck (845) 889-8831; terrapincatering.com Enjoy the same high-quality ingredients and service that you know at Terrapin Restaurant anywhere in the Hudson Valley. Catering events of all types and sizes, Terrapin prepares custom menus for every event, using local, organic ingredients whenever possible. Contact Catering Director Hugh Piney. C O F F E E

Irving Farm Coffee Roasters 23 Reagan Rd, Millerton (518) 789-3276; irvingfarm.com A quintessentially New York Company, at Irving Farm Coffee Roasters we know what the country means to the city—and vice versa. In 1999, Irving Farm established its farmhouse roastery in the town of Millerton. Now Irving Farm supplies carefully selected, handcrafted coffees to three cafes in the same metropolis, as well as our own small-town coffee house in Millerton. D I N E R S

Daily Planet 1202 Rt 55, Lagrangeville (845) 452-0110; dailyplanetdiner.com Palace Diner 194 Washington St, Poughkeepsie (845) 473-1576; thepalacediner.com Red Line Diner 588 Rt 9, Fishkill (845) 765-8401; dineatredline.com Table Talk Diner 2519 South Rd (Rt 9), Poughkeepsie (845) 849-2839; tabletalkdiner.com

G A R D E N I N G

Sabellico’s Greenhouses & Florist 33 Hillside Lake Rd, Hopewell Junction (845) 226-5943; sabellico.com Open year-round Grows most of what they sell and offers the healthiest plants around, advice on growing plants and a selection of organic veggie and herb plants. Depending on the season: a wide selection of organic veggie plants and herbs, along with premium trees, shrubs and roses. Fullservce florist shop on premesis. H O M E

California Closets 16 Saw Mill River Rd, Hawthorne (914) 592-1001; californiaclosets.com Showroom open Mon–Fri, 9–5; Sat 10–3. A pioneer in custom closets and personalized home storage. Let us help you transform the organization of your space, and design a solution that will fit your budget and your home’s aesthetic. Ethan Allen Rt 32, 94 North Plank Rd, Newburgh (845) 565-6000; ethanallen.com Mon–Fri 9–5:30; Sat 10–5:30; Sun noon–5. The Bells have been offering the finest in-home furnishings since 1955, and have expanded their store to offer the new, up-to-date Ethan Allen look, featuring country, casual, contemporary, and traditional furniture and accessories. Their staff offers complimentary interior design service and in-home house calls. N&S Supply, Inc. 205 Old Rt 9, Fishkill (845) 896-6291; nssupply.com Your one-stop resource for all plumbing, heating and HVAC needs, including specialty products designed and manufactured to meet your lifestyle needs; the latest innovative products, including cutting-edge bathroom technology from remote flushing toilets to hands-free faucets. Six locations: Fishkill, Brewster, Kingston, Catskill, Hudson and Danbury. Williams Lumber 6760 Rt 9, Rhinebeck (845) 876-9663 34 Blommer Rd, Tannersvile (518) 589-5200 2424 Rt 44, Pleasant Valley


(845) 605-3520 908 Rt 82, Hopewell Junction (845) 221-2751 9-11 E Market St, Red Hook (845) 758-5615 317 Kyserike Rd, High Falls (845) 687-7676 3679 Rt 9, Hudson (518) 851-3641 4246 Albany Post Rd, Hyde Park (845) 698-1004; williamslumber.com The largest independent home center in the area. K I T C H E N

Utensil 480 Main St, Beacon (845) 202-7181; utensilkitchenware.com Mon, Wed–Sat 11–6, Sun 11–5 A practical and affordable kitchenware shop offering cookware, bakeware, gadgets and specialty items for the home or professional chef. Warren Kitchen & Cutlery 6934 Rt 9, Rhinebeck (845) 876-6208; warrenkitchentools.com Mon–Sat 9:30–5:30; Sun 11–4:30 The Hudson Valley’s complete source for professional kitchen knives and tools, commercial quality cookware, bakeware, pocketknives and woodcarving tools. We stock the largest selection of name-brand cutlery in

the region at prices well below retail. Knife sets, knife blocks and carving boards. Professional knife sharpening while you wait. M A R K E T S

Adams Fairacre Farms 1560 Ulster Ave, Kingston (845) 336-6300 1240 Rt 300, Newburgh (845) 569-0303 765 Dutchess Tnpk, Poughkeepsie (845) 454-4330 160 Old Post Rd, Wappinger (845) 632-9955 adamsfarms.com Open daily A family-owned farm market/garden center. A cornucopia of fresh produce, meats, fish, deli, and prepared foods. Featuring Hudson Valley products, a great selection of the best local cheese, meat, produce and more. Barb’s Butchery 69 Spring St, Beacon (845) 831-8050; barbsbutchery.com Mon–Fri 11–7:30; Sat 10–6; lunch Tue–Sat; closed Sun & Mon Your new neighborhood butcher shop providing local, Hudson Valley–raised meat and poultry. Practicing nose-totail butchery, we are proud to offer fresh and smoked meats, specialty cuts, charcuterie, house-made stocks, craft bacon and more.

Beacon Pantry 382 Main St, Beacon (845) 440-8923; beaconpantry.com Mon–Sat 7–8; Sun 7–6 Providing artisan food and artisan service to Beacon and beyond, Beacon Pantry features more than 50 varieties of cut-to-order domestic and imported cheese and charcuterie. Large selection of local, Italian and hard-to-find French pantry items, grass-fed local meats and dairy. Stumptown coffee, unique chocolates, fine pastries and desserts. Serving European-style sandwiches and cheese plates. Catering for any size event. The Cheese Plate Water Street Market 10 Main St., New Paltz (845) 255-2444; CheesePlateNewPaltz.com Cheeses from around the world including our own backyard, along with everything that goes with them--pate, jam, chutney, pickles crackers and bread. Gifts too. Quattro's Poultry Farm and Market 2251 US-44, Pleasant Valley (845) 635-2018 A fourth-generation family-run poultry and game farm. Free-range meats raised without hormones, chemicals or antibiotics. Find them at Union Square, Rhinebeck Farmers' Markets as well as at the Pleasant Valley Farm

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Store, which also houses a custom butcher shop, smokehouse, specialty grocery and unique collection of craft beer on tap. Scarborough Fare 8 North Front St., New Paltz 257 Main St., Beacon (845) 255-0061; scarboroughfarenp.com Olive oil and vinegar tap room. Also imported pasta, gift baskets, glassware, loose leaf tea and more. TasteNY Store at Todd Hill Taconic State Pkwy, Lagrange Located 10 miles north of I-84 and 1 mile south of Rt 55 (845) 849-0247; ccedutchess.org Open Mon, Wed, Thu, Sat 10–7; Fri 10–8; Sun 11–7; closed Tue An asset along the Taconic State Parkway, find a vast array of foods and products grown or made in the Hudson Valley. Outdoor farmers’ market open Jun–Oct: Fri 3–7, Sun 2–6. N A T U R A L

F O O D S

Beacon Natural Market 348 Main St, Beacon (845) 838-1288; beaconnaturalmarket.com Mon–Sat 9–7; Sun 10–5 Lighting the way for a healthier world. Featuring organic prepared foods, deli and juice bar, organic and regional produce, meats and cheeses. Open since 2005, proprietors L.T. and Kitty Sherpa are dedicated to serving the Hudson

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Valley with a complete selection of products that are good for you and good for the planet, including an extensive alternative health department. Nutritionist on staff. Catering available. Mother Earth’s 300 Kings Mall Ct, Kingston (845) 336-5541 249 Main St, Saugerties (845) 246-9614 1955 South Rd, Poughkeepsie (845) 296-1069 motherearthstorehouse.com Open daily Offering the finest natural foods, bulk spices, herbs, vitamins, supplements and organic produce. The valley’s best organic, hot and cold takeout at our Kingston and Poughkeepsie locations. Sunflower Natural Market 75 Mill Hill Rd, Woodstock 24 Garden St, Rhinebeck (845) 679-5361; (845) 876-0798 sunflowernatural.com Mon–Fri 8–9; Sat 9–9; Sun 10–7 The area’s most complete natural foods market, featuring certified organic produce, organic milk, cheeses and eggs, a wide range of bulk organic grains and nuts, non-irradiated herbs and spices, plus vitamins, homeopathic and body care products. P A S T A

La Bella Pasta 906 Rt 28, Kingston (845) 331-9130; lbpasta.com Mon–Fri 10–6; Sat 11–3; closed Sun Fresh pasta made locally using only the finest ingredients. Large variety of ravioli (including vegan), tortellini, pastas and sauces. We deliver our product to fine restaurants, gourmet shops and caterers throughout the Hudson Valley. Call for product list and samples. Located on Rt. 28 West between Kingston and Woodstock. R E S T A U R A N T S

Angelina’s 43 Chestnut St., Cold Spring (845) 265-7078 Lunch & dinner Mon-Sat 11–9; Sun noon-9 This family friendly eatery serves up Italian comfort foods, pizzas and burgers. Save room for the homemade tiramisu. Aroma Osteria 114 Old Post Rd, Wappingers Falls (845) 298-6790; aromaosteriarestaurant.com Lunch Tue–Sat 11:30–2:30; Dinner Tue–Thu 5–10, Fri–Sat 5–11, Sun 4–9 Voted Best Italian Restaurant by Hudson Valley magazine; Poughkeepsie Journal awards four stars. A romantic, relaxed atmosphere with an elegant cocktail bar in a beautiful setting. Here, rustic Italian cuisine is served with a unique and extensive selection of Italian wines (many available by the glass). Catering for all occasions available on or off premises.

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Baja 328 328 Main St, Beacon (845) 838-BAJA; baja328.com Lunch & dinner Tue–Thu 11–10, Fri–Sat 11–11, Sun noon–8 Main Street’s newest hot spot, Baja 328 offers the finest authentic Southwestern food couples with 110-plus tequilas, the largest selection in the area. Beacon Bread Company 193 Main St., Beacon (845) 838-2867; beaconbread.com Breakfast & lunch daily 7-5 pm Bakery and bistro. Everything from scratch. Café Amarcord 276 Main St, Beacon (845) 440-0050; cafeamarcord.com Lunch & dinner Tue–Thu noon–10; Fri–Sat noon–11; Sun noon–9 Creative New American cuisine with Italian undertones, served in a warm atmosphere. Enjoy an artisanal cocktail at the onyx bar before having dinner in the bistro-style dining room or on our Main Street terrace. Bring colleagues for a casual lunch, or a date for a romantic night out. Café Mio 2356 Rt 44/55, Gardiner (845) 255-4949; miogardiner.com Breakfast & lunch Wed–Sun 8:30–4:30 A popular, casual café overlooking the Shawangunk Mountains. We are proud to offer the freshest local fare, drawing from our many surrounding farms— something that is at the core of our food philosophy. A varied selection of wines and craft beers. Caffe Macchiato 99 Liberty St, Newburgh (845) 565-4616; addressyourappetite.com Breakfast & lunch Tue–Fri 9–3; Sat–Sun 9–4 Located in the historic district of Newburgh, Caffe Macchiato is a European-style café offering an all-day breakfast and lunch along with a fairtrade coffee beverage selection. The menu focuses on seasonal items and chef/owner Jodi Cummings highlights several local farms and producers on the menu. All desserts and pastries are baked from scratch in-house. Canterbury Brook Inn 331 Main St, Cornwall (845) 534-9658; canterburybrookinn.com Dinner Tue–Thu 5–9; Fri–Sat 5–9:30 Hosts Hans and Kim Baumann offer fine Swiss continental cuisine featuring veal, duck, chicken, Schnitzel, pasta, filet mignon, fresh fish and much more. Enjoy a fabulous dessert while sipping a frothing cappuccino or espresso. We specialize in both on- and off-premise catering. Outdoor brookside dining. Reservations suggested.


Cathryn’s Tuscan Grill 91 Main St, Cold Spring (845) 265-5582; tuscangrill.com Lunch daily noon–4:30; Dinner daily 4:30–10:30; Brunch Sun noon–3; Flight Night Tue 7–9:30 Follow the red brick walk off Main Street through a landscaped garden into a romantic dining scene. Choose from an array of Northern Italian dishes such as pulled rabbit with fresh pappardelle pasta, seedless grapes and grappa sauce; and grilled partridge with blackberries, pearl onions and pancetta with a red wine sauce. Reasonably priced wines. Small private party room is a memorable, festive Tuscan accent. Clock Tower Grill Kitchen & Bar 512 Clock Tower Dr, Brewster (845) 582-0574; clocktowergrill.com Lunch & dinner Tue–Thu noon–9, Fri noon–11; dinner Sat 5–11, Sun 3–9 Set in a renovated barn, the atmosphere is casual yet sophisticated; the menu “rustic American” with many ingredients drawn from area farms. Cosimo’s Restaurant Group Cosimo’s On Union 1217 Rt 300, Newburgh (845) 567-1556; fax (845) 567-9246 Cosimo’s Middletown 620 Rt 211 East, Middletown (845) 692-3242 Cosimo’s Poughkeepsie 120 Delafield St, Poughkeepsie (845) 485-7172 Cosimo’s Woodbury Rt 32, Central Valley (845) 928-5222 cosimosrestaurantgroup.com Lunch & dinner daily Casual trattoria-style dining with some of the world’s best wines. Old-style Italian cuisine with a New World twist. Daily specials, pasta, fish and meat dishes. Distinctive cocktail lounges, a unique wine cellar for private dinner parties and beautiful catering facilities. County Fare 2652 E Main St, Wappingers Falls (845) 297-3300; facebook.com/countyfareny Mon-Fri 11-8; Sat 11-2; Sun 11-1:30 Locally sourced comfort food paired with craft brews on tap, a well-curated wine list and craft cocktails. Local and regional beers, as well as national and global craft brewers. Great service and outdoor seating available. Craft 47 47 W Main St, Goshen (845) 360-5253; craft47.com Lunch & dinner Tue–Thu noon–10, Fri–Sat noon–midnight; Sun noon–10 Kick back, relax and sample the best of the Hudson Valley at Craft 47. We offer small-plate American tapas, craft wine and 12 craft beers on tap, with even more in the cooler.

Crave Restaurant & Lounge 129 Washington St, Poughkeepsie (845) 452-3501; craverestaurantandlounge.com Dinner Wed–Sat 4–10, Sun 4:30–9; Brunch Sun 11:30–3 Chef Ed Kowalski serves contemporary food with modern twists in a romantic and intimate setting located directly under the Walkway Over The Hudson. Crooked Rooster 399 Manchester Rd., Poughkeepsie (845) 204-9900; thecrookedrooster.com Mon-Thu 11–7; Fri 11–8; Sat 11–4 With a fun, family-friendly vibe this new eater offers an equally fun and eclectic menu of noodle bowls, flatbreads, sandwiches, salads, burgers and wings to eat in or take out. Catering too. The Culinary Institute of America 1946 Campus Dr (off Rt 9), Hyde Park The premier culinary college offers exceptional global cuisine in its award-winning restaurants: American Bounty Restaurant (845) 451-1011; americanbountyrestaurant.com The Bocuse Restaurant (845) 451-1012; bocuserestaurant.com Reimagines classic French cuisine using modern techniques. Ristorante Caterina de’ Medici (845) 451-1013; ristorantecaterinademedici.com The Apple Pie Bakery Café (845) 905-4500; applepiebakerycafe.com Daughters Fare & Ale 7466 S Broadway, Red Hook (845) 835-8365; daughtersfareandale.com Lunch & dinner Wed–Thu 10–7, Fri 10–9, Sat 10–8, Sun 10–6 Five-star restaurant quality food in an 18-seat cafe setting. Eat in or take out fresh goods featuring local ingredients, and grab a craft beer, wine or specialty coffee. Catering is also available. Don’t miss Burger Fridays from 9–5pm when we shift our focus to burgers. Dino’s Vigneto Café 80 Vineyard Ave., Highland (845) 834-2828; vignetocafe.com Lunch Tue-Sun 10:30-4; Dinner nightly 4-10 Intimate Italian eatery specializing in homemade pasta, gourmet personal pizza and a varied menu of chicken, veal and seafood dishes. Live music on the weekends after 6pm. Dish Bistro & Wine Bar 947 S Lake Blvd, Mahopac (845) 621-3474; dishmahopac.com Mon-Thu 4-9; Fri–Sat 3-10; closed Sun Chef Peter A. Milano adds his own flair to both classic and modern cuisine, with dishes focused on local seasonal produce.

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Dogwood Bar & Restaurant 47 E Main St, Beacon (845) 202-7500; dogwoodbar.com Mon-Thu 5–12; Fri 4–2; Sat–Sun 3–2 Off the beaten path, Beacon's local gem. Inviting atmosphere. Great locally sourced food. Fine selection of 16 craft beers and specialty cocktails. Eclectic music and live performances. Family and vegetarian friendly. No TVs.

Grano Focacceria 3182 Rt 9 Suite 114, Cold Spring (845) 666-7007; granofocacceria.com Open daily 11-10 A popular family friendly concept in Italy comes stateside, featuring a menu centered on focaccia topped with favorite ingredients, such as broccoli raab and sausage, clams and hot peppers; ricotta and parmesan with fresh arugula—available by the slice or the sheet.

Dubrovnik 721 Main St., New Rochelle (914) 637-3777; dubrovnikny.com Authentic Croatian cuisine with a farmto-table, sea-to-table approach.

Harry’s Hot Sandwiches 449 Main St, Beacon (845) 765-8111; harrysbeacon.com Tue-Fri 8-4; Sat–Sun 11-4; Closed Mon Sandwich heaven in the heart of Beacon, serving classic sandwiches with a twist. Now serving breakfast all day.

The Dutchess Biercafe 1097 Main St, Fishkill (845) 440-7747 Lunch & dinner Mon, Wed 11:30–9, Thu 11:30–10, Fri–Sat 10:30–11; lunch Sun 11:30–4 New to Fishkill, our historic setting transports patrons to a quaint, Belgian cafe pouring the best in Belgian beer and Belgian-style ales. Our menu blends Belgian favorites with comfort food— moules frites, chicken and waffles, unique burger and daily specials. Essie’s Restaurant 14 Mount Carmel Pl, Poughkeepsie (845) 452-7181; essiesrestaurantpk.com Dinner Tue-Sat 5:30–10:30 A welcome and hip addition to Poughkeepsie’s Little Italy shows the chef’s American South and Caribbean roots in dishes prepared with a modern flair. Favorites include crispy jerk pork lardons; chicken and dumplings; coconut passion fruit panna cotta. Farm To Table Bistro 1083 Rt 9, Fishkill (845) 297-1111; ftbistro.com Mon-Thu 11:30–9:30; Fri–Sat 11:30–10; Sun 11:30–9 The focus is always finding the best the world has to offer: the best produce, wine, beef and certainly, the best fish and seafood. Patio dining available. Frida’s Bakery & Cafe 26 Main St, Milton (845) 795-5550; fridasbakeryny.com Breakfast & lunch daily 7–5 An extension of Buttermilk Falls Inn & Spa, Frida’s offers artisan breads, pastries and coffees as well as housemade breakfast and lunch options. Gino’s Restaurant 1671 Rt 9, Wappingers Falls (845) 297-8061; ginoswappingers.com Lunch & dinner Tue–Thu 11:30–9, Fri– Sat 11:30–10; Sun 1–9 Serving the Hudson Valley since 1984. Traditional southern Italian cuisine in a casual environment. Only the freshest ingredients used to prepare your favorite veal, chicken, seafood and pasta dishes. Catering on- and off-premise.

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Henry’s At Buttermilk Falls 220 North Rd, Milton (845) 795-1500; henrysatbuttermilk.com Lunch Fri–Sat 11:30–3; Dinner Sun– Thu 5–9; Brunch Sun 11–3 Local comes alive at this bucolic Inn & Spa, where the main ingredients are sourced from local producers and purveyors. An inventive menu features a fresh selection of large and small plates from casual burger and fries to refined New American dishes. Enjoy a pre-dinner stroll through the organic gardens and orchards or a drink overlooking the Hudson River and sweeping lawns. Al fresco dining available. Hudson Street Café 237 Hudson St, Cornwall-on-Hudson (845) 534-2450; hudsonstreetcafe.com Breakfast Mon–Fri 6–11:30; lunch Mon–Fri 11–3; brunch Sat 7–3, Sun 7–2 Good food served here. Breakfast includes hourmase corn and oat bran pancakes, huevos rancheros and scones baked fresh every morning. Lunches inclue a turkey brie panini and housemade empanadas. Delicious dinners with comfort classics like Donna’s meatloaf and buttermilk fried chicken, as well as seasonal specials. Custom catering available. Il Barilotto 1113 Main St, Fishkill (845) 897-4300; ilbarilottorestaurant.com Lunch Mon–Sat 11–2:30; dinner Mon–Thu 5–10, Fri–Sat 5–11 Blending the old with the new, Eduardo Lauria, chef-owner of Aroma Osteria, transformed an historic brick building in the heart of Fishkill to a trattoria and wine bar. The fare is Italian peasant with a contemporary flair. The selection of regional wines from Italy—available by the glass or flight—is extensive. Catering on- and off-premises. Le Express 1820 New Hackensack Rd, Wappingers Falls (845) 849-3565 Lunch & dinner Mon–Thu 11–10, Fri 11–11, Sat 4–11


A modern French American bistro that focuses on using foods from local Hudson Valley purveyors. Our goal is to have fun and create a small, special place that will provide you with a memorable dining experience. Leo’s Ristorante Rt 9D, Wappingers Falls (845) 838-3446 22 Quaker Ave, Cornwall (845) 534-3446 1433 Rt 300, Newburgh (845) 564-3446 leospizzeria.com Lunch & dinner Mon–Sat 11–10; Sun 2–9 A family favorite since 1981, Leo’s offers traditional classic Italian dishes, pizza, hot/cold subs, pasta, veal, chicken and appetizers. Daily specials and catering for all occasions whether in our location or yours. Great food served in a comfortable and relaxed atmosphere. Mexicali Blue 87 Main St, New Paltz (845) 255-5551 1571 Rt 9, Wappingers Falls (845) 298-8226; mexicali-blue.com Sun–Thu 11–9; Fri–Sat 11–10 Using fresh, natural ingredients, Mexicali Blue serves up delicious Southwestern and Californian cuisine in a fun, colorful setting. Tacos and burritos top the menu. Mexican beer and margaritas rule the drinks list. The Mill 46 Vassar Rd, Poughkeepsie (845) 214-0000; millpk.com Lunch & dinner Tue–Thu 11:30–9, Fri–Sat 11:30–10; dinner Sun 4–9; brunch Sun 11–4 Executive chef and Hudson Valley native Mark Haslam features fresh seasonal and local artisanal foods. Our casual and upbeat atmosphere coupled with our knowledgeable staff, acoustic entertainment and cozy indoor and outdoor dining make us the destination that serves all of our guests the dining experience they deserve. Mill House Brewing Company 289 Mill St, Poughkeepsie (845) 485-2739; millhousebrewing.com Lunch & dinner Mon, Wed-Sun; closed Tue Offers a warm, historic and visually appealing setting, with casual, yet professional service, food cooked from as close to the source as possible, and artfully crafted ales. Modern on the Rails 1 Station Plaza, Mamaroneck (914) 777-9300; modernontherails.com Lunch & dinner daily from 11:30; Mon dinner-only Set in a magnificent 19th century train station, offering Italian classics like pork osso bucco, linguini with freshly shucked clams and brick oven pizzas.

Nic L Inn 135 N Water St., Poughkeepsie (845) 452-5649; nickelinn.com Lunch & dinner; Tue-Thu 12–9; Fri-Sat 12–10; Sun 1-9 An inviting neighborhood eatery with locally sourced menu, pour-your-own wine system and outdoor seating (in season). Nina 27 W. Main St, Middletown (845) 344-6800; nina-restaurant.com Lunch Mon–Sat 11:30–2:30; dinner Mon–Sun from 5; brunch Sun 9:30–2 New York City–trained chef Franz Brendle brings an elegant flair to classic American cuisine. Features include filet mignon Roquefort, shrimp asparagus risotto and seafood specials. Nice selection of wines in various price ranges. Friendly staff, cozy décor. Hearty Sun brunch. Pamela’s on the Hudson 1 Park Place, Newburgh (845) 562-4505 Dinner Thur-Sun 4–til close pamelasonthehudson.com Contemporary American bistro and bar on the Hudson River. A warm, cozy and casual atmosphere with live music every evening and Happy Hour food and drink specials Thursday-Saturday 4:30pm-6:30pm. Pamela’s features an expansive wine by the glass menu as well as nightly dinner specials. Catering is available for weddings, corporate events, private events, and holiday parties.

EAT • DRINK • STAY 20 South Front St • Hudson NY 12534 R E S E R VAT I O N S 5 1 8 . 8 2 8 .1 6 3 5

Perch 1 King St, Marlboro (845) 236-3663 Lunch & Dinner; Closed Mon New from the owner of Cathryn’s Tuscan Grill in Cold Spring, offering a globally inspired, locally sourced menu. The eclectic list of wine and beer represents the best of the Hudson Valley. Poughkeepsie Ice House 1 Main St, Poughkeepsie (845) 232-5783; pkicehouse.com Sun–Wed 11:30–10; Thu–Sat til 11 The Poughkeepsie Ice House is the anchor for the Queen Bee City. The historic Hudson Valley waterfront brick building features old world charm and walking distance to the Poughkeepsie Train Station and the Walkway over the Hudson. Public boat docking and waterfront dining are available. The food is casually sophisticated with seasonal and local inspired menus. Redwood 63 N. Front St., Kingston (845) 259-5868 Lunch 11:30-3; Dinner 5-10; Sun Brunch. Closed Tue. The best of California cuisine and the Hudson Valley in a fun and relaxing atmosphere. Rooftop dining in season. Restaurant 1915 55 Hessian Dr, Bear Mountain (845) 786-2731 ext. 1915; visitbearmountain.com

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Thu–Sat 5–9, Sun 11–9 Located at the historic Bear Mountain Inn, enjoy a seasonal menu in a beautiful lodge setting. RiverMarket Bar & Kitchen 127 W Main St, Tarrytown (914) 631-3100; rivermarketbarandkitchen.com Lunch & dinner daily Innovative, epicurean hub featuring a restaurant, bar, wood-fired pizzeria, wine and spirits store, and farmers’ market. Riverview Restaurant 45 Fair St, Cold Spring (845) 265-4778; riverdining.com Lunch Tue–Fri noon–2:30, Sat noon–4; dinner Tue–Fri 5:30–9:30, Sat 5–10; Lunch & dinner Sun noon–9 Contemporary American cuisine with beautiful river views. Seasonally inspired menus featuring market fresh seafood, brick oven pizza and creative daily specials. No credit cards; checks OK. Reservations suggested. The Roundhouse 2 E Main St, Beacon (845) 765-8369; roundhousebeacon.com Lunch & dinner Wed-Sat 11:30-Close; Sun Brunch 11-3; Lunch 3-8 Set in a historic textile mill transformed into boutique hotel, the restaurant serves elegant, locally inspired American fare and offers a well-curated list of craft beers, cocktails and wines. The main dining room, lounge and seasonal patio all overlook Beacon Falls. A Tavola Trattoria 46 Main St., New Paltz Dinner Thu-Mon 5:30-10pm (845)255-1426 Seasonally inspired Italian cuisine with a focus on fresh, local produce and ingredients in a rustic, family-style atmosphere. Terrapin Restaurant & Red Bistro 6426 Montgomery St, Rhinebeck (845) 876-3330; terrapinrestaurant.com Lunch & dinner daily 11:30–midnight; dining room daily 5–9pm From far-flung origins, the world’s most diverse flavors meet and mingle here. From elements both historic and eclectic comes something surprising, fresh and dynamic: dishes to delight body and soul. Choose fine dining in Terrapin’s dining room or casual fare in Red Bistro & Bar. From good burgers and quesadillas to wild salmon and local filet mignon. Terrapin’s local organic and authentic menu satisfies all. Tito Santana Taqueria 142 Main St., Beacon (845) 765-2350; tacosantana.com Lunch & dinner Mon-Sun 11-9 Classic tacos and Mexican food in a colorful setting. The $2 taco Tuesday can’t be beat.

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Valley at the Garrison 2015 Rt 9, Garrison (845) 424-3604; thegarrison.com/restaurants Valley: Dinner Thu–Sun 5–9; midday menu Sat–Sun 11:30–2:30 Terrace: Mon–Thu 8–6; Fri–Sun 7–7 The Garrison’s signature fine-dining restaurant offering seasonal American Cuisine and an extensive international wine list of great accolade. Regional and NYS Craft breweries and distilleries to match the seasonal-regional focus of the kitchen. Our spectacular view will enhance any dining experience. The Village Tearoom 10 Plattekill Ave, New Paltz (845) 255-3434; thevillagetearoom.com Breakast, lunch & dinner Tues–Sat 8–9, Sun 8–8 The Village Tea Room is a unique gathering place, serving breakfast, lunch and dinner as well as a variety of teas. Tantalizing cakes and cookies. Organic honey, pot pies and roast chicken. Zagat survey says “Irish ex-pat Agnes Devereux has a real winner.” Wildfire Grill 74 Clinton St, Montgomery (845) 457-3770; wildfireny.com Lunch Mon–Sat 11:30–3; Sun noon–3; dinner Sun–Thu 5–9; Fri & Sat 5–10 Eclectic is the buzzword at this popular local eatery, where patrons can feast on a predominantly American menu with Asian, Mexican and Italian influences in a rustic Victorian setting. Woody’s Farm to Table 30 Quaker Ave, Cornwall (845) 534-1111; woodysfarmtotable.com Open Wed–Mon 11:30–8:30; closed Tue A “new old-fashioned” burger joint located in a restored 1910 building in picturesque Cornwall. Casual, family place offering fast, simple meals for people on the go using fresh, wholesome ingredients with a local emphasis. Xaviar’s Restaurant Group Chef-owner Peter Kelly offers his signature service and exceptional cuisine to four locations. Critics agree: Dining in the valley will never be the same. Xaviar’s at Piermont 506 Piermont Ave, Piermont (845) 359-7007 Lunch Fri, Sun noon–2; dinner Wed– Fri 6–9, Sat seatings 6 & 9, Sun 5–8 Freelance Café & Wine Bar 506 Piermont Ave, Piermont (845) 365-3250 Lunch Tue–Sun noon–3; dinner Tue–Thu 5:30–10, Fri 5:30–10:30, Sat 5:30–11, Sun 5–10 Restaurant X & Bully Boy Bar 117 North Rt 303, Congers (845) 268-6555 Lunch Tue–Fri noon–2:30; dinner Tue–Thu 5:30–10, Fri 5:30–10:30, Sat 5–11, Sun 5–8; brunch Sun seating 1pm


X2O Xaviars on the Hudson 71 Water Grant Way, Yonkers (914) 965-1111 Lunch Tue–Fri noon–2; dinner Tue–Fri 5:30–10, Sat 5–10, Sun 5–9; brunch Sun noon–2 Ziatun 244 Main St., Beacon (845) 765-8268; ziatun.com Lunch & dinner Thu-Mon 11-9 From the owners of Beacon Bread Company comes this little gem, serving authentic Palestinian-Arabic-Middle Eastern fare with many vegan and vegetarian options. S E R V I C E S

Hudson Valley Federal Credit Union (845) 463-3011; hvfcu.org Full-service financial cooperative serving individuals and business in Dutchess, Orange, Ulster and Putnam Counties. 17 local branches and contact center avaiulable late on weekdays and all day on Saturdays. Over 82,000 conveniently located surcharge-free nationwide ATMs and a full siute of online, movile and text banking services. HVFCU is federally insured by the NCUA and is an Equal Housing Lender. Jacobowitz and Gubits, LLP 158 Orange Ave., Walden (845) 778-2121; jacobowitz.com Mon-Thu 8:30-5:30 Expert legal services for restaurateurs includes business planning, succession planning, licenses and permits, employment, immigration, real estate, financing, contracts and taxation. T O U R I S M

Dutchess Tourism 3 Neptune Rd, Suite A11A, Poughkeepsie (845) 463-4000; dutchesstourism.com Ulster County Tourism 20 Broadway, Kingston (845) 334-5459; ulstercountyalive.com Westchester County Tourism (800) 833-9282; visitwestchesterny.com W H O L E S A L E

Red Barn Produce 217 Upper North Rd, Highland (845) 691-7428 Full-service, family owned and operated wholesaler servicing restaurants and institutions with a complete selection of fruits and vegetables for 20 years. A proud distributor of local, New York, high-quality produce at competitive prices emphasizing reliable and personal service. Pick-up or delivery available to Dutchess, Columbia, Ulster and Orange counties.

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New Paltz Wine 245 Main St., New Paltz (845) 255-8528; newpaltzwine.com Mon-Sat 10-9; Sun noon-6 Full-service wine and spirit shop. Large local selection. Friendly, knowledgeable staff. Case discounts. Special orders. W I N E R I E S

Shawangunk Wine Trail (845) 256-8456; (845) 291-1927; gunkswine.com Nestled between the Shawangunks and the Hudson River, just 60 miles north of NYC is a trail of 14 familyowned wineries from New Paltz to Warwick. The wineries offer tours and tastings amidst scenic beauty. A complete listing of wineries and events is available on our website. Stoutridge Vineyard 10 Ann Kaley Ln, Marlboro (845) 236-7620; stoutridge.com Many of our wines and spirits are locally grown, and all are from New York fruits and grains. Our wines are sold exclusively at the winery. Enjoy an authentic taste of the Hudson Valley at our winery, distillery and grounds. Warwick Valley Winery & Distillery 114 Little York Rd, Warwick (845) 258-4858; wvwinery.com Daily 11–6 for tastings Food & Wine magazine calls our draft cider “clean, vibrant” with a “sweet finish.” We produce wine for every occasion: Chardonnay, Riesling, Harvest Moon, Black Dirt Blush and Red, Cabernet Franc, Pinot Noir. As the Valley’s first distillery, we produce a line of fine brandies and liqueurs. Bakery Café serves lunch and fresh breads on weekends. Whitecliff Vineyard 331 McKinstry Rd, Gardiner (845) 255-4613; whitecliffwine.com Daily 11:30–5:30; Sat til 6 One of the valley’s largest vineyards boasts beautiful views of the Shawangunk Ridge. Owner/wine maker Michael Migliore produces award-winning wines from European vinifera varietals such as Chardonnay, Cabernet Franc and Riesling, as well as new hybrids. Visit our friendly tasting room. Winery tours by appointment, special events. 4

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Fine Food • Great Beer • Good Friends

The Cure for the Winter Blues! Our Gift Cards Make the Perfect Stocking Stuffers! Call Us Today to Book Your Holiday Party! Located on Route 9 Across from the FDR Library and Museum 4076 Albany Post Road Hyde Park, NY • 845-229-TAPS (8277) www.hydeparkbrewing.com 86

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Buy local. Eat local.

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Join us! The Valley Table sponsors numerous events each year—so come by to greet us and enjoy the great taste of winter in the Hudson Valley. Dec 10 Just in time for holidays. We’ll be doing our holiday shopping at Work:Shop the pop-up marketplace of artisans at Wickham Solid Wood Studio in Beacon.

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LAST CALL

FARMER, FUTURE TENSE Photo by Ethan Harrison Taken at the Young Farmers Conference, Stone Barns Center for Food and Agriculture, Dec 4, 2015 88 88

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h t e e t h a o r l b i d e l a e y c s e w m ith o C

COSIMO’S

CENTRAL VALLEY

NEWBURGH

(845) 928-5222

(845) 567-1556

POUGHKEEPSIE

MIDDLETOWN

(845) 485-7172

(845) 692-3242

cosimosrestaurantgroup.com COSIMO'S PROUDLY SUPPORTS LOCAL FARMERS

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