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T H E M AG A Z I N E O F H U D S O N VA L L E Y FA R M S , F O O D A N D C U I S I N E NUMBER 79

SEPTEMBER–NOVEMBER 2017

VALLEYTABLE.COM

INSIDE : H U D S O N VA L L E Y R E S TAU R A N T W E E K


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Sunday, noVember 5, 2017 THe GrandView on THe HudSon 176 Rinaldi Boulevard, Poughkeepsie, New York Register online at MidHudsonRegional.org/Taste or by calling the Development Office at (914)-493-2575. 241 North Road, Poughkeepsie, New York 12601 845.483.5000 | MidHudsonRegional.org

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MORE THAN A MEAL. AN EXPERIENCE. You can enjoy local dining that others come from all over the world to experience. You can feel the promise and passion of our students. And yes, you can get a reservation. EXPERIENCE CIA DINING American Bounty Restaurant The Bocuse Restaurant Post Road Brewhouse Ristorante Caterina de’ Medici Apple Pie Bakery Café ciarestaurantgroup.com

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number 79 september–november 2017

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featured articles 23 cooking with fire

There was a time when food was cooked without a convection air circulating system, magnetic induction coil, microwave generator or ceramic heating array. In the beginning, there was just fire. Now, some chefs are turning this most basic cooking method into an art form. by Leslie Coons

49 special section: hudson valley restaurant week

It’s the biggest, best, longest, most anticipated, most appreciated culinary event in the Hudson Valley. It’s the fall edition of Hudson Valley Restaurant Week, coming in late October. Did we mention that it’s the biggest, best, longest, most anticipated, most appreciated culinary event in the Hudson Valley? ’Nuff said.

66 the state of distilling

When New York State began revising its outdated laws governing the production of distilled spirits, few anticipated just how fast and far the revived industry would grow. Pioneers of the new wave of distilling in the Hudson Valley look back at how it all started, and where it’s headed. by David Handschuh

72 Q is for quercus

The growth of brewing and distilling throughout the region over the past decade has had a ripple effect on related industries, from hops growers to boilermakers. One cabinet maker-turned-cooper can barely keep up with the demand for his hand-made oak barrels. by David Handschuh

PHOTO : ANN STRATTON

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number 79

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departments 13 Good Stuff

High-end granola, apple cider vinegars, pumpkin carving tools, meals for cancer patients and caregivers, John Novi honored, cutting board aid, farmers’ market finds, letters, events and more

18 Openings

Heritage Food + Drink, Marta’s Vineyard, Meyer’s Olde Dutch, Lola’s New Paltz

33 Farms, Food & Markets Hudson Valley U-Pick Farms 41 Locally Grown Deer Defense, by Keith Stewart 44 Eating by the Season Eating Purple, by Kristen Warfield 63 Up Close Downing Park Urban Farm, by Kristen Warfield 76 Index of advertisers 78 Directory 88 Last Call Our Thanksgiving Table

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recipes Oven seared Hudson Valley foie gras (Andrew Chase / The Flammerie)

28 29

Porchetta (Shawn Burnette / Heritage Food + Drink)

Oven roasted oysters with shallots and herbs (Waldy Malouf / CIA)

47 Grilled Japanese eggplant and buttered Swiss chard tacos (Joana Herrera / Mariachi Mexico) 47 Sicilian purple cauliflower cavatappi (Laura Pensiero / Gigi Trattoria) 6

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EDITOR’S LETTER

Notes on servers and purple food Much was gained but something was lost when the language police tried to eliminate gender in occupational references. A fisherman became an angler (nobody liked the term fisherwoman, anyway); stewards and stewardesses became flight attendants. And waiters and waitresses became servers. (So why didn’t hosts and hostesses become greeters?) I’m all for gender equality, but I confess I’m partial to waitresses as human beings and as nouns. Waitresses (not servers) are, after all, a storied breed. Their praises have been sung by everyone from Tony Bennett to Tom Waits, and they are the stuff of myth and legend in Hollywood. My favorite aunt was a well-loved waitress at the luncheonette in Stern’s department store for more than 30 years. Among the nearly 80 covers we’ve produced for this magazine, near the top of the list of my favorites is Lora Shelley’s portrait of a waitress (Valley Table 7, Feb–April 2000). And, for the record, I married one. * At a recent dinner out at an excellent little restaurant tucked away in the Italian section of Poughkeepsie, in casual introductory conversation with the waitress, er, server, I quipped, “I don’t eat anything purple.” As jokes go, it barely rated a 2 on a scale of 1 to 10, so everyone rightfully ignored it. When she returned later to take our orders, however, the young woman turned to me and politely asked, “Should I instruct the kitchen that you’re allergic and your order should not contain any nightshade vegetables?” I was, in short, flummoxed. (I had to look that up, but it’s the appropriate word to describe my astonishment at her insight, her courtesy and her skill.) She was correct—many purple vegetables do belong to the nightshade family, which can cause ill effects in susceptible people. (The subject, in fact, is explored in “Eating Purple” in this issue.) The ensuing meal, by the way, was exemplary; there’s no doubt we’ll return to the restaurant soon.

I’m partial to waitresses as human beings and as nouns.

* Speaking of returning, as it does about this time each year, fall Hudson Valley Restaurant Week once again is looming on the horizon. Over the short span of two weeks, about a quarter of a million people will visit 200 or so participating restaurants, many of them booked up early. You can bet that every participating chef and every server, greeter, dishwasher, busboy and coat check girl will be intent on giving you the best they have. (It’s a great time, by the way, to show your appreciation for their efforts.) It’s absolutely the best time to enjoy the culinary riches of the Hudson Valley. —JN

On the cover: Purple vegetable still life Photo by Margarita Garcia Acevedo 8

2017 NOV2017 SEPT––nov TABLE sept VALLEY table THE valley the

THE VALLEY TABLE THE MAGAZINE OF HUDSON VALLEY FARMS, FOOD AND CUISINE THE VALLEY TABLE, INC. 380 MAIN STREET, SUITE 202 BEACON, NY 12508 (845) 765-2600 valleytable.com hudsonvalleyrestaurantweek.com NUMBER 79 SEPTEMBER – NOVEMBER 2017 PUBLISHER Janet Crawshaw janetc@valleytable.com EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Jerry Novesky jerryn@valleytable.com Managing Director Jennifer Bannan jennifer@valleytable.com Content & Comunications Coordinator Kristen Warfield kristen@valleytable.com Office Administrator Meghan Merry Graphic Design & Production Greg Simpson / Ephemera Design Nicole Tagliaferro nicole@valleytable.com Website Coordinator Nate Diedrick Advertising Representatives Maryellen Case Laura Lippman Kara Widmer Contributors to this issue Margarita Garcia Acevedo Leslie Coons Eva Deitch David Handschuh Keith Stewart Ann Stratton Sabrina Sucato THE VALLEY TABLE is exclusively devoted to Hudson Valley agriculture, food and cuisine. We support sustainable agricultural practices and efforts to strengthen the links among regional producers, marketers, restaurateurs and consumers. We urge you to patronize businesses that feature Hudson Valley products and to support initiatives that benefit regional agriculture and related efforts. Letters to the editor regarding magazine content are welcome and will be published as space permits. Letters should be mailed to the address above, or emailed to editor@valleytable.com. To be considered for publication, letters must be signed. THE VALLEY TABLE is published four times a year (March, June, Sept and Dec). Distribution is free at selected sites throughout the Hudson Valley or by subscription. Subscriptions are $20 per year. To subscribe, mail a check or money order payable to The Valley Table, 380 Main St., Suite 202, Beacon, NY 12508 or visit valleytable.com. COPYRIGHT © 2017, THE VALLEY TABLE, INC. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced in any form, mechanical or electronic, without written permission of the publishers. Advertisements designed by The Valley Table are copyrighted and may not be reproduced in whole or in part without written permission. ISSN 1257-8417


A Taste For Excellence. The Staub journey begins in the Alsace region of France. Rich in history, food and craft, the area is renowned for hearty one-pot recipes and fine enameled ceramics. French enameled cast iron cookware that marries the expression of the artisan with the culinary imagination of gourmet chefs to produce the ultimate in comfort food. Staub cookware excels in providing the perfect environment for slow-cooked, flavor-enhanced meals. Staub remains as the benchmark for enameled cast iron cookware used by many of world’s great chefs, and continues to be manufactured in France. With a wide assortment of interesting presentation pieces in dynamic colors, Staub cookware easily moves from the kitchen to the table at home and in the finest restaurants worldwide. And from now through the end of January we’re offering special discounts on a wide selection of Staub cookware in stock. What a wonderful opportunity to add piece of history to your kitchen!

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The Hudson Valley’s best selection of fine cutlery, professional cookware, appliances, serving pieces and kitchen tools. • • • • •

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Hard Cider Headquarters 9 different ciders on tap Over 45 bottled ciders Curated selection of wines & spirits 50+ organic, sustainable & biodynamic products

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Gourmet Bakery Bakery specializing specializing in in local, local, Gourmet Gourmet Bakery specializing in local, seasonal and gluten free. free. Gourmet Bakery specializing in local, seasonal and gluten Gourmet Bakery specializing in local, seasonal andny gluten gluten free. seasonal and 418 main street, beacon, 12508 • tel: free. 1.845.765.8502 418 main street, beacon, ny 12508 • tel: 1.845.765.8502 seasonal and gluten free. ellasbellasbeacon@gmail.com • 12508 www.ellasbellasbeacon.com Gourmet Bakery specializing in local, 418 main street, beacon, ny • tel: 1.845.765.8502 ellasbellasbeacon@gmail.com www.ellasbellasbeacon.com 418 main street, beacon, ny• 12508 • tel: 1.845.765.8502 ellasbellasbeacon@gmail.com • www.ellasbellasbeacon.com 418 main main street, beacon, ny• gluten 12508 tel:free. 1.845.765.8502 Gourmet Bakery specializing in local, 418 street, beacon, ny 12508 •• tel: 1.845.765.8502 ellasbellasbeacon@gmail.com www.ellasbellasbeacon.com seasonal and ellasbellasbeacon@gmail.com •• www.ellasbellasbeacon.com ellasbellasbeacon@gmail.com www.ellasbellasbeacon.com Pleaseand visitgluten our sister shop seasonal free. 418 main street, beacon, ny 12508 tel: 1.845.765.8502 Please visit our •sister shop Please visit our sister shop Ella’s Mercantile in the Catskills. ellasbellasbeacon@gmail.com • www.ellasbellasbeacon.com Please visit our sister shop Ella’s Mercantile in 1.845.765.8502 the Catskills. 418 main street, beacon, ny 12508 • tel: Please visit our sister shop Gourmet Bakery specializing in local, Ella’s Mercantile in the Catskills. Please visit our sister shop 124 bragg hallow rd., halcottsville, ny 12438 specializing local, Ella’s Mercantile in the in Catskills. EGourmet L L A’S Bakery ellasbellasbeacon@gmail.com • www.ellasbellasbeacon.com bragg hallow rd., halcottsville, ny 12438 Ella’s Mercantile in the Catskills. 1.607.326.7713 • www.ellasmercantile.com E L L Aseasonal ’ S 124 Ella’s Mercantile in the Catskills. and gluten free. 124 bragg hallow rd., halcottsville, ny 12438 • www.ellasmercantile.com Please visit our shop ny E ’’SS 1.607.326.7713 and gluten free. 124 bragg hallow rd.,sister halcottsville, 12438 E LL LL A Aseasonal 1.607.326.7713 • www.ellasmercantile.com 124 bragg hallow rd., halcottsville, ny 12438 M E R C A N T I L E

1.607.326.7713 • www.ellasmercantile.com 124 bragg hallow rd., halcottsville, ny 12438 LA A Ella’s Mercantile in 1.845.765.8502 theshop Catskills. E LL 418 L ’SSstreet, main beacon, ny 12508 tel: 1.607.326.7713 •• www.ellasmercantile.com Please visit our ••sister 1.607.326.7713 www.ellasmercantile.com 418 main street, beacon, ny 12508 tel: 1.845.765.8502 ellasbellasbeacon@gmail.com • www.ellasbellasbeacon.com 124 bragg hallow rd., halcottsville, ny 12438 • www.ellasbellasbeacon.com Mercantile in the Catskills. Eellasbellasbeacon@gmail.com L L A’S Ella’s 1.607.326.7713 • www.ellasmercantile.com bragg hallow rd., halcottsville, ny 12438 E L L A’S 124 Please visit our sister shop 1.607.326.7713 • www.ellasmercantile.com M M E E R R C C A A N N T T II L L E E M E R C A N T I L E M M E E R R C C A A N N T T II L L E E M E R C A N T I L E M E R C A N T I L E

M E R C A N T I L E

M E R C A N T I L E

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E E LL LL A A’’S S

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M E R C A N T I L E M E R C A N T I L E

Please visit our sister shop Ella’s Ella’s Mercantile Mercantile in in the the Catskills. Catskills. sept – nov 2017

124 bragg hallow rd., halcottsville, ny 12438 124 bragg hallow rd., halcottsville, ny 12438 1.607.326.7713 • www.ellasmercantile.com 1.607.326.7713 • www.ellasmercantile.com


GOOD STUFF

ALL IN T HE FAM ILY

LIKE MOM MAKES When Sara Higgins was raising three kids in the 1990s, most of the breakfast cereals on the market were loaded with sugar and artificial colors. Unimpressed by the commercial options, she began making her own granola instead. “There weren’t any choices out there I felt good about feeding to my kids,” she says. “So, like any parent would, I came up with my own.” Her first batches featured dried, hand-picked raspberries grown around the family’s 150-yearold farmhouse in Marlboro. Naturally, the kids ate it up—and so did Higgins’ friends and family. “Friends kept telling me that I should try selling it,” she recalls. “In 2007, I brought some to a manager at Adams Fairacre Farms and they started selling it in their stores. That really gave me validation that I was onto something and I went running with it. Within a year, we got picked up by Whole Foods.” Raspberry Fields Farm, the small granola company that could, took off. Now, nine years since the company’s start, Higgins bakes from her summer kitchen-turned commercial prep space

appropriately called “The Granolary.” Since 2016, the company has shifted mainly to online sales and wholesale at only a few local grocers and retailers. Her small staff of three plus the kids, now grown, handcraft the popular raspberry granola that started it all, along with French apple pie flavor and dark chocolate sea salt cookies. Simple ingredients—whole rolled oats, crisp rice, honey and coconut—make for a moist, chewy, scratch-made flavor. With milk it’s a tasty breakfast cereal; on its own it’s a satisfying power snack. Higgins admits her granola has become a staple among local hikers and bikers—it’s the “house granola” at Main Street Bistro in New Paltz, a popular brunch spot for Shawangunk Ridge explorers. A 12-ounce bag retails for $7.99 at Adams Fairacre Farms, Mohonk Mountain House and the Taste NY Store at Todd Hill. It and other products (including granola wedding favor sets) are available on the company's website. raspberryfieldsfarm.com —KW

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PR O-PU MPK IN

COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT

BUT IS IT ART?

CUT ME A DEAL

Whether you take hours carving intricate spooky scenes into your Halloween pumpkin or go for the classic, toothless jack-o-lantern look, there are two factors that will almost totally determine the success of your artwork: First, you must have the right tools; and second, you must have the right tools. Luckily for carving enthusiasts, Warren Cutlery Company, in Rhinebeck, offers a locally manufactured alternative to the mass-market, plastic orange carving tools that will flood grocery store shelves in waves come September. Featuring a black walnut handle, Warren’s Pro-Pumpkin Carving Kit ($20.99) includes three narrow and three wide mini-saw blade attachments that will accommodate almost any skill level or carving design challenge. The professional-grade kit also includes a wrench tool to switch blades safely and with ease. It’s available online and at the store in Rhinebeck. warrencutlery.com —KW

H ELPIN G H AN D S

EXPANDING THE NEST Sparrow’s Nest of the Hudson Valley, a local charity that provides free meals to cancer patients and their families, has moved its kitchen headquarters to a larger facility in Wappingers Falls to support a new expansion of its mission. In addition to providing meals to children under 18 whose parents are battling cancer, the organization will now also offer its services to families of children with cancer. Since the nonprofit’s inception in 2012, Sparrow’s Nest has served more than 1,200 people affected by cancer by delivering homemade meals to up to 225 people per week across the Hudson Valley. “Our goal is to give those battling cancer the precious time they need to concentrate on getting better,” says founder Krista Jones. A mother of three and Hopewell Junction resident, Jones founded the charity right from her home kitchen to help a friend and multiple other families in her community who had received a cancer diagnosis. Using its own food truck to deliver meals to families in Dutchess County and parts of Ulster, Orange and Putnam Counties, Sparrow’s Nest plays an important and key role in helping to ease the stress on caregivers who are often too sick or financially burdened to regularly cook for their families. sparrowsnestcharity.org —KW

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After crafting countless pieces of furniture, toys, jewelry boxes and cutting boards for family and friends over the years, local teacher, woodworker and Valley Table contributor John Roccanova was looking for a new way to put his skills to work. He and his wife Jean recognized that most education and community development projects worldwide—especially in Kenya and Haiti—needed support. So, in 2010, the Roccanovas founded Grow Against Poverty, Inc., a 501(c) (3) nonprofit aimed at raising money by selling woodcrafts. Sales of their handcrafted cutting boards, serving platters, salad bowls and beer flights have raised more than $54,000 since the project began. In the Busia district of Kenya, the money raised by Grow Against Poverty supports several projects, including construction of a classroom and computer lab, the startup of a school meal program, and helping families start their own small-scale poultry businesses. Prices for the handmade boards range from $10 to $150. They will be available at the Irondale Schoolhouse in Millerton (Dutchess County), November 24 and 25 from 9am–5pm. For more information, email John Roccanova at growagainstpoverty@gmail.com. —KW


fall farmers’market finds There’s something about the cool autumn air that makes a visit to the local farmers’ market that much more enjoyable (the re-emergence of warm, apple cider donuts and pumpkin-flavored everything doesn’t hurt, either). As we hold tight to the last bit of the summer harvest and prepare for the onset of the holidays, we share this fall’s finest farmers’ market finds.

Firthcliffe Cheese

Coffee-infused Maple Syrup

From Edgwick Farm, a 9-acre microdairy in Cornwall, comes this creamy, bloomy rind goat-milk cheese. Aged with ash, the wheel-shaped cheese is earthy, mushroomy and milky all at once, with an unctuous and smooth texture that coats every crevice of your mouth. Beacon Farmers’ Market; $12

Soukup Farms’ signature dark amber maple syrup meets the robust, earthy taste of locally roasted Irving Farm’s Gotham dark roast coffee. Great over desserts like ice cream or cheesecake, the syrup brings another level of decadence to breakfast staples like waffles and pancakes. Poughkeepsie Waterfront Market; $14/pint

Maya’s Jams Handmade by a mother-daughter-grandmother team in Sullivan County, these all-natural jams and syrups feature fruit from the family’s organic orchard and other neighboring fruit farms. Ranging from sweet to savory, the jams add a punch of flavor to breakfast or baking, while the syrups add a welcomed sweetness to cocktails. Smorgasburg Upstate; jam $8, syrup $20

Grandma’s Pumpkin Treats Don’t forget about Fido or Rover or Spot before leaving the market! These all-natural treats from Good Dog Biscuit Co. in Poughquag have simple ingredients like pumpkin and brown rice flour. We can’t honestly comment directly about the taste of the biscuits, but all our resident four-legged friends loved them. Arlington Farmers’ Market, $7/8-ounce jar

Grok Bites These made-in-New Paltz fruit-and-nut bites may make you redefine snack, healthful and candy bar all at once. Packed with fruits, nuts, dates and superfoods like cacao or matcha, the snacks come in a variety of flavors and are 100 percent raw, vegan and gluten free. New Paltz Open Air Market; $2.50

—Compiled by Kristen Warfield

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EVENT S

LETTERS

1,752 THANKS To the Editor: Thank you thank you to the Valley Table, and to your generous readers! Your recent article about Hudson Valley Seed’s school garden program (“Seeding young minds,” Valley Table 78, Jun-Aug 2017) mentioned how far more schools have requested our program than we have the current staff capacity to reach. The article inspired Valley Table readers to respond to that need, and they donated enough to hire a new staff person to teach at two more schools in Newburgh this fall! We are amazed that this article inspired such generosity, and on behalf of the students who will get to learn outside in their new school gardens this fall, we are incredibly grateful. Our passion is to help kids learn to love eating healthy veggies and stretch their minds and bodies outside. We are so excited that, because of your readers, 1,752 more kids in one of the most food-insecure communities in the Hudson Valley will get to do just that. We’re busy at work building the new gardens your readers funded at Newburgh’s Gidney Avenue Memorial School (GAMS) and Vails Gate Elementary School, and planting our existing gardens (two more in Newburgh, four in Beacon, one in Garrison, and two soon to come in Kingston) to be ready for lessons in September. Though our work is still only beginning, feeling the incredible support of our community that your article inspired makes us confident that we will find the continued funding needed to keep this work going in each of our nine schools and beyond. From our youngest students to the farmers and administrators with whom we partner, we see every day that the Hudson Valley region believes deeply in the importance of local, fresh, sustainable food; in community and collaboration; and in sharing these values with the next generation. Thank you to The Valley Table for your voice in this, and to each of you who make this possible! Ava Bynum Executive Director, Hudson Valley Seed

LOVE AT FIRST SIGHT To the Editor: Loved your editorial in the most recent issue (Valley Table 78, Jun-Aug 2017). Retired about the time you started up. Been going to the valley for about the same time and we got more out of this issue than we have out of any publication at any time during this entire period. Sad (steal from Mr. Trump), that we never saw The Valley Table before this spring. John Woodburn via email

Honoring a Friend John Novi, chef/owner of the Depuy Canal House in High Falls, got a chance to relax with guests, including Valley Table publisher Janet Crawshaw and editor Jerry Novesky, following a program honoring him at Mohonk Mountain House in June. Novi, who closed the restaurant and retired in December 2015, was presented with Mohonk Consultations’ Distinguished Achievement Award for his commitment to farmland preservation and sourcing local ingredients for his innovative cuisine at the famed restaurant.

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FESTIVALS AT BETHEL WOODS CENTER FOR THE ARTS 200 HURD RD, BETHEL Harvest Festival: Sundays, September 3-October 1 Wine Festival: October 7 Craft Beer Festival: October 14 bethelwoodscenter.org HUDSON VALLEY VEGFEST GOLD’S GYM, POUGHKEEPSIE September 23 & 24 Celebrate all things vegan with this premiere plant-based event. Taste vegan culinary delights, browse compassionate clothing, watch plantpowered cooking demos and vegan athlete fitness presentations and meet vegan chefs, authors, animal sanctuary reps and more. Tickets: $10; kids 10 and under: free. hvvegfest.org HUDSON VALLEY GARLIC FESTIVAL CANTINE FIELD, SAUGERTIES September 30 & October 1 Delve into an array of garlic and garlic-flavored foods, including garlic ice cream. Live entertainment, cooking demonstrations, garlic growing demos and more. Admission: $10; kids 12 and under: free. Hvgf.org THE GREAT COLLARD GREENS COOK-OFF 80 BROADWAY, NEWBURGH October 21, noon–4pm Watch judges crown the winner of the ultimate collard greens, cornbread and apple pie cook-off while enjoying more fresh food, local vendors, crafts, farm fun and more from the fair’s on-site farmers’ market. Rain or shine. Downingparkurbanfarm.org TASTE OF THE HUDSON VALLEY THE GRANDVIEW, POUGHKEEPSIE November 5 This epicurean festival brings together wines and culinary delights from Hudson Valley establishments and beyond. Nearly 100 food and wine pairings to enjoy. Proceeds will benefit Mid-Hudson Regional Hospital. midhudsonregional.org/taste WREATH FINERIES AT THE WINERIES SHAWANGUNK WINE TRAIL November 18–19 Ring in the start of the holiday season by visiting wineries along the Shawangunk Wine Trail. Receive a special souvenir wine glass and holiday ornament for attending. gunkswine.com

Visit ValleyTable.com for updates


Derek Grout, Harvest Spirits

Monastic Vinegars

N U TRIT IONAL P UNCH

SWEET ON SOUR Think Hudson Valley and your next thought might naturally be apples; from there it’s only a few milliseconds to apple cider, cider donuts, apple pie and all the other dreamy sweetness the valley’s apple harvest portends. Well, there’s another, fairly recent and immensely popular local apple derivative that’s going to sour your thoughts, but in a good way: apple cider vinegar. Apple cider vinegar packs quite a nutritional punch, and the zingy liquid contains probiotics that help increase the population of bacteria in the gut and promote digestion. It’s not a cure-all, though it comes tantalizingly close. According to Nancy Case, MS, RDN, CDN, outpatient dietitian at Mid-Hudson Regional Hospital, in Poughkeepsie, “Apple cider vinegar has been touted for helping people lose weight, control blood sugar, control blood health, and improve gut health.” Many people start their morning off with a shot of cider vinegar, or drink it mixed with warm water as a health-boosting tonic. The most healthful and arguably most flavorful versions of cider vinegar contain remnants of the “mother”—the bacteria culture responsible for the fermentation. The unique nature of each mother gives each vinegar its distinctive character. Brother Victor-Antoine d’Avila-Latourrette, of Our Lady of the Resurrection Monastery, in LaGrangeville (Dutchess County), has added apple and honey/apple cider vinegars to the extensive line of wine vinegars bottled at the monastery. Using apple cider donations from farms and vendors across the Hudson Valley, Brother Victor’s vinegars are created using a French recipe that dates back to the Middle Ages, to which he adds a unique medley of spices, including bay leaf, clove, cinnamon and brown sugar. The small-batch apple cider vinegar ferments for at least a year to develop a smooth, slightly sweet yet rich flavor profile.

photo left noah kalina ; photo right provided

A 10-ounce bottle of the monastery’s cider vinegar sells for $9 at the monastery gift shop. Derek Grout, co-owner of Harvest Spirits in Valatie (Columbia County), starts at the source for his apple cider vinegar, aptly marketed as “tree-to-bottle.” At Harvest Spirits Farm Distillery, Grout uses surplus apples from Golden Harvest Farms, the home of Harvest Spirits, to create cider, later made into vinegar. “Our apple vinegar is thicker, sweeter, and barrel-aged,” he says, likening the product to a balsamic vinegar in terms of richness and complexity. Grout also makes a fire apple vinegar using a proprietary blend of spices that give it a special kick. New to the lineup is a maple vinegar that adds a perfect touch of sweetness. The vinegars ($15/8-ounce bottle) are available at the distillery, Troy Farmers’ Market and at the Rhinebeck Farmers’ Market. Michelle Siefermann, CSA coordinator at Fishkill Farms in Hopewell Junction (Dutchess County), uses apples from the farm’s orchard to make cider vinegar. She begins with a sweet apple cider that is turned to hard cider and then to cider vinegar. Every batch is unique, Siefermann says. “It’s an experimental process—batches I do at the same time can have very different flavors based on the type of bacteria.” She notes the vinegar often has a spiciness that is both rich and refreshing. The tangy, golden liquid is a versatile ingredient for salad dressings, marinades, tonics and much more. Limited quantities of the cider vinegar ($4.75/16-ounce bottle) are available at the Fishkill Farm Store; call ahead to confirm availability. ourladyoftheresurrectionmonastery.webs.com; harvestspirits.com; fishkillfarms.com For recipes using these vinegars, visit ValleyTable.com. —SS

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OPENINGS

Heritage Food+Drink 1379 Rt 9, Wappingers Falls (845) 298-1555 heritagefooddrink.com

There’s an air of casual luxury throughout the new 250-seat Heritage Food + Drink, opened in mid-August in Wappingers Falls by Jesse Camac, a former partner in Chef Zak Pelaccio’s Hospitality Group (Fatty Crab, Fatty ‘Cue). “Heritage, simply put, is a celebration of New York and all things local,” the new restaurant’s website touts. Much of the menu is sourced from the region, including from Camac’s family-owned orchard and farm in Milton. Executive Chef Shawn Burnette, who has cooked alongside culinary all-stars like Sean Brock and April Bloomfield and was most recently chef at Butterfield in Accord (Ulster County), is at home preparing dishes like whiskey-soaked ribs, beer can chicken or wood-fired steak with ember-roasted mushrooms, vegetables and horseradish cream. The highlight is on meat cooked “slow and low” and finished on a state-of-the-art wood-burning grill, all in view from the dining room. With 72 hours’ notice and a reservation for six or more, Burnette will prepare a whole smoked suckling pig, leg of lamb or pork shoulder, served family style. With two bars, an outdoor patio, two private event rooms and two main dining rooms, seating options are plentiful. Statement light fixtures, tufted leather booths, marbled walls and a rich, signature black-and-yellow color scheme set a refined aesthetic throughout. At the bar, beverage director Jessica Gonzales, formerly head bartender of New York City’s The NoMad and Death & Company, shakes and stirs an array of specialty cocktails featuring house-made juices and syrups. The “Orchard Run” is a fresh pick for fall, with bonded applejack, bourbon, ginger, apple juice and more. A selection of international wines by the glass and local craft beers and ciders top off the drink menu. Sun-Thu 5-10pm; Fri-Sat 5-11pm

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photos this page : ann stratton


Lola’s Café New Paltz 49 Main St, New Paltz (845) 255-6555 lolascafeandcatering.com Ed Kowalski, a Hudson Valley native and the mastermind behind Poughkeepsie’s Crave Restaurant & Lounge and the popular take-out café Lola’s, has ventured out of the city with half of his culinary team and longtime colleague Brandon Brooks to open a second version of Lola’s across the river. Like its namesake, Lola’s New Paltz focuses on local, seasonal ingredients, though the new site is decidedly vegetarian-friendly, with an emphasis on side dishes and grain bowls (like the Power Bowl: edamame, mushrooms and scallions over farro and quinoa, with a ginger carrot vinaigrette). Daily blackboard specials range from heirloom tomato salads to over-the-top milkshakes alongside signature soups, wraps, salads and sandwiches. Lola’s New Paltz will not, however, replicate the original. “For Lola’s, we try to keep it simple,” Kowalski says, “but there’s a lot of surprises.” To start, the café serves both lunch and dinner, and diners can choose to dine al fresco on the front patio. There’s also a new, hand-selected beer and wine list with local offerings. Sun 11–8; Mon-Thur 11–9; Fri-Sat 11–10

Marta’s Vineyard 1955 South Rd, Poughkeepsie (845) 218-9672 martasvine.com Marta Marchetti-Kandl, owner of Marta’s Vineyard, Poughkeepsie’s newest wine and spirits shop, has a strictly “no-snob” philosophy about wine. She notes, “There’s a saying that we like to keep in mind: The best wine is any wine that you really enjoy.” A certified specialist of wine with a diploma from The Wine & Spirits Education Trust, Marchetti-Kandl welcomes newcomers and aficionados alike with her handpicked selection of wines from across the globe. Locals will recognize an array of Hudson Valley and New York wines and spirits, ranging from Warwick and Gardiner to Brooklyn and the Finger Lakes. “We stock what I consider to be the best of New York wines and spirits, plus some from unusual places like Lebanon and the Canary Islands,” Marchetti-Kandl notes, adding that she tests each product for quality before putting it out for sale. To help customers navigate among well-known favorites and rare artisanal varieties, the shop has a unique labeling system that makes it easy to identify top-rated, organic, biodynamic and vegan products. With a clear passion for wine education, Marchetti-Kandl plans to host tasting events and seminars at the store to teach people about international winemaking methods, food pairings and more. “We’re creating a sense of community here, providing a fun and relaxing place to shop and learn at the same time,” she says. Mon noon–7; Tue-Sat 10–7; Sun noon–5

lola ' s , marta ' s photo : ann stratton ; meyer ' s photo : provided

Meyer’s Olde Dutch 184 Main St, Beacon (845) 440-6900 meyersoldedutch.com Take your favorite burger joint, add homegrown ingredients and a fullservice local bar and you have Meyer’s Olde Dutch, the new counter service eatery from chef Brian Arnoff of Kitchen Sink Food & Drink. Housed in the former Poppy’s (a block away from Kitchen Sink) Meyer’s is a modern take on the classic burger restaurant with a large backyard patio. From the piledhigh double Dutch burger with bacon and cheddar to the vegan ’shrooms and nuts burger, carnivores and veg heads alike can get their fix of grilled goodness. Salads, hot dogs and chicken sandwiches round out the menu alongside doublecooked fries, sweet potato fritters and house-made dipping sauces. “All our Kitchen Sink philosophies about using local food purveyors are applied at Meyer’s Olde Dutch,” Arnoff notes, including New York State beef, cheese and local produce (some from his family microfarm in Hyde Park). Wed, Thu, Sun noon–9pm; Fri-Sat noon–midnight

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GLOBALLY INFLUENCED, AMERICAN EXECUTED & ENTIRELY HUDSON VALLEY Heritage, simply put, is a celebration of New York and all things local. We hope you’ll come and be a part of what we are – a place to enjoy life with what we know best – insanely delicious food and drink.

1379 U.S. 9, Wappingers Falls, NY 12590 info@heritagefooddrink.com | Instagram: @heritagefooddrink

www.heritagefoodanddrink.com | (845) 298-1555 www.heritagefooddrink.com

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ADVERTISEMENT

PEONY VODKA COCKTAIL COMPETITION Our VALLEY TABLE judges have made their decision... Special thanks to Janet Crawshaw, Tim Buzinski & Kara Widmer.

THE WINNER!

EMILY GUTIERREZ is a Hudson Valley native

who realized her passion for wines and spirits shortly after joining the Essie’s team. Emily’s inviting, charismatic, and humor -filled personality shines through in her cocktails. She’s worked at several restaurants in the Hudson Valley honing her skills. Although relatively new on the mixology scene, Emily’s passion, enthusiasm, and unique ideas excite customers every time they taste one of her creative and expertly-crafted libations!

GREEN GODDESS

ESSIE’S is located in the heart of the Little Italy section of Poughkeepsie, NY. Executive Chef Brandon Walker’s Modern American menu is inspired by global flavors and his family roots from the Caribbean and the American South. Chef Walker - a CIA graduate from Brooklyn - uses modern cooking techniques and local seasonal ingredients to support the local food economy and to showcase the finest Hudson Valley fare. essiesrestaurantpk.com

2oz Peony Vodka .5oz Lime Juice .5oz Simple Syrup 1oz Harney & Sons Tropical Green Tea (fresh brewed & chilled) 3 Dashes of Lavender Bitters 1 Dash Grapefruit Bitters Place all ingredients in a shaker, fill with ice and shake. Strain into a coupe glass and serve.

Let’s Hear It for the Runners Up!

STEVEN GREMMERT

TAKE 4

AUSTIN SULLIVAN is Director of Operations for HELSINKI HUDSON in Hudson, NY, where he allows his passion for service to shine. “For me, it’s about an experience. I love when people can gather for great food and drinks, in a place that’s welcoming and exciting...” You’ll find Austin behind the bar at Helsinki at least one night a week. - “I love being able to stop at the farms on my way in and grab berries that literally just came from the field, or pull fresh herbs from our courtyard garden and see what I can come up with to surprise my guests. I want them to come back and be excited to see me behind the bar.”

Seattle native STEVEN GREMMERT found an inspiring group of professionals at REDWOOD in Kingston, NY. With the creative help of owner Kelly Jenkins Polston, and Chef Sean, Redwood’s cocktail menu changes seasonally, utilizing the abundance of fresh, local ingredients. Some of Steven’s other great cocktails include the Lily Pad, the Floral Note, and the Thaifoon- to know how they taste you’ll have to go visit him on the roof at Redwood! redwooduptown.com

AUSTIN SULLIVAN

FARMER’S DAY OFF

helsinkihudson.com

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cooking withfire by leslie coons photos by eva deitch

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t ’ s h a r d t o p i n p o i n t e x a c t ly w h e n early humans learned how to control fire for cooking food, but many anthropologists say it was about 600,000 years ago. One thing is for certain: Chefs working today in the Hudson Valley continue to improve on the process, and by all accounts, customers are, well, hot for it. “I don’t know if it is in our DNA or part of umami, [but] there is a primal taste we have [for food cooked with fire],” says Waldy Malouf, senior director of food and beverage operations at the Culinary Institute of America (CIA) in Hyde Park. “It is the reason why a grilled hot dog tastes better than a boiled hot dog. We experience this in our system.” Malouf knows fire. In the early 1990s, he opened the Hudson River Club, and later Beacon Restaurant & Bar, both in Manhattan. In addition to creating a cuisine that celebrated the food grown and produced in the Hudson Valley, Malouf was one of the first chefs on the East Coast to bring live fire back into the commercial kitchen. Some people were making pizza and flatbreads in wood-burning ovens, but Malouf’s restaurants roasted meats and vegetables and grilled fish in them, too.

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Early in his career, Malouf visited Spain and Argentina, where chefs regularly cooked using wood fire. “I sort of fell in love with it,” he recalls. “In countries like Japan, Korea, Spain and Italy, they cook with live fire regularly, and in California, more people were doing it. It was an unusual thing for us to do in New York at that time. I just brought it back a little more.” Cooking with live fire “is very much a trend these days,” Malouf says. “It is not really easy because you have to commit to it, to learn how to use it in a commercial setting.” Because restaurants need different exhaust and fire-suppression systems, “It is a little more expensive than cooking with gas, and more expensive to set up,” he adds. At the Heritage Food + Drink, which opened in August in Wappingers Falls, 40 percent of the entrées are prepared on a 12-foot, custom-made, open-fire grill in the 250-seat restaurant, which also uses outside grills and smokes some of its food. “We do a lot of slow cooking on the grill, like Southern pulled pork,” says Executive Chef Shawn Burnette. “All our steaks, lobster and whole trout boned out are cooked on the grill. What I would really love, at some point in the future, is to expand the [inside grill].” Burnette is no stranger to cooking with fire. His background includes the acclaimed Husk in Charleston, South Carolina, and Butterfield at Hasbrouck House in Stone Ridge, where he brought back the property’s smokehouse. “I’ve been learning how to cook over fire for the past six years, since I used a wood oven, smoker and open pit at Husk,” he says. “We used the embers to cook, too, and we do that here. The color of the embers is the temperature of the fire. Like in a colonial hearth, we cook in cast iron and put the cast iron into the embers. I do a twist on pimento cheese, and prepare it in cast-iron pan. I put it into the firebox of the smoker,” he says. Nick DiBona, chef/owner of Madison Kitchen in Larchmont, employs live fire in different ways. A smoker at the restaurant is used to prepare lamb lollipops, which are served with mushroom purée and parsley oil. Every Wednesday, DiBona roasts a pig over charcoal at the restaurant, and his signature ice cream is served in what he calls Bona style: “We scoop ice cream, make an indentation on the top, fill with homemade meringue and hit it with a blow torch—it’s a twist on a baked Alaska,” he says. Di Bona also has a food truck that he uses to sell the ice cream at Brooklyn Flea + Smorgasburg and at private events; the

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ice cream also is available at his restaurant. Chef Andrew Chase grew up “all over the world,” but returned to the United States to earn a degree from the CIA. His wife is from Munich, Germany, and together they’ve worked at catering, organic farming and in a bakery in Germany. When they settled in Columbia County, they started selling a German-French specialty, flammkuchen (tarte flambée) from a food truck outfitted with a wood-fired brick oven. With their cream base, fresh herbs, and toppings—such as Berkshire bacon lardons, thin-sliced red onions and Gruyere, guajillo-braised pork shoulder, chipotle, caramelized onions and fresh mozzarella—the wood-fired flatbreads were a hit. The oven also was used to cook the meats and vegetables used as the toppings. The Chases recently sold their food truck and moved into a brick-and-mortar restaurant, the Flammerie in Kinderhook. Much of the European-inspired menu is cooked in the restaurant’s wood-fired oven, a Belforno with a 36-inch hearth. “About half of the menu comes out of that oven—flammkuchen, raclette, spätzle, veggies, bacon, pork belly and whole fish,” Chase says. His favorite dish is pork belly. “It is something very special. First a very long braise, then let it cool, then flash sear in the oven. We are serving it right now over sweet potato and parsnip purée with a mustard jus.” Because wood-fired ovens can get very hot (600 to 700 degrees Fahrenheit) and cook food very quickly, it is an art to use use them properly, Malouf notes. Indeed, there’s more to building a fire than just lighting a match to some kindling. The wood used will have a significant effect on the temperature, longevity and character of the fire—and the nature of the aromatic hydrocarbons released from the wood when it burns can influence the taste of the food, as well. “The char adds another level of flavor to food,” Malouf says. “Fire and smoke should be treated as a final ingredient in a dish.” Malouf favors oak, maple and apple, which “really doesn’t flavor food like apples, but it is a nice, lighter smoke.” For a hot-burning oven, he recommends using mesquite chips and chunks. Hardwood is de rigueur for most cooking fires, and in the Hudson Valley, apple, oak and maple help define the region’s terroir. The wood-fired oven used at the Flammerie “cooks so quickly that the food won’t pick up flavor from the wood,” Chase says, so he looks for high BTU-producing wood—cherry, maple and oak. Burnette makes his own charcoal from apple wood sourced from restaurant owner Jesse

Fire and smoke should be treated as a final ingredient in a dish. — WALDY MALOUF

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Once a pie goes in, you can’t walk away—you must be on it constantly. It is truly an artisan way of cooking. — PATRICK AMEDEO

FIRE AND PIZZA

Pizzeria Posto in Rhinebeck serves “the best pizza in Dutchess County,” because chef/ owner Patrick Amedeo “treats his woodfired oven with a huge amount of respect,” says CIA senior director of food and beverage operations Waldy Malouf. “He knows how to work it. It is an example of the correct and good use of a wood-burning oven. He is very passionate about it.” Amedeo has been cooking pizza in wood-fired ovens for almost 10 years. “We have no other cooking equipment in the pizzeria,” Amedeo notes. “We cook everything that’s on our menu in our oven.” His oven was made in Modena, Italy, shipped to Rhinebeck and fabricated in place. “The dome of my oven is a little higher in dimension, which slows the bake and caramelizes the crust more,” Amedeo says. “I am not looking to cook the pizza in 90 seconds like some Neapolitan ovens— that only creates a soupy, soggy crust. When we initially put a pie in, we stay away from fire to allow the pizza to develop lift, then slowly spin and relocate. We are constantly moving and shifting to areas of the oven floor. Once a pie goes in, you can’t walk away—you must be on it constantly. It is truly an artisan way of cooking.” —LC

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Camac’s family orchard in Milton. “We are really lucky—we get the wood when they trim the trees,” Burnette says, noting that he also buys white oak barrel staves from a whiskey-making friend. “I combine [apple] with aged white oak—that is my Southern heritage. You get the aromatics, the intense heat and the smoke of the white oak and a little whiskey essence.” In fact, Burnette says, he loves the whole process. “Fire is deep in my cooking,” he says. “I like the randomness of fire; I love the dance of it—and I like to smell like smoke. I get to experience the entire cooking process.” Burnette likes to use his restaurant’s grill as a teaching tool. “I like to keep the cooks focused. The fire makes them pay attention. I can teach them scientific principles using fire, like, this happened to the steak and here is why and how you can keep it from happening again.” Malouf teaches wood-fire cooking at the CIA’s various campuses around the country. He also cooks using fire at his Dutchess County home and plans to build a wood-burning oven. (His favorite fire-cooked dish? “Oysters roasted in a wood-burning oven, with a beurre blanc,” he says. “We’ve found the smoke flavor adheres to the fat better than anything else. You almost smoke the butter.”) For the chefs, though, the time, learning, expense and preparation necessary to successfully cook using live fire are worth it. “It really takes a lot of time to get a feeling for the temperature—you have to figure out a system,” Chase says. “There are different areas of the oven—some have higher temperatures—and you have to decide where is the steak spot, where do the flatbreads go. You don’t want the area cooking the flatbreads to get too cool, or they will stick. It is really interesting to work with something that almost feels alive.” 4 The Flammerie 7 Hudson St, Kinderhook (518) 758-1509; theflammerie.com Heritage Food + Drink 1379 Rt 9, Wappingers Falls (845) 298-1555; HeritageFoodDrink.com Madison Kitchen 7 Madison Ave, Larchmont (914) 732-3024; mklarchmont.com Pizzeria Posto 43 E Market St Courtyard, Rhinebeck (845) 876-3500; postopizzeria.com

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WOOD-FIRE OVEN SEARED HUDSON VALLEY FOIE GRAS ANDREW CHASE Ingredients 2 ounces sliced Hudson Valley foie gras (very cold) Salt and freshly ground pepper 1 ounce clarified butter 1 medium shallot thinly sliced 2 ounces dry hard cider 1 tablespoon apple butter 1 tablespoon toasted and crushed pistachios serves one Method 1. Heat small sauté pan on the open tiles of a preheated wood-fire oven, about 6 inches from flames for approximately 3 minutes. 2. Keep foie gras in the fridge until just prior to cooking. Gently score foie gras slice with a sharp knife in a crosshatch pattern, season lightly with salt and freshly ground pepper. 3. Add clarified butter to the hot sauté pan, then add the scored foie gras to the sauté pan, push the pan back to 6 inches from the flames and cook for 2 minutes. 4. Flip the foie gras and pull the pan towards the oven door or shelf to rest an additional minute in the pan. 5. Remove foie gras from the pan and keep warm, reserve rendered fat and butter in the sauté pan. 6. Add sliced shallots to the pan with foie gras fat and butter, push the pan close to the fire, stirring occasionally until shallots are lightly caramelized. 7. Remove caramelized shallots from pan, add cider and reduce to a syrup. 8. Plate a tablespoon of apple butter with caramelized shallots, drizzle the reduced cider over the shallots, top with the foie gras and finish with sprinkle of pistachios. For those without a wood-fired oven, try it on your grill: heat a cast iron pan at medium-high heat on the grates, follow same procedure with closing lid of the grill for two minutes after flipping the foie gras in the pan. The Flammerie 7 Hudson St, Kinderhook (518) 758-1509

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PORCHETTA SHAWN BURNETTE Ingredients double-thick pork loin chop 6 whole garlic cloves (to taste), peeled olive oil fresh parsley kosher salt serves one Method 1. In a small pot, submerge garlic cloves in olive oil and cook uncovered over low heat until garlic softens and browns. 2. Butterfly the loin chop, cutting from the fat side (leave the two halves connected). 3. When the garlic is cooked, remove from the pan and drain. Retain the oil. 4. Rub cooked garlic vigorously into the cut face of the chop, crushing the cloves. 5. Salt generously and then place an even coat of fresh parsley leaves over the rubbed face of chop. 6. Beginning on the outside, roll the chop, folding the rubbed side in. Tie with butcher’s twine. 7. On the hot spot of the grill, sear the outside of the porchetta, rolling it until it is evenly crusted. (Don’t panic if the color changes or a crust forms—it all tastes amazing.) 8. Move the chop to a cooler spot on the grill, or elevate the grate, and continue to cook to 145˚F internal temperature (check with a meat thermometer). 9. Remove from heat and let the meat rest for several minutes. Slice and serve with a light coat of the garlic cooking oil and fresh ground pepper. Heritage Food+Drink 1379 Rt 9, Wappingers Falls (845) 298-1555


WOOD OVEN ROASTED OYSTERS WITH SHALLOTS & HERBS WALDY MALOUF Ingredients 6 tablespoons unsalted butter 1 cup thinly sliced shallots ¼ cup dry white wine or dry vermouth Coarse sea salt or kosher salt Freshly ground black pepper ¼ cup chicken or vegetable broth (reduced-sodium if canned) or water 1 tablespoon snipped fresh chives 1 tablespoon chopped fresh flat-leaf parsley Rock salt to roast the oysters on 3 tablespoons black peppercorns 24 live oysters Lemon wedges for serving serves four Method Heat wood oven to 500-600°. For home cooks without access to a wood-fire oven, Malouf says the oysters can be roasted at a very high temperature in a conventional oven or even put under a broiler close to the heat. They may also be roasted in a very hot, covered Weber-type grill, which would add the smoke flavor to the oysters. To keep the oysters balanced while they roast, line the baking dish with a layer of edible rock salt dotted with peppercorns. The salt and pepper makes a great presentation. You can buy rock salt (for water softeners) at a hardware store. 1. In a heavy saucepan over medium heat, melt 4 tablespoons of the butter. Reduce the heat to low and add the shallots and wine. Cover and cook until most of the liquid is absorbed, about 4 to 5 minutes. 2. Season with salt and pepper and add the broth and the remaining 2 tablespoons of butter. Bring to a simmer, then remove from the heat and stir in the herbs. 3. Cover the bottom of an ovenproof baking dish large enough to hold all the oysters with rock salt. Sprinkle the peppercorns evenly over the salt. 4. Open the oysters, discarding the top shell. Loosen the oysters from the bottom shell, being careful not to spill their juices, and lay them in the baking dish. 5. Stir the shallot mixture and spoon some over each oyster. Roast until the edges of the oysters just begin to curl, about 5 to 8 minutes. Serve with lemon wedges. The Culinary Institute of America 1946 Campus Dr, Hyde Park (845) 452-9600

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SUNDAYS FREE SEPTEMBER 3-OCTOBER 1

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SATURDAY OCTOBER 7

CRAFT BEER HOLIDAY SATURDAY DECEMBER 2 SUNDAY DECEMBER 3

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Bethel Woods Center for the Arts is a not-for-profit cultural organization that inspires, educates, and empowers individuals through the arts and humanities. BWCA-FEST-VALLEYTABLE-SEPT.indd 1

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CANTERBURY BROOK INN ZAGAT RATED “EXTRAORDINARY”

THE HUDSON VALLEY’S NEWEST FINE WINE AND SPIRITS STORE

Stop By and See What You’re Missing • We carry all your favorites and special artisan selections that “over-deliver” on quality-to-price ratio. • What makes us so special? All of our products are selected (and tasted) by Marta, the owner, DWS, CSW, so you can expect us to help you find that perfect bottle.

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• We’ll provide amazing service and superb advice for pairing food and wines.

1955 South Rd. South Road Square Poughkeepsie, NY

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phone: 845.218.9672 MartasVineyardWine.com

Swiss Continental Cuisine $19.95 3-Course Dinner Tues–Thur Seasonal Fare • Catering Available 331 Main Street, Cornwall NY (845) 534-9658 www.canterburybrookinn.com HANS AND KIM BAUMANN, HOSTS

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RESERVATIONS SUGGESTED


Brothers’ TRAT TORIA

POUGHKEEPSIE JOURNAL

465 Main St. Beacon 2540 Rt. 55, Poughquag brotherstrattoria.com

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Whole sale fruit & Produce Where quality rules, local comes first and taste matters 217 UPPER NORTH ROAD, HIGHLAND • 845.691.7428 • FAX 845.691.7468 32

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FARMS, FOOD & MARKETS

u-pick harvest 2017

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t ’ s l o o k i n g l i k e a ba n n e r y e a r f o r t h i s

fall’s fruit and vegetable harvests in the Hudson Valley, and farms from Ghent to Gardiner to Granite Springs are gearing up with a wide variety of apples and pumpkins ready for pickin’. There’s only one thing better than spending a crisp fall afternoon enjoying the beauty of the fall foliage, picking a bushel of apples or the perfect Halloween pumpkin—and that’s going

home to enjoy the fruits of your labor. Many farms now include on-site markets, complete with pre-picked produce and fresh-baked apple cider doughnuts or pies, and there are activities like haunted houses, hayrides and corn mazes. So, check our up-to-date listings, doublecheck the farms’ websites for schedules and availability, pack up the family and... see you at the farm!

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u-pick farms in the hudson valley COLUMBIA Don Baker Farm 183 Rt 14, Hudson (518) 828-9542; donbakerfarm.com PYO: daily 9-5 apples Fix Brothers Fruit Farm 215 White Birch Rd, Hudson (518) 828-7560; fixbrosfruitfarm.com PYO: daily 8-5 apples, pumpkins; IPM method Golden Harvest Farms 3074 US Rt 9, Valatie (518) 758-7683; goldenharvestfarms.com PYO: Sat-Sun 9-4 apples

Love Apple Farm 1421 Rt 9H, Ghent (518) 828-5048; loveapplefarm.com PYO: daily 8-6 apples

Yonder Farms 37 Maple Ln, Valatie (518) 758-7011; yonderfruitfarms.com PYO: Sat–Sun 9-6 apples, pumpkins

Philip Orchards Farm 270 Rt 9H, Claverack (518) 851-6351; philiporchards.com PYO: daily 9-5:30 apples; IPM method

DUTCHESS

Samascott Orchards 5 Sunset Ave, Kinderhook (518) 758-7224; samascott.com PYO: daily 8-6 apples, pumpkins, squash Smith Farms 200 White Birch Rd, Hudson (518) 828-1228; smithfarmshudson.com PYO: Mon-Thu 10-5, Fri-Sat 10-4 apples

Barton Orchards 63 Apple Tree Ln, Poughquag (845) 227-2306; bartonorchards.com PYO: Mon-Fri 9-5, Sat–Sun 9-6 apples; IPM method Cedar Heights Orchards 8 Crosby Ln, Rhinebeck (845) 876-3231; rhinebeckapples.com PYO: 9-dusk daily apples

Extreme integrity. This store offers some of the best food in the entire world! Beautiful, local Biodynamic ® selection. ~ Jeff B.

Celebrating 200 Years of Family Farming

Pick Your Own Apples, Pick Your Own Apples, Pears Pears&&Pumpkins Pumpkins

APPLE CIDER • WINTER SQUASH • CIDER DONUTS BAKED GOODS • SWEET CORN

73 Clarks Lane, Milton, NY 12547 845-795-2383 biodynamic creamery • organic bakery new: organic hv chickens th

Join us for our Annual Fall Festival Sunday, October 8

OPEN DAILY 7:30 AM-7 PM • 518.672.7500 • HVFSTORE.ORG

9AM-6PM | Hopewell Jct. NY | 845-897-4377 | www..shkillfarms.com 34

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WEEKENDS 16 – Oct. WEEKENDSONLY ONLY, Sept. Sept. 12–Oct. 2522

OPEN Columbus Day

SEE WEBSITE FOR INFO ON FAMILY FESTS

www. prospecthillorchards.com


Dykeman Farm 823 W Dover Rd, Pawling (845) 832-6068; dykemanfarm.com PYO: Sat–Sun 10-5 pumpkins Fishkill Farms 9 Fishkill Farm Rd, Hopewell Junction (845) 897-4377; fishkillfarms.com PYO: daily 9-6 apples, pumpkins Green Horizons Organic 6 S Dingle Ln, Pawling (845) 855-5555 PYO: by appointment only apples, pumpkins Greig Farm 223 Pitcher Ln, Red Hook (845) 758-1234; greigfarm.com PYO: daily sunlight hours apples, pumpkins Meadowbrook Farm 29 Old Myers Corners Rd, Wappingers Falls (845) 297-3002; meadowbrookfarmmarket.com PYO: daily 9-6 apples, pumpkins Mead Orchards Farm 15 Scism Rd, Tivoli (845) 756-5641; meadorchards.com PYO: Sat–Sun 10-6 apples

ORANGE Apple Dave’s Orchards 82 Four Corners Rd, Warwick (845) 986-1684; appledavesorchardsanddistillery.com PYO: daily 9-5 apples, pumpkins Jones Farm 190 Angola Rd, Cornwall (845) 534-4445; jonesfarminc.com PYO: Mon & Wed–Fri 8-6, Sat–Sun 8-5 pumpkins Late Bloomer Farm 32 Union St, Montgomery (845) 742-8705; facebook.com/Late-BloomerFarm-211927258832194/ PYO: Wed-Sun 10-6 pumpkins Lawrence Farms Orchards 306 Frozen Ridge Rd, Newburgh (845) 562-4268; lawrencefarmsorchards.com PYO: daily 9-4 apples, pumpkins; IPM method Masker Orchards 45 Ball Rd, Warwick (845) 986-1058; maskers.com PYO: daily 9-5 apples Ochs Orchard 4 Ochs Ln, Warwick (845) 986-1591; ochsorchard.net PYO: Wed-Sun 9-5 apples, pumpkins Pennings Farm Market Orchard 169 Rt 94, Warwick (845) 986-1059; penningsorchard.com PYO: daily 9-5 apples

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Pierson Farm & Greenhouse 1448 Rt 211 W, Middletown (845) 386-1882; piersonsfarm.com PYO: daily 10-6 pumpkins Sleepy Hills Orchard 1328 Rt 284, Johnson (845) 726-3797; sleepyhillsorchard.com PYO: Sat-Sun 10-4 apples Soons Orchard 23 Soons Circle, New Hampton (845) 374-5471; soonsorchard.com PYO: daily 9-6 apples, pumpkins; IPM method Warwick Valley Winery, Distillery & Orchards 114 Little York Rd, Warwick (845) 258-4858; wvwinery.com PYO: Mon-Fri 12-5, Sat-Sun 11-5 apples, pears Wright Family Farm 329 Kings Hwy, Warwick (845) 986-1345; wrightfamilyfarm.com PYO: Sept: Sat-Sun 12-6/Oct: Fri 4-6, Sat-Sun 10-6 pumpkins

ROCKLAND Dr. Davies Farm 306 Rt 304, Congers (845) 268-7020; drdaviesfarm.com PYO: daily 10-4 apples, pumpkins Orchards of Concklin 2 S Mountain Rd, Pamona (845) 354-0369; theorchardsofconcklin.com PYO: Sun 10-5 apples; IPM method

ULSTER Dressel Farms 271 Rt 208, New Paltz (845) 255-0693; dresselfarms.com PYO: daily 9-6 apples, pumpkins

3074 Rte 9, Valatie, NY 12184 (518) 758-1776 • harvestspirits.com

Taking Thanksgiving Turkey orders starting October 1st

Dubois Farms 209 Perkinsville Rd, Highland (845) 795-4037; duboisfarms.com PYO: daily 10-5 apples, pumpkins Hurds Family Farm 2187 Rt 32, Modena (845) 883-7825; hurdsfamilyfarm.com PYO: daily 9-5 apples, pumpkins; IPM method Jenkins-Lueken Orchards 69 Yankee Foley Rd, New Paltz (845) 255-0999; jlorchards.com PYO: daily 9-5 apples, pumpkins Kelder’s Farm & Homegrown Mini Golf 5755 Rt 209, Kerhonkson (845) 626-7137; keldersfarm.com PYO: daily 10-6 apples, pumpkins Locust Grove Fruit Farm 199 North Rd, Milton (845) 795-5194; locustgrovefruitfarm.com PYO: Sat-Sun 10-5 Apples, pumpkins

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Market at Todd Hill

Grass-fed Beef & Lamb Pastured Pork Raised naturally on Warwick’s LOWLAND FARM

On-Farm Store: Open Saturdays 10 - 3 Enter at 32 Prices Switch Road (845) 461-3459 info@lowlandfarm.com Warwick, NY 10990

Store Open Store Open Mon, Wed, Thu, Sat: 8 AM - 6 PM Fri: Mon, 8 AM - Wed, 8 PM | Sun: AMAM - 7 PM Thu:9 8 -6 Closed on Tuesday Fri: 8 AM - 8 PM

PM

Contact us at: 845-849-0247 tastenytoddhill.com

Outdoor Sat,Farmers' Sun: 9Market AM - 7 PM Fridays, 2 pm - 6 pm Closed on Tuesday May 26 - Oct 14, 2017

An amazing collection of foods and products grown or made in the Hudson Valley. Located on the Taconic Parkway, 10 miles north of I-84, 1 mile south of Route 55, Lagrange, NY

VISIT OUR FARM STORE Tuesdays & Fridays: 2:00 pm - 6:00 pm Saturdays: 9:00 am - 1:00 pm May - November USDA Certified Organic vegetables, pastured meat and eggs, and selections from regional farms & food purveyors.

Drink Local This Fall!

SNAP accepted! glynwood.org/buy-our-products 845.265.3338

Season Long Farmers’ Markets: Woodstock, Arlington, Goshen, Peekskill & Beacon

Fresh Seafood Arriving Daily • Wholesale & Retail

hudsonvalleyseafood.com • 30 Valley Ave • Central Valley, NY • 845-928-9678

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“Baked & Grown, Just Like Home”

Prospect Hill Orchards 73 Clarks Ln, Milton (845) 795-2383; prospecthillorchards.com PYO: Sat–Sun 9-4 apples, pumpkins Saunderskill Farm 5100 Rt 209, Accord (845) 626-2676; saunderskill.com PYO: Tue–Sun 7-6 apples, pumpkins

Jones Farm & Country Store

Clearwaters Distinctive Gifts

Grandma Phoebe’s Kitchen

Clearwaters Gallery & Custom Framing

Homegrown Seasonal Produce Hayrides & Pick Your Own Pumpkins Homemade Baked Goods Fudge & Gift Baskets Breakfast & Lunch Cafe

Tantillo’s Farm 730 Rt 208, Gardiner (845) 256-9109; tantillosfarm.com PYO: daily 9-4:30 pumpkins, apples

Fine Gifts, Home Decor, Toys, Ladies Clothing & Accessories

Archival Framing

Artwork by Terri A. Clearwater

190 Angola Rd. Cornwall, NY 845-534-4445(P) • 845-534-4471(F) www.JonesFarmInc.com Mon & Wed - Fri: 8-6 • Sat & Sun: 8-5 Closed Tuesdays

Farm Market & Bakery Specialty Groceries Certified Organic Meats & Produce Daily Lunch Specials Family owned and organic since 1987

Thanksgiving Turkey Pre-order Organic Soils & Compost

5409 Route 22 Millerton, NY 12546 518.789.4191

Visit our website for hours, events & specials at:

mcenroeorganicfarm.com

Twin Star Orchards 155 N. Ohioville Rd, New Paltz (845) 633-8657; twinstarorchards.com PYO: Fri-Sun 11-7 apples Wallkill View Farms 15 Rt 299 W, New Paltz (845) 255-8050; wallkillviewfarmmarket.com PYO: daily 9-6:30 pumpkins Weed Orchards & Winery 43 Mount Zion Rd, Marlboro (845) 236-7848; weedorchards.com PYO: Sat-Sun 10-5 apples, pumpkins; IPM method Wright’s Farm 699 Rt 208, Gardiner (845) 255-5300; eatapples.com PYO: daily 8-4:30 apples; IPM method Wilklow Orchards Farm 341 Pancake Hollow Rd, Highland (845) 691-2339; wilkloworchards.com PYO: daily 9-6 apples, pumpkins

WESTCHESTER Harvest Moon Farm & Orchard 130 Hardscrabble Rd, North Salem (914) 485-1210; harvestmoonfarmandorchard.com PYO: daily 10-5 apples, pumpkins; IPM method Outhouse Orchards 139 Hardscrabble Rd, North Salem (914) 277-3188; outhouseorchardsny.com PYO: daily 9-5 pumpkins, apples Stuart’s Fruit Farm 62 Granite Springs Rd, Granite Springs (914) 245-2784; stuartsfarm.com PYO: daily 10-5 apples, pumpkins Wilkens Fruit and Fir Farm 1335 White Hill Rd, Yorktown Heights (914) 245-5111; wilkensfarm.com PYO: daily 10-4:30 apples, pumpkins; IPM method

ValleyTable.com for updates

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INTRODUCING

Like us on Facebook! Celebrating 16 years! Saturdays 9am to 2pm!

SANDWICHES • SALADS • COFFEE

PIE • GOURMET ITEMS • APPLE CIDER PEARS • PUMPKINS • APPLEWOOD

APPLES • DONUTS • GLUTEN FREE ITEMS

CHEF’S TABLE For reservations contact Mark@SproutCreekFarm.org

Try our award-winning cow & goat milk cheeses!

sproutcreekfarm.org 34 LAUER ROAD, POUGHKEEPSIE, NY Market & Creamery 845.485.9885 | Educational Programs & General Info 845.485.8438 | Culinary 845.206.0235

LTRY FARM & MA U O P S ’ O R RKE T T A T QU Our own farm-raised chickens, pheasants, ducks, geese, venison

TURKEYS WILD TURKEYS HERITAGE TURKEYS

IT’S TIME TO TALK TURKEY All-natural, strictly antibiotic- and hormone-free. Plump and tender. VISIT OUR FARM STORE RT. 44, PLEASANT VALLEY NY 12569 (845) 635-2018

apples, pears, plums A UNIQUE SHOP FOR CUSTOM-CUT PRIME MEATS Steaks • Chops • Leg of Lamb • Crown Roasts • Prime Rib Fresh or Smoked Hams | CRAFT on TAP! CRAFT BEERS BEERS&&BEER BEER on TAP! Our own Smokehouse Specialty Meats & Sausages ITALIAN SPECIALTIES: Cheeses, Pastas, Olive Oil, Vinegars Also LOCAL Breads, Vegetables, Honey, Jams, Grains & More!

Come taste how smooth Hudson Valley grain 36 times distilled can be…

Naturally Raised Seasonal Produce

…And while you are here try the gins and whiskey too!

Visit our Farm Market

www.stoutridge.com Friday-Sunday 11-6

Angus Beef, Poultry, Pork, Lamb, Turkeys

1697 Salt Point Turnpike • Salt Point, NY 12578 266-5042 or 266-3680

www.HahnFarm.com

(845) 236-7620 10 Ann Kaley Lane, Marlboro, NY 12542

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Mo NOW th O er PE Ea N I rth N K ’s IN Ca GS fé TO & N! De li

Since

1978

FALL IN LOVE

with the Hudson Valley’s premier natural food market. Focusing on wholesome, nutritious foods and supplements.

2241 ALBANY POST RD. WALDEN, NY ANGRYORCHARD.COM | 845.713.5180 TOURS, TASTINGS & TREE HOUSE

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LOCALLY GROWN

deer defense

I

n a n y s o c i a l g at h e r i n g w i t h p e o p l e i k n ow w h o

don’t make a living growing vegetables, I’m invariably hit with a few gardening questions: What’s causing the dark spots on the lower leaves of my tomatoes? Some black-andyellow insect is eating my zucchini. What is it? It’s October and my garlic is already up. Did I plant it too early? What do you do about woodchucks? They’ve eaten my kale. Before the conversation turns to some other subject (like the weather or the troubled state of the Union), my answers usually are (in order): Probably bacterial spot or speck. Striped or spotted cucumber beetles. Better that your garlic not emerge before winter—try planting in November. Dogs, traps, guns.

by keith stewart These days, though, there’s one other question I’m hearing more frequently, the answer to which is more complicated: How do you deal with deer? (This is often followed by a list of what deer have recently eaten on the property and an even longer string of expletives.) Mostly, I offer a sympathetic nod, then ask if the individual has considered erecting a large fence. The whitetail deer (Odocoileus virginianus) is well adapted to living amidst humans. Mature forest is not its preferred habitat—it thrives on disturbed land with plenty of new herbaceous growth, and many different kinds of vegetables, shrubs and flowering plants are very appealing, especially as winter approaches and less natural browse is available.

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Deer appetites increase in the fall, since it’s imperative that they gain weight and build up fat reserves to carry them through the lean, cold months ahead. In winters with prolonged snow cover and access cut off to even a meager diet, deer can lose up to 30 percent of their body weight—if they lose more than this, they’ll likely die from starvation. The deer population in the Hudson Valley is on the increase and has been for at least a couple of decades. Less hunting may be one of the reasons; milder winters, with less snow cover, another; subdivision of wooded and agricultural land may be a third. Thirty years ago, deer were not a major problem for us on the farm, except for occasional feeding on the edges of distant fields. Today, however, they’ve become a constant threat to many of our crops, and we spend an inordinate amount of time trying to thwart them.

One approach has been to grow more plants that they find unpalatable, like garlic, onions, shallots and certain herbs, but we already are maxed out on most of these. Our second (and main) defense is to try to exclude them. Because deer are good jumpers, this usually involves creating a barrier at least 8 feet high. For a number of years, we’ve considered putting up a permanent, heavy-duty woven wire fence, which is what many vegetable growers and orchardists resort to. This would entail setting 4- to 6-inchdiameter, 12-foot-high posts into the ground every 15 or 20 feet, then tightly attaching 8-foot-high galvanized wire mesh. There would need to be, at a minimum, three or four sturdy gates for access in and out of the fenced area and at least a 15-foot swath between the fence and the crop rows for tractors and equipment to navigate and turn.

The deer population in the Hudson Valley is on the increase and has been for at least a couple of decades.

If we had one or two large, relatively level fields, a permanent fence (meaning it might last 20 years) probably would be our best bet, but our farm is a patchwork of small, sloping fields with lots of hedgerows, woods and wet areas. Given our uneven land, rocky soil and the challenge of setting posts 3 or 4 feet into the ground, the cost to fence just several acres could approach $30,000 or more, and such a fence would reduce our tillable area, be difficult to maintain and, to my mind, would mar the natural beauty of the land. (I’ve always had a soft spot for the old Cole Porter/ Robert Fletcher song from Adios, Argentina: Give me land, lots of land under starry skies above/Don’t fence me in.) So, instead of a heavy duty, permanent fence, we’ve gone with temporary barriers that we keep in place for about eight months each year. To 1-inch-diameter, 10-foot fiberglass rods set 2 feet in the ground, we attach 8-foot,

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photos these pages keith stewart


heavy-gauge plastic netting using spring clips and cable ties, holding the netting tight to the ground with 8-inch ground stapes. (This prevents deer from getting under the fence, but not necessarily woodchucks, which are capable of chewing a hole in the plastic mesh.) For good measure, we run a line along the tops of the poles and tie on old white row-cover flags every 10 feet or so—these flags blow in the wind and are usually quite visible, especially at night. We also periodically soak the flags in liquid that has an offensive odor to deer— Deer Stopper (made with rotten eggs and rosemary) and Plantskydd (made from dried and powdered bovine blood) work reasonably well. These visual and olfactory repellents provide added deterrence. We get all our fencing supplies from an outfit called Kencove in Blairsville, PA.

needed. The fiberglass rods need to be no more than a half inch in diameter (except on the corners, where thicker rods add stability). The electric twine or ribbon is attached to the fiberglass rods with wire clips. Of course, this type of fence requires a 110-volt outlet or a portable solar-powered generating unit. We’ve used braided electric twine and ribbon fences in the past and probably will again, especially when pinched for time, despite a few drawbacks: Deer may eventually learn to jump over them; deer can inadvertently knock them over; and weeds or grasses that make contact with the braided line may cause the electric current to short, rendering the “fence” essentially worthless as a deterrent. (To avoid this, weeds and grass growing under the fence line must be trimmed repeatedly.) Earlier this year, one or two deer managed to breach our

Another temporary (or seasonal) fencing option is to use braided electric twine or half-inch electric ribbon attached to fiberglass rods. In this case, instead of creating a physical barrier to prevent deer from entering the fields, a sharp electric shock, preferably to the nose, sends them running in the opposite direction. Such fences usually employ two or three strands of twine or ribbon, at about 2, 4 and 6 feet above ground level (about where a deer’s inquiring nose is likely to be). This strategy calls for small pieces of tinfoil, smeared with the cheapest peanut butter available, wrapped tightly around the twine or ribbon every 6 or 8 feet. Ideally, a deer, attracted by the odor of the peanut butter, will make contact with its nose and receive a sharp electric smack. The fence itself is relatively easy to put up and take down. The braided electric twine or ribbon can be dispensed from a spool and rolled up when no longer

net fence near a wooded area and enjoyed several meals of sugar snap and snow peas, greatly reducing our supply for market. After walking a few thousand feet of fence line, we found the compromised section and repaired it. A few weeks later the same animals (or some of their brethren) ate the tops off a few hundred young tomato and pepper plants in an unfenced field. We halted all other farm work and rushed to put up a temporary fence to protect the remaining uneaten plants. If you’re thinking all this sounds a bit complicated and demanding—it is. However, if you’re in the vegetablegrowing business, having most of your crops eaten by deer is a lot worse. Deer are beautiful animals that were on this land long before we showed up. The challenge is how to co-exist with them and grow vegetables for market at the same time. Obviously, we’re still working on that. 4

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E AT I N G B Y T H E S E A S O N

eating

purple T

HE VIOLET END OF THE SPECTRUM IS THE MOST

text by kristen warfield photos by margarita garcia acevedo

powerful wavelength of all the visible colors, so scientifically and psychologically it’s not surprising that the color has developed quite a coveted aura throughout history, in addition to its association with wealth and royalty. Its allure hasn’t been lost on vegetables, either. At the end of last year, consumer trend advisors from the regional food market giant Whole Foods designated 2017 “The Year of Purple Foods.” Putting aside the marketing hype, at least this is one trend that can benefit your health, as well. Purple vegetables contain powerful antioxidants called anthocyanins, the compounds that give them their color. “The darker the food, the more antioxidants it contains,” explains Jahnavi Foster, registered nutritionist and health SEPT

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Local chefs are swapping purple vegetables into recipes, too, for a colorful change from traditional favorites.

educator at Mother Earth’s Storehouse in Kingston. “Antioxidants are key to fighting disease and inflammation, and can also help lower blood pressure and reduce ulcers.” Further, Foster notes, “There’s evidence that [purple vegetables] can help inhibit the growth of cancer and induce cancer cell death in patients with liver, prostate and breast cancers.” While many regard purple vegetables as modern hybrids or genetically modified varieties, historic evidence suggests that purple produce is by no means a new phenomenon. Carrots, for example, originally were purple or white and much thinner. A sixteenth-century mutation created a race of yellow carrots, and from that, Dutch growers developed the familiar, thick orange carrots we know today. Hardy and reliable purple potatoes, native to Peru, Ecuador and Bolivia, have been cultivated by indigenous farmers for millennia. Purple may be making a comeback, in fact: In 2003, Cornell University potato breeders Robert Plaisted, Ken Paddock and Walter De Jong released ‘Adirondack Blue,’ a potato variety with both blueish-purple skin and flesh. While the purple varieties are generally more healthful than their paler cousins, they can be prepared the same. They’re best eaten raw; if cooked, they’re better steamed or roasted as opposed to boiled because anthocyanins are water soluble. Local chefs are swapping purple vegetables into recipes, too, for a colorful change from traditional favorites. At Gigi Trattoria in Rhinebeck, owner and registered dietician Laura Pensiero incorporates purple vegetables in multiple places on her menus, including a Mediterranean purple potato salad on the catering menu and a traditional Sicilian cauliflower pasta at the restaurant. Coating curly cavatappi pasta, the thick, vibrant sauce dresses up the usually subtle-looking dish. “The cauliflower sauce is traditionally made with white cauliflower,” Pensiero notes. “When you use purple instead, it looks beautiful on 46 46

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the plate and there’s so much more there that makes it healthy, too. It’s definitely a special dish.” Joana Herrera, chef at Mariachi Mexico in Armonk, grows her own Japanese eggplant in the restaurant’s garden for use in several dishes, including one of her fall favorites: grilled eggplant, lentil and buttered Swiss chard tacos. (Japanese eggplant has thinner skin and a more delicate flavor than American eggplant—and it has fewer seeds, which is what can make American eggplants bitter). The skin color ranges from a light violet to a rich, dark purple—making for a beautiful and healthful vegetarian dish. “My main squeeze will always be a taco!” Herrera admits. “The grilled eggplant, chard and lentils topped with heirloom tomato and cow horn chile salsa gives you that familiar comfort food taste with each bite.” 4

what goes up . . . There’s little doubt that the chemistry behind purple vegetables is good. Eggplants are chock full of chlorogenic acid; purple grapes feature high amounts of resveratrol; and compared to its green cousins, purple broccoli has higher levels of just about everything beneficial. But don’t party just yet—there’s a downside: Eggplants, tomatoes, potatoes (not sweet potatoes) and all peppers are members of the nightshade family (Solanaceae). Other than the fruits, most parts of the plants in this family, including the leaves, stems, roots and flowers, contain toxins that can be dangerous if ingested. The crown member of the family—Atropa belladonna, or deadly nightshade—is the source of the powerful drug belladonna. Some of the alkaloids present in nightshade vegetables (including solanine, nicotine and capsaicin) may have inflammatory effects in some people. Many nutritionists suggest that those with autoimmune diseases, psoriasis, gout, arthritis or osteoporosis should try to steer clear of the nightshade vegetables. —VT


Sicilian purple cauliflower cavatappi L AU R A P E N S I E R O Ingredients 1 ⁄4 cup golden raisins 1 ⁄4 cup dry white wine 1 large head purple cauliflower, florets separated and cut into small pieces, stems chopped 1 ⁄4 cup olive oil 1 medium onion, finely diced 4 anchovy filets 1 ⁄3 cup pine nuts 2 tablespoons drained capers 2 small cloves garlic, thinly sliced zest of half lemon pinch red pepper flakes 1 ⁄3 cup fresh parsley leaves, finely chopped kosher salt 1 pound cavatappi pasta (or fusilli or orecchiette) ½ cup grated Parmiggiano or Grana Padano cheese Method 1. Bring a large pot of salted water to a boil. 2. Soak the raisins in white wine or water until plump, about 10 minutes. Drain, set aside. 3. Meanwhile, trim the cauliflower florets, cutting away as much stem as possible. In a food processor, pulse the cauliflower in a few batches until the pieces are approximately pea-sized. 4. Heat the oil in a large skillet over medium-high heat. When the oil is just about to smoke, add the onions and stir to coat. Stir the onions often until they begin to soften, about 3 minutes, then add the anchovies. 5. Cook onions and anchovies another 2 to 3 minutes, stirring; mash anchovies with a wooden spoon. 6. Add the pine nuts, raisins, capers, garlic, lemon zest, red pepper flakes and half of the parsley. Cook, stirring, until the pine nuts are golden, about 3 minutes. 7. Add the cauliflower to the skillet, stir to combine evenly. Season with salt. Cook and stir frequently until the cauliflower has softened, 3 to 5 minutes. Cover; set aside. 8. Add the cavatappi (or other pasta) to the large pot of boiling salted water and cook to al dente. 9. Return the cauliflower to medium-high heat. Add 1⁄3 cup of the pasta water and bring to boil. 10. Drain the pasta and combine it with the cauliflower. Toss. Add the grated cheese and toss again. Top with remaining chopped parsley; serve immediately Gigi Trattoria 6422 Montgomery St, Rhinebeck (845) 876-1007; gigihudsonvalley.com

PHOTOS THIS PAGE PROVIDED

Grilled Japanese eggplant and buttered Swiss chard tacos JOANA HERRERA Ingredients 5 Japanese eggplants 1 bunch Swiss chard, stems removed, roughly chopped 2 medium tomatoes (heirloom preferred) 2 jalapeño peppers 1 cup lentils 4 tablespoons butter 1 tablespoon canola oil 8 corn tortillas salt to taste makes 8 tacos; serves 4 Method Eggplants Cut eggplants in half lengthwise, score with diagonal cuts and sprinkle with salt. Let sit for about 30 minutes. 1. Wipe eggplants with a moist with paper towel to remove the excess moisture. 2. Brush with oil and grill over mediumhigh heat on a griddle or in a cast iron pan 4 to 5 minutes per side. 3. When cooked, remove from heat and cut the halves into 1-inch-thick pieces. Salsa Place whole tomatoes and jalepeños on an oiled griddle and grill 30 minutes, turning constantly until evenly charred. Pulse all in a blender to create a thick salsa. Season with salt to taste. Lentils Place lentils in a small pot with 4 cups hot water. Season with salt and simmer 20 minutes. Swiss chard Place chopped Swiss chard leaves into a non-stick pan. Add butter and cook over medium-high heat until wilted. Season with salt to taste. Remove leaves from pan, reserve the cooking liquid. Taco assembly 1. Heat tortillas in a non-stick pan over medium-high heat until soft, constantly turning so they will warm evenly. 2. Place the tortilla shell on a plate and spread one tablespoon each of the lentils, salsa, eggplant and Swiss chard. Spoon some of the Swiss chard cooking liquid on top. Mariachi Mexico 405 Main St, Armonk (914) 273-6805; mariachimexico.biz

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dine ,

Dr

in

k

&

Disc

o v e r.

Oc t 30th - Nov 12th

The Amsterdam

$22.95 $32.95 LUNCH

DINNER

Nina

The Ship Lantern Inn

The Valley Table’s Hudson Valley Restaurant Week

F

rom fresh-picked produce and grass-fed meats to locallycrafted wines, beer and spirits, Hudson Valley Restaurant Week is the time to discover (or re-discover) what makes the region a world-class culinary destination. More than 200 restaurants from Rye to Rhinebeck are gearing up for this highly-anticipated event with carefully selected prix fixe menus, many incorporating ingredients from local farms and purveyors. That’s because Hudson Valley Restaurant Week also is a celebration of all things local, from meat and produce from small-scale family farms

to the region’s newest wines, beers and spirits. Small or large, old or new, these dynamic Hudson Valley businesses shape our culture, our economy and of course, our palate. As you look through this guide to the restaurants, you’ll also learn about our sponsors—those industry leaders who help make this event possible year after year. For an up-to-date list of participants, menus, or to make reservations, log on to hudsonvalleyrestaurantweek.com. Happy fall Restaurant Week!

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THE VALLE Y TABLE’S HUDSON VALLE Y RESTAUR ANT WEEK

PARTICIPATING RESTAURANTS AS OF PRE SS TIME

KEY: L LUNCH $22.95

D DINNER $32.95

T CONVENIENT TO METRO-NORTH X EXCLUSIONS APPLY

Visit HudsonValleyRestaurantWeek.com for participating restaurant menus, updates and mor e. 121 RESTAURANT L D X 2 Dingle Ridge Rd, North Salem (914) 669-0121; 121restaurant.com This popular gathering spot embraces comfort foods, with freshness and simplicity in a farmhouse setting. 273 Kitchen L D X T 273 Halstead Ave, Harrison (914) 732-3333; 273kitchen.com From Chef Constantine Kalandranis of 8 North Broadway, a 30-seat small plates Mediterranean bistro with a seafood-heavy menu including various raw, cured and ceviche dishes, meat-based dishes and small bites. 76 HOUSE L D T 110 Main St, Tappan (845) 359-5476; 76house.com “America’s oldest tavern,” built in 1686, features the cuisine of celebrated chef Doug Mulholland and live entertainment. 8 NORTH BROADWAY L D X 8 N Broadway, Nyack (845) 353-1200; 8northbroadway.com This Mediterranean restaurant offers a changing menu “inspired by local farms and neighborhood friends.” 808 BISTRO L D T 808 Scarsdale Ave, Scarsdale (914) 722-0808; the808bistro.com This “neighborhood restaurant with a downtown feel” serves chicken, fish, shrimp and veal with a light Italian touch. AESOP’S FABLE RESTAURANT L D T 13 King St, Chappaqua (914) 238-3858; aesopsfablerestaurant.com This new farm to table restaurant serves up eclectic wood fired pizzas, meat entrees and market vegetable dishes alongside seasonal craft cocktails and organic juices. Intimate setting made complete with an outdoor garden firepit.

HOW IT WORKS

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AMICI’S L D T 35 Main St, Poughkeepsie (845) 452-4700; amicis-restaurant.com CIA trained chef Joel Trocino brings Italian American dishes like chianti braised short rib and pasta rustica to the waterfront district of Poughkeepsie. THE AMSTERDAM D X 6380 Mill St, Rhinebeck (845) 516-5033; lovetheamsterdam.com Locavore chef Sara Lukasiewicz serves up re-imagined American classics like in this new Dutch colonial-turned restaurant in the heart of Rhinebeck’s historic village center. New York state beer and wine dominate at the bar alongside locally-sourced craft cocktails. AQUATERRA GRILLE L D X 420 N Middletown Rd, Pearl River (845) 920-1340; aquaterragrille.com Casual family eatery boasting an extensive menu of modern American fare from the sea (Aqua) and land (Terra). AROMA OSTERIA D X 114 Old Post Rd, Wappingers Falls (845) 298-6790; aromaosteriarestaurant.com Classic rustic Italian with an emphasis on Southern Italy. Enjoy a romantic and relaxed atmosphere with an elegant cocktail bar. ARTIST’S PALATE D T X 307 Main St, Poughkeepsie (845) 242-6570; theartistspalate.biz Cosmopolitan elegance meets edgy, industry style. Contemporary American food with an extensive variety of unique wines and spirits.

A LOOK AT WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW FOR FALL 2017 HVRW

Participating restaurants offer a three-course, prix fixe dinner menu for $32.95 per person, and may offer a three-course lunch menu for $22.95 per person (plus tax, beverage and gratuity). Find the complete listing of Fall HVRW restaurant participants at HudsonValleyRestaurantWeek.com. Reservations are strongly encouraged (and required by many restaurants). For those offering online reservations through Open Table, you simply click on “Book Now.” For others, you simply call the restaurant directly to make reservations.

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AMERICAN BOUNTY L D X 1946 Campus Dr, Hyde Park (845) 451-1011; americanbountyrestaurant.com By consciously focusing on regional and seasonal products, the American Bounty Restaurant offers contemporary and traditional dishes brought to life in an honest and flavorful way.

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AUGIE’S PRIME CUT D 3436 Lexington Ave, Mohegan Lake (914) 743-1357; augiesprimecut.com A staple in the local community, favorites at this popular steak and seafood house include prime rib, Porterhouse and fresh lobster. BAJA 328 L D T 328 Main St, Beacon (845) 838-2252; baja328.com Beacon hot spot offering over 110 tequilas to accompany authentic Southwestern cuisine. BEEHIVE RESTAURANT L D 30 Old Rt 22, Armonk (914) 765-0688; beehive-restaurant.com Designed by a family that loves to cook, this familyfriendly restaurant serves Continental and American classics in the heart of Armonk. BENJAMIN STEAKHOUSE D X 610 Hartsdale Ave, White Plains (914) 428-6868; benjaminsteakhouse.com Serious steaks created by an alumnus of the venerable Peter Luger restaurant in a handsome setting with a central fireplace. BISTRO Z D T 455 S Broadway, Tarrytown (914) 524-6410; bistroz.com Conveniently located in the DoubleTree Hotel, offering casual comfort, fireside dining and an American menu blending fresh ingredients with an imaginative presentation. BLU POINTE L D X 120 Front St, Newburgh (845) 568-0100; blu-pointe.com This seafood-focused venue features a menu of the freshest products available, a contemporary lounge with fireplace, set right on the Hudson River. BOCUSE RESTAURANT L D 1946 Campus Dr, Hyde Park (845) 471-6608; bocuserestaurant.com This Culinary Institute of America restaurant re-imagines classic French cuisine using modern techniques with a new style accompanied by casual yet sophisticated service. THE BORLAND HOUSE INN L X 130 Clinton St, Montgomery (845) 457-1513; theborlandhouse.com This bed and breakfast features a restaurant offering seasonal farm fresh ingredients with Southern comfort-food influences. BRASSERIE 292 D T X 292 Main St, Poughkeepsie (845) 473-0292; brasserie292.com Serving classic brasserie fare: duck confit, steak frites and cassoulet. Transports diners to the heart of Paris, right down to the look of the menu.

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THE BRIAR’S RESTAURANT L D 512 N State Rd, Briarcliff Manor (914) 762-3424; thebriarsrestaurant.com Offering “down-home” traditional American fare with a touch of Mediterranean influence.

COMMUNAL KITCHEN D X 162 Main St, Nyack (845) 535-3133; communalkitchennyack.com Drawing inspiration from local, organic products, chef and owner, Jed Gidaly, serves globally inspired cuisine accompanied by handcrafted cocktails, small production wines and local craft beers.

BROADWAY BISTRO L D X 3 S Broadway, Nyack (845) 353-8361; 3broadwaybistro.com Authentic Tuscan cuisine with dishes ranging from terrine of eggplant to cavatelli, broccoli rabe pesto and sweet Italian sausage.

THE COOKERY D T 39 Chestnut St, Dobbs Ferry (914) 305-2336; thecookeryrestaurant.com Neighborhood eatery serves a neo-nostalgic menu, capturing the warmth of Italian comfort food while using sustainable products.

BROTHER’S FISH AND CHIPS D T 172 N Highland Ave, Ossining (914) 488-5141; brothersfishandchips.com Classic seafood restaurant with extensive lineup of fish options for fish and chips as well as reimagined dishes like fried bass tacos and red snapper ceviche. CAFE AMARCORD D T X 276 Main St, Beacon (845) 440-0050; cafeamarcord.com Creative New American cuisine with Italian undertones, served in a warm atmosphere. Enjoy an artisanal cocktail at the onyx bar before having dinner in the bistro-style dining room or on the Main Street terrace. CAFÉ OF LOVE L D T 38 E Main St, Mount Kisco (914) 242-1002; cafeofloveny.com New American fare taking local ingredients on a global adventure. #localtastesbetter CARLO’S ITALIAN RESTAURANT L D 179 Main St, Yonkers (914) 793-1458; carlosrestaurant.net A family-run Italian restaurant serving all the classics including chicken Paolo, shrimp oreganata, and veal Portofino. CATHRYN’S TUSCAN GRILL L D T 91 Main St, Cold Spring (845) 265-5582; tuscangrill.com Romantic and whimsical with an Italian menu that leans toward the north. The wine list is extensive and the welcome is warm. CATSKILL MOUNTAINS RESORT D 211 Mail Rd, Barryville (845) 456-0195; catskillmountainresort.com From the Mountains of Lorraine, France, to the Catskill Mountains. Enjoy American French Fusion cuisine at this relaxing mountainside resort. CEDAR STREET GRILL D T 23 Cedar St, Dobbs Ferry (914) 674-0706; cedarstreetgrillny.com A fine selection of American-themed fare and artisanal beers. Cozy and welcoming offering dishes made with simple, honest ingredients. CELLAR 49 L D X 49 East Sunnyside Ln, Tarrytown (914) 591-3183; tarrytownhouseestate.com Fine “tavern food” in the cellar of the Biddle Mansion within the Tarrytown House Estate. Offers a casual, energetic atmosphere and wine cellar. CENA 2000 L D 50 Front St, Newburgh (845) 561-7676; cena2000.com Cena 2000 juxtaposes an upscale Mediterranean menu and a serious wine list with Hudson River views on the Newburgh waterfront.

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CORTLANDT COLONIAL RESTAURANT D 714 Old Albany Post Rd, Cortlandt Manor (914) 739-3900; cortlandtcolonial.com Reminiscent of a private country estate, the menu offers a wide range of American favorites, from seafood to beef. Tarry Lodge

CHAR D T X 2 S Water St, Greenwich, CT (203) 900-1100; charct.com A sister restaurant to Dolphin, this upscale yet casual restaurant offers contemporary American cuisine in a setting to match. CHAR STEAKHOUSE & BAR D 151 Bryant Pond Rd, Mahopac (845) 526-1200; charsteakhouseandbar.com Casual dining with a classic steakhouse feel. The menu centers on dry-aged steaks and fresh seafood yet offers options for every taste. CHAT 19 L D T 19 Chatsworth Ave, Larchmont (914) 833-8871; chat19.net A casual, relaxed atmosphere to enjoy owner Mario Fava’s selection of grilled food, seafood, appetizers and salads. CHAT AMERICAN GRILL L D T 1 Christie Pl, Scarsdale (914) 722-4000; chatamericangrill.com Enjoy a meal by the fireplace, or watch the game on one of three flat-screen TVs at this all-American grill, sister to Chat 19. CITY LIMITS DINER L D T 200 Central Ave, White Plains (914) 686-9000; citylimitsdiner.com Redefining the American diner with a menu of comforting, sophisticated dishes, from housesmoked meats to gourmet pastry. City Perch Kitchen +Bar D 1 Livingstone Ave, Dobbs Ferry (914) 348-7007; cityperch.com Seasonal American dining from James Beardrenowned Chef Sherry Yard meets handcrafted garden-to-glass cocktails and a boutique wine list. Featuring open kitchen, raw seafood bar and brick oven pizza.

COSIMO’S WOODBURY L D 100 County Rt 32, Central Valley (845) 928-8265; cosimoswoodbury.com Casual and contemporary Italian cuisine with some of the world’s best wines. Warm, friendly and sophisticated atmosphere in four uniquely designed locations. COSIMO’S BRICK OVEN L D 620 Rt 211 E, Middletown (845) 692-3242; cosimosmiddletown.com COSIMO’S ON UNION L D 1217 Rt 300 (Union Ave) Newburgh (845) 567-1556; cosimosunion.com COSIMO’S TRATTORIA L D X 120 Delafield St, Poughkeepsie (845) 485-7172; cosimospoughkeepsie.com CRABTREE’S KITTLE HOUSE L D 11 Kittle Rd, Chappaqua (914) 666-8044; kittlehouse.com Stately country inn, emphasizing hospitality, offering a modern American menu and one of the world’s finest wine lists. CRAVE RESTAURANT & LOUNGE D T 129 Washington St, Poughkeepsie (845) 452-3501; craverestaurantandlounge.com Known for its contemporary American cuisine, new-urban setting, attentive service and warmth. Located just under the Walkway Over the Hudson.

EAT. SHARE. WIN. Dine out at your favorite HVRW restaurant Photograph your meal, favorite course, classy cocktail or that perfect bite. Then share it! Tag @valleytable & #HVRW

CLOCK TOWER GRILL L D X 512 Clock Tower Dr, Brewster (845) 582-0574; clocktowergrill.com In a renovated barn setting, the atmosphere is casual yet sophisticated. A farm-to-table menu features rustic American cuisine, including prime burgers, lobster mac and cheese and osso buco.

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DAN ROONEY’S CAFÉ & BAR L D T 810 Yonkers Ave, Yonkers (914) 457-2531; danrooneyscafeandbar.com The atmosphere and flavors of a traditional Irish pub with great food, beer and Irish whiskey. In the Empire City Casino in Yonkers.

ENZO’S RESTAURANT L D T 451 Mamaroneck Ave, Mamaroneck (914) 698-2911; enzosrestaurant.com Widely known for the authentic re-creation of regional Italian cuisine, Chef Luciano Savone’s menu includes dishes with layers of flavor served in generous portions to accompany a vintage wine selection.

DELFINO’S ITALIAN RESTAURANT D 60 Halstead Ave, Harrison (914) 835-2535; dineatdelfinosny.com Italian cuisine in a laid-back atmosphere with an extensive selection of fine wines. DINO’S VIGNETO CAFE L D X 80 Vineyard Ave, Highland (845) 834-2828; vignetocafe.com A neighborhood Italian eatery. Stop in for freshly homemade pasta and classic dishes. Whole wheat and gluten-free pastas available. DISH BISTRO & WINE BAR L D X 947 S Lake Blvd, Mahopac (845) 621-3474; dishmahopac.com Chef Peter A. Milano adds his own flair to classic and modern cuisines, with dishes capitalizing on local, seasonal produce. DOLPHIN L D T 1 Van Der Donck St, Yonkers (914) 751-8170; dolphinrbl.com On the banks of the Hudson River and decorated in dramatic, modern fashion, Dolphin’s menu draws liberally and fittingly from the sea.

Valley Restaurant at the Garrison

DUBROVNIK RESTAURANT L D T X 721 Main St, New Rochelle (914) 637-3777; dubrovnikny.com Authentic Croatian cuisine with a farm-to-table, sea-to-table approach. Known for its seafood and its authentic wine list. EASTCHESTER FISH GOURMET L D X 837 White Plains Rd, Scarsdale (914) 725-3450; eastchesterfish.com This popular cosmopolitan restaurant (and fish market) provides a bounty of seafood praised by even the staunchest New England foodies and delicious house-made pastas too. ELEVEN 11 GRILLE & SPIRITS D X 1111 Main St, Fishkill (845) 896-0011; eleven11grille.com Comfort food, pub favorites, pasta, steaks and daily specials in a homey tavern complete with exposed beams and bricks.

EQUUS RESTAURANT AT CASTLE HOTEL AND SPA D T X 400 Benedict Ave, Tarrytown (914) 631-1980; castlehotelandspa.com First-class service meets award-winning meals like dry-aged New York Strip with blue cheese polenta or organic scottish salmon. Situated atop rolling hills in a castle-turned-hotel and restaurant, views of the Hudson River are plentiful. ESSIE’S RESTAURANT D T X 14 Mount Carmel Pl, Poughkeepsie (845) 452-7181; essiesrestaurantpk.com Chef Brandon Walker serves up savory American dishes with global influence, like grit croquettes with garlic aioli, chicken and dumplings, sweetand-sour braised collard greens, and monkfish. EXIT 4 FOOD HALL L D 153 Main St, Mt. Kisco (914) 241-1200; exit4foodhall.com Westchester County welcomes a wide selection of cuisines in one convenient location. At various food stations, diners can enjoy premier dishes made with fresh Hudson Valley produce.

Good times . . . Good people . . . At HVFCU, we support the businesses and organizations that make our community a great place to live, work, and dine. It’s one of the reasons we’re the financial partner trusted by so many of our neighbors for more than 50 years.

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FARM TO TABLE BISTRO L D 1083 Rt. 9, Fishkill (845) 297-1111; Ftbistro.com New American menu is committed to crafted food and the community of farmers and purveyors that provide the freshest seasonally available ingredients. FAT SAL’S BAR & GRILL L D 265 Tate Ave, Buchanan (914) 930-1770; fatsalsbarandgrill.com Whether it’s Fat Sal’s porterhouse chili or grandma’s homemade meatballs, Fat Sal’s Bar & Grill has something for everyone. FIG & OLIVE L D T 696 White Plains Rd, Scarsdale (914) 725-2900; figandolive.com The impossibly chic environs of Manhattan’s meatpacking district transported to suburban Scarsdale, with an invigorated Mediterranean menu. FRANKIE & AUGIE’Z L D 3673 Hill Blvd, Jefferson Valley (914) 245-9241; frankandaugiez.com Family owned and operated, serving up “the best pizza in town” as well as a wide array of Italian dishes.

FRANKIE & FANUCCI’S WOOD OVEN PIZZERIA D T 301 Mamaroneck Ave, Mamaroneck (914) 630-4360 Authentic thin-crust, wood-fired pizzas with choice of toppings complement a variety of classic Italian dishes like bolo and nonna’s meatballs. ‘Pour your own’ taproom at both locations serves a hearty lineup of craft beer and wines. FRANKIE & FANUCCI’S WOOD OVEN PIZZERIA D T 202 E. Hartsdale Ave, Hartsdale (914) 725-8400 FRANKIE & JOHNNIE’S STEAKHOUSE L D T X 77 Purchase St, Rye (914) 925-3900; frankieandjohnnies.com Distinguished reputation for the finest steaks, chops and seafood, the menu is classic steakhouse fare. Stylish, sophisticated ambiance. GAUCHO GRILL D T X 1 N Broadway, White Plains (914) 437-9966; gauchogrillnewyork.com A one-of-a-kind Argentinean steakhouse with traditional cuisine, international wines and liquors served with impeccable service. GIULIO’S RESTAURANT D 154 Washington St, Tappan (845) 359-3657; giulios.biz A romantic setting complete with fireplaces and candlelight; serves Italian-inspired continental cuisine with extensive gluten-free options.

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GRAZIELLA’S ITALIAN BISTRO L D T X 99 Church St, White Plains (914) 761-5721; graziellasrestaurant.com Pasta, chicken, lamb, veal, steaks and seafood prepared with an Italian flair and served in a dramatically modern dining room. HALF MOON L D T X 1 High St, Dobbs Ferry (914) 693-4130; halfmoonhudson.com Casual American restaurant with panoramic views as far as Manhattan. Favorites include fresh Montauk seafood and burgers with creative flair. HARPER’S RESTAURANT & BAR D T X 92 Main St, Dobbs Ferry (914) 693-2306; harpersonmain.com A hip neighborhood tavern serving American food with an all-American wine list. Simple home cooking using local, seasonal ingredients. HARVEST ON HUDSON L D T X 1 River St, Hastings-on-Hudson (914) 478-2800; harvesthudson.com Overlooking the Hudson River and Palisades, a magnificent Tuscan farmhouse is the perfect setting for inspired Mediterranean cuisine. HENRY’S AT THE FARM L D 220 North Rd, Milton (845) 795-1310; henrysatbuttermilk.com A dining destination at the Buttermilk Falls Inn, Henry’s sources locally and from its own 40-acre farm. Elegant cuisine in a charming setting.

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HERITAGE FOOD+DRINK 1379 US 9, Wappingers Falls (845) 485-6455; heritagefooddrink.com Chef Shawn Burnette crafts the Hudson Valley’s bounty into imaginative ‘low and slow’ dishes like wood fired skirt steak or roasted broccoli with cornmeal-fried stems at this new 250-seat farm-totable dining destination. HUDSON FARMER & THE FISH L T 11 River St, Sleepy Hollow farmerandthefish.com Just like its sister restaurant, Purdy’s Farmer & the Fish, diners can enjoy the freshest, local ingredients prepared as beautiful, delicious dishes. HUDSON HOUSE OF NYACK D X 134 Main St, Nyack (845) 353-1355; hudsonhousenyack.com An antique village hall/jailhouse turned restaurant and bar sets the stage for enjoying refined American cuisine and delicious desserts. HUDSON HOUSE RIVER INN L D T X 2 Main St, Cold Spring (845) 265-9355; hudsonhouseinn.com A historic 1832 landmark serving dry-aged, handcut steaks and market-fresh fish on the riverfront. HUDSON’S RIBS AND FISH D 1099 Rt 9, Fishkill (845) 297-5002; hudsonsribsandfish.com Popular steakhouse specializing in hand-cut, aged choice meats, fresh seafood and trademark homemade popovers with strawberry butter.

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IL CENACOLO L D X 228 S Plank Rd, Newburgh (845) 564-4494; ilcenacolorestaurant.com A dining landmark in the Hudson Valley since 1988, celebrating the simplicity of classic Tuscan cuisine. IL LAGHETTO D X 825 S Lake Blvd, Mahopac (845) 621-5200; illaghettorestaurant.com Formerly The Terrace Club, featuring year-round lakeside dining and traditional Italian cuisine. Chat 19

THE HUDSON ROOM D T X 23 South Division St, Peekskill (914) 788-3663; hudsonroom.com Dedicated to Hudson Valley sources, serving fresh, fusion cuisine including dishes like grilled sliced bavette steak, seared organic vegetable stir-fry and a wide variety of sushi. IL BARILOTTO D X 1113 Main St, Fishkill (845) 897-4300; ilbarilottorestaurant.com An Italian trattoria and wine bar serving an innovative menu with influences from France and Spain in a warm, upbeat setting. IL CASTELLO L D X 576 Mamaroneck Ave, Mamaroneck (914) 777-2200; ilcastellomenu.com Specializes in handmade pastas and tableside presentation. Brimming with Old World Italian charm. Serving large portions that “make Mama proud.”

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INN AT POUND RIDGE L T 258 Westchester Ave, Pound Ridge (914) 764-1400; innatpoundridge.com Chef Jean-Georges brings casual elegance to Pound Ridge with a seasonal, farm-to-table menu and a contemporary country atmosphere. JUNIPER D T X 19 Main St, Hastings on Hudson (914) 478-2542; juniperhoh.com New American dishes like roasted duck breast with sweet potato and cranberry or brisket burgers alongside vegetarian specials served in a cozy cafe setting. KITCHEN SINK FOOD & DRINK D T X 157 Main St, Beacon (845) 765-0240; kitchensinkny.com One of Beacon’s culinary gems features an eclectic mix of global and family-influenced dishes with local ingredients and modern technique.

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L’INIZIO D X 698 Saw Mill River Rd, Ardsley (914) 693-5400; liniziony.com Award-winning chefs, Scott and Heather Fratangelo, bring their inventive, Italian-inspired, locally sourced cuisine and hospitality to Ardsley.

LE PROVENÇAL BISTRO L D T X 436 Mamaroneck Ave, Mamaroneck (914) 777-2324; provencalbistro.com Mediterranean-French bistro food with a flair that lives up to the French tradition, served in a charming, tastefully decorated dining room.

LA LANTERNA L D 23 Grey Oaks Ave, Yonkers (914) 476-3060; lalanterna.com Executive chef Valterio Tarone offers a unique Italian-Swiss menu served in an elegant yet cozy atmosphere.

LE SIRENE RISTORANTE L T X 1957 Palmer Ave, Larchmont (914) 834-8300; lesireneristorante.com Cosimo Bruno opened Le Sirene in 2014. Offering authentic Italian cuisine, the menu combines Old World flavor with family tradition.

LA PANETIÈRE L D X 530 Milton Rd, Rye (914) 967-8140; lapanetiere.com Southern French cuisine, complemented by an exceptional wine cellar, fresh baked breads and pastries. A Westchester landmark restaurant.

LENNY’S SEAFOOD & STEAKHOUSE L D T 2047 Boston Post Rd, Larchmont (914) 630-7800; lennyssteakhouse.com From Lenny Balidemaj (Il Castello), a popular seafood and steakhouse with Italian flavors and hospitality.

LAKEVIEW HOUSE L D X 343 Lakeside Rd, Newburgh (845) 566-7100; thelakeviewhouse.com Enjoy views of Orange Lake while browsing a menu of classic favorites, modern fare and daily specials. Excellent service and cozy atmosphere. LE EXPRESS BISTRO & BAR L D 1820 New Hackensack Rd, Wappingers Falls (845) 849-3565; lexpresshv.com Warm, contemporary bistro in a suburban plaza setting, offers ingredient-driven, French-American bistro fare.

Henry’s at the Farm

LE FONTANE RISTORANTE L D 137 Route 100, Katonah (914) 232-9619; efontane.net Authentic Southern Italian cuisine and hospitality headed by talented Neapolitan chef. LE JARDIN DU ROI L D T 95 King St, Chappaqua (914) 238-1368; lejardinchappaqua.com A local favorite, this cozy, French Bistro is perfect for a romantic meal or a night out with the family.

LEXINGTON SQUARE CAFE L D T 510 Lexington Ave, Mount Kisco (914) 244-3663; lexingtonsquarecafe.com A unique combination of spacious dining with an intimate feeling. Offers an eclectic menu of American fusion cuisine and a lively bar. LIBERTY STREET BISTRO D X 159–167 Main St, Goshen 97 Liberty St, Newburgh (845) 562-3900; libertystreetbistro.com Chef/Owner Michael Kelly offers classic Frenchinfluenced cuisine within a contemporary American style restaurant, embracing local flavors in each dish on his menu.

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LIMONCELLO AT ORANGE INN L D X 159–167 Main St, Goshen (845) 294-1880; limoncelloatorangeinn.com The historic Orange Inn (the oldest operating in Orange County) offers a northern Italian menu with an international twist.

MELTING POT L D T X 30 Mamaroneck Ave, White Plains (914) 993-6358; meltingpot.com/white-plains Fun and interactive dining experience featuring a menu of signature fondue dinners. MERITAGE RESTAURANT D X 1505 Weaver St, Scarsdale (914) 472-8484; meritagerestaurant.net Chef Chris Vergara brings a New American menu sourced from local purveyors to diners in a warm, comfortable neighborhood restaurant.

LITTLE DRUNKEN CHEF L D T X 36 Main St, Mount Kisco (914) 242-8800 This tapas-style eatery offers flavorful globallyinfluenced food with live music, an oyster bar, internationally-sourced craft beer and more. LUSARDI’S RESTAURANT L D T X 1885 Palmer Ave, Larchmont (914) 834-5555; lusardislarchmont.com A favorite neighborhood eatery with a reputation for flavorful Mediterranean dishes in a warm, friendly atmosphere. MACARTHUR’S RIVERVIEW RESTAURANT AT THE THAYER HOTEL L D X 674 Thayer Rd, West Point (845) 446-4731; thethayerhotel.com American dishes using local ingredients like grilled heritage pork porterhouse complement expansive views of the Hudson River in a one-of-a-kind historic setting. MADISON KITCHEN L D T X 7 Madison Ave, Larchmont (914) 732-3024; mklarchmont.com Seasonally inspired cocktails and craft beer complement Chef Di Bona’s assortment of small plates, charcuterie boards and entrées.

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THE MILL L D T 46 Vassar Rd, Poughkeepsie (845) 214-0000; millpk.com Casual and upbeat atmosphere coupled with knowledgeable staff, cozy indoor and outdoor dining and fresh, seasonal, local artisanal foods.

Dubrovnik

MAHONEY’S IRISH PUB L D T 35 Main St, Poughkeepsie (845) 471-7026; mahoneysirishpub.com Traditional Irish pub featuring house favorites and Irish fare like Jameson stout ribs and shepherd’s pie.

MILL HOUSE BREWING COMPANY L D T X 289 Mill St, Poughkeepsie (845) 485-2739; millhousebrewing.com A spacious upscale gastropub serving innovative locally sourced dishes. A wide selection of ales (brewed on site) and cocktails.

MARIACHI MEXICO D 405 Main St, Armonk (914) 273-6805; mariachimexico.biz “Eat, Drink, Smile, Love, Cheers to Life!” Stop in for Mexican favorites including flautitas, carnitas and enchiladas.

MIMA VINOTECA L D T 63 Main St, Irvington (914) 591-1300; mimasrestaurant.com A charming, simply decorated neighborhood restaurant and wine bar serving rustic fare.

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MODERNE BARN L D X 430 Bedford Rd, Armonk (914) 730-0001; modernebarn.com From the Livanos family, this urban-country-chic restaurant is casual but sophisticated. American menu with global influences.

NINA L D X 27 W Main St, Middletown (845) 344-6800; nina-restaurant.com Charm and ambiance in a vintage 1800s storefront (and former opera house). International cuisine, a relaxed atmosphere and hip late-night vibe.

MONTEVERDE AT OLDSTONE D X 28 Bear Mountain Bridge Rd, Cortlandt Manor (914) 737-6500; monteverdeatoldstone.com Offering a selection of American dishes like Moroccan spiced lamb and whole duck in a historic mansion with expansive views of the Hudson River.

NORTH PLANK ROAD TAVERN D X 30 Plank Rd, Newburgh (845) 562-5031; northplankroadtavern.com Diverse new American fare using farm-fresh, local ingredients in a historic tavern setting. THE OLDE STONE MILL D T X 2 Scarsdale Rd, Tuckahoe (914) 771-7661; theoldestonemill.com Traditional American steakhouse cuisine in a historic stone mill overlooking the banks of the Bronx River.

MORTON’S STEAKHOUSE D X 9 Maple Ave, White Plains (914) 683-6101; mortons.com/whiteplains This popular nightspot is all about aged, prime beef, served in elegance. The menu offers seafood, chicken, chops and gluten-sensitive options. MOSCATO RESTAURANT L D T X 874 Scarsdale Ave, Scarsdale (914) 723-5700; moscatorestaurant.com Named for the sweet, floral grape of the muscat family, enjoy sweet service and Mediterranean fare in the casual dining room. MOUNT IVY CAFE D 14 Theills St, Pomona (845) 354-4746; mtivycafe.com Known for generous portions of continental cuisine including tender steaks and fresh seafood, Rockland’s fine dining destination has been “simply the best” for 30 years.

Aroma Osteria

MP TAVERNA L D T X 1 Bridge St, Irvington (914) 231-7854; michaelpsilakis.com A modern interpretation of a traditional Greek tavern by Chef Michael Psilakis, awarded Food & Wine’s Best New Chef and Bon Appétit’s Chef of the Year. MULINO’S OF WESTCHESTER L D X 99 Court St, White Plains (914) 761-1818; mulinosny.com Serving modern Italian fare like carbonara and thinbreaded veal with vine ripe tomato salad.

r o v Sa

PERCH D X 1 King St, Marlboro (845) 236-3663; perchmarlboro.com From the owner of Cathryn’s Tuscan Grill, offering a globally inspired, locally sourced menu. An eclectic list of wine and beer. PETER PRATT’S INN D X 673 Croton Rd, Yorktown (914) 962-4090; prattsinn.com Guests can enjoy regional American cuisine by the fireside with dishes like venison-boar chili or char su duck spring rolls.

The Culina ry Institute of Americ a

The Hudson Valley

Terrapin Restaurant

se The Roundhou

FREE TIME? Actually, it’s priceless. Make sure you’re spending it wisely. the Hudson Valley. Distinctly Dutchess getaways include Come local bounty, award-winning wines, farmers’ markets, specialty food shops, The Culinary Institute of America, and multi-ethnic restaurants.

Savor

DistinctlyDutchess HUDSONVALLEYRESTAURANTWEEK.COM

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PIER 701 RESTAURANT & BAR L D 701 Piermont Ave, Piermont (845) 848-2550; pier701ny.com Chef-owner, Denis Whitton, offers traditional French cuisine with Mediterranean influences at this waterfront spot.

REDWOOD RESTAURANT D X 63 N Front St, Kingston 845-259-5868; redwooduptown.com A bit of California in the Hudson Valley. Redwood’s rooftop deck allows for an enjoyable, scenic dining experience overlooking the mountains. Venison, duck, lobster, vegetable dishes and more.

PLATES L D T X 121 Myrtle Blvd, Larchmont (914) 834-1244; platesonthepark.com Chef-owner Matthew Karp’s artisanal culinary craft menu includes hand-rolled pasta, homemade sourdough breads, home-fermented vinegars and a repertoire of American classics. POUGHKEEPSIE ICE HOUSE L D T 1 Main St, Poughkeepsie (845) 232-5783; poughkeepsieicehouse.com An historic Hudson Valley waterfront with Old World charm. Casually sophisticated cuisine with seasonal and locally inspired menus. PRIMAVERA RESTAURANT AND BAR L D T 592 Rt 22, Croton Falls (914) 277-4580; primaverarestaurantandbar.com A friendly atmosphere and fine dining experience, with a small-town spirit that is warm, welcoming and inclusive. PURDY’S FARMER AND THE FISH L D T X 100 Titicus Rd, North Salem (914) 617-8380; farmerandthefish.com When a fishmonger partners with a chef who studied agriculture, the result is a communityoriented restaurant with locally grown produce and high-quality seafood.

RED HAT ON THE RIVER L D T X 1 Bridge St, Irvington (914) 591-5888; redhatontheriver.com A bustling, multi-level eatery, affording 180˚ views of the Hudson. French bistro classics mixed with seasonally changing dishes.

The Village Tea Room

RAASA INDIAN CUISINE L D X 145 E Main St, Elmsford (914) 347-7890; raasaindiancuisine.com Modern interpretation of classic Indian cuisine including tikka masala, curry, paneer and more with an extensive vegetarian menu. RAMIRO’S 954 D X 954 Rt 6, Mahopac (845) 621-3333; ramiros954.com Nuevo Latino cuisine with a contemporary approach and creativity. Hospitality and warmth reign supreme.

RELA CAFE L D T 25 S Regent St, Port Chester (914) 249-9072; relacafe.com American and Italian favorites like pasta, pizza, steak and seafood in a comfortable, contemporary setting. RESTAURANT 1915 L D 3020 Seven Lakes Dr, Bear Mountain (845) 786-2731; visitbearmountain.com Located at the historic Bear Mountain Inn, enjoy a seasonal menu in a beautiful lodge setting. RESTAURANT X & THE BULLY BOY BAR L D 117 N Rt 303, Congers (845) 268-6555; xaviars.com Peter Kelly’s elegant roadside restaurant features four dining rooms, a welcoming bar, a menu of classic dishes, and modern American cuisine.

for changing seasons Crisp air, a kaleidoscope of color, freshly harvested meals, and a festival for every occasion.

SEEK FOR YOURSELF. ulstercountyalive.com

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RINIS RESTAURANT & WINE BAR L D 12 W. Main St, Elmsford (914) 592-6799; rinisristorante.com Classic Italian dishes including pork chops with sweet and hot peppers and eggplant parmigiana in a warm and friendly atmosphere.

ROSIE’S BISTRO ITALIANO L D T X 10 Palmer Ave, Bronxville (914) 793-2000; rosiesbronxville.com Vintage posters in a festive dining room with splashes of yellow and wood accents. The Italian menu is designed to keep things fresh and seasonal.

RISOTTO D 788 Commerce St, Thornwood (914) 769-6000 ; risotto-restaurant.com Authentic Italian cuisine in a cozy neighborhood restaurant. Known for braised meats, homemade pastas and specialty soups; save room for dessert.

THE ROUNDHOUSE BY TERRANCE BRENNAN D T 2 E Main St, Beacon (845) 765-8369; roundhousebeacon.com A locally inspired seasonal menu, craft beers and creative artisanal cocktails. Floor-to-ceiling windows yield stunning waterfall views.

RISTORANTE CATERINA DE’ MEDICI L D 1946 Campus Dr, Hyde Park (845) 471-6608; ristorantecaterinademedici.com Authentic regional Italian cuisine crafted at the Culinary Institute of America includes wood-fired pizza and other simple rustic dishes. RIVER CITY GRILLE L D T X 6 S Broadway, Irvington (914) 591-2033; rivercitygrille.com Eclectic American cuisine served in a vibrant bistro setting. Over a dozen wines by the glass and the bottle. Cocktails are both modern and classic. RIVERMARKET BAR & KITCHEN L D T X 127 W Main St, Tarrytown (914) 631-3100; rivermarketbarandkitchen.com Veritable epicurean hub across from the MetroNorth train station features a farm-to-table restaurant, wood-fired pizzeria and wine shop.

RUTH’S CHRIS STEAK HOUSE L D X 670 White Plains Rd, Tarrytown (914) 631-3311; ruthschris.com The classic steakhouse, complete with mahogany bar and lounge, offers aged steaks and fresh seafood. Located in the Westchester Marriott.

Café Amacord

RIVERVIEW RESTAURANT L D T 45 Fair St, Cold Spring (845) 265-4778; riverdining.com Contemporary American cuisine in a casual, friendly setting, featuring spectacular views of the Hudson River and Storm King Mountain.

RYE HOUSE L D T X 126 N Main St, Port Chester (914) 481-8771; ryehousepc.com Offering an American menu filled with cuisine from the Southeast, Southwest, Heartland and Rust Belt, as well as artisanal spirits, craft cocktails and domestic craft beer. SAINT GEORGE BISTRO D T X 155 Southside Ave, Hastings-on-Hudson (914) 478-1671; saintgeorgebistro.com This French bistro offers reworked classics, local seafood, fine meats, seasonal vegetables and French wine.

A Feast FOR YOUR EYES

EXPAND YOUR CULINARY ADVENTURES. Minutes from our fabulous field-to-table restaurants, craft beverage tasting rooms, and farm markets are international destinations like Storm King Art Center, Woodbury Common, and West Point. That’s only the beginning of what we have to savor here in Orange County. Call for a free travel guide: 845-615-3860 www.OrangeTourism.org

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HVRW Board of Advisors Peter Kelly Co-Chair

xaviars restaurant group

Dr. Tim Ryan Co-Chair

the culinary institute of america

Tim and Nina Zagat Honorary Co-Chairs

zagat

Vincent Barcelona

supreme oil company/ admiration foods

Nick Citera

cosimo’s restaurant group

John Crabtree

crabtree’s kittle house

Agnes Devereux

the village tea room restaurant and bake shop

David DiBari

the cookery

Cathryn Fadde

cathry n’s tuscan grill perch

Josh Kroner

terrapin restaurant

Rich Parente

clock tower grill

Glenn Vogt

rivermarket bar & kitchen

MaryKay Vrba

dutchess tourism

Kevin Zraly

windows on the world wine school

Janet Crawshaw

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SALTAIRE OYSTER BAR & FISH HOUSE L D T X 55 Abendroth Ave, Port Chester (914) 939-2425; saltaireoysterbar.com A Westchester fish and oyster bar serving 10 varieties of oysters and 5 signature sauces alongside craft cocktails.

SIXTY 5 ON MAIN D X 65 Main St, Nyack (845) 358-5200; sixty5onmain.com Chef Moshe Grundman using seasonal ingredients and international influences offers upscale, small plate dining to Nyack.

SAM’S OF GEDNEY WAY L D X 50 Gedney Way, White Plains (914) 949-0978; samsofgedneyway.com A modern American bistro with room for everyone offering a variety of atmospheres for any dining occasion.

SOFRITO L D T X 175 Main St, White Plains (914) 428-5500; sofritowhiteplains.com The aromatic mix of onions, garlic, and tomato are the essence of authentic Puerto Rican cuisine in this colorful, contemporary dining scene.

SAMMY’S DOWNTOWN BISTRO L D T X 124 Pondfield Rd, Bronxville (914) 337-3200; sammysbronxville.com A neighborhood favorite serving American and continental cuisine with Italian accents in an inviting, modern setting.

SONORA RESTAURANT L D T X 179 Rectory St, Port Chester (914) 933-0200; sonorarestaurant.net South American flavors with French-Asian infusion, complemented by a great wine list, delightful cocktails and attentive service.

SAPORE STEAKHOUSE L D X 1108 Main St, Fishkill (845) 897-3300; saporesteakhouse.com Dry-aged beef cooked to your instructions in a spacious, comfortable, club setting.

SOUR KRAUT L D 118 Main St, Nyack (845) 358-3122; sour-kraut.com Hudson Valley’s favorite German-style restaurant is back, ready to serve up favorites including wiener schnitzel and wild mushroom strudel.

SAPORI ITAIAN RESTAURANT L D T X 324 Central Ave, White Plains (914) 684-8855; saporiofwhiteplains.com Savory Italian dishes prepared with love and passion. Homemade pastas, fresh seafood with an extensive Italian and American wine list. SCALIA & CO CRAFT KITCHEN & BAR L D 785 ShopRite Plaza, State Rt 17M, Suite 2, Monroe (845) 395-0906; scaliaandco.com Chef Mark Glielmi’s open kitchen turns out classic Italian cuisine including homemade burrata, mozzarella and cannoli in a casual, upbeat setting. SCARAMELLA’S RISTORANTE L D X 1 Southfield Ave, Dobbs Ferry (914) 693-6024; scaramellas.com Offering fine Northern and Southern Italian cuisine including pasta, steak and seafood. SEASONS OF PIERMONT D X 506 Piermont Ave, Piermont (845) 359-7007; seasonspiermont.com New American fare like duck dumplings, spice rubbed lamb and pea risotto centered on local ingredients alongside an extensive wine cellar.

SPARKILL STEAKHOUSE L D X 500 Route 340, Sparkill (845) 398-3300; sparkillsteakhouse.com Traditional steakhouse experience with classic sides and fresh, expertly butchered cuts of meat and seafood. STAGECOACH INN L D X 268 Main St, Goshen (845) 294-5526 Dishes like truffle lasagna and hand-cut steaks served in three unique areas of this historic boutique inn, including the main dining room, fullywindowed solarium and an outdoor porch. STORM KING TAVERN L D 18 Ridge Rd, Cornwall (845) 458-5361; stormkingrestaurant.com Boasting views of Black Rock Forest, the tavern menu offers American food in a casual atmosphere. SUNSET COVE L D 238 Green St, Tarrytown (914) 366-7889; sunsetcove.net Enjoy the raw bar and hand crafted dishes with a distinctive Italian flair while overlooking the Hudson River and Tappan Zee Bridge.

SERGIO’S RISTORANTE L D X 503 Fifth Ave, Pelham (914) 278-9771; sergiosofpelham.com Enjoy fine Italian cuisine in a newly designed space and savor classic dishes like Linguini alle vongole or Trenete al tartufo.

TAGINE RESTAURANT & WINE BAR D 120 Grand St, Croton-on-Hudson (914) 827-9393; taginecroton.com A unique bistro where French favorites, like steak frites and salade niçoise mix with Moroccan classics.

SHADOWS ON THE HUDSON L D T X 176 Rinaldi Blvd, Poughkeepsie (845) 486-9500; shadowsonthehudson.com An expansive restaurant set on a 40-foot cliff overlooking the Hudson River and the MidHudson Bridge offers a varied menu of steak and seafood.

TANDOORI TASTE OF INDIA D 163 N. Main St, Port Chester (914) 937-2727; tandooritasteofindia.com Authentic Indian cuisine including masala, curry, korma and biryani with expansive vegetarian options in the heart of Westchester. Signature clay tandoor oven used on-site.

SHIP LANTERN INN D 1725 Rt 9W, Milton (845) 795-5400; shiplanterninn.com Since 1925, genuine hospitality and gracious blacktie service, white tablecloths and fine American cuisine for a relaxing experience.

TARRY LODGE L D T X 18 Mill St, Port Chester (914) 939-3111; tarrylodge.com A suburban outpost of New York’s Batali-Bastianich outfit, famous for thin-crust pizza, house-made pasta and authentic Italian cooking.

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TERRA RUSTICA L D T 77 South Moger Ave, Mount Kisco (914) 666-7005; terrarusticaristorante.com Offering Italian favorites from Orecchiette Gaeta to Ossobuco Di Angello to the diners of Mount Kisco and the Hudson Valley.

TRATTORIA LOCANDA L D X 1105 Main St, Fishkill (845) 896-4100; locandarestaurant.com Known for its comfortable neighborhood charm and serves fine southern Italian cuisine in a casual, brick-walled dining room.

TERRAPIN RESTAURANT D X 6426 Montgomery St, Rhinebeck (845) 876-3330; terrapinrestaurant.com Italian, Asian and French influences and local products served in a creative interpretation of New American cuisine.

TUTTABELLA TRATTORIA L D X 754 White Plains Rd, Scarsdale (914) 725-0566; tuttabellatrattoria.com Enjoy classic Italian favorites like pasta, seafood and steak in a relaxed, family-friendly atmosphere.

TEXAS DE BRAZIL D X 1584 Palisades Center Dr, West Nyack (845) 727-1313; texasdebrazil.com An authentic Brazilian-American churrascaria (steakhouse) combines the cuisine of Southern Brazil with the spirit of Texas. TEXAS DE BRAZIL D X 1 Ridge Hill Blvd, Yonkers (914) 652-9660; texasdebrazil.com THYME STEAK & SEAFOOD L D X 3605 Crompond Rd, Yorktown Heights (914) 788-8700; thymesteakandseafood.com American fare served with genuine, neighborly hospitality in a warm and inviting setting, with a dedicated focus on gluten-free offerings.

THE TWISTED OAK L D T X 61 Main St, Tarrytown (914) 332-1992; thetwistedoakny.com Italian influenced American farmhouse cuisine with homemade pasta and charcuterie pair nicely with ingredient-driven cocktails, craft beer and modest wine list.

Baja 328

TOSCANA RISTORANTE L D X 214 Main St, Eastchester (914) 361-1119; toscana-ristorante.com Chef Michele Lepore prepares a wide variety of classic Italian dishes, from medaglioni di pollo to bistecca di manzo. TRADITIONS 118 D X 11 Old Tomahawk St, Somers (914) 248-7200; traditions118restaurant.com Traditional cuisine with classic Italian influences in an eclectic and comfortable atmosphere. Extensive martini menu.

TWO SPEAR STREET D X 2 Spear St, Nyack (845) 353-7733; 2spearstreet.com New American cuisine in a romantic setting on the river overlooking the Tappan Zee. UNION RESTAURANT & BAR LATINO L D X 22-24 New Main St, Haverstraw (845) 429-4354; unionrestaurant.net Continental cuisine with a Latin twist in an upscale hacienda setting. Friendly staff offer specialty cocktails and sangrias.

eat LOCAL HA qtr love_Layout 1 8/29/15 4:35 PM Page 1

at the farm or table

FABLE FARM, OSSINING, NY

Something fresh is always growing in Westchester. Westchester County is a premiere dining destination with a robust menu of restaurants to satisfy every appetite. Whether you’re in the mood for breathtaking waterfront views, charming historic ambiance, sleek and modern new spaces or farm-to-table freshness, Westchester is a culinary gem in the Hudson Valley. Meet and explore Westchester County at VisitWestchesterNY.com

drink LOCAL

love what’s on your table the valley table magazine

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UNOODLES SNACK BAR D X 14 Main St, Haverstraw (845) 947-7625; unoodles.net Set in a 1950s-style bar, taste some of the best noodle dishes in the valley while enjoying creative cocktails and live entertainment.

WOULD RESTAURANT D 120 North Rd, Highland (845) 691-9883; thewould.com New American cuisine with a French flair and a long history of warm hospitality in the heart of apple country.

VALLEY RESTAURANT AT THE GARRISON D X 2015 Rt 9, Garrison (845) 424-3604; thegarrison.com American farm-to-table cuisine showcasing ingredients from its own 3-acre farm as well as from area farms and producers, served with elegance in a country setting with river views.

X20 XAVIARS ON THE HUDSON L D T 71 Water Grant St, Yonkers (914) 965-1111; xaviars.com Classic French technique with Italian and Spanish influences and Asian embellishments yields an original cuisine unique to the Hudson Valley.

VELO BISTRO & WINE BAR L D X 2 N. Broadway, Nyack (845) 353-7667; velonyack.com Food and wine pairing is elevated to an art form at this trendy yet consistent Nyack mainstay offering adventurous good cooking and 20different wines by the glass.

ZERO OTTO NOVE L D X 55 Old Rt. 22, Armonk (914) 273-0089; 089armonk.roberto089.com Chef Roberto Paciullo provides the a taste of Southern Italy in abundant portions fueled by local products brought directly to the restaurant’s quaint farmhouse tables.

Restaurant X

VILLAGE TEAROOM RESTAURANT & BAKE SHOP L D 10 Plattekill Ave, New Paltz (845) 255-3434; thevillagetearoom.com A European-style tearoom offering a full menu of sophisticated foods, showcasing Irish roots and a commitment to local farms.

WILDFIRE GRILL L D 74 Clinton St, Montgomery (845) 457-3770; wildfireny.com A popular local eatery featauring an eclectic, predominantly American menu with Asian, Mexican and Italian influences.

WASABI L D X 110 Main St, Nyack (845) 358-7977; wasabinyack.com Chef Doug Chi Nguyen brings his international influence and love of food to Nyack, serving artfully plated sushi and entrées.

WINSTON RESTAURANT D T X 130 E Main St, Mount Kisco (914) 244-9780; winstonrestaurant.com Diners can enjoy New American fare on the three levels of the restaurant: the gastropub, the dining room, and the seasonal rooftop bar.

Visit HudsonValleyRestaurantWeek.com for the latest restaurant additions, menus, reservations policies and more.

Thank You to Our Sponsors Hudson Valley Restaurant Week would not be possible without their generous support. presenting sponsor

Interested in Sponsorship? Contact The ValleyTable (845) 765-2600 / hvrw@valleytable.com

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UP CLOSE

downing park urban farm

text by kristen warfield photos by ann stratton

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L-R: Marisa Brink, Liana Hoodes, Virginia Kasinski, Carl Jack

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c o l o r f u l , h a n d - s p r aw l e d s i g n t o p s

the gates at the foot of a sloping hill near the center of the City of Newburgh. The perimeter, lined with blooming flowers, encompasses 2.5 acres of raised wooden planting beds overflowing with organic vegetables and herbs. A new, covered hoop house stands quiet watch over it all. Walk through the new plantings and the buzz of urban traffic and pedestrian banter below seem to disintegrate. Welcome to Downing Park Urban Farm. “We are thrilled to see it looking like this after all this time,” says Virginia Kasinski, the farm’s outreach manager. After years of being ignored by the city, two greenhouses, built in 1937, were rusting and overflowing with weeds, their glass panes obliterated. The abandoned site was a magnet for casual trash dumping and drug use. It was difficult to imagine that the eyesore was once the source of all the plants and flowers for Downing Park, the spectacular 35-acre site designed by America’s preeminent landscape architects, Calvert Vaux and Frederick Law Olmstead, and opened in 1897. Named for their mentor, Newburgh native Andrew Jackson Downing, the “father of

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American landscape architecture,” the park still stands as a model of serene, contemplative landscape design. In June 2015, Newburgh received a Housing and Urban Development (HUD) grant to restore activity to the site. The city joined forces with the Newburgh Community Land Bank and the Downing Park Planning Committee to transform the space.


The sense of excitement among the staff as they unload batches of new seedlings from a delivery truck at this urban oasis is palpable. To head farmer Carl Jack, the activity marks a new beginning for both the farm project and the city. Along with help from the Center for Hope (an after-school and employment program for Newburgh youth that Jack also directs), the farm is anticipating its first full-scale harvest since the initiative began. In addition to learning the ins and outs of growing food, the program teaches the teens beekeeping and the entrepreneurial skills behind selling the veggies and honey. “I grew up on a farm in South Carolina and went to college at the Mount [Mount Saint Mary’s College] for social work,” Jack says. “I went in a million different directions before I ended back here in farming. Growing up like that taught me about hard work. It taught me about real life. The kids in Newburgh don’t have that same upbringing that I did—they’re not growing up in a rural area where they can work in a field all day—they don’t have that opportunity to learn where food comes from or how it’s grown. Bringing them to work on the farm gives them that.” While the ultimate goal of the project is to bring inner-city residents together around food, farm program coordinator Liana Hoodes, former executive director of the National Organic Coalition, stresses that, although the farm isn’t a “community garden” (a garden area available to the general public to grow their own crops), “it is still a resource to make fresh produce more accessible to city residents.” Hoodes notes the farm will host community days and workshops so people can learn how to grow their own food with little to no outside land, impacting food security throughout the city. In addition to donating fruits and vegetables to area food pantries and shelters, Hoodes says the farming team plans to sell produce to city farmers’ markets and restaurants. (In fact, the farm had its first wholesale customer last year— Jodi Cummings, chef/owner of Caffe Macchiato on Liberty Street—even though the farm was not in full production.) Recently, Michael Kelly, chef/owner of Liberty Street Bistro, became another customer. “There are so many cultures here in Newburgh and so many great restaurants—they’ve all inspired what we’re growing here,” Jack says. The grandmother of one of the kids who works with us calls me every week asking when the collards are going to be ready. I’ve met some Trinidadian people who want us to grow habañero peppers, so we want to plant some of those for them. We have some Italian people checking in with us about the great eggplant we grew last year. Every person, every family has a special something that they love to cook with. We want to make it available to them right in the center of their community.” 4

There are so many cultures here in Newburgh and so many great restaurants— they’ve all inspired what we’re growing here.

Downing Park Urban Farm will host a fall cook-off event on October 21. Follow them on Facebook for more details. Downing Park Urban Farm 207 Carpenter Ave, Newburgh (farm) 15 Chambers St, Newburgh (office) downingparkurbanfarm.org

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stateof the

distilling

text and photos by david handschuh

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A rock climber, a dancer and two old high school friends walk into a bar. (You’re waiting for a joke, right?)

Sorry. In reality, the rock climber, the dancer and the two high school friends walked through the halls of the New York State Legislature in Albany about 13 years ago. They were there to lobby the State Liquor Authority and the State Legislature to change laws to benefit farm distilleries. As a result of their efforts, New York passed the most significant piece of legislation regarding spirits since President Franklin D. Roosevelt repealed Prohibition in 1933.

T

h e fa r m d i s t i l l e ry ac t , w h i c h b e ca m e l aw i n

2007, was the fuse that lit an explosion in craft distilling in New York State and, in turn, around the country. What started out as three farm distilleries in the Hudson Valley in 2005 has turned into 27 in Dutchess, Ulster, Sullivan, Orange, Putnam, Rockland and Westchester Counties as of 2017. “It took three years and three governors to get us where we wanted,” says Ralph Erenzo, of Tuthilltown Spirits in Gardiner (Ulster County). In all, there are now 140 farm distilleries in New York, and secondary industries like barrel making and malting are racing to support the production of whiskey, rye, bourbon-style whiskey, gin, vodka and rum, according to Stefan Fleming, Assistant Director for Industry Development at Empire State Development, a state-run economic and industrial development agency. Fleming says Governor Andrew Cuomo has been a driving force behind the growth of the craft beverage industry across New York State. “Governor Cuomo has worked diligently with the legislature to roll back, change or eliminate outdated and archaic regulations that were still in effect from the Prohibition era,” he notes. New York State distillers are an interesting bunch. Smart, hard working, always learning from each other, they bring dramatically different ages and backgrounds to this baby industry. “Distillers are a unique breed,” says Brian McKenzie, former president of the New York Distillers Guild and the owner and distiller at Finger Lakes Distilling. “I think we all realize that there is much work to be done to get consumers to recognize and appreciate New York State craft spirits.” McKenzie notes that while established and newer distilleries are competitors, “We can all benefit by working together to steal some market share from the massproduced spirits that people have consumed for years. We've formed some great friendships over the years in working toward this goal.” Collectively, the farm distilleries, Distiller’s Guild, the State Liquor Authority and Empire State Development, with support and encouragement from the governor and the

legislature, have birthed a terroir—a New York flavor of spirits—that’s been winning awards and moving in on the top shelves behind bartenders around the globe. That terroir comes from state laws that mandate farm-distilled spirits contain a minimum of 75 percent New York-grown raw agricultural materials. More than a decade after the first legal stills in New York State fired up, Ralph Erenzo, Jeremy Kidde and Jason Grizzanti, and Derek and Ashley Grout are the distillers emeriti of the Hudson Valley. They all freely admit that in the beginning they had almost no clue what they were getting into. “We started completely blind,” says Harvest Spirit’s Derek Grout, a statement echoed by Tuthilltown Spirits' Ralph Erenzo. “Not a single person who works here knew anything at all about spirits when they started—that includes the owners,” Erenzo smiles. “We taught ourselves how to distill and how to build a distillery.” Production at regional distilleries has increased from perhaps a few experimental bottles a year drawn from a 100-gallon copper pot still to more than 130,000 gallons a year at some. The operations have changed and, like the spirits they’ve produced, matured in many ways. Sitting outside their distinctly rustic distillery buildings, a faint whiff of malted grains in the air, each of the original Hudson Valley distillers recently looked back over the past decade and at the future of the industry in the valley.

BRAGGING RIGHTS For the record: Warwick Valley Winery and Distillery received its distillery license in 2002, making it the first distillery in the state since Prohibition—its commercial production was limited to brandies and eau de vie. The distinction of being the first distillery to legally produce whiskey in New York since Prohibition goes to Tuthilltown Spirits, which began production in 2005. Harvest Spirits is the first farm distillery in the state licensed under the Farm Distillery Act of 2007. —VT

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BLACK DIRT DISTILLERY Jeremy Kidde and Jason Grizzanti, the brains and taste buds Premium Outlet Center in Central Valley (Orange County) behind wildly successful Black Dirt Distillery in Warwick offers small plates of charcuterie, hummus and sandwiches (Orange County), have been friends since grade school in as well as spirits, cocktails, a small wine selection and a Montclair, New Jersey. Jeremy found a career in investment collection of New York State beers, wines and spirits to management in San Francisco, while Jason worked on his refresh and nourish shoppers at the popular location just family farm, Warwick Valley Winery and Orchards, and then 50 miles north of Manhattan. “The Woodbury location is pursued a master's degree in brewing and distilling. Using doing very well,” Kidde observes. “It is well received and many customers have said they are happy to apples from the family orchard and other local have something like that there.” Additionally, farms, the duo started producing apple brandy When we first The Taste New York store at Grand Central in 2002 under the Warwick Valley Distillery sells Black Dirt and other Hudson label and saw their first bottling—about 200 started, people didn’t Station Valley spirits, along with cheese, honey gallons—in 2004. They added pear, black currant and cherry brandies to their portfolio think of a New York and other locally produced edibles. The shared winery, cidery and distillery soon after. (These weren’t flavored brandies, they were distilled using New York State whiskey—they actually tasting room visitors center in Warwick, which features products from Black Dirt fruits, and lots of them—it takes roughly didn’t think of any Distilling along with those from Warwick 5,000 gallons of pressed cider to make 500 Winery and Doc’s Hard Cider, features gallons of apple brandy.) whiskey beyond live music every weekend, year ’round. Last year, the entrepreneurial duo produced 130,000 gallons of Warwick gin, apple- Ireland, Scotland or Kidde notes that last year, 120,000 visitors stopped in for tours, tastings or music. jack and Black Dirt Bourbon—30,000 gallons Tennessee. The exposure and sales have naturally of branded product for Black Dirt Distillery, with spurred growth in the business. The little an additional 100,000 gallons bulk contract distillate, sold under other labels. The spirits are stored in three aging distillery that produced less than 200 gallons its first year facilities, known as rick houses, in the town of Pine Island, an will process more than a million gallons of cider from New York State apples over the next 12 months, all destined area known mainly for its vast onion farms. to become brandy, applejack or hard cider, according to That’s quite a change from the Friday before Christmas Kidde. “When we first started, people didn’t think of a New in 2005, when Astor Spirits in New York City purchased York whiskey—they actually didn’t think of any whiskey two cases of Warwick Valley Distillery pear brandy. (“We beyond Ireland, Scotland or Tennessee,” Kidde stresses, doubled our sales for the year,” Kidde laughs.) Black Dirt adding, “We realized early on that the facility we were Distillery spirits are now available at the farm and in stores distilling in was too small.” Kidde and Grizzanti plan to and bars throughout New York, New Jersey, Connecticut, continue to produce at current levels while they expand Maryland, Washington DC, Rhode Island, Georgia, distribution. In fact, through contract distilling and a Louisiana and California. financial infusion from equity investors, Kidde hints, “We’re A newly opened food and spirits tasting room known set up with a capacity to go global.” as the Black Dirt Bourbon Barn at Woodbury Commons

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HARVEST SPIRITS Derek Grout is a third-generation farmer, but he’d left the our products. Farmers were selling apples for five cents a family farm his grandparents established in 1954 in Valatie pound when our growing cost was eight cents a pound.” (Columbia County) to become a graphic designer in Boston Grout was one of the original New York farmers-turnedduring the wild west days of the internet boom. Eventually, lobbyists who worked to establish the Farm Distillery License he moved back, started a distillery business, and met his wife legislation and to change local laws that prohibited distilling. “On the local level, I simply attended a town meeting and Ashley, who grew up in nearby Harlemville. They’re now partners beyond marriage. At Harvest Spirits, proposed my idea of a distillery. The town was happy to rescind the Prohibition-era law,” he notes. Ashley fulfills many roles—business manager, Grout joined with Ralph Erenzo, Brian bookkeeper, photographer, graphic designer, This farm was McKenzie from Finger Lakes Distilling events marketing and expert taster. Derek is the distiller—on any given day he can always teetering on and Julie Suarez and Jeff Williams from the New York Farm Bureau to lobby the be found checking on apples in a walk-in bankruptcy... selling state legislature and the governor to pass freezer or lifting a giant bag filled with the Farm Distilling Act, the legislation juniper, lemongrass and coriander from apples for five that paved the way for farm distillers to the liquid in a 250-gallon tub destined to be bottled as gin. (And there’s Señor Don cents a pound when distribute their own products and open tasting rooms on the farms. Gato, the distillery cat, who paces up and our growing cost At Harvest Spirits, Grout installed a down the wooden deck in front of the small, 100-gallon pot still in an old apple distillery looking for a mouse or a scratch was eight cents cold storage room and took the bruised, behind the ears, or both.) dropped or “funny looking, dented apples” that The distillery shares a parking lot with a pound. people don’t buy and turned them into vodka, Golden Harvest Farms, the 200-acre family farm with more than 60,000 apple trees Grout’s dad and applejack and specialty brandies. In 2007, Harvest Spirits grandfather worked for years. Out front, there’s an apple became New York's first farm distillery under the new law. Visitors to the small-batch distillery often get to try a sign, designed by his grandmother in the 1960s, that he faithfully repaints every few years. It’s the connection to new liquid that’s not yet bottled. Today’s experimental family that makes Grout proud to be part of Harvest Spirits. spirit is a barrel-aged gin, not yet for sale. And the thinking extends outside the barrel, so to speak. Harvest is the “Growing up, this farm was always teetering on bankruptcy,” Grout remembers. “Farms were really struggling Hudson Valley’s first producer of aged balsamic vinegar. Made from apples, of course. back then in New York. We had trouble finding markets for

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T U T H I L LT O W N S P I R I T S The credit for the explosion of New York State craft distillers employing the same sales technique that earned Tuthilltown top-shelf bragging rights in many New York bars. actually belongs to a bunch of nosy neighbors in the small, Sinewy and strong, despite a car crash that almost killed picturesque Ulster County town of Gardiner, in the shadow him a few years ago, Erenzo is lauded by many for his of the Shawangunk Ridge, Minnewaska State Park and passion, dogged determination and his interest in creating Mohonk Preserve. “Not in my backyard” was the cry that rang out just after a “New York-style” spirit, key to the New York State small Ralph Erenzo, a professional climber from New York City, bought distillery resurgence. The distillery, which produced an admirable a 36-acre parcel of land off Albany Post Road that 5,000 gallons of spirits in 2007, grew expoincluded a river, an historic gristmill and several The acquisition nentially, distilling almost 80,000 gallons in related buildings. Lured by the Shawangunk Ridge, a rock-climbing mecca that draws visof Hudson was a 2016, distributed worldwide. In addition to being a financial success, Tuthilltown itors from around the world, Erenzo wanted significant signal to brands have garnered many national and to open “Bunks in the Gunks,” an affordable, international awards. minimalist housing opportunity for visiting the spirits industry In fact, Hudson Baby Bourbon caught climbers. A few neighbors had other plans the attention of William Grant & Sons and shut down the “Bunks in the Gunks” that New York craft Ltd., a distillery, owner and distributor idea. “I planned to retire at Tuthilltown for distilling had arrived of a number of major labels, including my last project, but it was made impossiworld-renowned Glenfiddich and Balvenie. ble by NIMBY neighbors,” Erenzo recalls. and should be In 2010, the Scottish company added the Erenzo changed plans, too, when he discovered a New York State law authorizing a taken seriously. Hudson brand to its portfolio. According to Erenzo, “The acquisition of Hudson was a new distillery class license that lowered the significant signal to the spirits industry that New permit fee from $65,000 a year to $1,500 for three years. “The Tuthilltown Project,” as he calls the distillery York craft distilling had arrived and should be taken seriously.” In April 2017, Erenzo sold the remainder of Tuthilltown idea, began shortly thereafter. In 2005, Tuthilltown became the first legal distillery since Prohibition to produce whiskey Spirits to William Grant, including the entire 36-acre site— in New York. By 2007, it was producing two vodkas from the distillery, Tuthill House at the Mill restaurant, visitor apples, corn whiskey and four aged whiskeys, including its center and scenic grounds on the Shawangunk Kill. “[Head distiller] Brian Lee and I had reached the limit of our abilities signature Hudson Baby Bourbon. to fund and manage the growing business at Tuthilltown,” Erenzo literally built the brand from the ground up. He Erenzo says. “We sought a way to ensure the distillery would loaded up the first batches into his 1998 Honda Element continue to prosper and improve. William Grant & Sons is and drove to bars and liquor stores in New York City, offering sips of Baby Bourbon and telling prospective clients, making certain Tuthilltown remains true to its type—a small “I’m not a salesman; I made this.” Most of the time, he made local farm distillery working with local growers.” Even after the sale closed, Ralph is still there every day, a sale. Later, he made Tuthilltown’s whiskey and bourbon tasting barrels, guiding tours and welcoming people who an international name by going from bar to bar in Paris,

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RISING TIDE Barley, wheat and rye, sourced 100 percent from New York State, are all needed to produce the mash which is the starting point for spirits and beers. Dennis and Jeanette Nesel of Hudson Valley Malting are scaling up to meet the needs of New York State distillers and brewers. “We’re seeing one or two new distillers or brewers every month, and the existing ones have a growing demand,” Dennis says while raking drying grains in concentric circles on the floor of the Germantown malt house. “We started with 50,000 pounds in 2015—we’ll be floor malting 150 tons of grains in 2017,” Dennis says. “There are more megaways and corporate ways of doing it—large stainless steel drums and machinery—but we do malting by hand. We’re craft; we’re small batch; we do this by sight, smell and feel. To make a true Hudson Valley whiskey or beer we feel you have to start by using local ingredients.” The Nesels’ business is a perfect example of the growth in secondary industries that has resulted from the craft-beverage explosion spawned by changes in New York’s brewing and distilling laws over the past dozen years. Hops and grain growers and even coopers have seen a growing demand for their products and services. —DH

have stopped in and supported the brand for more than a decade. In July, a packed, full-sized bus pulled up, and he greeted each visitor with a smile and a handshake. So, where do New York’s farm-distilled spirits go over the next decade? Some say that the market is nearing saturation for brands, yet the popularity of New York spirits continues to grow on a local, national and worldwide scale. Erenzo believes that the next area of growth will be in the secondary markets that support distilling. A cooperage recently opened in High Falls that may help ease a barrel shortage, and a malting room in Germantown is one of only two in the state available to meet the growing demand for the grains that are the base of every distilled spirit. Agritourism is growing, too, along with the spirits industry. Wine trails in Gardiner, New Paltz, Marlboro and Milton bring thousands of visitors a year to Ulster County, but many are coming to taste local spirits, as well. Erenzo estimates 40,000 visitors stopped by his distillery last year.

Derek Grout sums up the potential for the next decade and beyond. “This has benefited the farm in ways I’ve never imagined,” he says, citing the addition of a stable business in the community, skills and employment to a handful of dedicated employees, and “a heritage I can pass on to my children.” 4 Black Dirt Distillery 114 Little York Rd, Warwick (845) 258-6020; blackdirtdistillery.com Harvest Spirits 3074 US Rt 9, Valatie (518) 758-1776; harvestspirits.com Tuthilltown Spirits 14 Grist Mill Ln, Gardiner (845) 255-1527; tuthilltown.com

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Q

is for

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J

text and photos by david handschuh

o h n c ox wa s a c u s to m ca b i n e t m a k e r f o r

quercus The explosive rebirth of local distilling in New York since 2007 has fueled a rising demand for barrels...

27 years before transitioning his woodworking shop in High Falls to follow a dream. He wanted to become a cooper. He found specialized, centuries-old tools at auctions out West. He customized and modernized old machinery. He sourced white oak from the Catskills and Adirondacks and began drying and aging the quarter-sawn wood for two years. All the while he learned, practiced, improved and perfected his barrel-making skills. Cox takes his place in a long tradition of Hudson Valley barrel makers who provided containers for aging, storing and shipping spirits, as well as for transporting dry goods. A cooperage in nearby Rosendale produced the barrels used to store and ship one of the most important building products ever invented—Rosendale Cement, used to construct the Brooklyn Bridge, the base of the Statue of Liberty and innumerable other bridges, tunnels, skyscrapers and apartment buildings in New York City during the nineteenth century. Local coopers throughout the state also built butter churns, slack barrels for dry goods and tight barrels for liquids. But Prohibition and modern materials made the cooper’s skills seem irrelevant, and the craft was all but extinct in New York State for almost a century. The explosive rebirth of local distilling in New York since 2007 has fueled a rising demand for barrels, however. Two years ago, Cox opened Quercus Cooperage (from Quercus, the Latin name for the oak genus), in High Falls; in December 2016, the first Quercus barrel—replete with New York wood staves, metal hoops and rivets—rolled out the door, so to speak. For aging bourbon or other spirits, distillers choose the “toast,” or degree of charring of the barrel, based on the desired flavor profile. Quercus barrels are charred using sawdust and compressed air, not with propane (the more common method of charring). For commercial distillers, Quercus manufactures traditional 53-gallon barrels, 30-gallon trentas, 9.5-gallon firkins (a traditional ale barrel), 4-gallon kiokes (Douglas fir tanks used to ferment sauerkraut or kimchi), as well as custom, 800-gallon washbacks, mash rakes, paddles and other specialty tools. Quercus Cooperage 186 Mohonk Rd, High Falls (917) 578-9948; qcooperage.com

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Wine & Wow! Visit our 15 wonderful wineries, sample our world class wines

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INDEX TO ADVERTISERS

PAGE 86 A Tavola Trattoria / 845.255.1426 / atavolany.com 4 Adams Fairacre Farms / adamsfarms.com 40 Angry Orchard / 845.713.5180 / angryorchard.com 32 Aroma Osteria / 845.298.6790 / aromaosteriarestaurant.com 48 Baja 328 / 845.838.BAJA / baja328.com 87 Barb’s Butchery / 845.831.8050 / barbsbutchery.com 86 Beacon Craft Beer Shoppe / 845.202.7470 87 Beacon Natural Market / 845.838.1288 / beaconnaturalmarket.com 30 Bethel Woods / 866.781.2922 / bethelwoodscenter.org 20 Black Dirt Distillery / 845.258.6020 / blackdirtdistillery.com 12 Boutique Wine & Spirits / 845.765.1555 / boutiquewsc.com 36 Brooklyn Cider House / 845.633.8657 / brooklynciderhouse.com 31 Brother’s Trattoria / 845.383.3300 / brotherstrattoria.com 48 Café Amarcord / 845.440.0050 / cafeamarcord.com 10 Caffe Macchiato / 845.565.4616 / addressyourapetite.com 30 Canterbury Brook Inn / 845.534.9658 / canterburybrookinn.com 22 Clock Tower Grill / 845.582.0574 / clocktowergrill.com C4 Cosimo’s / cosimosrestaurantgroup.com 82 Craft 47 / 845.360.5253 / craft47.com 22 Crave Restaurant & Lounge / 845.452.3501 /craverestaurantandlounge.com 04 Culinary Institute of America / 845.471.6608 / ciarestaurants.com C3 Daily Planet Diner / 845.452.0110 / dailyplanetdiner.com 75 Dino’s Vigneto Café / 845.834.2828 / www.vignetocafe.com 12 Dottie Audrey’s Bakery Kitchen / 845.915.3088 / dottieaudreys.com 11 Dubrovnik / 914.637.3777 / Dubrovnikny.com 57 Dutchess County Tourism / 845.463.4000 / dutchesstourism.com 12 Ella’s Bellas / 845.765.8502 / ellasbellasbeacon.com 85 Farm to Table Bistro / 845.297.1111 / ftbistro.com 34 Fishkill Farms / 845.897.4377 / fishkillfarms.com 31 Fresh Company / 845.424.8204 / freshcompany.net 77 The Greens at Copake Country Club / 518.352.0019 / copakecountryclub.com 10 Gino’s Restaurant / 845.297.8061 / ginoswappingers.com 39 Hahn Farm / 845.266.3680 C2 Half Moon / 914.693.4130 36 Harvest Spirits / 518.758.1776 / harvestspirits.com 34 Hawthorne Valley Farm / 518.672.7500 / hawthornevalleyfarm.org 36 Hemlock Hill / 914.737.2810 / hemlockhillfarm.com 87 Henry’s at the Farm / 845.795.1500 / buttermilkfallsinn.com/henrys 20 Heritage Food + Drink / info@heritagefooddrink.com 84 Howell’s Sunflower Café / 845.615.9135 /howellscafe.com 84 Hudson St. Café / 845.565-2450 / hudsonstreetcafe.com 52 Hudson Valley Federal Credit Union / 845.463.3011 / hvfcu.org 35 Hudson Valley Fresh / hudsonvalleyfresh.com 37 Hudson Valley Seafood / 845. 928.9678 / hudson valleyseafood.com 55 Hudson Whiskey / 845.255.1527 / hudsonwhiskey.com 11 Il Barilotto / 845.897.4300 / ilbarilottorestaurant.com 75 Jacobowitz & Gubits / 866.993.7575 / jacobowitz.com 80 Judelson, Giordano & Siegal.com / 877.740.9500 / JGSPC.com 38 Jones Farm / 845.534.4445 / jonesfarminc.com 87 Key Food Marketplace / 845.838.0984 / keyfood.com

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PAGE 86 Leo’s Ristorante & Bar / leospizzeria.com 74 Limoncello / 845.294.1880 / limoncelloatorangeinn.com 84 Louisa J. Steinberg / 929.367.8828 / louisasteinbergmdphd.com 77 Love Apple Farm / 518.828.5048/ www.loveapplefarm.com 30 Marta’s Vineyard / 845.218.9672 / martasvine.com 54 Metro North / mta.info 74 Mill, The / 845.214.0000 / millpk.com 48 Mill House Brewing Company / 845.485.BREW / millhousebrewing.com 40 Mother Earth’s / motherearthstorehouse.com 84 Mountain Meadow Bed & Breakfast / 845.255.6144 / mountainmeadowsbnb.com 7 Niche / 212.777.2101 / nichemodern.com 2 N&S Supply / nssupply.com 82 Nina / 845.344.6800 / nina-restaurant.com 59 Orange County Tourism / 845.615.3860 / orangetourism.org 56 Pamal Broadcasting / pamal.com 86 Pamela's Traveling Feast / 845.562.4505 / pamelasny.com 79 Paula’s Public House / 845.454.7821 / paulaspublichouse.com 21 Peony Vodka / 845.702.3903 / peonyvodka.com 74 Poughkeepsie Ice House / 845.232.5783 / poughkeepsieicehouse.com 80 Poughkeepsie Galleria / 845.297.7600 / poughkeepsiegalleriamall.com 2 Putnam County Tourism / 845.808.1015 / www.tourputnam.org 2 Ramiro’s 954 / 845.621.3333 / ramiros954.com 32 Red Barn Produce / 845.691.7428 79 Red House / 845.795.6285 / redhouseny.com C3 Red Line Diner / 845.765.8401 / dineatredline.com 48 Redwood / 845.259.5868 / www.redwooduptown.com 53 Rockland County Tourism / 845.364.2170 / www.explorerocklandny.com 81 Roundhouse, The / 845.765.8369 81 Scarborough Fare / 845.831.7247 / www.scarboroughfarenp.com 74 Shawangunk Wine Trail / gunkswine.com 39 Stoutridge Vineyard / 845.236.7620 / stoutridge.com 77 Sunflower Natural Foods Market / 845.679.5361 / sunflowernatural.com C3 Table Talk Diner / 845.849.2839 / tabletalkdiner.com 37 TasteNY Store at Todd Hill / 845.849.0247 83 Terrapin Restaurant / 845.876.3330 / terrapinrestaurant.com 20 Tito Santana / 845.765.2350 / tacosantana.com 12 Tuthill House at the Mill / 845.255.1527/ www.tuthillhouse.com 58 Ulster County Tourism / 845.340.3566 10 Valley at the Garrison / 845.424.3604 x39 / thegarrison.com 85 Village Tea Room / 845.255.3434 / thevillagetearoom.com C3 Vanikiotis Diner Group / vanikiotisgroup.com 9 Warren Kitchen & Cutlery / 845.876.6208 / warrenkitchentools.com 1 Westchester Medical Center / 914.493.7000 / westchestermedicalcenter.com 61 Westchester Tourism / www.westchestertourism.com 37 Whitecliff Vineyard / 845.255.4613 / whitecliffwine.com 75 Wildfire Grill / 845.457.3770 77 William Farm & Sons / 518.828.1635 7 Williams Lumber & Home Center / 845.876.WOOD / williamslumber.com 85 Woody’s Farm to Table / 845.534.1111 / woodysfarmtotable.com


From Local Farms

to our tables, fireside dining with a view Serving Lunch, Dinner and Sunday Brunch 44 Golf Course Road Craryville, NY 12521  |  518.325.0019   www.thegreensatcopake.com 

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DIRECTORY

A C C O M M O D A T I O N S

Mountain Meadows B&B 542 Albany Post Rd, New Paltz (845) 255-6144 mountainmeadowsbnb.com Nestled in the foothills of the Catskills in the shado w of the Shawangunk Ridge, a cozy bed and breakfast. Hosts, Maria and Joe, welcome y ou to their upstate New York geta way, complete with in-ground pool and hot tub, patio and gardens. William Farmer & Sons 20 S Front St, Hudson (518) 828-1635; wmfarmerandsons.com William Farmer & Sons reno vated a historic boarding house in downtown Hudson and imbues it with a spirit of hospitality to provide a unique place to sta y, a mercantile, a bar and a restaur ant. “Stay happ y. Enjo y cr aft coc ktails and a gratifying meal.” A R T

Newburgh Art Supply 5 Grand St, Newburgh (845) 561-5552; newburghartsupply.com Mon-Thu 10–6; F ri 11–7; Sat 10–6; Closed Sun See, feel and experience quality art materials in one of Newburgh’s restored landmarks in the heart of the Washington Market neighborhood. Your local sour ce for essential creati ve supplies for the student, professional and enthusiast. Celebr ating 9 y ears of service! B A K E R I E S

The Alternative Baker 407 Main St, Rosendale (845) 658-3355; lemoncakes.com Thu - Mon 7–5; Closed Tue & Wed 100% all butter scr atch baked goods, plus man y allergy friendly options. Where taste is everything. Dottie Audrey’s Bakery Kitchen 549 Rt 17, Tuxedo Park (845) 915-3088 dottieaudreys.com

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Mon-Fri 7–6 ; Sat 8–6; Sun 8–4 A welcoming roadside eatery and bakery offering scr atch-made, comfort food. Slo w-rise, freshly baked breads, scones, pastries. Breakfast, lunc h, catering and prepared foods to go. Ella’s Bellas 418–420 Main St, Beacon (845) 765-8502 Mon & Wed 8–5; Thu–Sat 8–7; Sun 9–4; closed Tue Ella’s Bellas be lieves th at an indulgence should taste like an indulgence regardless of our dietary restrictions. We specialize in gluten-free products, but we promise y ou w on’t kno w the difference. B E E R

&

Pamela’s Traveling Feast & Pamela’s Bird and Bottle 1123 Old Albany Post Rd, Garrison (845) 424-2333 pamelastravelingfeast.com Adding to her custom cr afted cuisine with exceptional service, Pamela Resc h, o wner of P amela’s Traveling F east, announces her acquisition of the Bird & Bottle Inn. This historic, c harming, and spirited 1761 colonial inn features four guest rooms with expansi ve grounds an d pe rmanent te nt structure for weddings and pri vate events. Offering Special Wine Paring Dinners sev eral times a month, please call for dates and information. Weddings, private events, corporate events and holiday parties.

B R E W E R I E S

Beacon Craft Beer Shoppe 262 Main Street, Beacon 845-202-7470 The finest curated selection of beer in the Hudson Valley, including Saranac, Dogfish Head, Pipeworks, Evil Twin, Ommegang, Southern Tier, P eak Organic, Sam Adam's Boston Lager , F ounders, Abita Purple Haze, Newburgh, Brooklyn and Upstate Brewing Stouts, Ales and Sours. Also featuring Angry Orchard, Citizen and Gr aft hard ciders. Call for information about upcoming tastings.

Terrapin Restaurant Catering & Events 6426 Montgomery St, Rhinebeck (845) 889-8831; terrapincatering.com Enjoy the same high-quality ingredients and service that you kno w at Terrapin Restaur ant anywhere in the Hudson Valley. Catering ev ents of all types and sizes, Terrapin prepares custom menus for ev ery ev ent, using local, organic ingredients w henever possible. Contact Catering Director Hugh Piney. C I D E R I E S

C A T E R I N G

Fresh Company PO Box 187, Garrison (845) 424-8204; freshcompany.net At our kitc hen one hour north of Manhattan in the Hudson Highlands, we gather great local and imported ingredients for events of all sizes and poc ketbooks, from grand affairs to drop-off parties. We emphasize the freshest, finest ingredients, because great food is the spark that ignites a con vivial gathering. Executi ve c hef Shelley Boris dr aws inspir ation from cooking styles from around the world. Her distinct, w arm style is reflected in meals that encourage hospitality and leisure at the table.

2017

Angry Orchard 2241 Albany Post Rd., Walden (845) 713-5180 angryorchard.com Tours, Tasting & Treehouse Brooklyn Cider House 115 N Ohioville Rd., New Paltz (845) 633-8657 brooklynciderhouse.com Farm Store: Wed & Thu 11 - 6; Fri - Sun 11 - 7 Restaurant: Fri - Sun 12 - 7 Pick your own ugly apples and hang out for a nibble and a sip. Woodfired pizza, burgers, hard cider, homemade cider doughnuts and a growing selection of locally made specialty items. Visit our or chard and bring home some cider and some memories.

D I N E R S

Daily Planet 1202 Rt 55, Lagrangeville (845) 452-0110; dailyplanetdiner.com Red Line Diner 588 Rt 9, Fishkill (845) 765-8401; dineatredline.com Table Talk Diner 2519 South Rd (Rt 9), Poughkeepsie (845) 849-2839; tabletalkdiner.com H O M E

N&S Supply, Inc. 205 Old Rt 9, Fishkill (845) 896-6291; nssupply.com Your one-stop resour ce for all plumbing, heating and HV AC needs, including specialty prod ucts designed and manufactured to meet y our lifestyle needs; the latest inno vative products, includ ing cutting-edge bathroom tech nology from remote flushing toilets to hands-free faucets. Six loca tions: F ishkill, Brewster , Kingston, Catskill, Hudson and Danbury. Williams Lumber 6760 Rt 9, Rhinebeck (845) 876-9663 34 Blommer Rd, Tannersvile (518) 589-5200 2424 Rt 44, Pleasant Valley (845) 605-3520 908 Rt 82, Hopewell Junction (845) 221-2751 9-11 E Market St, Red Hook (845) 758-5615 317 Kyserike Rd, High Falls (845) 687-7676 3679 Rt 9, Hudson (518) 851-3641 4246 Albany Post Rd, Hyde Park (845) 698-1004; williamslumber.com The largest independent home cen ter in the area. K I T C H E N

Warren Kitchen & Cutlery 6934 Rt 9, Rhinebeck (845) 876-6208; warrenkitchentools.com Mon–Sat 9:30–5:30; Sun 11–4:30 The Hudson Valley’s complete source for professional kitc hen


knives and tools, commer cial quality cookw are, bakew are, pocketknives and w oodcarving tools. We stoc k the largest selection of name-br and cutlery in the region at prices well belo w retail. Knife sets, knife bloc ks and carving boards. Professional knife sharpening while you wait. M A R K E T S

&

R E T A I L

Adams Fairacre Farms 1560 Ulster Ave, Kingston (845) 336-6300 1240 Rt 300, Newburgh (845) 569-0303 765 Dutchess Tnpk, Poughkeepsie (845) 454-4330 160 Old Post Rd, Wappinger (845) 632-9955 adamsfarms.com Open daily A family-o wned farm market/garden center. A cornucopia of fresh pro duce, meats, fish, deli, and prepared foods. Featuring Hudson Valley products, a great selection of the best local cheese, meat, produce and more. Barb’s Butchery 69 Spring St, Beacon (845) 831-8050; barbsbutchery.com Mon–Fri 11–7:30; Sat 10–6; lunch Tue–Sat; closed Sun & Mon Your new neighborhood butc her shop pro viding local, Hudson Valley–raised meat and poultry . Practicing nose-to-tail butc hery, we are proud to offer fresh and smoked meats, specialty cuts, c harcuterie, house-made stocks, craft bacon and more. Beacon Pantry 382 Main St, Beacon (845) 440-8923; beaconpantry.com Mon–Sat 7–8; Sun 7–6 Providing artisan food and artisan ser vice to Beacon and bey ond, Beacon Pantry features more than 50 v arieties of cut-to-order domestic and imported cheese and charcuterie. Large selection of local, Italian and hard-to-find French pantry items, gr ass-fed local meats and dairy. Stumptown coffee, unique c hocolates, fine pastries and desserts. Serving European-style sandwiches and c heese plates. Catering for any size event. Fishkill Farms 9 Fishkill Farm Rd., Hopewell Jct. (845)-897-4377; fishkillfarms.com Open 7 days, 9am-6pm, year-round. Organic v egetables, eco certified apples, fresh donuts and homemade pies. Hudson Valley Seafood 30 Valley Ave, Central Valley (845) 928-9678 hudsonvalleyseafood.com Tue - Fri 10 - 6; Sat 9 - 5 Strides are made to make the customer a ware of the nuances

behind fresh seafood and assist in good choices and provide not just fish, but information. Love Apple Farm 1421 New York 9H, Ghent (518) 828-5048; (518) 567-1200 loveapplefarm.com Mon & Tue 10–5; Wed & Thu 9–5; Fri–Sun 9–6 A family-friendly fruit farm expanded to a full-scale agritourist destination and market. A well-curated selection of Hudson Valley products and café. U-pick apples (in season), petting zoo and playground.

Paulas’ House

Please check our website or Facebook for hours

PUBLIC

Poughkeepsie Galleria 2001 South Rd., Poughkeepsie (845) 297-7600 poughkeepsiegalleriamall.com Scarborough Fare 8 North Front St., New Paltz 257 Main St., Beacon (845) 255-0061; scarboroughfarenp.com Olive oi l and v inegar tap ro om. Also imported pasta, gift baskets, glassware, loose leaf tea and more. TasteNY Store at Todd Hill Taconic State Pkwy, Lagrange Located 10 miles north of I-84 and 1 mile south of Rt 55 (845) 849-0247; ccedutchess.org Open Mon, Wed, Thu, Sat 10–7; Fri 10–8; Sun 11–7; closed Tue An asset along the Taconic State Parkway, find a vast arr ay of foods and products gro wn or made in the Hudson Valley. Outdoor farmers’ market open J un–Oct: F ri 3–7, Sun 2–6. N A T U R A L

“Food is Love Served on a Plate” 2186 New Hackensack Rd, Poughkeepsie 845.454.7821 | paulaspublichouse.com

F O O D S

Beacon Natural Market 348 Main St, Beacon (845) 838-1288; beaconnaturalmarket.com Mon–Sat 9–7; Sun 10–5 Lighting the way for a healthier world. Featuring organic prepared foods, deli and juice bar , organic and regional produce, meats and c heeses. Open since 2005, proprietors L.T . and Kitty Sherpa are dedicated to serving the Hudson Valley with a complete selection of products that are good for y ou and good for the planet, including an extensi ve alternati ve health department. Nutritionist on staff. Catering available. Mother Earth’s Storehouse 300 Kings Mall Ct, Kingston (845) 336-5541 249 Main St, Saugerties (845) 246-9614 1955 South Rd, Poughkeepsie (845) 296-1069 motherearthstorehouse.com Open daily Offering the finest natural foods, bulk spices, herbs, vitamins, supplements

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and organic produce. The valley’s best organic, hot and cold takeout at our Kingston and Poughkeepsie locations. Sunflower Natural Market 75 Mill Hill Rd, Woodstock 24 Garden St, Rhinebeck (845) 679-5361; (845) 876-0798 sunflowernatural.com Mon–Fri 8–9; Sat 9–9; Sun 10–7 The area’s most complete natur al foods market, featuring certified organic produce, organic milk, chees es and eggs, a wide range of bulk organic grains and nuts, nonirradiated herbs and spices, plus vitamins, homeopathic and bod y care products. R E S T A U R A N T S

A Tavola Trattoria 46 Main St. New Paltz Thu-Mon 5:30-10pm (845)255-1426 Seasonally inspired Italian cuisine with a focus on fresh, local produce and ingredients in a rustic, family-style atmosphere. Angelina’s 43 Chestnut St, Cold Spring (845) 265-7078 Lunch & dinner Mon-Sat 11–9; Sun noon-9 This family friendly eatery serv es up Italian comfort foods, pizzas and burgers. Sa ve room for the homemade tiramisu.

You’re shopping in the best of company You’re shopping in the best of company

Aroma Osteria 114 Old Post Rd, Wappingers Falls (845) 298-6790; aromaosteriarestaurant.com Lunch Tue–Sat 11:30–2:30; Dinner Tue–Thu 5–10, Fri–Sat 5–11, Sun 4–9 Voted Best Italian Restaur ant by Hudson V alley magazine; Poughkeepsie Journal awards four stars. A romantic, relaxed atmosphere with an elegant cocktail bar in a beautiful setting. Here, rustic Italian cuisine is served with a unique and extensive selection of Italian wines (man y available b y the glass). Catering for all occasions a vailable on or off premises. Baja 328 328 Main St, Beacon (845) 838-BAJA; baja328.com Lunch & dinner Tue–Thu 11–10, Fri–Sat 11–11, Sun noon–8 Main Street’s newest hot spot, Baja 328 offers the finest authentic Southwestern food couples with 110-plus tequilas, the largest selection in the area.

PoughkeepsieGalleriaMall.com PoughkeepsieGalleriaMall.com 2001 South Road, Poughkeepsie NY 845.297.7600 2001 South Road, Poughkeepsie NY

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Beacon Bread Company 193 Main St, Beacon (845) 838-2867; beaconbread.com Breakfast & lunch daily 7-5 pm Bakery and bistro. Everything from scratch.

Brother’s Trattoria 465 Main St, Beacon (845) 838-3300 brotherstrattoria.com Mon - Sun 11 - 10 An upscale New York restaurant serving the unique cuisine and pronounced flavors of Northern Italy. Café Amarcord 276 Main St, Beacon (845) 440-0050; cafeamarcord.com Lunch & dinner Tue–Thu noon–10; Fri–Sat noon–11; Sun noon–9 Creative New American cuisine with Italian undertones, serv ed in a w arm atmosphere. Enjoy an artisanal cocktail at the on yx bar before ha ving dinner in the bistro-style dining room or on our Main Street terr ace. Bring colleagues for a casual lunc h, or a date for a romantic night out. Caffe Macchiato 99 Liberty St, Newburgh (845) 565-4616; addressyourappetite.com Breakfast & lunch Tue–Fri 9–3; Sat–Sun 9–4 Located in the historic district of Newburgh, Caffe Macc hiato is a European-style café offering an all-day breakfast and lunc h along with a fair -trade coffee bev erage selection. The menu focuses on seasonal items and chef/owner Jodi Cummings highlights sev eral local farms and producers on the menu. All desserts and pastries are baked from scratch in-house. Canterbury Brook Inn 331 Main St, Cornwall (845) 534-9658; canterburybrookinn.com Dinner Tue–Thu 5–9; Fri–Sat 5–9:30 Hosts Hans and Kim Baumann offer fine Swiss continental cuisine featuring v eal, duc k, c hicken, Schnitzel, pasta, filet mignon, fresh fish and much more. Enjo y a fabulous dessert w hile sipping a frothing cappuccino or espresso. We specialize in both on- and off-premise catering. Outdoor brookside dining. Reservations suggested. Clock Tower Grill Kitchen & Bar 512 Clock Tower Dr, Brewster (845) 582-0574; clocktowergrill.com Lunch & dinner Tue–Thu noon–9, Fri noon–11; dinner Sat 5–11, Sun 3–9 Set in a reno vated barn, the atmo sphere is casual yet sophisticated; the menu “rustic American” with man y ingredients drawn from area farms. Cosimo’s Restaurant Group Cosimo’s On Union 1217 Rt 300, Newburgh (845) 567-1556; fax (845) 567-9246


Cosimo’s Middletown 620 Rt 211 East, Middletown (845) 692-3242 Cosimo’s Poughkeepsie 120 Delafield St, Poughkeepsie (845) 485-7172 Cosimo’s Woodbury Rt 32, Central Valley (845) 928-5222 cosimosrestaurantgroup.com Lunch & dinner daily Casual tra ttoria-style dining with some of the w orld’s best wines. Old-style Italian cuisine with a New World twist. Daily specials, pasta, fish and meat dishes. Distinctive cocktail lounges, a unique wine cellar for private dinner parties and beautiful catering facilities. Craft 47 47 W Main St, Goshen (845) 360-5253; craft47.com Lunch & dinner Tue–Thu noon–10, Fri–Sat noon–midnight; Sun noon–10 Kick back, relax and sample the best of the Hudson Valley at Craft 47. We offer small-plate American tapas, craft wine and 12 craft beers on tap, with even more in the cooler. Crave Restaurant & Lounge 129 Washington St, Poughkeepsie (845) 452-3501; craverestaurantandlounge.com Dinner Wed–Sat 4–10, Sun 4:30–9; Brunch Sun 11:30–3 Chef Ed K owalski serv es contem porary food with modern twists in a romantic and intimate set ting located directly under the Walkway Over The Hudson. The Culinary Institute of America 1946 Campus Dr (off Rt 9), Hyde Park The premier culinary college offers exceptional global cuisine in its award-winning restaurants: American Bounty Restaurant (845) 451-1011; americanbountyrestaurant.com The Bocuse Restaurant (845) 451-1012; bocuserestaurant.com Reimagines classic F rench cuisine using modern techniques. Ristorante Caterina de’ Medici (845) 451-1013; ristorantecaterinademedici.com The Apple Pie Bakery Café (845) 905-4500; applepiebakerycafe.com Dino’s Vigneto Café 80 Vineyard Ave., Highland (845) 834-2828; vignetocafe.com Lunch Tue-Sun 10:30-4; Dinner nightly 4–10 Intimate Italian eatery specializing in

homemade pasta, gourmet personal pizza and a varied menu of chicken, veal and seafood dishes. Li ve music on the weekends after 6pm. Dubrovnik 721 Main St, New Rochelle (914) 637-3777; dubrovnikny.com Authentic Croatian cuisine with a farm-to-table, sea-to-table approach. Farm To Table Bistro 1083 Rt 9, Fishkill (845) 297-1111; ftbistro.com Mon-Thu 11:30–9:30; Fri–Sat 11:30–10; Sun 11:30–9 The focus is alw ays finding the best the world has to offer: the best produce, wine, beef and certainly, the best fish and seafood. Patio dining available. Gino’s Restaurant 1671 Rt 9, Wappingers Falls (845) 297-8061; ginoswappingers.com Lunch & dinner Tue–Thu 11:30–9, Fri–Sat 11:30–10; Sun 1–9 Serving the Hudson Valley since 1984. Traditional southern Italian cuisine in a casual en vironment. Only the freshest ingredients used to prepare y our fa vorite v eal, chicken, seafood and pasta dishes. Catering on- and off-premise.

Whole-farm cuisine by Michelin starred Chef Terrance Brennan. Cocktails featuring local breweries, distilleries, cideries and wineries.

2 EAST M A IN STR EET, B EACO N N Y 8 4 5 -76 5 - 8 369 | R O U N D H O U SEBYTB .CO M

The Greens at Copake Country Club 44 Golf Course Rd, Copake Lake (518) 352-0019 copakecountryclub.com Mon-Thu 11–8:30; Fri & Sat 11–9:30; Sun 11–8; Brunch until 2:30 Dinner nightly from 5 Dine o verlooking the stunning 160-acre golf course nestled in the foothills of the Berkshire and Catskill Mountains. Half Moon 1 High St., Dobbs Ferry (914)-693-4131; harvest2000.com Montauk seafood, Hudson Valley farm to table, sunset views, r aw bar and tiki bar. Henry’s At Buttermilk Falls 220 North Rd, Milton (845) 795-1500; henrysatbuttermilk.com Lunch Fri–Sat 11:30–3; Dinner Sun– Thu 5–9; Brunch Sun 11–3 Local comes ali ve at this bucolic Inn & Spa, w here the main ingredients are sourced from local producers and purveyors. An inventive menu features a fresh selection of large and small plates from casual burger and fries to refined New American dishes. Enjo y a pre-dinner stroll through the organic gardens and orchards or a drink o verlooking the Hudson River and sweeping lawns. Al fresco dining available.

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Heritage Food + Drink 1379 U.S. Rt 9, Wappingers Falls (845)298-1555 info@heritagefooddrink.com New American, farm-to-table cuisine, specializing in items cooked on a wood burning grill. Howell’s Sunflower Café 18 West Main St, Goshen (845) 615-9135; (845) 294-5561 howellscafe.com Mon & Sat 7–4; Tue-Fri 7–7 We offer a wide variety of delicious dishes for lunc h and breakfast. Whatever you're in the mood for , from health food to comfort food, you can find it here! Hudson Street Café 190 South Plank Rd, Newburgh (845) 565-2450 hudsonstreetcafe.com Mon-Fri 8–3; Sat-Sun 8–3 Featuring organic, locally sour ced ingredients, Chef Donna Hammond and staff cel ebrate the café’ s brand new location in Newburgh. Breakfast and lunc h offered daily , while dinner , beer , wine and cider are coming this summer . Custom and corpor ate catering is a vailable at the cafe or off-site v enues. Ample parking, AURA rated. Il Barilotto 1113 Main St, Fishkill (845) 897-4300; ilbarilottorestaurant.com Lunch Mon–Sat 11–2:30; dinner Mon–Thu 5–10, Fri–Sat 5–11 Blending the old with the new , Eduardo Lauria, c hef-owner of Aroma Osteria, tr ansformed an historic brick building in the heart of F ishkill to a tr attoria and wine bar. The fare is Italian peasant with a contempor ary flair. The selection of regional wines from Italy—available b y the glass or flight—is extensive. Catering onand off-premises. Leo’s Ristorante Rt 9D, Wappingers Falls (845) 838-3446 22 Quaker Ave, Cornwall (845) 534-3446 1433 Rt 300, Newburgh (845) 564-3446; leospizzeria.com Lunch & dinner Mon–Sat 11–10; Sun 2–9 A family fa vorite since 1981, Leo’ s offers tr aditional classic Italian dishes, pizza, hot/cold subs, pasta, veal, c hicken and appetizers. Daily specials and catering for all occasions whether in our location or y ours. Great food serv ed in a comfortable and relaxed atmosphere. Mill House Brewing Company 289 Mill St, Poughkeepsie (845) 485-2739; millhousebrewing.com Lunch & dinner Mon, Wed-Sun; closed Tue

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Offers a w arm, historic and visually appealing setting, with casual, y et professional service, food cooked from as close to the source as possible, and artfully crafted ales. Nina 27 W. Main St, Middletown (845) 344-6800; nina-restaurant.com Lunch Mon–Sat 11:30–2:30; dinner Mon–Sun from 5; brunch Sun 9:30–2 New York City–tr ained c hef F ranz Brendle brings an elegant flair to classic American cuisine. F eatures include filet mignon Roquefort, shrimp asparagus risotto and seafood specials. Nice selection of wines in various price r anges. F riendly staff, cozy décor. Hearty Sun brunch. Paula’s Public House 2186 New Hackensack Rd, Poughkeepsie (845) 454-7821 paulaspublichouse.com Mon & Tue 4–11; Wed & Thu 11–11; Fri & Sat 11–1; Sun 12–6 An in viting gastro pub sporting a cozy and friendly en vironment complemented b y the w armth of a fireplace and a rustic ambiance. Paula’s offers lunc h, supper and late-night fare and features li ve music, open mic and kar aoke nights. Poughkeepsie Ice House 1 Main St, Poughkeepsie (845) 232-5783 poughkeepsieicehouse.com Mon – Thu 11:30 – 9; F ri & Sat 11:30 – 10; Sun 11 – 9 Premier w ater front dining with breathtaking views. Committed to using the freshest local ingredients in the food and delivering a warm & friendly dining experience. Ramiro’s 954 954 Rt 6, Mahopac (845) 621-3333 ramiros954.com Tue–Thu 3:30–9; Fri & Sat 3:30–10; Sun 1–9 A family-friendly food destination for locals and visitors, offering Latin American fusion cuisine. Chef Ramiro takes a modern approach to tr aditional recipes, flavors and textures, incorpor ating seasonal ingredients. Parents relax and dine while kids eat and play in the unique “Jan’s Place.” Red House 30 Main St, Milton (845) 795-6285; redhouseny.com Tue-Sun 11:30–3:30, 5–10 Red House Asian Fusion offers a menu sho wcasing the fresh flavors of Thai, J apanese and Chinese cuisines. The renovated space offers the ambiance of a lounge with a fullservice bar, and includes an eclectic selection of Asian wines and liquors.


Redwood 63 N. Front St, Kingston (845) 259-5868 Lunch 11:30–3; Dinner 5–10; Sun Brunch. Closed Tue. The best of California cuisine and the Hudson Valley in a fun and relaxing atmosphere. Rooftop dining in season. The Roundhouse 2 E Main St, Beacon (845) 765-8369; roundhousebeacon.com Lunch & dinner Wed-Sat 11:30Close; Sun Brunch 11-3; Lunch 3-8 Set in a historic textile mill transformed into boutique hotel, the restaurant serves elegant, locally inspired American fare and offers a well-cur ated list of cr aft beers, cocktails and wines. The main dining room, lounge and seasonal patio all overlook Beacon Falls. Sweet Pea’s Cafe 318 Blooming Grove Tpke, New Windsor (845) 391-8034 sweetpeascafeinc.com Mon - Fri 8 - 4; Sat 8 - 3 Serves homemade, fresh & tasty breakfast and lunc h in a comfortable f unky at mosphere. Offering catering for small ev ents on location evenings & Sundays. Terrapin Restaurant & Red Bistro 6426 Montgomery St, Rhinebeck (845) 876-3330; terrapinrestaurant.com Lunch & dinner daily 11:30– midnight; dining room daily 5–9pm From far -flung origins, the world’s most di verse flavors meet and mingle here. F rom elements both historic and eclectic comes something surprising, fresh and dynamic: dishes to delight body and soul. Choose fine dining in Terrapin’s dining room or casual fare in Red Bistro & Bar. From good burgers and quesadillas to wild salmon and local filet mignon. Terrapin’s local organic and authentic menu satisfies all. Tito Santana Taqueria 142 Main St, Beacon (845) 765-2350; tacosantana.com Lunch & dinner Mon-Sun 11–9 Classic tacos and Mexican food in a colorful setting. The $2 taco Tuesday can’t be beat. Valley at the Garrison 2015 Rt 9, Garrison (845) 424-3604; thegarrison.com/restaurants Valley: Dinner Thu–Sun 5–9; midday menu Sat–Sun 11:30–2:30 Terrace: Mon–Thu 8–6; Fri–Sun 7–7 The Garrison’ s signature finedining restaur ant offering seasonal American Cuisine and an extensi ve international wine list of great accolade. Regional and NYS Cr aft

breweries and distilleries to matc h the seasonal-regional focus of the kitchen. Our spectacular view will enhance any dining experience. Tuthill House at the Mill 20 Grist Mill Lane, Gardiner (845) 255-1527; tuthillhouse.com The finest cuisine with the best bourbon in the Hudson Valley. Enjoy fresh, local ingredients and craft spirits in the rustic splendor of our historic mill. The Village Tearoom 10 Plattekill Ave, New Paltz (845) 255-3434; thevillagetearoom.com Breakast, lunch & dinner Tues–Sat 8–9, Sun 8–8 The Village Tea Room is a unique gathering place, serving breakfast, lunch and dinner as well as a variety of teas. Tantalizing cakes and cookies. Organic honey , pot pies and roast chicken. Zagat survey says “Irish ex-pat Agnes Dev ereux has a real winner.” Wildfire Grill 74 Clinton St, Montgomery (845) 457-3770; wildfireny.com Lunch Mon–Sat 11:30–3; Sun noon–3; dinner Sun–Thu 5–9; Fri & Sat 5–10 Eclectic is the buzzw ord at this popular local eatery, where patrons can feast on a predominantly American menu with Asian, Mexican and Italian influences in a rustic Victorian setting. Woody’s Farm to Table 30 Quaker Ave, Cornwall (845) 534-1111; woodysfarmtotable.com Open Wed–Mon 11:30–8:30; closed Tue A “new old-fashioned” burger joint located in a restored 1910 building in picturesque Cornwall. Casual, family place offering fast, simple meals for people on the go using fresh, w holesome ingredi ents with a local emphasis.

restaurant | bistro | bar

A Hudson Valley Dining Destination Voted Best Bistro & Best Farm to Table Restaurant

Xaviar’s Restaurant Group Chef-owner P eter Kelly offers his signature service and exceptional cuisine to four locations. Critics agree: Dining in the v alley will never be the same. Freelance Café & Wine Bar 506 Piermont Ave, Piermont (845) 365-3250 Lunch Tue–Sun noon–3; dinner Tue–Thu 5:30–10, Fri 5:30–10:30, Sat 5:30–11, Sun 5–10 Restaurant X & Bully Boy Bar 117 North Rt 303, Congers (845) 268-6555 Lunch Tue–Fri noon–2:30; dinner Tue–Thu 5:30–10, Fri 5:30–10:30, Sat 5–11, Sun 5–8; brunch Sun seating 1

lunch & dinner daily in rhinebeck 845-876-3330 terrapinrestaurant.com sept

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X2O Xaviars on the Hudson 71 Water Grant Way, Yonkers (914) 965-1111 Lunch Tue–Fri noon–2; dinner Tue– Fri 5:30–10, Sat 5–10, Sun 5–9; brunch Sun noon–2

Breakfast Breakfast&& Lunch Daily

Lunch Daily

Available Open Forevenings for catering

Dinner

Custom Catering

190 S. Plank Road, Newburgh 845.565.2450 www.hudsonstreetcafe.com

Louisa J. Steinberg M.D., Ph.D. Warm, comprehensive, personalized treatment. Experience Manhattan private psychiatric treatment from the comfort of your own home. Offering telepsychiatry services to residents of the Hudson Valley.

For more information, visit www.LouisaSteinbergMDPhD.com contact@louisasteinbergmdphd.com (929) 367-8828

Ziatun 244 Main St, Beacon (845) 765-8268; ziatun.com Lunch & dinner Thu-Mon 11-9 From the o wners of Beacon Bread Company comes this little gem, serving authentic Palestinian-ArabicMiddle Eas tern f are w ith m any vegan and vegetarian options. S E R V I C E S

Hudson Valley Federal Credit Union (845) 463-3011; hvfcu.org Full-service financial cooperative serving indi viduals and business in Dutc hess, Or ange, Ulster and Putnam Counties. 17 local br anches and contact center avaiulable late on weekdays and all da y on Saturda ys. Over 82,000 con veniently located surcharge-free nationwide ATMs and a full siute of online, mo vile and text banking services. HVFCU is federally insured b y the NCUA and is an Equal Housing Lender. Jacobowitz and Gubits, LLP 158 Orange Ave, Walden (845) 778-2121; jacobowitz.com Mon-Thu 8:30-5:30 Expert legal services for restaurateurs includes business planning, succession planning, licenses and permits, emplo yment, immigr ation, real estate, financing, contracts and taxation. Judelson, Giordano & Siegal 633 Rt 211, East Middletown 3 Neptune Rd, Poughkeepsie (877) 740-9500 JGSPC.com More than an accounting firm, full business ad visors. Our philosoph y is one of collabor ative effort, as we work along side y ou to solv e the problems and address the needs of your specific business.

Created with pure w hole food ingredients, ImmuneSc hein Ginger Elixirs pro mote we llbeing a nd health. If y ou are in sear ch of the purest, highest quality , small-batc h ginger elixir on the market for a detox, great taste and flexibility of use, then ImmuneSc hein Ginger Elixirs will be for you. T O U R I S M

Dutchess Tourism 3 Neptune Rd, Suite A11A, Poughkeepsie (845) 463-4000; dutchesstourism.com Orange County Tourism 99 Main St., Goshen (845) 615-3860; orangetourism.org Putnam County Tourism (845) 808-1015; Tourputnam.org Rockland County Tourism 50 sanatorium Rd., Pomona (845) 364-2170; (800) 295-5723 explorerocklandny.com Ulster County Tourism 20 Broadway, Kingston (845) 340-3566 ulstercountyalive.com Westchester County Tourism (800) 833-9282; visitwestchesterny.com W H O L E S A L E

Red Barn Produce 217 Upper North Rd, Highland (845) 691-7428 Full-service, family owned and operated wholesaler servicing restaurants and institutions with a complete selection of fruits and vegetables for 20 years. A proud distributor of local, New York, high-quality produce at competitive prices emphasizing reliable and personal service. Pick-up or delivery available to Dutchess, Columbia, Ulster and Orange counties. W I N E

Louisa J. Steinberg 53 W 86th St., Suite 1, New York (929) 367-8828 louisasteinbergmdphd.com Westchester Medical Center 100 Woods Rd., Valhalla (914) 493-7000 westchestermedicalcenter.com S P E C I A L T Y P R O D U C T S

ImmuneSchein 43 Basin Rd, West Hurley (828) 319-1844 immune-schein.com Thu 1–7; Fri-Sun 11–7

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S P I R I T S

Boutique Wine & Spirits 18 Westage Dr, Suite 13, Fishkill (845) 765-1555 boutiquewsc.com Mon - Sat 10 - 7; Sun 12 - 6 Explore new gr apes, new regions, new styles or new br ands, or perhaps an entirely new category to y ou like mead or hard cider. Variety, as they sa y, is the spice of life! Hudson Whiskey 14 Grist Mill Ln, Gardiner (845) 255-1527 hudsonwhiskey.com Mon - Sat 11 - 6; Sun 12 - 6


Marta’s Vineyard 1955 South Rd Suite 3, Poughkeepsie (845) 218-9672 martasvine.com Open 7 days This new shop features favorites and well-kno wn producers of wines and spirits alongside a notable selection of organic and biodynamic wines. Each product is chosen by the o wner, Marta, w ho holds internationally recognized certifications in wine and spirits. Check bac k for wine, spirits and cocktail classes. Fundr aisers and events scheduled monthly. W I N E R I E S

Shawangunk Wine Trail (845) 256-8456; (845) 291-1927; gunkswine.com Nestled between the Shawangunks and the Hudson Ri ver, just 60 miles north of NYC is a tr ail of 14 family-owned wineries from New Paltz to Warwick. The wineries offer tou rs a nd t astings a midst scenic beauty . A complete listing of wineries and ev ents is available on our website. Stoutridge Vineyard 10 Ann Kaley Ln, Marlboro (845) 236-7620; stoutridge.com Many of our wines and spirits are locally gro wn, and all are from New York fruits and gr ains. Our wines are sold exclusi vely at the winery. Enjoy an authentic taste of the Hudson Valley at our winery , distillery and grounds. Warwick Valley Winery & Black Dirt Distillery 114 Little York Rd, Warwick (845) 258-4858; wvwinery.com Daily 11–6 for tastings Food & Wine magazine calls our draft cider “clean, vibr ant” with a “sweet finish.” We produce wine for ev ery occasion: Chardonna y, Riesling, Harvest Moon, Black Dirt Blush and Red, Cabernet F ranc, Pinot Noir . As the Valley’s first

distillery, we produce a line of fine brandies and liqueurs. Bakery Café serves lunc h and fresh breads on weekends. Whitecliff Vineyard 331 McKinstry Rd, Gardiner (845) 255-4613; whitecliffwine.com Daily 11:30–5:30; Sat til 6 One of the v alley’s largest vineyards boasts beautiful views of the Sha wangunk Ridge. Owner/ wine maker Mic hael Migliore produces a ward-winning wines from European vinifer a v arietals such as Chardonna y, Cabernet Franc and Riesling, as well as new h ybrids. Visit ou r f riendly tasting room. Winery tours by appointment, special events.

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Beacon

CRAFT BEER SHOPPE

262 Main St. Beacon 845-202-7470 The finest curated selection of domestic, imported & craft beer in the Hudson Valley. Call for information about upcoming tastings.

Proudly Serving Locals & Visitors! 268 Main St., Beacon (845) 838-0984

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Your neighborhood purveyor of local Hudson Valley-raised meats Nose-to-Tail · Grass & Grain Finished Angus · Specialty Cuts Charcuterie · Smoked Meats · House-made Stocks · Craſt Bacon

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Nose-to-Tail · Grass & Grain Finished Angus · Specialty Cuts Charcuterie · Smoked Meats · House-made Stocks · Craſt Bacon Lunch Served Daily

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69 Spring Street, Beacon, NY 12508 845.831.8050 • www.barbsbutchery.com

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Mon - Fri Mon -Fri11am 12pM- 7:30pm -7pM Sat & Sun 10-7 Sat & Sun 10am - 6pm

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LAST CALL

our thanksgiving table Valley Table staff members share their favorite Thanksgiving dish. Recipes online at valleytable.com. Happy Thanksgiving!

Sagaponack corn pudding Meghan Merry Northwind Farms turkey Janet Crawshaw

Nanny’s citrus cranberry sauce Nicole Tagliaferro

Italian stuffing with sausage Jennifer Bannan

Whitecliff Gamay Timothy Buzinski

Collard greens Kara Widmer

Vegan sweet potato casserole Kristen Warfield

Pumpkin pie (not shown) Jessica Beim 88 88

the THE valley VALLEYtable TABLE sept SEPT– –nov NOV2017 2017

VALLEY TABLE PHOTO


PICK YOUR OWN PUMPKIN

1202 ROUTE 55 LAGRANGEVILLE, NY 12540 T: 845.452.0110 DAILYPLANETDINER.COM OPEN DAILY 6AM-12AM

2521 C SOUTH ROAD (RTE 9) POUGHKEEPSIE, NY 12601 T: 845.849.2839 TABLETALKDINER.COM SUN-THURS 6AM-11PM FRI-SAT 6AM-12AM

588 ROUTE 9 FISHKILL, NY 12524 T: 845.765.8401 DINEATREDLINE.COM OPEN 24 HOURS

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Cosimos.com NEWBURGH (845) 567-1556

CENTRAL VALLEY (845) 928-5222

POUGHKEEPSIE (845) 485-7172

MIDDLETOWN (845) 692-3242

The Valley Table, 79, Sept/Nov 2017