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T H E M AG A Z I N E O F H U D S O N VA L L E Y FA R M S , F O O D A N D C U I S I N E NUMBER 80

DECEMBER 2017–FEBRUARY 2018

T H E VA L L E Y

VALLEYTABLE.COM


Our Our heart heart is is with with yours. yours. Here. Here.

MidHudson Regional Hospital, a member of the MidHudson Regional Hospital, a member of the Westchester Medical Center Health Network, Westchester Medical Center Health Network, is now home to the Heart & Vascular Institute—the largest is now home to the Heart & Vascular Institute—the largest multi-specialty cardiovascular practice in the Hudson Valley. multi-specialty cardiovascular practice in the Hudson Valley. Now, you have local access to exceptional care for a full spectrum Now, you have local access Plus, to exceptional care for a full to spectrum of heart-related conditions. a seamless connection advanced of heart-relatedservices conditions. Plus, a seamless connection to advanced cardiovascular at WMCHealth’s flagship Westchester Medical Center. cardiovascular services at WMCHealth’s flagship Westchester Medical Center.

For questions or appointments, For or appointments, call questions 845-483-5720 or visit call 845-483-5720 or visit WMCHealth.org/Heart WMCHealth.org/Heart

Advancing Care. Here. Advancing Care. Here.

Westchester Medical Center Health Network includes: Medical Center Health Network WESTCHESTER MEDICALWestchester CENTER I MARIA FARERI CHILDREN’S HOSPITALincludes: I BEHAVIORAL HEALTH CENTER MIDHUDSON REGIONAL GOOD FARERI SAMARITAN HOSPITAL I BON SECOURS COMMUNITY HOSPITAL WESTCHESTER MEDICALHOSPITAL CENTER I I MARIA CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL I BEHAVIORAL HEALTH CENTER ST. ANTHONY I HEALTHALLIANCE BROADWAY CAMPUS MIDHUDSON REGIONALCOMMUNITY HOSPITAL IHOSPITAL GOOD SAMARITAN HOSPITAL HOSPITAL: I BON SECOURS COMMUNITY HOSPITAL HOSPITAL: MARY’S AVENUE CAMPUS HOSPITAL: I MARGARETVILLE HOSPITAL ST.HEALTHALLIANCE ANTHONY COMMUNITY HOSPITAL I HEALTHALLIANCE BROADWAY CAMPUS HEALTHALLIANCE HOSPITAL: MARY’S AVENUE CAMPUS I MARGARETVILLE HOSPITAL


Poughkeepsies hottest lunch spot & New Paltz’s newest lunch and dinner spot New Paltz Poughkeepsie Order Online!

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2017– feb 2018

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One of the most highly rated restaurants and wine bars in the Hudson Valley

Business Lunch Special

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O

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We offer amenities and services smartly designed for a seamless travel experience. Inviting social spaces, elegant guestrooms and suites, and 2,100 square feet of event space, Hyatt House Fishkill is the perfect retreat for the modern traveler. 845.897.5757

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MORE THAN A MEAL. AN EXPERIENCE. You can enjoy local dining that others come from all over the world to experience. You can feel the promise and passion of our students. And yes, you can get a reservation. EXPERIENCE CIA DINING American Bounty Restaurant The Bocuse Restaurant Post Road Brewhouse Ristorante Caterina de’ Medici Apple Pie Bakery Café ciarestaurantgroup.com

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number 80 december 2017–february 2018

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featured articles 35 going, going, saved

40 pasta 3 ways

51 growing oil

Over the past 25 years, the Orange County Land Trust has evolved into one of the most successful private land preservation organizations in the state. Executive Director Jim Delaune’s goal is to preserve the county by keeping the land in production. He’s not looking for postcards—he’s looking for farmers. by Jeff Storey

Pasta is bound by tradition yet perfect for adapting, modifying and updating to suit current tastes or trends. Chefs in the Hudson Valley are using local ingredients and time-tested techniques to perfect their pasta dishes and to introduce diners to new realms of flavor. We’re not talking about your mother’s spaghetti and meatballs here. by Leslie Coons Bostian

Few views are prettier than a field abundant with sunflowers in full bloom. But where most people see a beautiful photo op, a couple of Dutchess County brothers saw opportunity. What they came up with is a cold-pressed sunflower oil business, one of only two statewide. Business is, dare we say, blooming. by David Handschuh

PHOTO : MEGHAN SPIRO

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number 80

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departments

13 Good Stuff

Sipping chocolate, farmers’ market finds, jammin’ book, new creamery, kudos, events and more

55 Farms, Food & Markets Winter Farmers’ Markets

62 Eating by the Season ’Tis the Season for Cookies by Catherine Morba

18 Openings

Canoe Hill, Silvia, City Perch, Pub Street, Vegetalien

65 Drink

Honey: Not just for Earl Grey anymore, by Tim Buzinski

23 Locally Grown

Why Organic? A farmer replies by Keith Stewart

68 Index of Advertisers

30 Up Close

71 Directory

Stacey Penlon’s Beacon Pantry by Kristen Warfield

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62 Recipes 34

Sausage meatballs with lemon and sage (Stacey Penlon / Beacon Pantry)

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Pasta alla Genovese (Sean Tompkins / Redwood)

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Agnolotti (Michael Kelly / Liberty St Bistro)

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Winter mare e monti (Francesco Buitoni / Mercato)


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Head hunters

EDITOR’S LETTER

Maybe it was the image of the Trump boys hefting the body of a small leopard one of them had just shot, or maybe it was that infamous shot of Trump Junior holding up the severed tail of an elephant—whatever the impetus, hunting has been on my mind lately. This time of year it’s a natural topic of conversation around many tables, when questions like “Did you get your deer yet?” or “How many turkeys have you seen?” or even “Are you going for a bear this year?” tend to come up when things get slow. But the fact that, as we go to press, the president is considering overturning a 2014 ban on the import of animal ’trophies’ brought the subject front and center, albeit in a context that doesn’t foster reasoned discourse. I am not a hunter—never have been, though I’ve slaughtered more than my share of trout, bass, pike, perch, bluegills and catfish in my time. Many, no, most, of my friends hunt. They are, as far as I’m aware, responsible about how they approach it, respectful of property rights and laws governing kill limits, seasons, gun regulations and so on. One friend used to occasionally leave a grouse on the front porch on his way to work after a good morning bird hunt, and our friends have shared many warm dinners featuring their harvest of venison, wild turkey, rabbit, squirrel, grouse, duck, quail and goose. We’ve never really examined or sanctioned hunting in these pages, however. What venison recipes we’ve printed applied to farmed animals and commercial products. I don’t subscribe to the shallow philosophy that says if you don’t kill it, gut it and skin it yourself then you shouldn’t eat it, though I’ve done that, and I believe that most people come out of that experience with a greater respect and appreciation for life, ironic as it sounds. That said, the issue of hunting becomes blurred by two words: bozos and trophies. A neighbor, using fluorescent paint, used to spray “horse” on the side of his horses every deer season, after losing two to wahoos with rifles. It might be funny if it weren’t such a common occurrence. For too many, “deer season” means it’s time to dust off the ol’ .30-06, put on the Carhart vest, drive upstate and kill something— anything—that has four legs and wanders into their sights. Tracking ability? Survival skills? Only if they came packaged with the premium stereo in the new SUV. The concept of trophy hunting is another bewilderment. I like a good argument as much as the next guy, but I’ve yet to hear convincing proof that shooting an animal from a distance where sight begins to falter, then nailing its head to the living room wall certifies that a person (man or woman) has superior skills as a human being, better hormones or a larger sex organ. This is particularly apropos when it comes to those “hunters” who are helicoptered in to managed habitat, fed, outfitted, guided to their game (or, if they can afford it, have the game guided to them), assured that their kill is good population management practice, then flown home first class, comfortable in assuming that the meat of their kill will feed the local population while its head is being stuffed, mounted and readied for shipping home. With the very rare exception of some troupes of chimpanzees, no creature on this earth other than homo sapiens kills another species simply for pride or pleasure. And there’s the rub. To hunt for sustenance or survival is, let’s face it, human. Unfortunately, to pose laughing next to a creature you’ve just killed for no good reason other than the photo op apparently is, too. —JN

THE VALLEY TABLE THE MAGAZINE OF HUDSON VALLEY FARMS, FOOD AND CUISINE THE VALLEY TABLE, INC. 380 MAIN STREET, SUITE 202 BEACON, NY 12508 (845) 765-2600 valleytable.com hudsonvalleyrestaurantweek.com NUMBER 80 DEC 2017 – FEB 2018 PUBLISHER Janet Crawshaw janetc@valleytable.com EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Jerry Novesky jerryn@valleytable.com Managing Director Jennifer Bannan jennifer@valleytable.com Office Administrator Meghan Merry info@valleytable.com Graphic Design & Productio/n Greg Simpson / Ephemera Design Nicole Tagliaferro nicole@valleytable.com Website Coordinator Nate Diedrick Intern Catherine Morba Advertising Representatives Christopher Goodman Laura Lippman MCase Media Kara Widmer sales@valleytable.com Contributors to this issue Leslie Coons Bostian Air Nonken Helanna Bratman Meghan Spiro Tim Buzinski Keith Stewart Eva Deitch Jeff Storey David Handschuh Sabrina Sucato Meghan MacEnroe Kristen Warfield THE VALLEY TABLE is exclusively devoted to Hudson Valley agriculture, food and cuisine. We support sustainable agricultural practices and efforts to strengthen the links among regional producers, marketers, restaurateurs and consumers. We urge you to patronize businesses that feature Hudson Valley products and to support initiatives that benefit regional agriculture and related efforts. Letters to the editor regarding magazine content are welcome and will be published as space permits. Letters should be mailed to the address above, or emailed to editor@valleytable.com. To be considered for publication, letters must be signed. THE VALLEY TABLE is published four times a year (March, June, Sept and Dec). Distribution is free at selected sites throughout the Hudson Valley or by subscription. Subscriptions are $20 per year. To subscribe, mail a check or money order payable to The Valley Table, 380 Main St., Suite 202, Beacon, NY 12508 or visit valleytable.com.

On the cover: The hand of Francesco Buitoni making pasta

Photo by Meghan Spiro 8

THE valley VALLEY table TABLE dec DEC2017– 2017 feb – FEB 2018 the 2018

COPYRIGHT © 2017, THE VALLEY TABLE, INC. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced in any form, mechanical or electronic, without written permission of the publishers. Advertisements designed by The Valley Table are copyrighted and may not be reproduced in whole or in part without written permission. ISSN 1257-8417


This season’s masterpieces for the oven and stove-top and your table. Cookware that has been the mainstay of French chefs since 1925 continues to evolve. In Enameled Cast Iron, Enamel on Steel and Stoneware. No other cookware distributes heat, browns, or caramelizes food to perfection like it. Bake, broil, braise, sauté, marinate, refrigerate and freeze in your Le Creuset.

New styles and colors are now in stock!

Le Creuset. Functional and beautiful. Warren Kitchen & Cutlery, for the Hudson Valley’s best selection of fine cutlery, professional cookware, appliances, serving pieces and kitchen tools. • • • •

Unique and rare knives from around the world. Expert sharpening on premises. A complete selection of coffee making systems. Gift wrapping available.

6934 Route 9 Rhinebeck, NY 12572 Just north of the 9G intersection 845-876-6208 Mon–Sat 9:30–5:30, Sun 11–4:30 Visit us on the web, or order on-line, at www.warrenkitchentools.com dec

2017– feb 2018

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Brothers’ TRAT TORIA

POUGHKEEPSIE JOURNAL

465 Main St. Beacon 2540 Rt. 55, Poughquag brotherstrattoria.com

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MAKE WARM MEMORIES THIS WINTER. Angry Orchard Innovation Cider House Presents MONTHLY WINTER CIDER PAIRING SERIES Join us for a culinary experience crafted by Chef Shawn Hubbell of Amuzae Catering and Head Cider Maker Ryan Burk featuring cuisine made from the finest local Hudson Valley ingredients and expertly paired with our specialty ciders. Reserve your space now. 2241 Albany Post Road, Walden, NY 12586 (845) 713-5180 | tours@angryorchard.com ANGRYORCHARD.COM dec

2017– feb 2018

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SEASONAL-LOCAL CRAFT FOODS ALWAYS...

AT VALLEY RESTAURANT OPEN TO THE PUBLIC FOR DINNER, WEEKEND BRUNCH & SPECIAL GATHERINGS CALL OR EMAIL TODAY TO MAKE

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Fine Food • Great Beer • Good Friends

The Cure for the Winter Blues! Our Gift Cards Make the Perfect Stocking Stuffers! Call Us Today to Book Your Holiday Party! Located on Route 9 Across from the FDR Library and Museum 4076 Albany Post Road Hyde Park, NY • 845-229-TAPS (8277) www.hydeparkbrewing.com 12

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EAT • DRINK • STAY 20 South Front St • Hudson NY 12534 R E S E R VAT I O N S 5 1 8 . 8 2 8 .1 6 3 5


GOOD STUFF

TAKE T IM E

SLOW DOWN AND SMELL THE CHEESE Alan and Barbara Glustoff of 5 Spoke Creamery are sure of one thing: Producing great cheese takes time. From their historic farm in Goshen (Orange County), the pair produces a unique line of aged, raw, European-inspired artisanal cheeses along with approachable classics. Each variety is crafted on-site using milk from their own cows, then aged in a below-ground, European-style aging room on their farm. Alan, a food chemist who has worked in the food industry for decades (including product development for Unilever Food Solutions), says he has always been intrigued with cheese. “It’s one of my most favorite foods—it’s always been that one product that’s fascinated me.” The couple moved to the Hudson Valley about 10 years ago, leasing a small plot of land to try milking and cheesemaking for a few years, then took the leap to purchase and restore an abandoned Goshen dairy farm five years ago. “We wanted to work for us, rather than for others; we wanted something that could truly be ours,” Alan says. The property and barn, which hadn’t been used for nearly 30 years, needed restoration and retrofitting. The project included creating a “cave”—an underground cheese aging room. “The natural bacteria in the air within the cave helps create ideal conditions for mold-ripened cheeses,” Alan says. “The cave really helps us produce some super-unique cheeses.” The lineup of 5 Spoke cheeses ranges wide. The most popular among local restaurateurs is Tumbleweed, a semihard Cantal Fermier and aged cheddar hybrid that is aged

12 months in the cave, offering a nutty flavor with finishing touches of sweetness. Then there’s the striking Harvest Moon, a naturally bright orange cheese inspired by the French Mimolette that offers hints of butterscotch evolving with age. (French Mimolette was once banned from import by the FDA because of alleged allergic reactions.) The unique color of the cheese stems from annatto, a tree seed. “We are one of the very few—if not the only company—in the U.S. making Mimolette,” Alan notes. “We had to dig back very far to find Old World French recipes to find how to make it just right. We also source our cheese molds from France to keep it as authentic as possible.” From packaged varieties to full wheels, a number of retailers across the Hudson Valley currently offer 5 Spoke cheeses. Adam’s Fairacre Farms, Hannaford’s, Shop Rite and specialty markets carry the products, either pre-packaged in the dairy section or fresh-cut at the deli counter. The cheeses also are available to order at the farm, and plans for an on-site market are in the works. “We view the bicycle part of our name as a metaphor [for] what company is about,” Alan notes. “With a bike, you can slow down, take back roads and experience things in a unique way that isn’t available when you zoom by at 60 miles per hour.” He applies that same metaphor to his approach to food and cheese. “It takes time to know where your food comes from and how to choose carefully—it’s all about that balance and taking time to find a great food you enjoy.” —KW

5 Spoke Creamery 1089 Pulaski Highway, Goshen 5spokecreamery.com

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SECON D H ELPIN G

EVENT S

JAM IN PRINT Just a few jars of jam can open nearly endless possibilities for the culinary curious. That’s what Christopher Wilson, owner of the small-batch, Cuddebackvillebased LunaGrown Jam company proves in his new book, Beyond the Bread: Tasteful Exploration with Jam & Marmalade (LunaGrown, 2017; $18.50 paperback). The book highlights innovative recipes using jam and marmalade, from creative cocktails and muffins to simple salad dressings, marinades and desserts that inspire readers to use jam in ways they may never have imagined. Savory dinner ideas include pineappleglazed ham and sautéed carrots with apricot jam, or desserts like marmaladeglazed pound cake or jam-filled miniature cheesecakes. Drinks include raspberry hot chocolate and blueberry lemonade and cocktails featuring jam and marmalade, a popular practice that dates back to the early 1900s. Wilson offers jam-pairing guides with a wide variety of cheeses, wines and beers, along with notes on serving and displaying while entertaining. The book, already in its second printing, is available online at lunagrown.com and wherever LunaGrown is sold.

—KW H AN D IN H AN D

PAYING FORWARD, AND BACK Harvest on Hudson, the upscale eatery in Hastings-on-Hudson that was damaged by hurricane Sandy in 2012, opened up its patio and restaurant in October for a night of food and cocktails, live music, raffles and a silent auction to benefit victims devastated by recent hurricanes in the Caribbean. ”Having been effected by Sandy, we couldn’t just sit back knowing people needed help,” said Angelo Liberatore, Partner of Fort Pond Bay Company. “We are so happy that we could give back and thank everyone for showing support.” All the proceeds from the event—almost $7,000—were donated to Hand in Hand Hurricane Relief Efforts.

WORK:SHOP WICKHAM SOLID WOOD STUDIO, BEACON December 9 and 10 A festive pop-up winter market of museum-store-quality, locally made, hand-crafted, small goods in wool, glass, clay, paper, linen, silk, wood, metal and beeswax. A Valley Table sponsored event. workshopwintermarket.com SUNSET SENSATIONS WINE AND FOOD EVENT LOCUST GROVE ESTATE, POUGHKEEPSIE December 14, 5:30-7:30pm Enjoy a Hudson River sunset, sipping fine wines paired with culinary creations. Cooking demonstration by featured chef Ed Kowalski of Crave Restaurant. Tour the historic mansion decked for the holidays. $32 in advance, $35 day of. lgny.org PANCAKE BREAKFAST WITH SANTA CROWN MAPLE ESTATE AT MADAVA FARMS, DOVER PLAINS December 9, 10, 16, and 17,10am-2pm Enjoy a holiday pancake breakfast featuring Crown Maple’s sustainably made maple syrup produced on the pristine 800-acre estate and state-ofthe-art sugar “house”. $18 for adults, $13 for children 12 and under, free for 3 and under. crownmaple.com CIDER PAIRING DINNER ANGRY ORCHARD, WALDEN January 6, 7-10 pm Join cider maker Ryan Burk and chef Shawn Hubbell of Amuzae Catering for a four-course menu paired with small batch New York cider styles available exclusively at the Angry Orchard Innovation. Cider House. (Part of a winter dining series.) Tickets: $80 angryorchard.com HUDSON VALLEY RAIL TRAIL WINTERFEST 11 CHURCH ST, HIGHLAND January 13, 11am-2pm Bundle up and head outdoors for this celebration of winter. Warm up with a chili contest, roasted chestnuts, toasted marshmallows, snacks and drinks. Plenty of kids activities, plus wood carving demonstrations and wagon rides. hudsonvalleyrailtrail.net

Harvest-on-Hudson staff that spearheaded the fundraising effort (l-r): Angelo Liberatore, Nick Macchi, Ben Liberatore, Cali LaSpina, Fernando Quinones.

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photo by simon feldman


winter farmers’market finds Cold weather is primetime for eating. We’ve gathered some of our favorite locally made products to beat the winter chill—and to share with loved ones this holiday season.

Töst This non-alcoholic sparkling beverage blend of white tea, white cranberry, ginger and spice is perfect for your next holiday toast or “just because” celebration. With a pure, dry taste and hints of peach and crisp citrus, the natural Redhook-based beverage pairs seamlessly with any meal. Adams Fairacre Farms; $6.99/25-ounce bottle

Ardent Homesteader Caramel Sauce From a humble homestead in Arden comes this versatile, small-batch caramel sauce. Whether using in cookies, pie or another favorite family recipe, this five-ingredient dessert sauce is great for holiday baking needs. Blooming Hill Farm Market; $15/12-ounce jar

Poughkeepsie Microgreens Sprinkle some of these tiny superfoods on salads and sandwiches for a healthful boost of flavor. Grown at the Indoor Organic Gardens of Poughkeepsie, the greens are available fresh-picked all winter long. Sunflower Natural Foods Market; $6/1.5-ounce pack

Angry Orchard The Muse Inspired by sparkling wines and slightly sweet demi-sec champagne, this cider has slightly dry finish with a lingering sweet apple note. A special Walden Cider House release, The Muse is a great choice for celebrations and pairing with hearty meals, like oven-roasted lamb or creamy pasta. Angry Orchard Innovation Cider House; $14/24-ounce bottle

Arbor Hill Grape Twists Snack on these concord grape-flavored licorice candies from the upstate winery and food producer Arbor Hill. A welcomed change from traditional cherry licorice, these twists make perfect stocking stuffers for the wine and candy lover in your life. Taste NY Store at Todd Hill; $4.95/16-ounce pack

Screamin’ Onionz Add a touch of spice to your favorite dish with this wholesome Millbrookmade condiment. Offered in mild, medium and hot, Screamin’ Onionz adds a leveled punch of zesty, complex flavor to burgers, omelets, tacos, buddha bowls and more. Homestead Farm Market; $8.99/ 16-ounce jar

—Compiled by Kristen Warfield

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AWAR D S & H ON OR S

EVENT S

KUDOS To Nick Citera, co-owner of Cosimo’s Restaurant and Development Group, who was presented with the Marist College President’s Community Service Award in October. Marist President David Yellen cited Citera’s deep involvement with local communities, including his 20-year tenure on the Food Bank of the Hudson Valley board of advisors. Citer, a Marist alumnus and long-time area resident, also has worked on a multitude of culinary-related initiatives throughout the Hudson Valley; he serves on The Valley Table magazine’s Hudson Valley Restaurant Week board of advisors and,in partnership with the Dutchess County Chamber of Commerce, administers a Hudson Valley scholarship fund at the Culinary Institute of America in Hyde Park. Cosimo’s Restaurant Group employs approximately 500 people across its locations. To Ryan Burk, head cider maker at Angry Orchard, who notched a spot on Wine Enthusiast magazine’s “Top 40 Under-40 Tastemakers.” The magazine notes, “These winemakers, grape growers, retailers, bartenders, educators and more are redefining the alcohol beverage industry as we know it... Each of these honorees is doing their part to lead the conversation and leave a lasting influence on the world of food and drink for generations to come.” Burk was a cider maker at Michigan-based Virtue Cider before he was named head cider maker at Angry Orchard in 2015. Nationally, Burk is a board member of the United States Association of Cider Makers and the Cider Institute of North America.

To the Ashokan Center celebrating its 5th annual Winter Hoot—a celebration of music and nature for all generations. homeofthehoot.com for details.

NOFA-NY WINTER CONFERENCE SARATOGA HILTON & CITY CENTER, SARATOGA SPRINGS January 19-21 Organic farmers and gardeners from across the state meet, confer, celebrate and exchange knowledge at this festive, information-filled annual conference. Featuring 12 workshop tracks centered around this year’s theme—Healthy People, Healthy Planet—all of which aim to recognize the intersection of health and agriculture. nofany.org BURNS NIGHT SUPPER THE ROUNDHOUSE, BEACON January 30, 7-11pm The Hudson Highlands Pipe Band honors Scottish icon/poet Robert Burns, (Auld Lang Syne) with its bag pipes, traditional Scottish-inspired fare, including haggis and whiskey, and music from the T McCann band. Tickets $125. hhhpb.org WINTER HOOT THE ASHOKAN CENTER, OLIVEBRIDGE February 2-4 The Winter Hoot is a down-home music gathering where everyone is welcome and there's joy to spare. Local music alongside local food, beer and wine, plus fun family activities for all ages. homeofthehoot.com ICE HARVEST FESTIVAL HANFORD MILLS MUSEUM, EAST MEREDITH February 3, 10am-4pm Before there was refrigeration, ice was used to preserve food and keep it cold during warm months. The Handford Mills Museum celebrates the craft of ice harvesting with historic tools and techniques. Ice sculpting, horse-drawn sleigh rides, blacksmithing and cooking demos, hot soups and local vendors. hanfordmills.org SARATOGA CHOWDERFEST 20TH ANNIVERSARY SARATOGA SPRINGS February 3, 11am-4pm More than 80 vendors participate in this celebration, offering a wide selection of chowders. Enjoy live music, family activities and dog-friendly chowder for canine companions. discoversaratoga.org

valleytable.com for updates

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photos : top , daryl estrine ; middle , eva deitch ; bottom , ethan harrison


SLOW FIX

SIP, DON’T SLURP

Spending a cold winter day out in the snow and ice practically demands a steaming mug of hot cocoa. The common, store-bought packets may do for some in a pinch, but master chocolatiers in the Hudson Valley have something much more decadent and delicious to offer: a rich elixir called “sipping chocolate.” Typically made from ground chocolate mixed with hot milk or cream, sipping chocolate is hot cocoa times 10. Since the chocolate component is so rich and concentrated, sipping chocolate is usually served in small quantities, like an espresso. A few local artisan chocolatiers now offer their own versions of this winter treat. Oliver Kita, owner of Oliver Kita Fine Confections in Rhinebeck, describes his sipping chocolate as “luxurious”—a description earned by its 54 percent dark ground cocoa content, giving it a rich and robust flavor. “Our sipping chocolate mix is very dark and dramatic,” Kita says. “At our retail store, we serve a fresh homemade version of it that is essentially liquid chocolate—very thick and very rich, similar to what one would order from a European cafe.” Kita also offers the mix at the store’s retail location and online ($10.25/8-ounce pouch). Fruition Chocolate, in Shokan (Ulster County), uses a blend of roasted Peruvian and Dominican cocoa beans, cane sugar and sea salt in its sipping chocolate mix. Owner Bryan Graham notes, “Most hot chocolate mixes are made from cocoa powder, [from which] most cocoa butter is pressed out; our mixes are based on full chocolate—no cocoa butter Oliver Kita Chocolates 18 W Market St, Rhinebeck (845) 876-2665; oliverkita.com

Fruition Chocolate 3091 Rt28, Shokan (845) 657-6717; tastefruition.com

photo left noah kalina ; photo right provided

is removed—which makes it creamier without adding any milk ingredients. We wanted it to be accessible to people who are vegan or allergic to dairy.” During the holiday season, specialty flavors are available, including mint, orange spice and malted milk. The mix ($21.95/12-ounce tin) is available at the Fruition store in Woodstock and online. Lagusta’s Luscious, a Fair Trade vegan chocolate company in New Paltz, offers multiple ways to get your sipping chocolate fix this winter. The first is the company’s signature drinking chocolate mix ($10/7-ounce jar), which comes in two varieties: original (organic, Fair Trade semisweet chocolate with sugar), and spicy (the original blend with less sugar, mild ancho chiles, canela Mexican cinnamon and vanilla). “At home, you can control the intensity of the drink by using more or less mixed with hot almond milk,” owner Lagusta Yearwood says. “We also serve a super-rich homemade sipping chocolate at the shop and our cafe (Commissary) down the street. It’s made with the same amount of chocolate ganache that goes into five of our truffles.” It’s topped with vegan whipped cream and vegan marshmallows. At the shop, Yearwood also offers a fun option: the “magic drinking chocolate sphere” ($6.50). Pour a cup of heated non-dairy milk over the round chocolate ball, whisk and voila!—a rich chocolate experience, complete with vegan mini marshmallows that appear as the drink liquefies. —KW Lagusta’s Luscious 25 N Front St, New Paltz (845) 633-8615; lagustasluscious.com

Commissary 11 Church St, New Paltz (845) 288-3426

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OPENINGS

Vegetalien 504 Main St, Beacon (845) 838-1943 vegetalien.life

As plant-based eating continues to trend nationwide, the husband-and-wife duo behind the local River Valley Restaurant Group (Beacon Bread, Ziatun, Angelina’s, Tito Santana Taqueria) have brought a fully-vegan café to Beacon’s Main Street. Incorporating organic, local produce whenever possible, the focus here is and finding creative ways to “veganize” nontraditional dishes. Kamel and Lena Jamal offer a balanced, healthful mix of provisions at this fast-casual stop. Végétalien (French for vegan) offers salads, soups and sandwiches alongside made-to-order juices and smoothies, to eat in or take out. Large portions and ample plant-based proteins make for a filling meal where animal proteins aren’t missed. The portobello mushroom and caramelized onion panini, or the broccoli “cheddar” style soup are robust and substantial, while the kale caesar salad with cashew cream dressing or green juice with cucumber, carrot, apple and parsley allows for a lighter option. The focus above all is on fresh. “The response has been great so far—people are coming in whether they’re vegan or not,” Lena says. “We’re continuously bringing in new menu items and specials based [on] what’s in season and what we can get from our local farms that week.”

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Silvia 42 Mill Hill Rd, Woodstock (845) 679-4242 silviawoodstockny.com Diners have been raving about the gorgeous tastes in this creative, contemporary Woodstock restaurant, opened this summer. Located in Joyous Lake, the legendary 1970's music venue where musicians such as The Rolling Stones and The Band performed, the dining area is balanced with warm touches of wood, stone, bright metals, natural light, original artwork and views across a broad, wood-beamed porch. Owners Betty and Doris Choi, Betty’s husband Craig Leonard and Doris’ brother-in-law Niall Grant, draw on their Korean roots for many of the items on the inspired menu (including a special Korean menu on Thursdays), but there is much that goes beyond tradition. Chef Doris, author of The Fresh Energy Cookbook (Skirt! 2012; $29.95 hardcover), is a well-known raw and plant-based food guru. Her seasonal menus feature dishes like grass-fed Korean BBQ beef lettuce wraps, cucumber salad, kimchi, fermented miso garlic paste; seafood and pumpkin bouillabaisse with Thai red curry, coconut milk, Thai basil, cilantro and lime; and butternut squash pudding with coconut milk, ginger, pumpkin pie spices, date molasses and candied walnuts. Tuesday is “vegan night”—expect creative dishes like ash-roasted kuri squash—and don’t be surprised at the Middle-Eastern touches to classics, like grilled halloumi with a tomato salad. Ingredients are sourced within the Hudson Valley when possible.

vegetalien photos meghan spiro ; silvia photo theresa horgan


Pub Street 20 Wheeler Ave, Pleasantville (914) 909-5408 pubstreet.com Since opening in August, Pub Street has been delivering great drinks and fresh seafood in a comfortable gastropub that’s already gathered a crowd of regulars. Located in the historic stone train station building formerly hosting the Iron Horse Grill, Pub Street has reimagined the intimate space with simple elegance. The decor blends the comfort of tradition with fresh, modern aesthetics. Cocktails include some original concoctions, including the Merchant of Venice (prosecco with a pomegranatecinnamon reduction) and Summer’s End (bourbon, muddled blackberries, and lemon bitters). The menu has a strong seafood focus, emphasizing American coastal classics like lobster rolls, raw oysters and a BLT wedge. Some dishes feature a Japanese touch—the salmon poke sushi fritter and a rice bowl with crispy chicken, kabayaki, pickles, Japanese-style rice, and sambal aioli, for example. There are few options for vegetarians and vegans, but many good choices for gluten-free and paleo diners. Serving lunch and dinner Tuesday through Sunday and brunch on the weekend, Pub Street fills up after 7 pm, so reservations are recommended.

photos this page provided

City Perch Kitchen + Bar 1 Livingstone Ave, Dobbs Ferry (914) 348-7003 cityperch.com More than just a place to drink and dine, City Perch is for hanging out. Together with the iPic movie theater (next door— where else?), this new Dobbs Ferry restaurant caters to groups on a night out. Make yourself comfortable with extensive seating, TVs tuned to the games, or upscale bar games like brushedsteel foosball. A live DJ spins beats to keep the energy hopping on Friday and Saturday nights starting at 9 pm. Known for its mixology expertise, City Perch’s cocktail menu is extensive and exciting. Nothing is held back, from the mojito with passion fruit, coconut, ginger and pineapple, to the grasshopper steaming with liquid nitrogen. At daily dinner and weekend brunches, diners dive into comfort favorites. The menu is distinctively Southern, including corn bread, ribs, and crab cakes. Everything is upleveled from the classic, like lobster on a Cobb salad, and maple-bourbon-pecan butter for your biscuits, and you can add truffles or caviar to any dish. And save room for dessert—Executive Chef Sherry Yard was Wolfgang Puck’s pastry chef for 20 years and has three James Beard Awards for Outstanding Pastry Chef of the Year. She doesn’t shy from decadence. Try the deep, dark chocolate doughnut with pistachio ice cream, dark chocolate sauce, and pistachio tuile if you want proof. With two other locations (Maryland and New Jersey), the iPic team seems to be developing a formula for customer satisfaction: good drinks, upscale menu, and room for fun.

Canoe Hill 3264 Franklin Ave, Millbrook (845) 605-1570 canoehillny.com Minimalistic, quaint, and just a touch rustic, Canoe Hill is a small den where you’ll find fresh oysters—$1 after 9pm— and cocktails that define perfection. Past the bar where locals chat and sip on their drinks, the main dining room is warmed by a wood stove with cozy nooks perfect for enjoying a meal or the variety of small plates available. One guest likened the experience to that of having dinner at the house of an old friend. Though the menu changes on an almost daily basis, fresh oysters remain a constant and some dishes, like the porchetta with polenta and the cheddar grilled cheese, have caught the attention of diners. Chef/owner Michael DelGrosso keeps the menu small but makes up for it with variety in the selection and exceptionally fresh ingredients—so fresh that they don’t even have a freezer. The entrance is hidden away down an alley and is easy to miss, but this is a gem worth looking for.

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WHY ORGANIC? a farmer answers

F

IFTY YEARS AGO,

organic farming was, at best, laughed off as a joke by the agricultural establishment (the land-grant colleges and federal and state departments of agriculture). At worst, it was regarded, with thinly veiled hostility, as anachronistic and bordering on un-American. If you doubt this, remember the treatment meted out to Rachel Carson after she published Silent Spring. Her groundbreaking classic on the effects of DDT still has much to teach us. We’ve come some distance since then, but not far enough.

by keith stewart PHOTO THIS PAGE : HELANNA BRATMAN

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Producing and marketing food contributes nearly a trillion dollars annually to the U.S. economy. Chemical-intensive, industrial-scale agribusiness is the overwhelmingly dominant force, with giant food conglomerates like Cargill (the largest privately held company in North America, with annual revenue of well over $100 billion) reaping most of the profits. Cargill, along with a handful of other food giants, has a strong interest in keeping things the way they are and, no doubt, capturing an even larger share of our food dollars. Huge sums of money are spent lobbying Congress to do their bidding. They argue that organic and small-scale, local, ecological food production—all enormously popular with the public—can never be more than a niche market because such methods are too costly and inefficient to feed the earth’s soaring human population. But there is reason to question this self-serving thesis. For one thing, at present, global food production is more than adequate to provide for every human on the planet. Resolve and obstacles to distribution are what stand in the way. For more than 30 years, our certified organic farm in Orange County has fed thousands of New Yorkers chemical-

free vegetables, herbs and fruit. We’ve made a living doing this on just 16 acres of an old dairy farm with rocky, uneven ground that only knew cows, corn and hay before we came along. Across America, thousands of farmers, young and old, are bucking the trend and doing what we do—producing quality food without degrading the land and the larger environment in the process. These new farmers’ dedication and labor breathe fresh air and a sense of hope back into small towns and depressed rural communities. Most people are delighted to live close to an organic or sustainably managed farm. But you’d be lucky to find one person in a thousand (and certainly no CEO) who would choose to live anywhere near a twenty-first century hog factory or cattle feedlot. “Organic” is now a firmly established niche in the food market, and it’s growing every year. In 2016, sales of organic food reached $47 billion. Impressive though this may sound, it represents only 5 percent of the total food dollars spent in America. There are a variety of reasons why that percentage should be far higher.

1.

According to many studies, fresh, organic food is nutritionally superior.

Each of us gets just one body on this earth, though, judging by the number of people we know with artificial hips, shoulders and knees, the medical profession has become fairly adept at replacing at least some body parts. Consuming meat from animals fed large doses of antibiotics and growth hormones is very likely harmful to our long-term health. The same may be said of fruits and vegetables with pesticide residues on them.We may pay a little more for organic food because organic farming is not subsidized by the federal government (as are the big commodity crops like corn and soybeans) and generally requires more human labor. But eating organic should make our bodies run better and last longer—which means saving on doctor visits and medications. 24

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2.

It is no longer debatable: Food produced using organic methods is vastly better for the environment.

According to the journal Nature, researchers around the world have concluded that agriculture is responsible for as much as one third of global greenhouse gas emissions. Synthetic chemical fertilizer and pesticides are mostly fossil fuel-based; in addition to polluting our air and water, they degrade the soil and the vital microbial community that resides within it. Degraded soils erode and wash into streams and rivers and ultimately reach the ocean. Where the Mississippi empties its payload of fertilizer and pesticide runoff into the Gulf of Mexico, for example, there is a nearly 9,000 square mile “dead zone” in which algae flourish but where fish and shrimp cannot survive. Organic farmers use compost, manure, cover crops, natural amendments, crop rotation and fallow periods to maintain and improve soil health. These practices add organic matter to the soil, which keeps the soil’s microbial community well fed and keeps carbon (the primary ingredient of organic matter) in the ground where it belongs, not in the atmosphere where it contributes significantly to air pollution and, ultimately, climate change. Soils high in organic matter also hold more water, which makes them more drought resistant and less dependent on irrigation. Organic farmers view nature as an ally, not an adversary. They may, on occasion, be frustrated by the cards they are dealt—extreme weather, unruly weeds, troublesome pests and diseases—but they take it as a given that millions of years of evolution and natural selection embody more PHOTO THIS PAGE : HELANNA BRATMAN

wisdom than they do. Over time, most recognize that when the land is cared for and its health kept a priority, it seems to respond in kind. Food production that depends on synthetic (and often toxic) chemicals implies an attitude of superiority, domination and an alarming disconnect between man and nature. Such hubris is costly. Despite what the manufacturers tell us, it is a fact that neonicotinoid insecticides, in widespread use since the 1990s, are a primary reason for the huge decline in bee populations, something even the most advanced technology cannot create a substitute for. Bees are important pollinators of at least 30 percent of our food crops. Populations of the iconic and much-loved monarch butterfly have dropped by 80 percent in less than 20 years. This is directly attributed to widespread use of Roundup, the Monsanto Company’s ubiquitous herbicide that efficiently kills the milkweed that monarchs depend on to complete their life cycle. (Another Monsanto product, Agent Orange, a highly toxic defoliant, was widely and indiscriminately used during the Vietnam War. Its effects still plague many American veterans as well as Vietnamese 50 years after the war.)

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3.

Chemical products used in conventional farming can pose serious health risks for farmworkers and others,

Farmworkers exposed to dangerous chemicals suffer from cancer, birth defects, reproductive health problems and neurological disorders, such as Parkinson’s Disease, at much higher rates than the general population. Because most agricultural workers in this country are “undocumented” migrants (they are usually the only people willing to do this work) and have a muted voice at best, this dirty little truth is conveniently brushed under the table. The federal government has no comprehensive system in place for monitoring chronic illnesses among farmworkers resulting from exposure to pesticides. There is little doubt, however, that worker productivity declines, health care costs increase, and humans suffer and die. Case in point: Before President Donald Trump was elected, the federal Environmental Protection Agency was on track to ban the use of chlorpyrifos, a pesticide created by Dow AgroSciences, a subsidiary of chemical manufacturing giant Dow Chemical, that is highly toxic to birds, fish and a

wide range of insects, including bees. It has also been linked to developmental problems in children. Under the leadership of Trump-appointee Scott Pruitt, the EPA abruptly changed its stance in March 2017, allowing the use of chlorpyrifos to continue. Coincidentally, in April, more than 50 farmworkers outside of Bakersfield, CA, were exposed to spray drift from a nearby field treated with this endocrinedisrupting chemical and almost immediately succumbed to violent nausea and vomiting. Coincidentally, too, Dow AgroSciences contributed a million dollars to President Trump’s inaugural committee, and the company’s chairman and CEO, Andrew Liveris, attended a post-election Trump rally, held nowhere near a sprayed field.

Necessity, not ideology The recent transition to organic farming in Cuba is a remarkable story. When the Soviet Union collapsed in 1990, its aid to Cuba stopped abruptly. This meant no more imported pesticides and fertilizers, and no more fuel or parts for tractors or equipment. At the same time, the U.S. tightened its sanctions. It quickly became clear to the Cuban government that the island would soon be facing serious food shortages. In desperation, the big state-run farms were broken up and the government started handing out 30-acre lots to small farmers, especially in the vicinity of cities and towns. And they seriously promoted organic farming. For the best part of a decade, many Cubans went hungry and malnourished. Now the island nation has a flourishing small and organic farm economy. It’s progressed from being one of the poorest food-producing countries in Latin America to being one of the most productive. Cuba is now a model for small-scale, ecological agriculture. The transformation was driven by necessity, not ideology. —KS

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5.

Studies have found no significant yield differences between conventionally and organically grown corn, wheat or soybeans.

4.

Factory farms subject animals to cruel conditions and may concentrate toxic byproducts in the environment.

Over 90 percent of the meat, milk and eggs we consume comes from “factory farms,” also known as CAFOs (concentrated animal feeding operations), where animals are treated abominably, most spending their short lives in cages or on concrete pads in highly confined spaces. They are regarded not as sentient beings that experience pain, fear and privation in much the same way we humans do, but as mere units of production. (The industry prefers the term “livestock units” (weight) over naming different animal species. One beef cow, for example, is equivalent to eight hogs or 400 chickens.) Between 2002 and 2012, despite a steady increase in organic production, the number of livestock units on factory farms in this country actually increased by 20 percent. In the past 20 years, several states have relaxed environmental rules for factory farms, creating toxic epicenters of pollution. During the same period, the largest commercial meat and milk processing companies pressured livestock producers to consolidate and operate more intensively. Inevitably, the big guys got bigger and the smaller, conventional livestock farms have all but disappeared. PHOTO THIS PAGE : JERRY NOVESKY

Researchers at UC Berkeley analyzed 115 studies comparing yields of organic versus conventional farms. Their results, published in 2014, found organic yields lagging behind conventional yields by, at most, 19 percent—a much smaller yield difference than previously estimated. Yield disparities varied depending on crops grown; no yield differences were found for leguminous crops like peas, beans and lentils. For 38 years, the Rodale Institute, in Emmaus, PA, has been conducting trials that compare the yields of organic and conventionally grown grains (corn, soybeans and wheat). They’ve found no significant yield differences—except in drought years, when the organically managed plots easily out-performed their conventional ones. If just half—or even a quarter—of the enormous amount of money that has promoted industrial agriculture and funded the development of synthetic pesticides and fertilizers over the past 50 years had gone to research on organic and sustainable farming methods, one has to wonder if today there would be any yield differences at all between these two very different approaches to commercial agriculture. In our current, degraded global environment, a strong case can be made that even a modestly lower yield would be a small price to pay for shifting to agricultural methods that promote sustainability and ecological health. I think future generations would vote for that.

My big beef is against large-scale, corporatized, chemicalintensive agribusiness and its monopolistic grip on our food system. I’m a fan of small, local farmers of all types, regardless of whether some use chemicals or not. To my mind, there should be many more of us. We all work hard to make a living; we all want good health for our farms and ourselves; and we can all learn from each other. I believe each one of us who works the land and is in touch with nature every day understands the importance of looking after this awesome, living planet of ours. It’s just a matter of remembering this and leaning toward the light whenever we can. 4 DEC

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UP CLOSE

stacey penlon’s

beaconpantry

M

o s t av i d t r av e l e r s w i l l

admit that the fastest way to experience a culture is, quite simply, through its food. Another, though far slower way, would be to pack your bags and move there. Stacey Penlon, owner of Beacon Pantry, a Euro-inspired cafe and market on Beacon’s Main Street, has done both. She draws on her culinary travels and shopping experiences for the selection of Italian and French pantry items, imported and domestic cheese, meats and charcuterie in the shop—as well as the breakfasts, lunches and dinners in the cafe that incorporate them all.

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text by kristen warfield photos by eva deitch


Growing up in Rochester next door to an Italian family (straight from Naples), Penlon fell in love with Italian food and food traditions at an early age. “They made everything from scratch—the sauces, the breads, the desserts,” Penlon recalls. “Even though we were in the suburbs, half of their backyard was taken up by a garden.” She also remembers the aroma of fresh tomato sauce cooking for Sunday dinner at her best friend’s house, who grew up with those same Italian cultural traditions. “I have always gravitated to that culture—the idea of sharing, the meal being hours long and a whole part of your Sunday,” she says. “There was always a warmth in those families around food.” Penlon eventually studied for her bachelor’s and master’s degrees in Italian language and literature and moved to Italy at age 24. She worked as a caretaker for an affluent Italian family with a young son to whom she taught English. She quickly became accustomed to European food culture—especially the clerks at the cheese counters, who created a truly individual shopping experience based on their knowledge of the customers’ preferences. After living in Beacon with her husband, Stephen, for seven years, Penlon left her long-term job in finance in 2013 and turned her attention toward a second career. “We had always had this idea of opening a business on Main Street,” Penlon recalls. “I had just left my job and was looking for another one. I got a call for an interview [in New York City]—I got all suited up and ready with my resume, sat through a two-hour interview and spent four hours on the train. I came home feeling so drained—kind of like, ‘Why am I doing this?’ Both of us knew that if I was going to try something new, it was time.” The next day, she noticed a vacant storefront for rent on Main Street. At only 400 square feet, it was tiny, but the little

shop was perfect for what she wanted to bring to Beacon. “I knew that if I had a business here that it would have to be something I was passionate about—food was just a natural,” she says. “I also asked people what they found themselves driving outside of Beacon for—the answer was often specialty foods, cheese and imported products. It was pretty clear to me from the beginning that it would be a cheeseand specialty-foods store, bringing in my love for Italian, French and Spanish food, and also incorporating some local and domestic products.” With their son, Mola, Stacey and Stephen got to work on the space, building shelves, planning the layout and painting. “I also started bringing people in for interviews,” Penlon says, thinking back with a smile. “I met one of my first and long-time staff members, Jen, then—we did the interview on lawn chairs.” Penlon also enrolled in an intensive, threeday cheese class at Murray’s Cheese Shop in New York, which explored each aspect of cheese, from production to serving and pairing. She was well-versed about cheese from her European travels, but she wanted to learn more about selecting and ordering product. “Cheese was the focal point [of the shop]—I wanted it to be a place where people could come to learn about new varieties, how they’re made and why we chose to carry them,” Penlon says. “I wanted it to be cut-to-order—like a European experience, where the service [is tailored] to the individual customer.” By March 2014, Beacon Pantry was open for business. With its well-stocked cheese counter and a growing selection of imported European specialty products, the community response to the shop was immediate and positive. The specialty groceries were a hit; many customers

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I’ve always liked to entertain and take care of people through food, so from day one we’ve had full table service. with European roots found comfort in the French and Italian products that brought back memories of home. The Pantry, however, outgrew itself. “We started doing fresh fish, selling produce and catering—all things customers asked us for,” Penlon says, but what she planned as a retail location quickly morphed into a cafe. “We started making some simple sandwiches,” Penlon laughs. “We would make the sandwiches on the scale and wrap them up on the windowsill. We had no space!” Delivery boxes spilled into walkways, customers bumped elbows in the tiny seating area, and the already crowded space behind the counter got jammed up as food prep employees and clerks constantly weaved to avoid colliding with each other.After nine months at its original location, Beacon Pantry moved to the other end of Main Street and reopened as a larger specialty store and a full-service cafe. The new location offered seating for breakfast and lunch as well as outdoor patio dining, and there was space for a prep kitchen at the rear of the building that became a hub for filling catering orders, baking and hosting culinary classes for children and adults. In August 2017, Penlon was able to split the cafe and specialty grocery shop operations when more space in the building became available. The cafe-turned-restaurant now serves breakfast and lunch daily, with dinner service a few nights per week. From crisp salads with fresh baguette to the locally-lauded croque monsieur with French ham,

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Gruyere and Béchamel, there’s a common theme: The food is at once simple and flavorful, combining local staples with a clear European influence. Chef Davide Blanc, originally from Piemonte, Italy, adds his knowledge of European cuisine with familiar comfort. The cheese and charcuterie boards are hand-selected and crafted unique to each customer. “No two cheese boards are ever the same,” Penlon notes. The dinner menu, though minimal, offers an intimate selection of Pantry classics with large and smaller portions available. Wine and beer round out the offerings alongside coffee, tea and espresso. One thing you won’t find, however, is counter service. “I’ve always liked to entertain and take care of people through food, so from day one we’ve had full table service,” Penlon says. “That goes back to my experiences at cafes and even coffee shops in Europe—even if you’re just ordering a cappuccino, they’ll serve you at your table and really give you a nice experience.” Through a separate entrance, guests can browse a large selection of European and local specialty products and learn about new products—especially the cheeses—from the experts. “There’s an ongoing joke I make that cheese is intimidating,” Penlon laughs. “It really can be for people— they may not know where it’s from, how to pronounce it or how to serve it. For many, it’s easier to go with what’s familiar. We want to take away the intimidation and make cheese approachable and fun, to educate people so they’re comfortable.”

E A SY A P P E T I Z E R S F ROM T H E P RO

One of Beacon Pantry's early goals was to make food, cooking and entertaining easy, fun and approachable. While a beautiful cheese plate is always welcome, sometimes you want something different. Halloumi is a great example of a delicious and lesser-known cheese that is perfect for company. It’s a Cypriot sheep's milk cheese that doesn't really melt. Most people think of it as a cheese for grilling, but when company is coming and you aren't firing up the grill, a frying pan yields great results. We like to get a frying pan quite hot, add a generous amount of olive oil and throw in the sliced or cubed halloumi. Sear it well on all sides to a nice brown color (don't move it around too much). When it is golden brown and has crispy edges, add some dried or fresh herbs like thyme or oregano. Remove the pan from the heat, squeeze on some lemon juice and transfer the mixture to a nice serving plate. Pour on any pan drippings (don't waste that good oil and the liquid from the cheese), more olive oil (be generous with your best, full-flavored olive oil). Place crusty bread around the cheese and serve with toothpicks. One easy, bite-sized jewel for entertaining is a goat cheese-stuffed date. We make a small slit in the date, fill it with high-quality goat cheese and sprinkle chopped pistachios, pomegranate seeds and zest a little orange rind on top. These are colorful, bite sized, easy to prepare and easy for guests to eat. If you have access to good-quality seafood, nothing could be easier than searing tail-on shrimp with lots of chopped garlic, olive oil and parsley, and cooking until just seared through. This is a Spanish tapasstyle preparation that every seafood lover will enjoy (serving any type of seafood at a party always seems special to guests). —Stacey Penlon

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Penlon says she runs into a French native at least once a week who tells her about the wonderful food memories the store brings back—a special candy she hasn’t had since childhood or a French soap that reminds her of a family member. But it isn’t just the faded memories that Penlon sees as special, it’s the new ones she’s helping create. “As a little girl, running errands with my father on Fridays was really exciting,” Penlon says. “The guy at the deli would always give me a cookie, and the woman at the bank would always let me open the safety deposit box. The memories of those routines and traditions—and the food—stuck with me. For three years now, I’ve seen customers’ children who were really little when I first opened. They come every week and get their coffee beans and a special cookie, or they’ll come for a snack before dance class. It’s fun to see them grow up and to be part of their day-to-day life. I think back fondly about the people [who were] part of my routine as a kid, and now I realize I’ve become that lady for others—I’m becoming one of those fond memories.” 4 Beacon Pantry 382 Main St, Beacon (845) 440-8923 beaconpantry.com

SAUSAGE MEATBALLS WITH LEMON AND SAGE STACEY PENLON / BEACON PANTRY Ingredients 1 pound sweet Italian sausage, removed from casing (or mix sweet and hot sausage to taste) 3 garlic cloves, minced 2 sprigs fresh sage, roughly chopped zest and juice of 2 lemons, separated 1/2 cup panko breadcrumbs milk to cover breadcrumbs all-purpose white flour to coat meatballs for frying 2 garlic cloves, crushed (for frying) 2 sprigs sage, intact 6 tablespoons butter Method Soak panko breadcrumbs in milk for 30 minutes. When soaked, squeeze out excess milk and discard milk. Set soaked breadcrumbs aside. 1. Place sausage, garlic, sage, lemon zest and soaked breadcrumbs in a large bowl. Work mixture with your hands until evenly combined. 2. Form sausage mixture into 11/2-inch balls, and roll each ball in flour. 3. Melt butter in a large sauté pan. Add meatballs, crushed garlic cloves and sprigs of whole sage--don’t crowd the pan. 4. Fry, turning occasionally, until meatballs are browned well and cooked through. 5. Just before removing from heat, add reserved juice of two lemons. (For extra lemon flavor, add the entire squeezed lemon rind and stir it around in the pan before removing.)

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orange county land trust turns 25

going, going, saved

M by jeff storey

ORSE P ITTS , 65, HAS BEEN GROWING ORGANIC SALAD greens, fruits and edible flowers in once-rural Orange County for 32 years. The produce from his 142-acre Windfall Farms in Montgomery is well known among the discriminating patrons of the Union Square Greenmarket in New York City. Then the Interstate sliced through the landscape 60 miles northwest of New York City. Pitts wanted to keep farming, but that became more and more difficult as his property was zoned industrial and warehouses and factories sprung up around him. “I was running all over the place trying to preserve [my] farmland,” Pitts says, but he received little encouragement and became “very demoralized.” So the Orange County Land Trust stepped in. Using a $931,800 grant from the state and a $303,750 contribution from the Scenic Hudson, the Orange County Land Trust (OCLT) was able

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Louis V. Mills

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to negotiate a permanent conservation easement with Pitts that precludes subdivision and future development. Pitts sums it up succinctly: “The Orange County Land Trust is my salvation.” And that’s what the self-described “scrappy, no-frills” land trust hopes to be for more working farms in a county that was once identified by its farms. “I feel blessed to help people that care about their land,” says Jim Delaune, who has been OCLT Executive Director for 12 years. “These are good people.” Delaune, a two-term Ulster County legislator, former restaurateur and retired City of Newburgh Economic Development Director, says that he knew nothing about conservation when he took his current job. “I’ve found that nothing is more rewarding than nonprofit work, especially pertaining to land conservation,” he says. “I’m motivated by the thought that if we succeed and get it right, then the land we’ve protected and continue to protect will benefit generations of Orange County residents.” The OCLT was established in 1993 by former Orange County Executive Louis V. Mills, who assembled a group of visionaries alarmed that the county’s “fields and farms were being swallowed up by development,” notes Jean Wort, of Fort Montgomery, one of the trust’s original board members. Since then, the OCLT, which will celebrate 25 years in 2018, has become “the voice of, and a catalyst for, private conservation of land in Orange County,” according to the organization’s current five-year plan. Property owners who want to preserve their land frequently turn to the organization for advice, and the group has greatly expanded its outreach to local communities and businesses. “We’ve [become] much more professional,” confirms Stuart Turner, a professional planner and OCLT Board


In my opinion, a non-profit can’t survive and flourish if it isn’t willing to be entrepreneurial, and on occasion take a calculated risk. —Jim Delaune

President. Warwick farmer William Brown, OCLT’s Vice President, adds that the trust’s activity and expertise has increased considerably in the last half dozen years. Since its first land acquisition in 1995 (now a 60-acre public nature preserve), the OCLT has protected nearly 6,000 acres of farmland, forests, wetlands, wildlife corridors and threatened animal and plant habitat. As of September 2017, the OCLT holds 32 easements for 2,591 acres of land and owns 14 properties with 1,449 acres, including preserves open to the public. It has fostered recreation, worked to preserve the quality of drinking water and collaborated on an ongoing multi-year effort to fill gaps in a projected open-space corridor from Storm King, on the Hudson River near West Point, to Sterling Forest, a beautiful and environmentally significant mountainous sub-region that extends from southern Orange County into New Jersey. The OCLT has adopted a strategy that allows it to act quickly to protect property from an imminent threat: It purchases the threatened property, manages it for a few years, then transfers it to the state as an addition to a larger preserve. The trust also helps monitor and manage easements held by other entities, as it does with the Open Space Institute for 11,000 acres of farmland in the Town of Warwick. More attention is being paid to conservation, since demand for land from developers has slowed in the wake of the recession, but trust officials say much more remains to be done. “We’ve become inundated with inquiries from landowners regarding conservation easements, especially DECdec 2017 – FEBfeb2018 2017– 2018 VALLEYTABLE valleytable..COM com

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from the farm community,” Delaune says. “Our staff works in overdrive to do more with less. There’s no doubt in my mind that if we had greater funds, we could increase staff capacity, pursue more projects and, in the end, conserve more land before it’s gone for good.” To accomplish its goals, the trust’s strategic plan is to increase the pace of conservation. Its efforts have resulted in a 25 percent increase in the amount of protected acreage in the county in 2016. OCLT Director of Acquisition and Stewardship Matt Decker says there are currently about 20 projects at varying stages of review pending. (A rough rule of thumb used by conservation professionals is that one project in 10 may bear fruit.) The land trust initially was a volunteer organization, and it still has about 85 volunteers, some of whom help monitor the nature preserves and assist in clean-ups and trail maintenance. But it now has four full-time staff and one part-timer. The additional staff has “really upped our game,” Delaune says, specifically noting the successful completion of a rigorous accreditation process in 2014. He says it is the trust’s “mark of distinction.” “Now we take a more sophisticated approach and gauge success in the sustainable farmland we protect and the linkages we provide for wildlife to move along the landscape and recreational trails for people. We look at the quality of the transaction as opposed to pure acreage protected,” Delaune explains. One way that land conservation entities like the Orange County Land Trust continue to reach their goals despite

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limited resources is through partnerships. The OCLT has successfully partnered with the Open Space Institute, Scenic Hudson, the American Farmland Trust, the Black Rock Forest Consortium and the New York-New Jersey Trail Conference, among others. In one instance, the OCLT turned to a small donated acquisition fund to join with the Open Space Institute and the Trail Conference (the “big dogs,” Delaune calls them) to purchase 435 acres of forest at the southern end of the Shawangunk Ridge in western Orange County. The land eventually was added to the state forest preserve. “If I had to put my finger on the one thing I do well,” Delaune admits, “it’s recognizing strengths in people and putting folks together when it’s evident to me that each party has something to offer. In my opinion, a non-profit can’t survive and flourish if it isn’t willing to be entrepreneurial, and on occasion take a calculated risk.” Terrence Nolan, the Open Space Institute’s Senior Vice President for Conservation Acquisitions, who frequently works with the trust, says Delaune is an “excellent matchmaker and very creative. I don’t feel a sense of competition—I feel a sense of partnership.” The land trust also enjoys a level of support and a relationship with the Orange County government that is unique in conservation circles. The county reimburses the land trust for staff time and transaction costs on joint projects, according to Orange County Planning Commissioner David Church. That amounted to $58,892 in 2015, 13 percent of the land trust’s annual budget.


Jim Delaune

Historically, farms have shaped Orange County’s landscape and way of life, but the percentage of land farmed in the county has plunged from 75 percent in the early twentieth century to only around 17 percent today. In the two decades before the establishment of the land trust, the number of farms declined to 641 from 891, according to a county report. Preserved farmland in the county currently totals 7,790 acres; the OCLT is responsible for more than 2,000 acres, 49 percent of the land it owns or holds easements on. According to its plan, the land trust’s “top conservation goal is the preservation of working farms,” which Delaune calls the “most precious” of the county’s open land. Highest priority for protection goes to land with high-quality soils and sufficient acreage to support commercial farming. However, the trust is interested in doing more than preserving empty land—its goal is to keep the land active by producing food on it. “We want to ensure that there is a critical mass of good farmland to support an agricultural industry in Orange County and that the land remains affordable and in the hands of farmers,” Decker stresses. Sponsors welcomed the Windfall Farms arrangement because Pitts is committed to working with young farmers, who often have difficulty finding affordable land to farm. In fact, Pitts would like to scale down his workload and attract more neophyte farmers to lease parts of his farm. The easement the OCLT helped negotiate is unusual in that it permits tenants to build equity by installing new infrastructure on the land they lease. Jim Oldham, Executive Director of Massachusetts-based Equity Trust, is working with Pitts, the OCLT and the New York City-based Greenmarket to plan the farm’s future. He

says that the farm could transition into a “shared ownership” sometime in the future. Similarly, Equity Trust is collaborating with the OCLT and Scenic Hudson to add an “affordable” wrinkle to an easement currently being negotiated on a 197acre farm in Mount Hope. The land is being farmed by a young couple who sell their produce and meat in nearby Otisville. They want to buy the farm, but it would be unaffordable without an attached easement (held by the land trust) that would require them to keep farming, to sell only to another farmer if their plans change and to use agricultural values in the transaction. The OCLT has received a $300,298 state grant for the easement. Scenic Hudson will contribute $105,582 and Equity Trust about $200,000. Deals of this type are common in New England but are very rare in New York. It could be a model for future Orange County Land Trust transactions. Delaune says the Orange County Land Trust’s conservation strategy “has evolved from both the top down and the bottom up. We’re pretty scrappy and ‘no frills’—that is to say, the staff and board provide a high level of creativity, energy and problem solving. We are hitting our stride and I see great things in our future. I’m pretty sure that Lou Mills would be very proud of where we are today and our outlook for tomorrow.” 4 Orange County Land Trust 50 Ogden Dr, New Windsor (845) 534-3690; OCLT.org PHOTO CREDITS: Page 35 (Hunter Farm Preserve) Tom Bushey Page 36 bottom (Windfall Farms) OCLT Page 37 bottom (Moonbeams Preserve) Angelo Marcialis Page 38 (Clove Brook Farm) Jeannne Cimorelli All photos above courtesy OCLT Page 37 top and this page: Jerry Novesky 2017– feb2018 2018 VALLEYTABLE valleytable. COM com DECdec 2017 – FEB

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3

pasta

A

by leslie coons bostian photos by meghan spiro

lt h o u g h i t m a k e s

a good story, Marco Polo didn’t introduce noodles from China to Italy. People in the Mediterranean were eating pasta long before the explorer and merchant from medieval Venice stepped foot in China. While wheat was first grown in the Mediterranean, most food historians agree that noodles were initially made in China some time before 200 bce, according to Harold McGee’s On Food and Cooking. China and other Far East cultures originated a number of different

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traditional pasta or noodle dishes, including wontons, potstickers and filled dumplings. In Italy, postmedieval pasta makers formed guilds and were responsible for an evolution of the dish, according to McGee, who says they first prepared the distinctive style of pasta where it is served as the main component of a dish but not drowned in sauce, soup or stew. Most countries and cultures can now claim some kind of traditional pasta or noodle dish. Germany, for example, has spaetzle, Russia pelmeny, Poland pierogi,

Mongolia bansh and Mexico fideos. Regardless of its point of entry and despite its many incarnations, pasta remains one of the most ubiquitous and recognizable foods on the planet. Essentially, it is a mixture of flour (often wheat), water (or olive oil), and (usually) eggs—a combination that makes an affordable, approachable, comfortable food that is sometimes even considered a convenience food. Thanks to some local chefs who offer it fresh and handmade, pasta in the Hudson Valley can offer an amazing dining experience.


REDWOOD BAR + RESTAURANT

The “flavor-forward, modern, approachable” menu at the Redwood Bar + Restaurant in Kingston includes pasta dishes from different cultures. “Not being Italian, I am detached from cultural associations with it, so I also think of ramen and Chinese noodles as pasta,” chefowner Sean Tompkins says. “Pasta is hot, plentiful, customizable, full of tastes and textures—pasta is one of my favorite foods, from long before I started cooking.” Redwood’s menu includes lamb farfalle with merguez, ras el hanout, ricotta, peas and saffron; spicy vegetable ramen with smoked tofu, beech mushroom, bok choy, sprouts and an egg; and soup dumplings with braised pork, ginger and cabbage. “I started in the Hudson Valley as a cook when I was a lot younger, and, to be honest, the level of food at that time wasn’t optimal,” Tompkins says. “Then I went to Westchester to work with a chef from Sicily—I thought I would learn about pasta, but I didn’t.” He didn’t really understand the art of making pasta until he went to work in an Italian restaurant where “every pasta dish on the menu was made fresh, in house. I learned by making 10 pounds of dough a day.” Then a stint at a Mediterranean restaurant found him making “50 pounds of just fettuccine a week.” Tompkins now has a kitchen staff of four at Redwood, which he opened with Kelly and Scott Polston in 2016, but he generally makes all the pasta himself. “I need it to be clean-edged. I am very precise about the shapes and size, just very technical about it.”

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LIBERT Y STREET BISTRO

With a focus on classic Frenchinfluenced cuisine, Liberty Street Bistro in Newburgh has quickly gained a reputation that draws customers from well outside the Newburgh area. “When we did the menu for the bistro, opening a ‘destination’ restaurant—a restaurant with that reputation—wasn’t my intention,” chef-owner Michael Kelly says of his contemporary American restaurant. Pasta always is on the menu, but one day a week it comes to the forefront. Kelly offers “Pasta Monday,” a weekly dining event that “evolved out of the fact that our main dinner menu is pretty large, perhaps even somewhat intimidating. So we scaled it back and made the menu more approachable for that night,” he says. Scaled back, maybe, but definitely not oversimplified. Monday’s menu includes dishes such as barigoule artichoke tagliatelle with a poached fried egg and black pepper; and porchetta and pappardelle with acorn squash, beech mushroom and chicken apple jus. Dylan Ruiz (shown at right) has worked at Liberty Street Bistro since it opened, and Kelly credits him with much of the success of the restaurant's pasta program. ”He is one of the better (pasta makers) in the Hudson Valley,” Kelly says. Kelly grew up in nearby Cornwall, graduated from the Culinary Institute of America, and then moved to New York City, where he worked in Thomas Keller’s Bouchon Bakery, Gordon Ramsay’s Gordon Ramsay at the London Hotel, and Markus Glocker’s Bâtard. He opened Liberty Street Bistro in 2016. The kitchen has five chefs in addition to Kelly (“Only one less station than a fine-dining kitchen in New York City would have,” he stresses). Everyone stays busy. “We all enjoy making pasta and I like teaching new techniques,” he says. “New customers gravitate toward the familiar, like ravioli. We try to guide them to some other things. Kelly’s pasta epiphany came when he was working in local restaurants, before he attended culinary school.

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He bought a copy of Keller’s French Laundry Cookbook. “The book is sort of a bible to a lot of people in the industry—there is a whole section in there on pasta. Then I went to culinary school and made some pasta. I went out in the workforce for people like Gordon Ramsay and I made a ton of pasta. Making pasta—once you get used to it, it becomes second nature.” A customer favorite is agnolotti filled with mascarpone—according

to Kelly, “Filled pastas are where the real talent shows through— anything filled and then served with a light acidic sauce.” The Liberty Street Bistro menu offers a very rich, pressurized butter sauce (an emulsified butter sauce that is ejected onto the plate from a canister) that is a crowd pleaser. The sauce is key, Kelly says. “Pasta is a vehicle for the sauce,” he laughs. “You wouldn’t have pasta without sauce.”


MERCATO OSTERIA ENOTECA

Native Italian Francesco Buitoni really understands pasta. He came to New York and worked at San Domenico on Central Park South and as sommelier at Mario Batali’s Otto. In the Hudson Valley, he cooked at Stony Creek in Tivoli and Ca’Mea in Hudson before opening his Red Hook restaurant, Mercato Osteria Enoteca, in 2006. (Francesco is a seventh-generation pasta maker in, yes, that Buitoni family—the one that started making pasta commercially in 1827.) Though the Buitoni name is well known for its packaged pasta, in his restaurant Buitoni serves up fresh, handmade pasta, a skill he learned from his grandmother. “I have been making pasta since I was a little kid. I learned from her so much,” he says. For making pasta dough, Buitoni says the little things mean a lot. Buitoni’s grandmother “always used fresh eggs from the farm—and I use this little farm for years for eggs. I buy whatever they have. Eggs are very important in pasta—it is very important that they be fresh. The dough—it is all tactile, there is no science behind it. It is trial and error. It’s like making bread—once you get it, you get it.” At Mercato, Buitoni’s dough is rolled out in a machine. “We make sheets of pasta dough,” he notes, explaining that the sheets are used to handcraft the various pastas that will be on the menu that day. The Mercato menu features fresh pasta dishes such as penne all’arrabiata with tomato, pancetta, Calabrian chilies, Hudson Valley cream and chives; and tufolli alla bolognese with a traditional ragu of veal, beef, pork and prosciutto di Parma. 4 Redwood Bar + Restaurant 63 North Front Street, Kingston 845-259-5868; redwooduptown.com Mercato Osteria Enoteca 61 East Market Street, Red Hook 845-758-5879; mercatoredhook.com Liberty Street Bistro 97 Liberty Street, Newburgh 845-562-3900; libertystreetbistro.com

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PASTA ALLA GENOVESE SEAN TOMPKINS / REDWOOD Ingredients 6 pounds onions, peeled, blanched, julienned as thin as possible 2 cloves garlic, sliced 1/4 cup olive oil 1 pound veal shanks 1/2 rack pork ribs 8 ounces pork skin salt and pepper, to taste 1 tablespoon tomato paste 1 cup white wine 2 fresh bay leaves 1 cup milk 1 cup cherry tomatoes Parmigiano Reggiano (2 to 4 years old) serves 10 Method 1. Place olive oil in sauce pot on medium high heat. Sear veal and pork until brown. 2. Add tomato paste and lower heat to just below medium. 3. Cook tomato paste until it begins to darken. then add white wine and cook until tomato paste thickens. 4. Add onions, garlic and remaining ingredients and cook covered over low to medium heat until the onions have melted into the sauce. The sauce should be thick and orange with no visible onions. 5. Remove all bones from sauce. Season with salt and pepper to taste. Sliced cherry tomatoes and Parmigiano Reggiano may be added right before plating the dish. Serve with large extruded noodles such as paccheri or rigatoni. (For paccheri, serve eight noodles per person.)

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Chef Sean Tompkins makes Pasta alla Genovese frequently at home, and his family loves it. The dish is from Napoli, named after the merchants who brought it from Genoa. Using meat cuts with bones will add significant flavor to the sauce. Pork or beef shanks may be used in place of the veal. The pork skin is important; gelatin may be used instead. (Gelatins vary in strength—use 6 to 10 grams of silver 160 bloom for this dish.)


AGNOLOTTI MICHAEL KELLY / LIBERTY STREET BISTRO Ingredients PASTA

17 egg yolks 1 whole egg 1 tablespoon extra virgin olive oil zest of 3 lemons 1 teaspoon kosher salt 7 cups (800 grams) OO flour Combine the eggs, olive oil, lemon zest and salt.

AGNOLOTTI MASCARPONE FILLING

6 medium russet potatoes, whole 1 3/4 cup mascarpone cheese 3 lemons, juiced 1/4 cup butter salt to taste

Method PASTA

1. On a flat surface, create a flour well (resembling a donut) with a cavity in the center for the egg mixture. Mix the wet ingredients with fingers, slowly incorporating small amount of flour into the wet ingredients. The mixture will begin to thicken and get stickier. When you can pick up the wet ball of dough, begin to knead in the remaining flour. 2. Continue to knead the dough for approximately 10 minutes in order to develop gluten, which provides texture and resiliency to the dough. It should be feel dense and smooth when finished. 3. Allow the dough to rest at least an hour, but preferably overnight, wrapped tightly in plastic and refrigerated. FILLING

Preheat oven to 350˚F 1. Puncture potatoes with a fork and roast in 350˚F oven for approximately 1 hour. Once potatoes are cooked, peel away skin using a paring knife. Pass the potatoes through either a potato ricer or a fine mesh sieve to refine their texture. 2. In a mixing bowl, using a rubber spatula fold together the mascarpone, lemon, butter and salt with the potatoes. Pack the filling into a piping bag with a large piping tip (about 5/8 inch).

Making pasta—once you get used to it, it becomes second nature.

AGNOLOTTI

1. Unwrap the dough and flatten out into a sheet. Continually feed the sheet through your pasta machine while decreasing the opening size each time you put the dough through. When finished, you should have a very thin sheet of pasta, just barely translucent and equal in width the whole length of the sheet. (The dough can be rolled out by hand using a large roller but this method is not recommended.) 2. To form agnolotti, cut the sheet into 3-foot lengths, covering the pieces not being used with a towel to prevent them from drying. With the sheet laid horizontally, pipe a thick bead of filling across the the whole length of the sheet, leaving about half an inch of dough under the bead. 3. Using either water or egg-wash, paint a 1-inch stripe above the bead of filling. Then, using two hands and working from right to left, slowly lift the bottom flap over the filling and onto the painted egg-wash above. Do this the whole length of pasta, then take your thumb and tuck the dough tightly next to the filling down the whole tube. Using your middle finger and thumb on both hands, pinch off 1-inch sections of pasta to begin to form the agnolotti. Ensure that you pinch tightly to create a good seal. 4. Using a fluted pasta wheel, cut along the top seamed edge you created earlier above the tube. Then firmly cut through the pinched sections of the tube so that the top edge of the pinch and the top edge of the tube come together and seal. When complete, the pasta should resemble a stuffed pillow case. Cook the pasta 2 to 3 minutes in generously salted boiling water. Serve with a slightly acidic brown butter sauce, shaved truffles and Parmesan.

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ROLL YOUR OWN

Making pasta at home can be an enjoyable project that yields delicious results. Numerous recipes and how-to videos can be found online, in books and magazines, and packaged with new pasta machines. Most of them use all-purpose flour, water or olive oil, and often, eggs. Some chefs use farina or durum flour; both chefs who shared pasta recipes for this article recommend using 00 flour. Francesco Buitoni, chef-owner of Mercato Osteria Enoteca in Red Hook, recommends using one of the many pasta machines available for home use. His grandmother cut pasta by hand at her home in Italy, but that is a much harder process. Hand-cranked pasta makers usually are sturdy, metal, manual machines, priced anywhere from $25 to $150. They come in different sizes and widths, which should be considered when deciding how much and what type of pasta you want to make. One part of the machine uses steel or aluminum rollers to flatten and stretch the dough. Another part uses cutters to turn the dough into spaghetti, fettuccine, and the like. (You also can bypass the cutters and just fill the flattened dough sheets to make ravioli.) There are motorized pasta machines that cost from several hundred to several thousand dollars, and there are pasta rollers and cutters that attach to kitchen devices such as KitchenAid stand mixers. There literally are dozens of different pasta shapes used with various fillings and sauces. (The National Pasta Association’s dictionary of pasta shapes at pastafits.org/pasta-dictionary, may be helpful.) Buitoni offers this modern advice to home cooks looking for information on how to shape their pasta: “Look on YouTube. There are videos now that show you how to do it.” To shape pasta at home by hand, “You need a larger rolling pin and a good-size table,” Buitoni says. “You need practice--to get the dough really thin is hard. My grandmother, she made it look effortless.” Above all, to make really good pasta, “you have to be attentive,” Buitoni stresses. “It really is a thing of hand. It is hard to teach. There is definitely a lot to learn but you can never buy a store-bought pasta, even fresh, that is as good as homemade.” Buitoni has supplied a tutorial for creating the pasta to accompany his winter mare e monti (sea and mountain) sauce.

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WINTER MARE E MONTI FRANCESCO BUITONI / MERCATO OSTERIA Ingredients 2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil 2 medium garlic cloves, slightly crushed 8 ounces medium shrimp (wild), cleaned, deveined and cut crosswise 8 ounces shiitake and oyster mushrooms (or your favorite variety), sliced (option: 4 ounces dried mushrooms) 1/2 cup white wine 8 ounces butternut squash, cut in 1-inch cubes, tossed in olive oil and salt and pepper to taste, and roasted in a 450˚F oven for 20 minutes. (May be made in advance but make extra because you’ll end up sneaking pieces to eat while you cook.) 8 ounces lacinato kale, center rib removed. Blanch in boiling water for 30 seconds; roughly chop after blanching salt and freshly cracked pepper, to taste 1/4 teaspoon wild fennel pollen 1/2 cup shrimp stock (use shells from shrimp and mushroom stems) (Option: chicken or vegetable stock) 1/2 tablespoon extra virgin olive oil, to finish 1 tablespoon good cultured butter, to finish additional stock if needed for consistency of sauce (or use water that pasta was cooked in) pappardelle pasta serves 4 Method 1. Heat olive oil in large sauté pan, add 2 garlic cloves and sear 20 seconds per side, giving garlic no more than a slight blonde hue. 2. Add the shrimp and mushrooms, sautée 1 minute, stirring so shrimp cooks on both sides. 3. Add white wine and let the alcohol evaporate for about 30 seconds. 4. Add butternut squash and kale and cook 1 minute. 5. Sprinkle with salt, pepper and fennel pollen to taste and cook 1 more minute. 6. Add the stock and stir a few times, then turn heat off (make sure shrimp are cooked). 7. Add 1/2 tablespoon extra virgin olive oil, hot fresh pasta and butter. Toss.


FRESH PASTA TUTORIAL FRANCESCO BUITONI / MERCATO OSTERIA Tools needed bench scraper (optional) wide rolling pin sharp knife pasta machine Ingredients 3 1/2 cups 00 pasta flour 4 medium eggs, preferably from free-running hens 1 1/2 teaspoons extra virgin olive oil 1/2 teaspoon kosher or sea salt flour and semolina, for dusting Method 1. Place flour in middle of table or in a large bowl. Make a “well” in the flour and crack 4 eggs into the center. 2. Add olive oil and salt, then beat all ingredients carefully to keep them within the well. 3. Once all are combined, slowly and gradually bring in the flour from the inside part of the well, trying not to break the flour wall. The mass will start to build in about 3 minutes. 4. Using a scraper or your hands, fold all ingredients together. Remove any dried-out pieces of dough that may still be on the work surface and begin to knead dough as you would bread dough. (If using a bowl, just use your hands to mix ingredients; once the dough comes together, remove it from the bowl and place on a hard work surface. Add water if the dough seems dry and too stiff.) 5. Knead for about 10 minutes. 6. Form dough into a ball and wrap in plastic, making sure it is sealed well. Let rest at room temperature for 30 minutes. 7. Unwrap dough and flatten it with your hands as if you were making a pizza. The dough must be thin enough to go through the pasta machine. 8. Run the sheet through the pasta machine repeatedly, making the sheet thinner each time until reaching the machine’s second-to-last setting (usually a number 2 on the dial). Dust both sides of the sheet with flour after each run. Once the pasta is the correct thickness, you are ready to cut it into the desired shape. (The recipe for Winter Mare e Monti Sauce calls for pappardelle.) You’ll have one long pasta ribbon, which you’ll need to cut into sections in order for the sheet to feed properly through the appropriate cutter available for your machine. Adjustments may be slightly different for each machine. Once you’ve cut all the pasta, sprinkle it with a little flour and semolina and set it aside. No pasta machine? “If rolling the dough by hand—good luck,” Buitoni notes. “Just keep going until the dough reaches the thickness of a manila folder.” You’ll end up with one large circular disk. Flour it well and begin to roll it (but not too tight) until you end up with what looks like a giant fruit rollup, he says. Using a sharp knife, cut the pasta to the desired width, starting at one end and working to the other end of roll. Then unravel the pasta ribbons and dust with flour and semolina to prevent sticking and to help the drying process. When ready to plate the dish, plunge the fresh pasta in a large pot of boiling salted water. Cook for about 3 minutes and serve with your favorite sauce. —LCB

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2017– feb 2018

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HRYN’S T A R CATTuscan Y H N Grill ’’SS’S R R Y Y H H N N T T C A A Grill CC TTuscan TuscanGrill Grill uscan

OUT WITH THE OLD, IN WITH THE NEW! W NO N! E P O

Serving Lunch & Dinner Daily Serving Dinner Prix & Fixe Serving Lunch Lunch & Dinner Daily Daily Serving Lunch & Dinner Daily Serving Lunch & Dinner Daily SparklingPrix Sunday Brunch Fixe Prix Fixe 3 pm Noon–

Prix FixeBrunch Fixe Sparkling Sunday SparklingPrix Sunday Brunch 3 Sparkling Noon– Sunday Brunch Sparkling Sunday 3 pm Noon– pmBrunch

3Lounge 3 pm pm with Wine BarNoon– &Noon– Cocktail Late Night Lounge Menu Available Wine Bar Bar & & Cocktail Cocktail Lounge Lounge with with Wine Late Night Lounge Menu Available Wine Bar & Cocktail Lounge Wine Bar & Cocktail Lounge withwith Late Night Lounge Menu Available 91Late Main Street, Cold Spring, NY Late Night Lounge Menu Available Night Lounge Menu Available 845.265.5582 91 91 Main Main Street, Street, Cold Cold Spring, Spring, NY NY “America’s 1,000 top Italian Restaurants” Zagat 845.265.5582 Main Street, Cold Spring, 91 91 Main Street, Cold Spring, NYNY 845.265.5582 845.265.5582 845.265.5582 “America’s 1,000 top Italian Restaurants” Zagat

“America’s 1,000 top Italian Restaurants” Zagat www.TuscanGrill.com “America’s 1,000 Italian Restaurants” Zagat “America’s 1,000 toptop Italian Restaurants” Zagat

www.TuscanGrill.com www.TuscanGrill.com www.TuscanGrill.com www.TuscanGrill.com

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Wine • Liquor • Cider • Mead 9 Hard Ciders on Tap Curated Selection of Wines & Spirits 50+ Organic and Sustainable Products 18 Westage Drive, Fishkill 1/4 mi north of I-84 on Rt. 9 Next to Hudson Buffet Boutique_Wines_Spirits

845.765.1555 boutiquewsc.com

BoutiqueWinesandSpirits


Whole sale fruit & Produce Where quality rules, local comes first and taste matters 217 UPPER NORTH ROAD, HIGHLAND • 845.691.7428 • FAX 845.691.7468

The key to your next mortgage is at Walden Savings Bank

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dec

2017–

feb

2018

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CANTERBURY BROOK INN ZAGAT RATED “EXTRAORDINARY”

Enjoy Delicious Craft Cocktails Made with our Award Winning Spirits in the Rustic Splendor of our Historic Grist Mill

Swiss Continental Cuisine $19.95 3-Course Dinner Tues–Thur Seasonal Fare • Catering Available 331 Main Street, Cornwall NY (845) 534-9658 www.canterburybrookinn.com HANS AND KIM BAUMANN, HOSTS

|

RESERVATIONS SUGGESTED

at the farm or table THE HUDSON VALLEY’S NEWEST FINE WINE AND SPIRITS STORE

A Wide Selection for All Your Holiday Gift Needs

• Holiday Gift Registry

• Corporate Gifts Tastefully wrapped and

delivered to your office. ($100 minimum with FREE* delivery & wrapping)

Something fresh is always growing in Westchester. Westchester County is a premiere dining destination with a robust menu of restaurants to satisfy every appetite. Whether you’re in the mood for breathtaking waterfront views, charming historic ambiance, sleek and modern new spaces or farm-to-table freshness, Westchester is a culinary gem in the Hudson Valley. Meet and explore Westchester County at VisitWestchesterNY.com

• Gift Packs To suit many different tastes and budgets.

Hostess Gifts Chanukah Gifts Stocking Stuffers

• Tasting Events From French

Champagne to Cocktails, and Big Burley Reds. Visit our website for a full listing of EVENTS or follow us on FB.

oday! Stop by T 1955 South Rd. South Road Square Poughkeepsie, NY

(Southbound, right after Poughkeepsie Galleria)

Mon: noon- 7:00pm, Tues.-Sat: 10-7pm Sun: noon -7:00pm

phone: 845.218.9672 MartasVineyardWine.com * Delivery rates may apply outside the general Poughkeepsie area.

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growing

OIL

T

HEY WERE BRIGHT YELLOW FACES STARING

up at the sky, basking in the sunshine, causing drivers to slam on their brakes and pull off the road. People piled out of their precariously parked cars, phones in hand, just to grab pictures. By autumn, the big sunflower faces, some almost a foot wide, are hunched over as if in mourning, standing like silent sentries at a cemetery. Five acres of sunflowers in the town of LaGrange (Dutchess County) became a field of dreams for brothers Jeff and Kevin Haight and their families, the owner/operators of Hudson Valley Cold Pressed Oils, one of only two

text and photos by david handschuh

DEC 2017 – FEB dec 2017– feb2018 2018 VALLEYTABLE valleytable..COM com

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sunflower oil producers in New York State. Their “corporate headquarters” is located on two farms totaling more than 300 acres that straddle Pleasant Valley and LaGrange. From the top of their hilly acreage you can see the Shawangunk Ridge and the Catskill Mountains on the other side of the Hudson, more than 25 miles away. Sunflower oil is commonly used as a biodiesel fuel, but Jeff and his wife Allison “thought it was a way better food product than a fuel product.” They realized that the taste, health benefits and high smoking point of sunflower oil made for a three-tiered bonanza just waiting to be harvested in the Hudson Valley. Kevin drives a large combine through acres of dead flowers in November after “four blackbirds appear in the field,” as an old superstition dictates. It takes about

It takes about one acre of sunflowers to make 100 gallons of oil, or 20 pounds of raw seed to make a gallon. one acre of sunflowers to make 100 gallons of oil, or 20 pounds of raw seed to make a gallon. The sunflowers are fed into a seed cleaner that removes the stems and other pieces of the head, leaving just clean seeds, which await pressing in two large gravity bins alongside the old barn. A stainless steel, food-grade cold press squeezes the shelled seeds without any need for added chemicals, giving a healthier, more natural oil. Only about a quarter of the seed is pressed into oil by this process; the remainder is extruded into high-protein pellets for livestock on neighboring farms that get this delicacy to supplement their grazing. The thick, unfiltered oil is golden toned, with tiny black bits of seed; once filtered, the oil will be its recognizable, clear yellow color with a rich, nutty taste. The Haights’ high-oleic sunflower oil has mono-unsaturated fat levels of 80 percent DEC

SEPT––FEB DEC2018 2017 2017

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and above and contains only 7 to 8 percent saturated fat (compared to coconut oil, which is 70 percent saturated fat). It’s also gluten-free, non-GMO, and is high in Omega 9 and high in vitamin E. Hudson Valley Cold Pressed Oils can be found locally at Adams in Poughkeepsie and Kingston, Duo Market, Taste NY, Walbridge Farm or online. Stop by the farm, by appointment, for a tour, and you might spot the two woodchucks that are their unofficial mascots. They make frequent guest appearances around the farm but don’t munch on the seeds. “They like flowers better,” Allison says. 4 Hudson Valley Cold Pressed Oils 235 Plass Rd, Pleasant Valley (845) 489-8368; hudsonvalleycoldpressedoils.com

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FARMS, FOOD & MARKETS

eat local all winter long

T

h e g r o w i n g s e a s o n m ay b e b e h i n d u s ,

but there still is plenty of good local eating to be had in the winter months ahead thanks to the farms, markets and CSAs extending their season through the coldest months of the year. This is the time when root vegetables reign supreme. Among the bushels of vibrant red beets, sweet carrots and purple potatoes, winter market-goers can find tender spinach, nutrient-rich winter greens, even corn and other tender vegetables (flash frozen in season). There will certainly be crisp apples

photo by eva deitch

as well as other fruits preserved (frozen, jammed or jellied) along with apple cider, maple syrup, honey, artisanal cheeses, breads, eggs, meats, dairy and even seafood. CSA stands for “Community Supported Agriculture.” Consumers pay a subscription fee in advance, then receive a changing weekly supply of the farm’s harvest. It’s a way for consumers to buy directly from a farmer in their community and to eat seasonally—even in winter. Visit valleytable.com for a list of farms offering winter shares this season.

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2017– feb 2018

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shop farmers’markets this winter COLUMBIA COUNTY Hudson Indoor Market Elks Lodge, 601 Union St, Hudson Sat 10-1; Dec, Feb-Apr hudsonfarmersmarketny.com

DUTCHESS COUNTY Amenia Farmers’ Market Town Hall, 4988 Rt 22, Amenia Sat 10-2; Nov-Apr ameniafarmersmarket.com

3074 Rte 9, Valatie, NY 12184 (518) 758-1776 • harvestspirits.com

Village Green

Markets

ANNOUNCES TWO NEW WINTER MARKETS!

FARMERS’ MARKET Dec. 9 - May 26 Saturdays, 9-1 925 South Street

&

FARMERS’ MARKET

Nov. 30 - April 26 Thursdays, 11-5 13-15 Boniface Circle

Local Farms incl Certified Organic • Meat • Poultry • Eggs • Fishmonger Breads & Baked Goods • Honey • Olive Oil • Cheese • Pickles & Olives Rotating Vendors • Prepared Foods • Artisans VillageGreenFarmersMarkets.com

Beacon Indoor Farmers’ Market American Legion/VFW Hall, 413 Main St, Beacon Sun 10-2; Dec 3-Apr 29 beaconfarmersmarket.org Hudson Valley Regional Farmers’ Market Hudson Valley Cerebral Palsy Association 15 Mount Ebo Rd S, Brewster Sun 10–2; year-round hudsonvalleyfarmersmarket.org Millerton Indoor Farmers’ Market Methodist Church Corner Dutchess and Main St, Millerton Sat 10-2; Nov 4-Dec 23 2nd & 4th Sat; Jan 6-Apr 28 millertonfarmersmarket.org Poughkeepsie—Vassar College Indoor Market College Center 129 Raymond Ave, Poughkeepsie Thu 10-4, Nov-May sustainability.vassar.edu/campus-initiatives/ indoor-farmers-market/

We Have Your Holiday Seafood Needs Covered! Ask About Our Catering & Platters

Angus Beef, Poultry, Pork, Lamb, Turkeys

Naturally Raised Seasonal Produce Fresh Seafood Arriving Daily • Wholesale & Retail

Visit our Farm Market 1697 Salt Point Turnpike • Salt Point, NY 12578 266-5042 or 266-3680

#HudsonValleysFishMonger

HudsonValleySeafood.com • 30 Valley Ave • Central Valley, NY • 845-928-9678 56

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www.HahnFarm.com


Red Hook-Hudson Valley Farmers’ Market Greig Farm 229 Pitcher Ln, Red Hook Sat 10-3, year-round greigfarm.com/hudson-valley-farmers-market.html Rhinebeck Winter Market Town Hall, 80 E Market St, Rhinebeck Sun 10-2; Dec-Apr rhinebeckfarmersmarket.com

ORANGE COUNTY Cornwall Farmers’ Market Munger Cottage Community Room, 40 Munger Dr, Cornwall 2nd Sat 10:30-1:30; Dec 9, Jan 13, Feb 10, Mar 10 cornwallny.com/Departments/Farmers-Market

Come taste how delicious Hudson Valley cherries can be… …And while you are here try the vodka, whiskey and gins too! www.stoutridge.com Friday-Sunday 11-6 (845) 236-7620 10 Ann Kaley Lane Marlboro, NY 12542

Monroe Winter Farmers’ Market Museum Village, Monroe 3rd Sun, 12-4; Dec 17, Jan 21, Feb 18, Mar 18 (845) 238-2366 farmmarkettemplate.com Warwick Winter Farmers’ Market 115 Liberty Corners Rd, Pine Island Sun 10-2; Nov 26-May 6 (845) 258-4998

PUTNAM COUNTY Cold Spring Indoor Farmers’ Market Parish Hall, Episcopal Church of St. Mary-in-the-Highlands 1 Chestnut St, Cold Spring Sat 9:30-1:30; Nov-Apr csfarmmarket.org

ROCKLAND COUNTY Nyack Winter Farmers’ Market Nyack Center, 58 Depew Ave, Nyack Thu 8-2; Dec-Apr nyack-ny.gov/nyack-winter-farmers-market

GRASS FED • PASTURE RAISED

Beef • Pork • Lamb • Goat • Chicken • Eggs Animal Welfare Approved WINTER SALE HOURS Thursdays 3 - 6pm • Beginning 11/16 Pick up at our farm office or order online. FULL & HALF WINTER MEAT SHARES NOW AVAILABLE! glynwood.org/buy-our-products 845.265.3338

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2017– feb 2018

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Palisades Indoor Winter Farmers’ Market Palisades Community Center 675 Oak Tree Rd, Palisades Sat 9-1; Jan 14-May 20 palisadesfm.org The SOUK in Piermont The OUTSIDE IN, 249 Ferdon Ave, Piermont Sun 11-3; Jan 7-Mar 25 theoutside.in/thesouk

SULLIVAN COUNTY Callicoon Indoor Farmers’ Market Delaware Youth Center 8 Creamery Rd, Callicoon Sun 11-2; Nov-Apr callicoonfarmersmarket.org

ULSTER COUNTY

Brand New Farm Store Open 7 Days!

Kingston Farmers’ Market Old Dutch Church, 272 Wall St, Kingston Alternate Sat 10–2; Dec 2-Apr 21 kingstonfarmersmarket.org Rosendale Winter Farmers’ Market Rosendale Recreation Center 1055 Rt 32, Rosendale 2nd and 4th Sun 10-2; Dec-Apr rosendalefarmersmarketny.com

WESTCHESTER COUNTY

PASTURE-RAISED MEATS Mon-Sat 9-6|Thurs 9-7|Sun 9-2 Family farming in Westchester, NY since 1939

Cortlandt Manor, NY 914-737-2810|hemlockhillfarm.com

Chappaqua Farmers’ Market Chappaqua Train Station, Allen Pl Sat 9-1; Dec 2, 9, 16 First Congregational Church 210 Orchard Ridge Rd Sat 9-1; Jan 6, Feb 3 chappaquafarmersmarket.org Gossett’s Farm Market Gossett Brothers Nursery 1202 Rt 35, South Salem Sat 9-1; year-round gossettbrothers.com

“Baked & Grown, Just Like Home”

FARMSTEAD CHEESES

Jones Farm & Country Store

Clearwaters Distinctive Gifts

Grandma Phoebe’s Kitchen

Clearwaters Gallery & Custom Framing

Homegrown Seasonal Produce Local & Gourmet Foods Homemade Baked Goods Fudge & Gift Baskets Breakfast & Lunch Cafe

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Fine Gifts, Home Decor, Toys, Ladies Clothing & Accessories

Archival Framing

Artwork by Terri A. Clearwater

2017– feb 2018

190 Angola Rd. Cornwall, NY 845-534-4445(P) • 845-534-4471(F) www.JonesFarmInc.com Mon & Wed - Fri: 8-6 • Sat & Sun: 8-5 Closed Tuesdays

GRASS FED COWS • RAW MILK HAND MADE • 100% SOLAR POWERED LOCALLY MADE IN GOSHEN, NY 5SPOKECREAMERY.COM


Hastings-on-Hudson Winter Farmers’ Market Hastings-on-Hudson Public Library 7 Maple Ave Sat 9-1; Dec 2, 16 James Harmon Community Center 44 Main St Sat 9-1; Jan 6, 20; Feb 3, 17 hastingsfarmersmarket.org

Extreme integrity. This store offers some of the best food in the entire world! Beautiful, local Biodynamic ® selection. ~ JEFF B.

Irvington Winter Market Main St. School Auditorium, 101 Main St 2nd & 4th Sat 9-1; Dec 9, 23; Jan 13, 27; Feb 10, 24 irvmkt.org Mamaroneck Winter Down-to-Earth Farmers’ Market St. Thomas Episcopal Church, 168 W Boston Post Rd, Mamaroneck Sat 9-1; Jan 6-Apr 14 downtoearthmarkets.com Ossining Down-to-Earth Farmers’ Market Near Main & Spring Streets, Ossining Sat 9-1; Jan 6-Apr 14 downtoearthmarkets.com Peekskill Farmers’ Market 925 South Street, Peekskill Sat 9-1; Dec 9-May 26 villagegreenfarmersmarkets.com Pleasantville Indoor Farmers’ Market Pleasantville Middle School, 40 Romer Ave, Pleasantville Sat 9-1; Dec 6-Mar 24 pleasantvillefarmersmarket.org Scarsdale Farmers’ Market Thur 11-5; Nov 30-Apr 26 13-15 Boniface Circle, Scarsdale villagegreenfarmersmarkets.com

F O R A L L Y O U R W I N T E R + H O L I D AY S H O P P I N G N E E D S

ORGANIC TURKEY: ORDER ONLINE & PICK UP IN STORE O P E N D A I LY 7 : 3 0 A M - 7 P M • H V F S T O R E . O R G

Market at Todd Hill Store Open

Store Open Mon, Wed, Thu: 8 AM - 6 PM Mon, Wed, Thu, Sat: 8 AM - 6 PM Fri: 8 AM - 8 PM Fri: 8 AM - 8 PM | Sun: 9 AM - 7 PM Sat, Sun: 9 AM - 7 PM Closed on Tuesday

Contact us at: 845-849-0247 tastenytoddhill.com

Closed on Tuesday

An amazing collection of foods and products grown or made in the Hudson Valley. Located on the Taconic Parkway, 10 miles north of I-84, 1 mile south of Route 55, Lagrange, NY

valleytable.com for updates

Grass-fed Beef & Lamb Pastured Pork Raised naturally on Warwick’s LOWLAND FARM

On-Farm Store: Open Saturdays 10 - 3 Enter at 32 Prices Switch Road (845) 461-3459 info@lowlandfarm.com Warwick, NY 10990

dec

2017– feb 2018

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“Don’t Miss!” - NY Times

Jan’s Kids Dining Loft Kids eat & play while you dine! For Kids Loft Reservations: 914.255.5414

@_ramiros954 954 Rt. 6 Mahopac | ramiros954.com | 845.621.3333

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AU T H E N T I C C R OAT IA N C U I S I N E . FARM TO TABLE | FRESH FISH & SEAFOOD DAILY | ORGANIC FARM RAISED MEATS ORGANIC WINES AVAILABLE | CRAFT COCKTAILS

D U B R O V N I K R E S TAU R A N T CALL FOR RESERVATIONS OR BOOK YOUR EVENT (914) 637-3777 721 MAIN STREET | NEW ROCHELLE 10801 | www.dubrovnikny.com

Gourmet Bakery Bakery specializing specializing in in local, local, Gourmet Gourmet Bakery specializing in local, seasonal and gluten free. free. Gourmet Bakery specializing in local, seasonal and gluten Gourmet Bakery specializing in local, seasonal andny gluten gluten free. seasonal and 418 main street, beacon, 12508 • tel: free. 1.845.765.8502 seasonal and gluten free. 418 main street, beacon, ny 12508 • tel: 1.845.765.8502 Gourmet Bakery specializing in local, ellasbellasbeacon@gmail.com • 12508 www.ellasbellasbeacon.com 418 main street, beacon, ny • tel: 1.845.765.8502 ellasbellasbeacon@gmail.com www.ellasbellasbeacon.com 418 main street, beacon, ny• 12508 • tel: 1.845.765.8502 ellasbellasbeacon@gmail.com • www.ellasbellasbeacon.com 418 street, beacon, ny 12508 •• tel: 1.845.765.8502 seasonal and Gourmet Bakery specializing in local, ellasbellasbeacon@gmail.com www.ellasbellasbeacon.com 418 main main street, beacon, ny• gluten 12508 tel: free. 1.845.765.8502 ellasbellasbeacon@gmail.com •• www.ellasbellasbeacon.com ellasbellasbeacon@gmail.com www.ellasbellasbeacon.com Please visit our sister shop seasonal and 418 main street, beacon, ny gluten 12508 tel: free. 1.845.765.8502 Please visit our •sister shop Please visit our sister shop Ella’s Mercantile in the Catskills. ellasbellasbeacon@gmail.com • www.ellasbellasbeacon.com Please visit our sister shop Ella’s Mercantile in 1.845.765.8502 the Catskills. 418 main street, beacon, ny 12508 • tel: Please visit our sister shop Gourmet Bakery specializing in local, Ella’s Mercantile in the Catskills. Please visit our shop 124 bragg hallow rd.,sister halcottsville, ny 12438 Gourmet specializing in local, Ella’s Mercantile in the Catskills. E L L A’S Bakery ellasbellasbeacon@gmail.com • www.ellasbellasbeacon.com 124 bragg hallow rd., halcottsville, ny 12438 Ella’s Mercantile in the Catskills. 1.607.326.7713 • www.ellasmercantile.com E L L Aseasonal ’ S 1.607.326.7713 Ella’s Mercantile in the Catskills. and gluten free. 124 bragg hallow rd., halcottsville, ny 12438 12438 Please visit our shop ny • www.ellasmercantile.com E ’’SS 1.607.326.7713 124 bragg hallow rd.,sister halcottsville, and gluten free. E LL LL A Aseasonal • www.ellasmercantile.com 124 bragg hallow rd., halcottsville, ny 12438 M E R C A N T I L E

124 bragg hallow rd., halcottsville, ny 12438 1.607.326.7713 • www.ellasmercantile.com E LL 418 L ’SSstreet, Ella’s Mercantile in 1.845.765.8502 the Catskills. LA A main beacon, ny 12508 tel: 1.607.326.7713 www.ellasmercantile.com Please visit our ••sister shop 1.607.326.7713 •• www.ellasmercantile.com 418 main street, beacon, ny 12508 tel: 1.845.765.8502 • www.ellasbellasbeacon.com 124 bragg hallow rd., halcottsville, ny 12438 ellasbellasbeacon@gmail.com • www.ellasbellasbeacon.com Mercantile in the Catskills. Eellasbellasbeacon@gmail.com L L A’S Ella’s 1.607.326.6098 • www.ellasmercantile.com bragg hallow rd., halcottsville, ny 12438 E L L A’S 124 Please visit our sister shop 1.607.326.7713 • www.ellasmercantile.com M M M M M

E E E E E

R R R R R

C C C C C

A A A A A

N N N N N

T T T T T

II I II

L L L L L

E E E E E

M E R C A N T I L E M E R C A N T I L E

M E R C A N T I L E

M E R C A N T I L E

E E LL LL A A’’S S M E R C A N T I L E M E R C A N T I L E

Please visit our sister shop Ella’s Mercantile Ella’s Mercantile in in the the Catskills. Catskills. dec 2017– feb 2018 valleytable . com

61 124 bragg hallow rd., halcottsville, ny 12438 124 bragg hallow rd., halcottsville, ny 12438 1.607.326.7713 • www.ellasmercantile.com 1.607.326.7713 • www.ellasmercantile.com


62 ’tis the

E AT I N G B Y T H E S E A S O N

season XXX

cookies for

5

XXX

W

HETHER DUNKED INTO A GLASS

of milk while sitting fireside or enjoyed alongside a mug of hot cocoa on a snowy day, big batches of cookies always seem to be part of winter gatherings of friends or family. Few traditions have withstood the test of time quite like family cookie recipes. Passed from generation to generation, each new batch yields memories as rich as the decadent flavors that go into their making. Whether you make your own or let a pro make them for you, cookies really are a universal comfort food, especially around the holiday season. We asked a few Hudson Valley bakers to share their insights into just what it takes to craft the perfect holiday cookie.

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by catherine morba

VALLEY TABLE PHOTOS


4 2

1 3

Cardoso’s Cookies Cardoso’s Cookies develops seasonal cookie recipes to match every holiday, but the year-round, tried-and-true favorite is still its Ultimate Chocolate Chip Cookie. 1 The cookie earns its title from the successful collaboration of bittersweet, semisweet, white and milk chocolate chips. This unexpected spin on a classic combines the elements of festivity and tradition that are so unique to the holiday season. CIA graduate Anthony Cardoso makes a wide variety of cookies from scratch and uses local ingredients when possible (right down to the locally sourced jam in his Linzer Cookie and the caramel sauce in the Salted Caramel Chocolate Cookie). “There’s a lot of stress during the holiday season, and people like their guilty pleasures. Cookies are often on the top of that list,“ Cardoso says.

By The Way Bakery Like the snow that dusts the ground across the Hudson Valley in early winter, powdered sugar tops By The Way Bakery’s Almond Cookies. 2 Owner Helene Godin was inspired to create this deceptively simple and humblelooking cookie during a trip to Isatanbul, Turkey. Since then, the confection has enchanted cookie lovers on this side of the pond with its crunchy exterior and chewy interior. It is, in fact, one of the hardest cookies to keep in stock around

the holidays. Godin is dedicated to making gluten- and dairy-free sweets without compromising quality. “If it doesn’t taste as good or better than its conventional counterpart, we won’t sell it,” she says. The almond cookie is proof: With its unmistakably bold flavor and melt-in-your-mouth texture, it would never be suspected of lacking conventional ingredients. Godin believes that cookies are holiday staples because “you can make everyone happy with a single plate. You’re sure to make every person in the room smile when you put out a cookie platter.”

Frida’s Bakery + Café The bakers at Frida’s Bakery + Café pride themselves on paying homage to the community from which the bakery arose. Like most of their treats, the baking team at Frida’s came together to develop their signature Pignoli Cookie 3 by combining their own personal family recipes. Pignoli (a.k.a pine nuts) are traditional Italian cookies made with almond paste and chopped pine nuts. The cookie is rolled in more pine nuts before being baked to an exquisite golden brown. Frida’s pignoli cookies are among those timeless foods that literally drip with “family heritage” and nostalgia. “The people who live in this tiny hamlet are people we have known our entire lives,” baker Jordan Polumbo remarks. “When they come in, they expect that pignoli cookie in the case to taste like grandma’s pignoli.” DEC

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Ella’s Bellas Bakery The heat from the ginger and cloves in the Ginger Spice Cookie 4 from Ella’s Bellas is enough to warm you up on even the coldest winter day. A molasses-and-butter base gives the cookie its soft and chewy inner texture, while the cinnamon-sugar dusting finishes off the cookie with just a hint of added sweetness. Like all the gluten-free baked goods offered at Ella’s Bellas, owner Carley Hughes developed her recipe based on a “rule of three” philosophy, which maintains that only after three tries can a recipe reach its fullest potential. The holiday season is certainly an appropriate time to put the extra effort in to create a perfect batch of cookies. “A lot of families take that time to get together and make more labor-intensive cookies,” Hughes reasons. “People do things—take the extra step—just to spend more time together as a family.”

Lavender Bakery Hand-painted with festive holiday colors and imprinted with classic images of wooden soldiers, Christmas trees and snowflakes, Lavender Bakery’s Molded Sugar Cookies 5, 6 are truly the intersection of baking and art. The sugar cookie, with the correct consistency to hold finely detailed impressions, lends itself to ornate decoration like no other. Multi-talented baker Marcia Hamilton has created Nutcracker-inspired designs for the cookies so authentic that they have been dubbed the official cookie of the New York City Ballet for three years. The rich flavors used at Lavender 64

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around the holidays—from anise to cinnamon to orange— are characteristically festive. “My baked goods, whether cakes or cookies or pies, have to taste as good as they look or it’s just an empty promise,” Hamilton says. Especially around the holidays, she believes cookies are “an expression of love and gratitude. Baking cookies was so important in our family—great food for your family is truly an expression of love.” Though Hamilton doesn’t yet have a retail site, she can fill custom orders; contact her via phone or email. 4 For selected recipes, go to valleytable.com By The Way Bakery 574 Warburton Ave, Hastings on Hudson (914) 478-0555; btwbakery.com Cardoso Cookies ascardoso@zoho.com (914) 475-2928; cardosocookies.com Ella’s Bellas 418 Main St, Beacon (845) 765-8502; ellasbellasbeacon.com Frida’s Bakery + Cafe 26 Main St, Milton (845) 795-5550; fridasbakeryny.com Lavender Bakery Clermont (917) 612-7981; lavenderbakeryny@gmail.com


DRINK

not just for earl grey anymore

by tim buzinski

H

oney — and the bees that produce it — can

command an almost religious dedication. Its taste, color, consistency, health benefits (real and imagined), history (and mythology) have bestowed an almost mystical quality on the sticky liquid.

On a more worldly level, however, honey is the basis of mead, one of the oldest known fermented (“hard”) beverages. The enjoyment of mead is well documented in historic art and literature from all parts of the globe—evidence of its use dates to 2800bce in Europe, and as far back as 7000bce in China.

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Mead and honeybased distilled spirits rely on the honey as their essence, so to speak, but honey can benefit other beverages in more subtle ways.

Tastes change, though, and interest in the smooth overtones of honey-based drinks—or anything suggesting sweetness—waned over time. Still, whether because of curiosity, dedication or accident, honey-based beverages seem to be gaining in popularity, especially with the current emphasis on locally sourced ingredients. Mead is essentially fermented honey. The general methods for making it haven’t changed much for millennia—honey is diluted with water (usually in a 1:4 to 1:6 ratio), yeast and other additives such as herbs and spices are introduced, and the mixture is allowed to ferment until the desired amount of residual sugar is reached, or until it is “dry” (no residual sugar). Alcohol content of mead can range from about 6 percent to over 20 percent. Kurt Swanson and his wife, Lisa, began experimenting with mead infused with herbs as a medicinal tonic almost a decade ago, but Swanson soon recognized a potential market for high-quality mead. In 2014, he founded Mysto Mead, the region’s first craft mead company, in Carmel (Putnam County). Swanson begins with a 1:4 dilution of honey and water, then adds nutrients (“Honey doesn’t have everything in its sugar base that yeast needs to thrive,” he notes), a starter and yeast, and allows the mixture to ferment about a month until dry. He back-sweetens individual batches he wants to have a bit of sweetness, though the dry meads comprise the bulk of his sales. Mysto Mead currently lists ten distinct meads in production, and Swanson notes that many of the flavors have a culinary inspiration. (He says he tends to think in

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flavor combinations—thus Mysto Basil & Mint, or Chipotle & Cocoa, for instance.) He farms his own chipotle peppers, and some herbs come from other local farms. “We try to source everything as locally as possible,” he says. Swanson also is experimenting with barrel-aging mead in oak barrels previously used by local distilleries. Though often sipped on their own, meads are amiable companions at the table. Probably the easiest and most popular way to enjoy mead on a winter’s evening is with a selection of cheeses and some charcuterie. The honeyed notes of the mead draw out the flavors of the cheese while the weight and depth of its flavor are a good match for the rich meats. Mysto Mead’s Classic Sparkling Mead is an easy pairing with seafood, while roasted meats shine alongside the spice-driven Super Star or the more robust Rye Soaked Oak. Perhaps the most intriguing use of honey has been developed by a local brewery. Evan Watson, a veteran home brewer, was working at Captain Lawrence Brewery when the industry was rattled by a hop shortage about a decade ago. His wife, Emily, recalls Evan asking, “What if we could source everything locally—what would that look like?” What it would look like turned out to be Plan Bee Farm Brewery, which the couple established in 2013 and moved to their current 25-acre farm site near Poughkeepsie in 2015. Plan Bee’s unique beers use a starter created with honey and herbs sourced on the farm. Some items are sourced elsewhere in the Hudson Valley—mainly the grain, which is grown in Tivoli and malted in Germantown. Even the waste from brewery stays close to home: Spent grain helps feed a neighbor’s cows. “Every aspect of what we do” has a local focus, Emily notes, adding, “We try to keep the money in the local market.” Plan Bee beers have become among the most soughtafter local brews in the region. Barn Beer, an ideal introduction to the roster, is refreshingly tart, but layers of flavor evolve over time, making it ideal as a foil to wintery stews. Royal Jelly is a tart, barrel-aged beer with exotic fruit and citrus notes, with an acidity that makes it a perfect appetite stimulant before dinner. Dandeliaison offers an array of savory herbs on the palate with a weighty texture countered by a refreshing finish—lovely paired with roast poultry perfumed with sage and thyme. Honey also can be introduced into the distillation process to create a distinctive spirit. In 2009, Still the One Distillery, in Port Chester (Westchester County) began producing several spirits using orange flower honey. Founder Ed Tiedge says, “[We] did not want to do the same old vodka recipe out there—we wanted to do something unique.” His efforts yielded an uncommon result—STO Comb Vodka, a honey vodka that is not sweet yet retains some of the honey essence; it is more aromatic and textural than grain-based versions, similar to a good potato vodka. To create STO Comb Gin, the distillery uses a “tea bag” method to infuse coriander, sage, rose petals, galangal and, of course, juniper, into the mix—the combination creates a classically styled gin ideal for mixing. Try it shaken with an alpine-infused liqueur, vermouth and a squeeze of lemon for a winter’s eve cocktail.


The company also created Jarhead, a gin specifically developed for a Wounded Warriors benefit. It’s now permanently included in the product line. The addition of 80 percent New York state wheat gives this spirit a lighter profile worthy of the best gin and tonic. Mead and honey-based distilled spirits rely on the honey as their essence, so to speak, but honey can benefit other beverages in more subtle ways. Claire Marin, founder of Catskill Provisions, in Long Eddy (Sullivan County), tends more than 300 hives spanning three counties and taps more than 2,000 maple trees. She produces a rye whiskey, sourced from a distiller in Rochester, tempered with her own wildflower honey. The whiskey is aromatic, with layered honey notes mingling with rye’s classic spice elements. While Plan Bee and Catskill Provisions are able to source the honey they need locally, other producers are forced to seek other sources to meet their needs. Mysto Mead, for example, sources honey from the Finger Lakes. “We require a large amount even for a small operation,” Swanson says. “There are a number of apiaries up there [that can] consistently supply us with a quality product at a relatively stable price.” Still the One, on the other hand, procures honey from Florida, a decision mainly based on quantity and consistency. The region, in fact, may be geographically unable to support the kind of commercial honey production needed to sustain even a few small-scale breweries or distilleries. Glynwood Farm beekeeper Rodney Dow explains, “We need more open areas to commercially produce quality honey.” Dow, an apiarist almost continuously since

1961 and a firm believer in what he calls “sustainable beekeeping,” is particularly concerned about colony collapse disorder, which has devastated the honeybee population. Dow is working on a bee-breeding program that may help ensure current and future distillers, breweries, cideries—and even wineries—will have access to the honey they need to develop their unique beverages. There is no denying honey can enhance many beverages, and it’s not just about the sweetness. “Honey adds a layer of complexity,” Marin stresses. Indeed, with its abundant aromatics and varying levels of sweet and savory elements, honey can be enjoyed in a flight of beverages. Try some local mead or a honey-based spirit in a cocktail— you may find it’s your cup of tea after all. 4 Mysto Mead 187 Church Hill Rd, Carmel (914) 299-3683; mystomead.com Still the One Distillery 1 Martin Pl, Port Chester (914) 305-4437; stilltheonedistillery.com Catskill Provisions 244 Lake Rd, Long Eddy (845) 418-6482; catskillprovisions.com Plan Bee Farm Brewery 115 Underhill Rd, Poughkeepsie (765) 307-8589; planbeefarmbrewery.com

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INDEX TO ADVERTISERS

PAGE 58 5 Spoke Creamery / 5spokecreamery.com 7 Adams Fairacre Farms / adamsfarms.com 11 Angry Orchard / 845.713.5180 / angryorchard.com 21 Aroma Osteria / 845.298.6790 / aromaosteriarestaurant.com 29 Baja 328 / 845.838.BAJA / baja328.com 70 Barb’s Butchery / 845.831.8050 / barbsbutchery.com 60 Beacon Natural Market / 845.838.1288 / beaconnaturalmarket.com 71 Beacon Pantry / 845.440.8923 / beaconpantry.com 60 Black Dirt Distillery / 845.258.6020 / blackdirtdistillery.com 48 Boutique Wine & Spirits / 845.765.1555 / boutiquewsc.com 10 Brother’s Trattoria / 845.383.3300 / brotherstrattoria.com 61 Café Amarcord / 845.440.0050 / cafeamarcord.com 50 Canterbury Brook Inn / 845.534.9658 / canterburybrookinn.com 48 Cathryn’s Tuscan Grill / 845.265.5582 / tuscangrill.com 70 Clock Tower Grill / 845.582.0574 / clocktowergrill.com C4 Cosimo’s / cosimosrestaurantgroup.com 10 Craft 47 / 845.360.5253 / craft47.com 04 Culinary Institute of America / 845.471.6608 / ciarestaurants.com 22 The Daily Beet / 845.563.0924 / thedailybeetnewburgh.com C3 Daily Planet Diner / 845.452.0110 / dailyplanetdiner.com 61 Dubrovnik / 914.637.3777 / dubrovnikny.com 61 Ella’s Bellas / 845.765.8502 / ellasbellasbeacon.com 74 Farm to Table Bistro / 845.297.1111 / ftbistro.com 21 Fresh Company / 845.424.8204 / freshcompany.net 71 The Greens at Copake Country Club / 518.352.0019 / copakecountryclub.com 75 Gino’s Restaurant / 845.297.8061 / ginoswappingers.com 57 Glynwood / 845.265.3338 / glynwood.org 56 Hahn Farm / 845.266.3680 / hahnfarm.com 80 Half Moon / 914.693.4130 / halfmoonhudson.com 56 Harvest Spirits / 518.758.1776 / harvestspirits.com 59 Hawthorne Valley Farm / 518.672.7500 / hawthornevalleyfarm.org 58 Hemlock Hill / 914.737.2810 / hemlockhillfarm.com 29 Henry’s at the Farm / 845.795.1500 / buttermilkfallsinn.com/henrys 72 Hudson St. Café / 845.565-2450 / hudsonstreetcafe.com 78 Hudson Valley Federal Credit Union / 845.463.3011 / hvfcu.org 57 Hudson Valley Fresh / 845.226.3065 / hudsonvalleyfresh.com 56 Hudson Valley Seafood / 845. 928.9678 / hudsonvalleyseafood.com 3 Hyatt House Fishkill / 845.897.5757 / fishkill.house.hyatt.com 12 Hyde Park Brewing / 845.229.8277 / hydeparkbrewing.com 2 Il Barilotto / 845.897.4300 / ilbarilottorestaurant.com 78 Jacobowitz & Gubits / 866.993.7575 / jacobowitz.com 20 Judelson, Giordano & Siegal.com / 877.740.9500 / JGSPC.com 58 Jones Farm / 845.534.4445 / jonesfarminc.com 69 Kitchen Sink Food & Drink / 845.765.0240 / kitchensinkny.com 76 Leo’s Ristorante & Bar / leospizzeria.com

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PAGE 1 Lola’s Café / 845.255.6555 / 845.471.8555 / lolascafeandcatering.com 29 Love Apple Farm / 518.828.5048 / loveapplefarm.com 59 Lowland Farm / 845.461.3459 / lowlandfarm.com 50 Marta’s Vineyard / 845.218.9672 / martasvine.com 69 Meyer’s Olde Dutch / 845.440.6900 / meyersoldedutch.com 21 Mill House Brewing Company / 845.485.BREW / millhousebrewing.com 22 Mother Earth’s / motherearthstorehouse.com 72 Mountain Meadow Bed & Breakfast / 845.255.6144 / mountainmeadowsbnb.com 20 N&S Supply / nssupply.com 10 Nina / 845.344.6800 / nina-restaurant.com 79 Pamal Broadcasting / pamal.com 77 Paula’s Public House / 845.454.7821 / paulaspublichouse.com 56 Village Green Markets / 914.418.4920 / villagegreenfarmersmarkets.com 76 Poughkeepsie Galleria / 845.297.7600 / poughkeepsiegalleriamall.com 2 Putnam County Tourism / 845.808.1015 / tourputnam.org 58 Quattro’s Poultry Farm & Market / 845.635.2018 60 Ramiro’s 954 / 845.621.3333 / ramiros954.com 49 Red Barn Produce / 845.691.7428 / redbarnproduceny.com 60 Red House / 845.795.6285 / redhouseny.com C3 Red Line Diner / 845.765.8401 / dineatredline.com 77 Redwood / 845.259.5868 / redwooduptown.com 75 The Roundhouse / 845.765.8369 / roundhousebeacon.com 48 Shawangunk Wine Trail / 845.256.8456 / gunkswine.com 69 Sidelines Restaurant & Sports Bar / 845.758.4545 22 The Souk / 845.398.0706 / theoutside.in 57 Stoutridge Vineyard / 845.236.7620 / stoutridge.com 2 Sunflower Natural Foods Market / 845.679.5361 / sunflowernatural.com C3 Table Talk Diner / 845.849.2839 / tabletalkdiner.com 59 TasteNY Store at Todd Hill / 845.849.0247 taste.ny.gov 73 Terrapin Restaurant / 845.876.3330 / terrapinrestaurant.com 50 Tuthill House at the Mill / 845.255.1527/ tuthillhouse.com 12 Valley at the Garrison / 845.424.3604 x39 / thegarrison.com 72 Village Tea Room / 845.255.3434 / thevillagetearoom.com C3 Vanikiotis Diner Group / vanikiotisgroup.com 49 Walden Savings Bank / 845.457.7700 / waldensavingsbank.com 9 Warren Kitchen & Cutlery / 845.876.6208 / warrenkitchentools.com C2 Westchester Medical Center / 914.493.7000 / westchestermedicalcenter.com 50 Westchester Tourism / 914.995.8500 / westchestertourism.com 59 Whitecliff Vineyard / 845.255.4613 / whitecliffwine.com 79 Wickham Solid Wood Studio / 917.797.9247 / wickham.com 20 Wildfire Grill / 845.457.3770 / wildfireny.com 12 WM Farmer & Sons / 518.828.1635 / wmfarmerandsons.com 3 Williams Lumber & Home Center / 845.876.WOOD / williamslumber.com 74 Woody’s Farm to Table / 845.534.1111 / woodysfarmtotable.com


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WED, WED, THURS, THURS, AND AND SUN: SUN: 12PM 12PM TO TO 9PM 9PM WED, THURS, AND TO WED,FRI THURS, SAT: AND SUN: SUN: 12PM 12PM TO 9PM 9PM FRI AND AND SAT: 12PM 12PM TO TO 12AM 12AM FRI FRI AND AND SAT: SAT: 12PM 12PM TO TO 12AM 12AM

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The Perfect Gift

Taste what everyone’s talking about

7:59 AM

80 84pp

FINAL

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THE VALLEY TABLE

20 YEARS OF GREAT FOOD Clip and mail to: THE VALLEY TABLE 380 Main St Beacon, NY 12508

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Your neighborhood purveyor of local Hudson Valley-raised meats Nose-to-Tail · Grass & Grain Finished Angus · Specialty Cuts Charcuterie · Smoked Meats · House-made Stocks · Craſt Bacon

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Or subscribe online! ValleyTable.com 1 Year Subscription $20

A card announcing your gift will be sent to the recipient. Taste what everyone’s talking about

ADDRESS

Nose-to-Tail · Grass & Grain Finished Angus · Specialty Cuts CITY Charcuterie · Smoked Meats · House-made StocksGIFT · Craſt NAMEBacon CITY

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Mon - Fri Mon -Fri11am 12pM- 7:30pm -7pM Sat & Sun 10-7 Sat & Sun 10am - 6pm

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CARD NUMBER

69 Spring Street, Beacon, NY 12508 845.831.8050 • www.barbsbutchery.com 70

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DIRECTORY A C C O M M O D A T I O N S

A R T

Hyatt House Fishkill 100 Westage Business Center Dr, Fishkill (845) 897-5757 fishkill.house.hyatt.com Inviting social spaces and elegant guest rooms make this the perfect retreat for the modern traveler. Offering amenities and services smartly designed for a seamless travel experience.

Newburgh Art Supply 5 Grand St, Newburgh (845) 561-5552 newburghartsupply.com Mon-Thu 10–6; Fri 11–7; Sat 10–6; Closed Sun See, feel and experience quality art materials in one of Newburgh’s restored landmarks in the heart of the Washington Market neighborhood. Your local source for essential creative supplies for the student, professional and enthusiast. Celebrating 9 years of service!

Mountain Meadows B&B 542 Albany Post Rd, New Paltz (845) 255-6144 mountainmeadowsbnb.com Nestled in the foothills of the Catskills in the shadow of the Shawangunk Ridge, a cozy bed and breakfast. Hosts, Maria and Joe, welcome you to their upstate New York getaway, complete with in-ground pool and hot tub, patio and gardens. William Farmer & Sons 20 S Front St, Hudson (518) 828-1635; wmfarmerandsons.com William Farmer & Sons renovated a historic boarding house in downtown Hudson and imbues it with a spirit of hospitality to provide a unique place to stay, a mercantile, a bar and a restaurant. “Stay happy. Enjoy craft cocktails and a gratifying meal.”

A R T I S A N A L P R O D U C T S

5 Spoke Creamery 5spokecreamery.com Great cheese starts with great milk. At 5 Spoke Creamery all cheeses are handmade in the farmstead tradition (produced on site with a closed herd) from the raw milk of grass-fed cows, free of pesticides and hormones. ImmuneSchein 43 Basin Rd, West Hurley (828) 319-1844 immune-schein.com Thu 1–7; Fri-Sun 11–7 Created with a passion and appreciation for pure whole food ingredients, ImmuneSchein Ginger

Café & Market • Breakfast, Brunch, Lunch & Dinner • Serving Beer & Wine European & Local Groceries • Artisanal Cheese & Meat • Specialty Gift Crates

Open 7 Days a Week Holiday Catering is Our Specialty! 382 MAIN STREET • BEACON, NY • 845.440.8923 • WWW.BEACONPANTRY.COM

Elixirs promote wellbeing and health. If you are in search of the purest, highest quality, small-batch ginger elixir on the market for a detox, great taste and flexibility of use, then ImmuneSchein Ginger Elixirs will be for you. B A K E R I E S

The Alternative Baker 407 Main St, Rosendale (845) 658-3355; lemoncakes.com Thu-Mon from 7 am; closed Tue-Wed Twenty years of small-batch, scratch, homemade all-butter baked goods. We offer gluten-free and allergy-friendly options, plus made-to-order sandwiches. Vegan vegetable soups in season, hot mulled New York cider, JB Peel coffees and Harney teas, artisanal drinks, and our award-winning Belgium hot chocolate and other seasonal drinks. Special-occasion cakes and desserts. Unique wedding cakes. All ”Worth a detour”—(NY Times). Ella’s Bellas 418–420 Main St, Beacon (845) 765-8502 Mon & Wed 8–5; Thu–Sat 8–7; Sun 9–4; closed Tue Ella’s Bellas believes that an indulgence should taste like an indulgence

regardless of our dietary restrictions. We specialize in gluten-free products, but we promise you won’t know the difference. B E E R

&

B R E W E R I E S

Hyde Park Brewing 4076 Albany Post Rd, Hyde Park (845) 229-8277; hydeparkbrewing.com Mon-Tue 4–10; Wed-Thu 11–10; Fri-Sat 11–12; Sun 11–9 “Anytime is a good time for a beer” at the Hyde Park Brewing Company. Offering a vast menu of fresh cuisine with an emphasis on seasonal, local, and fresh ingredients. C A T E R I N G

Fresh Company PO Box 187, Garrison (845) 424-8204; freshcompany.net At our kitchen one hour north of Manhattan in the Hudson Highlands, we gather great local and imported ingredients for events of all sizes and pocketbooks, from grand affairs to drop-off parties. We emphasize the freshest, finest ingredients, because great food is the spark that ignites a convivial gathering. Executive chef Shelley Boris draws inspiration from cook-

FIRESIDE D INING with a view

NEW SEASONAL MENU • MONTHLY EVENTS • DAILY BAR SPECIALS DINNER THURSDAY - MONDAY • SERVING LUNCH ON FRIDAY & SATURDAY • SUNDAY BRUNCH WWW.THEGREENSATCOPAKE.COM  • 44 GOLF COURSE RD. CRARYVILLE • 518.325.0019

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ing styles from around the world. Her distinct, warm style is reflected in meals that encourage hospitality and leisure at the table.

Mountain Views - Hot Tub - Fire Pit

Terrapin Restaurant Catering & Events 6426 Montgomery St, Rhinebeck (845) 889-8831; terrapincatering.com Enjoy the same high-quality ingredients and service that you know at Terrapin Restaurant anywhere in the Hudson Valley. Catering events of all types and sizes, Terrapin prepares custom menus for every event, using local, organic ingredients whenever possible. Contact Catering Director Hugh Piney. C I D E R Y

Angry Orchard 2241 Albany Post Rd, Walden (845) 713-5180 angryorchard.com The cider makers continue to innovate with ingredients and cider making techniques, creating new enjoyable ciders. All are encouraged to come by for a visit and taste some of the specialty ciders made on-site. Visit for tours, tastings and special brunch and dinner!

Breakfast&& Lunch Breakfast Lunch Daily- Sat Mon, Wed 8am - 3pm

D I N E R S

Available Open Forevenings Dinner for catering

Thur - Sat 5pm - 9pm Sun Brunch 8am - 2pm

Custom Catering Closed Tues

190 S. Plank Road, Newburgh 845.565.2450 www.hudsonstreetcafe.com

Daily Planet 1202 Rt 55, Lagrangeville (845) 452-0110; dailyplanetdiner.com Palace Diner 194 Washington St, Poughkeepsie (845) 473-1576; thepalacediner.com Red Line Diner 588 Rt 9, Fishkill (845) 765-8401; dineatredline.com Table Talk Diner 2519 South Rd (Rt 9), Poughkeepsie (845) 849-2839; tabletalkdiner.com H O M E

LOVE WHAT’S ON YOUR TABLE V A L L E Y TA B L E . C O M

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N&S Supply, Inc. 205 Old Rt 9, Fishkill (845) 896-6291; nssupply.com Your one-stop resource for all plumbing, heating and HVAC needs, including specialty products designed and manufactured to meet your lifestyle needs; the latest innovative products, including cutting-edge bathroom technology from remote flushing toilets to hands-free faucets. Six locations: Fishkill, Brewster, Kingston, Catskill, Hudson and Danbury. Williams Lumber 6760 Rt 9, Rhinebeck (845) 876-9663 34 Blommer Rd, Tannersvile (518) 589-5200 2424 Rt 44, Pleasant Valley (845) 605-3520 908 Rt 82, Hopewell Junction (845) 221-2751

9-11 E Market St, Red Hook (845) 758-5615 317 Kyserike Rd, High Falls (845) 687-7676 3679 Rt 9, Hudson (518) 851-3641 4246 Albany Post Rd, Hyde Park (845) 698-1004; williamslumber.com The largest independent home center in the area. K I T C H E N

Warren Kitchen & Cutlery 6934 Rt 9, Rhinebeck (845) 876-6208; warrenkitchentools.com Mon–Sat 9:30–5:30; Sun 11–4:30 The Hudson Valley’s complete source for professional kitchen knives and tools, commercial quality cookware, bakeware, pocketknives and woodcarving tools. We stock the largest selection of name-brand cutlery in the region at prices well below retail. Knife sets, knife blocks and carving boards. Professional knife sharpening while you wait. M A R K E T S

Adams Fairacre Farms 1560 Ulster Ave, Kingston (845) 336-6300 1240 Rt 300, Newburgh (845) 569-0303 765 Dutchess Tnpk, Poughkeepsie (845) 454-4330 160 Old Post Rd, Wappinger (845) 632-9955 adamsfarms.com Open daily A family-owned farm market/garden center. A cornucopia of fresh produce, meats, fish, deli, and prepared foods. Featuring Hudson Valley products, a great selection of the best local cheese, meat, produce and more. Barb’s Butchery 69 Spring St, Beacon (845) 831-8050; barbsbutchery.com Mon–Fri 11–7:30; Sat 10–6; lunch Tue–Sat; closed Sun & Mon Your new neighborhood butcher shop providing local, Hudson Valley– raised meat and poultry. Practicing nose-to-tail butchery, we are proud to offer fresh and smoked meats, specialty cuts, charcuterie, house-made stocks, craft bacon and more. Beacon Pantry 382 Main St, Beacon (845) 440-8923; beaconpantry.com Market: Mon–Sat 9–8; Sun 9–6 Café: Mon-Wed 8-5; Thu-Sun 8-9 Providing artisan food and service to Beacon and beyond. Cut-to-order domestic and imported cheese and charcuterie; local, Italian and hardto-find French pantry items; grass-fed local meats and dairy. Stumptown coffee, unique chocolates, fine pastries and desserts. Serving European-style sandwiches and cheese plates. Tapas and dinner on weekends. Catering for any size event.


Love Apple Farm 1421 New York 9H, Ghent (518) 828-5048 (518) 567-1200 loveapplefarm.com Mon & Tue 10–5; Wed & Thu 9–5; Fri–Sun 9–6 A family-friendly fruit farm expanded to a full-scale agritourist destination and market. A well-curated selection of Hudson Valley products and café. U-pick apples (in season), petting zoo and playground. TasteNY Store at Todd Hill Taconic State Pkwy, Lagrange Located 10 miles north of I-84 and 1 mile south of Rt 55 (845) 849-0247; ccedutchess.org Open Mon, Wed, Thu, Sat 10–7; Fri 10–8; Sun 11–7; closed Tue An asset along the Taconic State Parkway, find a vast array of foods and products grown or made in the Hudson Valley. Outdoor farmers’ market open Jun–Oct: Fri 3–7, Sun 2–6. N A T U R A L

F O O D S

Beacon Natural Market 348 Main St, Beacon (845) 838-1288; beaconnaturalmarket.com Mon–Sat 9–7; Sun 10–5 Lighting the way for a healthier world. Featuring organic prepared foods, deli and juice bar, organic and regional produce, meats and cheeses. Open since 2005, proprietors L.T. and Kitty Sherpa are dedicated to serving the Hudson Valley with a complete selection of products that are good for you and good for the planet, including an extensive alternative health department. Nutritionist on staff. Catering available. Mother Earth’s 300 Kings Mall Ct, Kingston (845) 336-5541 249 Main St, Saugerties (845) 246-9614 1955 South Rd, Poughkeepsie (845) 296-1069 motherearthstorehouse.com Open daily Offering the finest natural foods, bulk spices, herbs, vitamins, supplements and organic produce. The valley’s best organic, hot and cold takeout at our Kingston and Poughkeepsie locations. Sunflower Natural Market 75 Mill Hill Rd, Woodstock 24 Garden St, Rhinebeck (845) 679-5361 (845) 876-0798 sunflowernatural.com Mon–Fri 8–9; Sat 9–9; Sun 10–7 The area’s most complete natural foods market, featuring certified organic produce, organic milk, cheeses and eggs, a wide range of bulk organic grains and nuts, non-irradiated herbs and spices, plus vitamins, homeopathic and body care products.

R E S T A U R A N T S

Aroma Osteria 114 Old Post Rd, Wappingers Falls (845) 298-6790; aromaosteriarestaurant.com Lunch Tue–Sat 11:30–2:30; Dinner Tue–Thu 5–10, Fri–Sat 5–11, Sun 4–9 Voted Best Italian Restaurant by Hudson Valley magazine; Poughkeepsie Journal awards four stars. A romantic, relaxed atmosphere with an elegant cocktail bar in a beautiful setting. Here, rustic Italian cuisine is served with a unique and extensive selection of Italian wines (many available by the glass). Catering for all occasions available on or off premises. Baja 328 328 Main St, Beacon (845) 838-BAJA; baja328.com Lunch & dinner Tue–Thu 11–10, Fri–Sat 11–11, Sun noon–8 Main Street’s newest hot spot, Baja 328 offers the finest authentic Southwestern food couples with 110plus tequilas, the largest selection in the area. Café Amarcord 276 Main St, Beacon (845) 440-0050; cafeamarcord.com Lunch & dinner Tue–Thu noon–10; Fri–Sat noon–11; Sun noon–9 Creative New American cuisine with Italian undertones, served in a warm atmosphere. Enjoy an artisanal cocktail at the onyx bar before having dinner in the bistro-style dining room or on our Main Street terrace. Bring colleagues for a casual lunch, or a date for a romantic night out. Caffe Macchiato 99 Liberty St, Newburgh (845) 565-4616; addressyourappetite.com Breakfast & lunch Tue–Fri 9–3; Sat–Sun 9–4 Located in the historic district of Newburgh, Caffe Macchiato is a European-style café offering an all-day breakfast and lunch along with a fair-trade coffee beverage selection. The menu focuses on seasonal items and chef/owner Jodi Cummings highlights several local farms and producers on the menu. All desserts and pastries are baked from scratch in-house. Canterbury Brook Inn 331 Main St, Cornwall (845) 534-9658; canterburybrookinn.com Dinner Tue–Thu 5–9; Fri–Sat 5–9:30 Hosts Hans and Kim Baumann offer fine Swiss continental cuisine featuring veal, duck, chicken, Schnitzel, pasta, filet mignon, fresh fish and much more. Enjoy a fabulous dessert while sipping a frothing cappuccino or espresso. We specialize in both on- and off-premise catering. Outdoor brookside dining. Reservations suggested.

restaurant | bistro | bar

A Hudson Valley Dining Destination Voted Best Bistro & Best Farm-to-Table Restaurant

lunch & dinner daily in rhinebeck 845-876-3330 terrapinrestaurant.com dec

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Cathryn’s 91 Main St, Cold Spring (845) 265-5582; tuscangrill.com Lunch & dinner Mon-Thu 12-9:30; Fri-Sat 12-10:30; Sun 12-9 Follow the red brick walk off Main Street through a landscaped garden into a romantic dining scene. Choose from an array of Northern Italian dishes such as pulled rabbit with fresh papardelle pasta, seedless grapes and grappa sauce; and grilled partridge with blackberries, pearl onions and pancetta with a red wine sauce. Reasonably priced wines. Small private party room.

The premier culinary college offers exceptional global cuisine in its award-winning restaurants: American Bounty Restaurant (845) 451-1011; americanbountyrestaurant.com The Bocuse Restaurant (845) 451-1012; bocuserestaurant.com Reimagines classic French cuisine using modern techniques. Ristorante Caterina de’ Medici (845) 451-1013; ristorantecaterinademedici.com The Apple Pie Bakery Café (845) 905-4500; applepiebakerycafe.com

Clock Tower Grill Kitchen & Bar 512 Clock Tower Dr, Brewster (845) 582-0574; clocktowergrill.com Lunch & dinner Tue–Thu noon–9, Fri noon–11; dinner Sat 5–11, Sun 3–9 Set in a renovated barn, the atmosphere is casual yet sophisticated; the menu “rustic American” with many ingredients drawn from area farms.

The Daily Beet 118 Liberty St, Newburgh (845)563-0924; Thedailybeetnewburgh.com Mon-Sun 9-5 From Jodi Cummings, chef/owner of Caffe Machiatto comes this market/eatery specializing in local and healthy foods, acai bowls, daily soups, grab-and-go foods, elixirs/ shots, and juice/smoothie bar

Cosimo’s Restaurant Group Cosimo’s On Union 1217 Rt 300, Newburgh (845) 567-1556; fax (845) 567-9246 Cosimo’s Middletown 620 Rt 211 East, Middletown (845) 692-3242 Cosimo’s Poughkeepsie 120 Delafield St, Poughkeepsie (845) 485-7172 Cosimo’s Woodbury Rt 32, Central Valley (845) 928-5222 cosimosrestaurantgroup.com Lunch & dinner daily Casual trattoria-style dining with some of the world’s best wines. Old-style Italian cuisine with a New World twist. Daily specials, pasta, fish and meat dishes. Distinctive cocktail lounges, a unique wine cellar for private dinner parties and beautiful catering facilities. Craft 47 47 W Main St, Goshen (845) 360-5253; craft47.com Lunch & dinner Tue–Thu noon–10, Fri–Sat noon–midnight; Sun noon–10 Kick back, relax and sample the best of the Hudson Valley at Craft 47. We offer small-plate American tapas, craft wine and 12 craft beers on tap, with even more in the cooler. Crave Restaurant & Lounge 129 Washington St, Poughkeepsie (845) 452-3501; craverestaurantandlounge.com Dinner Wed–Sat 4–10, Sun 4:30–9; Brunch Sun 11:30–3 Chef Ed Kowalski serves contemporary food with modern twists in a romantic and intimate setting located directly under the Walkway Over The Hudson. The Culinary Institute of America 1946 Campus Dr (off Rt 9), Hyde Park

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Dubrovnik 721 Main St., New Rochelle (914) 637-3777; dubrovnikny.com Authentic Croatian cuisine with a farm-to-table, sea-to-table approach. Farm To Table Bistro 1083 Rt 9, Fishkill (845) 297-1111; ftbistro.com Mon-Thu 11:30–9:30; Fri–Sat 11:30–10; Sun 11:30–9 The focus is always finding the best the world has to offer: the best produce, wine, beef and certainly, the best fish and seafood. Patio dining available. Gino’s Restaurant 1671 Rt 9, Wappingers Falls (845) 297-8061; ginoswappingers.com Lunch & dinner Tue–Thu 11:30–9, Fri–Sat 11:30–10; Sun 1–9 Serving the Hudson Valley since 1984. Traditional southern Italian cuisine in a casual environment. Only the freshest ingredients used to prepare your favorite veal, chicken, seafood and pasta dishes. Catering on- and off-premise. The Greens at Copake Country Club 44 Golf Course Rd, Copake Lake (518) 352-0019 copakecountryclub.com Mon-Thu 11–8:30; Fri & Sat 11–9:30; Sun 11–8; Brunch until 2:30 Dinner nightly from 5 Dine overlooking the stunning 160-acre golf course nestled in the foothills of the Berkshire and Catskill Mountains. Half Moon 1 High St., Dobbs Ferry (914)-693-4131; harvest2000.com Montauk seafood, Hudson Valley farm to table, sunset views, raw bar and tiki bar.


Henry’s At Buttermilk Falls 220 North Rd, Milton (845) 795-1500; henrysatbuttermilk.com Lunch Fri–Sat 11:30–3; Dinner Sun– Thu 5–9; Brunch Sun 11–3 Local comes alive at this bucolic Inn & Spa, where the main ingredients are sourced from local producers and purveyors. An inventive menu features a fresh selection of large and small plates from casual burger and fries to refined New American dishes. Enjoy a pre-dinner stroll through the organic gardens and orchards or a drink overlooking the Hudson River and sweeping lawns. Al fresco dining available. Hudson Street Café 190 South Plank Rd, Newburgh (845) 565-2450; hudsonstreetcafe.com Breakfast & lunch Mon, Wed-Fri 8–3; Sat-Sun 8–3 Dinner Thu-Sat Featuring organic, locally sourced ingredients, Chef Donna Hammond and staff celebrate the café’s new location in Newburgh. The popular breakfast and lunch spot, now offers dinner with menu changing weekly. Enjoy local beers and ciders and a carefully crafted wine list. Champagne cocktails at brunch, lunch or dinner. Custom and corporate catering is available at the cafe or off-site venues. Ample parking, AURA rated, closed Tuesday. Il Barilotto 1113 Main St, Fishkill (845) 897-4300; ilbarilottorestaurant.com Lunch Mon–Sat 11–2:30; dinner Mon–Thu 5–10, Fri–Sat 5–11 Blending the old with the new, Eduardo Lauria, chef-owner of Aroma Osteria, transformed an historic brick building in the heart of Fishkill to a trattoria and wine bar. The fare is Italian peasant with a contemporary flair. The selection of regional wines from Italy—available by the glass or flight—is extensive. Catering on- and off-premises. Kitchen Sink 157 Main St, Beacon (845)765-0240; kitchensinkny.com Mon, Wed-Sat; Opens at 5; Sun 11-5 Features an eclectic mix of global and family-influenced dishes that blend local Hudson Valley ingredients with modern techniques. Providing a mix of dishes allows the chance to go night after night and get a totally unique taste experience. Leo’s Ristorante Rt 9D, Wappingers Falls (845) 838-3446 22 Quaker Ave, Cornwall (845) 534-3446 1433 Rt 300, Newburgh (845) 564-3446; leospizzeria.com Lunch & dinner Mon–Sat 11–10; Sun 2–9 A family favorite since 1981, Leo’s offers traditional classic Italian dishes, pizza, hot/cold subs, pasta, veal, chicken and appetizers. Daily specials and catering for all occasions

whether in our location or yours. Great food served in a comfortable and relaxed atmosphere. Lola’s Café 49 Main St, New Paltz (845)255-6555 Mon-Thu 11-9; Fri- Sat 11-10; Sun 11-8 131 Washington St, Poughkeepsie (845)471-8555 Mon-Fri 10-5; Sat 10-4 lolascafeandcatering.com. Poughkeepsie’s hottest lunch spot is now New Paltz’s newest lunch and dinner spot. Fast and friendly vibe. Great food, Generous portions abound. One of the Hudson Valley’s leading gourmet catering companies.

Whole-farm cuisine, cocktails featuring local breweries, distilleries, cideries and wineries.

Meyer’s Olde Dutch 184 Main St, Beacon (845)440-6900; meyersoldedutch.com Lunch & dinner Sun, Wed-Thu 12-9; Fri-Sat 12-12 A fun and casual, modern interpretation of the classic burger joint with a full-service bar. Mill House Brewing Company 289 Mill St, Poughkeepsie (845) 485-2739; millhousebrewing.com Lunch & dinner Mon, Wed-Sun; closed Tue Offers a warm, historic and visually appealing setting, with casual, yet professional service, food cooked from as close to the source as possible, and artfully crafted ales. Nina 27 W. Main St, Middletown (845) 344-6800; nina-restaurant.com Lunch Mon–Sat 11:30–2:30; dinner Mon–Sun from 5; brunch Sun 9:30–2 New York City–trained chef Franz Brendle brings an elegant flair to classic American cuisine. Features include filet mignon Roquefort, shrimp asparagus risotto and seafood specials. Nice selection of wines in various price ranges. Friendly staff, cozy décor. Hearty Sun brunch. Paula’s Public House 2186 New Hackensack Rd, Poughkeepsie (845) 454-7821 paulaspublichouse.com Mon & Tue 4–11; Wed & Thu 11–11; Fri & Sat 11–1; Sun 12–6 An inviting gastro pub sporting a cozy and friendly environment complemented by the warmth of a fireplace and a rustic ambiance. Paula’s offers lunch, supper and latenight fare and features live music, open mic and karaoke nights. Ramiro’s 954 954 Rt 6, Mahopac (845) 621-3333 ramiros954.com Tue–Thu 3:30–9; Fri & Sat 3:30–10; Sun 1–9

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You’re shopping in the best of company You’re shopping in the best of company

A family-friendly food destination for locals and visitors, offering Latin American fusion cuisine. Chef Ramiro takes a modern approach to traditional recipes, flavors and textures, incorporating seasonal ingredients. Parents relax and dine while kids eat and play in the unique “Jan’s Place.” Red House 30 Main St, Milton (845) 795-6285; redhouseny.com Tue-Sun 11:30–3:30, 5–10 Red House Asian Fusion offers a menu showcasing the fresh flavors of Thai, Japanese and Chinese cuisines. The renovated space offers the ambiance of a lounge with a full-service bar, and includes an eclectic selection of Asian wines and liquors.

PoughkeepsieGalleriaMall.com PoughkeepsieGalleriaMall.com 2001 South Road, Poughkeepsie NY 845.297.7600 2001 South Road, Poughkeepsie NY

845.297.7600

2017 Hudson Valley Pizza Fest – Best Overall Pizza Winner –

Redwood 63 N. Front St, Kingston (845) 259-5868 Lunch 11:30–3; Dinner 5–10; Sun Brunch. Closed Tue. The best of California cuisine and the Hudson Valley in a fun and relaxing atmosphere. Rooftop dining in season. The Roundhouse 2 E Main St, Beacon (845) 765-8369; roundhousebeacon.com Lunch & dinner Wed-Sat 11:30Close; Sun Brunch 11-3; Lunch 3-8 Set in a historic textile mill transformed into boutique hotel, the restaurant serves elegant, locally inspired American fare and offers a well-curated list of craft beers, cocktails and wines. The main dining room, lounge and seasonal patio all overlook Beacon Falls. Sweet Pea’s Cafe 318 Blooming Grove Tpke, New Windsor (845) 391-8034; sweetpeascafeinc.com Mon-Fri 8-4; Sat 8-3 Serves homemade, fresh & tasty breakfast and lunch in a comfortable funky atmosphere. Offering catering for small events on location evenings & Sundays. Terrapin Restaurant & Red Bistro 6426 Montgomery St, Rhinebeck (845) 876-3330; terrapinrestaurant.com Lunch & dinner daily 11:30– midnight; dining room daily 5–9pm From far-flung origins, the world’s most diverse flavors meet and mingle here. From elements both historic and eclectic comes something surprising, fresh and dynamic: dishes to delight body and soul. Choose fine dining in Terrapin’s dining room or casual fare in Red Bistro & Bar. From good burgers and quesadillas to wild salmon and local filet mignon. Terrapin’s local organic and authentic menu satisfies all.

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Valley at the Garrison 2015 Rt 9, Garrison (845) 424-3604; thegarrison.com/restaurants Valley: Dinner Thu–Sun 5–9; midday menu Sat–Sun 11:30–2:30 Terrace: Mon–Thu 8–6; Fri–Sun 7–7 The Garrison’s signature fine-dining restaurant offering seasonal American Cuisine and an extensive international wine list of great accolade. Regional and NYS Craft breweries and distilleries to match the seasonal-regional focus of the kitchen. Our spectacular view will enhance any dining experience. The Village Tearoom 10 Plattekill Ave, New Paltz (845) 255-3434; thevillagetearoom.com Breakast, lunch & dinner Tues–Sat 8–9, Sun 8–8 The Village Tea Room is a unique gathering place, serving breakfast, lunch and dinner as well as a variety of teas. Tantalizing cakes and cookies. Organic honey, pot pies and roast chicken. Zagat survey says “Irish ex-pat Agnes Devereux has a real winner.” Wildfire Grill 74 Clinton St, Montgomery (845) 457-3770; wildfireny.com Lunch Mon–Sat 11:30–3; Sun noon–3; dinner Sun–Thu 5–9; Fri & Sat 5–10 Eclectic is the buzzword at this popular local eatery, where patrons can feast on a predominantly American menu with Asian, Mexican and Italian influences in a rustic Victorian setting. Woody’s Farm to Table 30 Quaker Ave, Cornwall (845) 534-1111; woodysfarmtotable.com Open Wed–Mon 11:30–8:30; closed Tue A “new old-fashioned” burger joint located in a restored 1910 building in picturesque Cornwall. Casual, family place offering fast, simple meals for people on the go using fresh, wholesome ingredients with a local emphasis. Xaviar’s Restaurant Group Chef-owner Peter Kelly offers his signature service and exceptional cuisine. Critics agree: Dining in the valley will never be the same. Restaurant X & Bully Boy Bar 117 North Rt 303, Congers (845) 268-6555 Lunch Tue–Fri noon–2:30; dinner Tue–Thu 5:30–10, Fri 5:30–10:30, Sat 5–11, Sun 5–8; brunch Sun seating 1pm X2O Xaviars on the Hudson 71 Water Grant Way, Yonkers (914) 965-1111 Lunch Tue–Fri noon–2; dinner Tue–Fri 5:30–10, Sat 5–10, Sun 5–9; brunch Sun noon–2


S E R V I C E S

Jacobowitz and Gubits, LLP 158 Orange Ave, Walden (845) 778-2121; jacobowitz.com Mon-Thu 8:30-5:30 Expert legal services for restaurateurs includes business planning, succession planning, licenses and permits, employment, immigration, real estate, financing, contracts and taxation. Judelson, Giordano & Siegal 633 Rt 211, East Middletown 3 Neptune Rd, Poughkeepsie (877) 740-9500 JGSPC.com More than an accounting firm, full business advisors. Our philosophy is one of collaborative effort, as we work along side you to solve the problems and address the needs of your specific business. Walden Savings Bank (845)457-7700; waldensavingsbank.com Westchester Medical Center 100 Woods Rd, Valhalla (914) 493-7000 westchestermedicalcenter.com T O U R I S M

Dutchess Tourism (845) 463-4000; dutchesstourism.com Putnam County Tourism (845) 808-1015; Tourputnam.org Ulster County Tourism (845) 340-3566 ulstercountyalive.com Rockland County Tourism (845) 364-2170 explorerocklandny.com Westchester County Tourism (800) 833-9282; visitwestchesterny.com W H O L E S A L E

Red Barn Produce 217 Upper North Rd, Highland (845) 691-7428 Full-service, family owned and operated wholesaler servicing restaurants and institutions with a complete selection of fruits and vegetables for 20 years. A proud distributor of local, New York, high-quality produce at competitive prices emphasizing reliable and personal service. Pick-up or delivery available to Dutchess, Columbia, Ulster and Orange counties. W I N E

&

S P I R I T S

Boutique Wine & Spirits 18 Westage Dr, Suite 13, Fishkill (845) 765-1555 boutiquewsc.com Mon-Sat 10-7; Sun 12-6

Explore new grapes, new regions, new styles or new brands, or perhaps an entirely new category to you like mead or hard cider. Variety, as they say, is the spice of life! Marta’s Vineyard 1955 South Rd Suite 3, Poughkeepsie (845) 218-9672 martasvine.com Open 7 days This new shop features favorites and well-known producers of wines and spirits alongside a notable selection of organic and biodynamic wines. Each product is chosen by the owner, Marta, who holds internationally recognized certifications in wine and spirits. Check back for wine, spirits and cocktail classes. Fundraisers and events scheduled monthly.

Paulas’ House

Please check our website or Facebook for hours

PUBLIC

W I N E R I E S

Shawangunk Wine Trail (845) 256-8456; (845) 291-1927; gunkswine.com Nestled between the Shawangunks and the Hudson River, just 60 miles north of NYC is a trail of 14 familyowned wineries from New Paltz to Warwick. The wineries offer tours and tastings amidst scenic beauty. A complete listing of wineries and events is available on our website. Stoutridge Vineyard & Distillery 10 Ann Kaley Ln, Marlboro (845) 236-7620; stoutridge.com Many of our wines and spirits are locally grown, and all are from New York fruits and grains. Our wines are sold exclusively at the winery. Enjoy an authentic taste of the Hudson Valley at our winery, distillery and grounds.

“Food is Love Served on a Plate” 2186 New Hackensack Rd, Poughkeepsie 845.454.7821 | paulaspublichouse.com

Warwick Valley Winery & Distillery 114 Little York Rd, Warwick (845) 258-4858; wvwinery.com Daily 11–6 for tastings Food & Wine magazine calls our draft cider “clean, vibrant” with a “sweet finish.” We produce wine for every occasion: Chardonnay, Riesling, Harvest Moon, Black Dirt Blush and Red, Cabernet Franc, Pinot Noir. As the Valley’s first distillery, we produce a line of fine brandies and liqueurs. Bakery Café serves lunch and fresh breads on weekends. Whitecliff Vineyard 331 McKinstry Rd, Gardiner (845) 255-4613; whitecliffwine.com Daily 11:30–5:30; Sat til 6 One of the valley’s largest vineyards boasts beautiful views of the Shawangunk Ridge. Owner/ wine maker Michael Migliore produces award-winning wines from European vinifera varietals such as Chardonnay, Cabernet Franc and Riesling, as well as new hybrids. Visit our friendly tasting room. Winery tours by appointment, special events. 4

ModernAmerican American Modern Cuisine Inspired Cocktails Cocktails Cuisine + +Inspired Beerson onTap Tap 1212Beers PrivateBanquet BanquetRoom Room Private

Serving Serving Lunch Dinner + Dinner Sunday SaturdayBrunch + Sunday Brunch Closed Closed Tues & Wed

63 North Front St. in historic Uptown Kingston 845.259.5868 • redwooduptown.com

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Good times . . . Good people . . . At HVFCU, we support the businesses and organizations that make our community a great place to live, work, and dine. It’s one of the reasons we’re the financial partner trusted by so many of our neighbors for more than 50 years.

hvfcu.org

|

845.463.3011

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The Valley Table 80, Winter 2017-18  
The Valley Table 80, Winter 2017-18  
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